New Courses for SPRING 2019 -

LJST 221—LAW AND WASTE —  Visiting Professor BRANGAN — DESCRIPTION

The term "waste" is used so widely in common parlance that it hardly seems necessary to consider its meaning. Yet, it is not always clear who has the authority to decide what is useful or efficient, and what is waste.  This course takes up this problem of authority and examines how different concepts of waste relate to the law.  "Waste" historically has been linked to the legal right to own and mange property. But the determination of whether an act, a thing, or a person is "waste" has implications not only for private law, but for public laws regulating labor, health and welfare, education, global trade, and the environment.  Descriptions of certain bodies, cultures and lands in terms of waste justify exploitation and violence by states and other powerful actors.  How do we reconcile the imperative to avoid waste with the demands of order and justice? We will look closely at this question as we consider the social and legal construction of waste.

Course Information
Meeting Time: Mon. & Wed. 2:30pm - 3:50pm

LJST 224—EXPERIMENTS IN LEGAL & CULTURAL PRODUCTION — Visiting Professor Brangan — DESCRIPTION

The idea of law as experimental runs counter to the common view of law as well settled and historically rooted. Yet, under the federal system in America, states have long been regarded as "laboratories" for law. Moreover, Supreme Court decisions arise as “test cases” that painstakingly mix plaintiffs, procedures, and venues and are timed to move law in a hoped-for direction. What is a test case but a kind of experiment? This course examines legal experiments alongside experimental aesthetic works. Convention may “govern” art and literature, but both are also regulated by real laws, like copyright and obscenity. When artists go beyond the norms of their fields, they may also test the limits of the law. Artistic experimentation can suggest new ways to think about property, identity, sex, work, power, and language. How are different forms of experimentation connected? How do they challenge or extend our visions of what society might be otherwise?

Course Information
Meeting Time: Monday & Wednesday.  12:30 - 1:50pm