Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought

David Delaney

Race, Place, and the Law

David Delaney

Race, Place, and the Law

"Delaney's argument is original, provocative, and very creative."

-- Nicholas K. Blomley, author of Law, Space, and the Geographies of Power
The Legal Geographies Reader

David Delaney, Nicholas Blomley & Richard Ford

The Legal Geographies Reader

This timely Reader brings together, for the first time, key writings on the relation between law and geography in an effort to clarify the connections between these two increasingly complex concepts.

"The Reader in Law and Geography combines the talents of diverse professionals focused upon issues of enormous importance."

-- Professor Gordon L. Clark, University of Oxford

"The mutual inscription of law in space and of space in law, for so long invisible, emerges in this volume with the utmost clarity and cogency.

-- Professor Boaventura de Sousa Santos, University of Coimbra, Portugal

Law and Nature

David Delaney

Law and Nature

This interdisciplinary study explores the relationship between conceptions of nature and (largely American) legal thought and practice. It focuses on the politics and pragmatics of nature talk as expressed in both extra-legal disputes and their transformation and translation into forms of legal discourse (tort, property, contract, administrative law, criminal law and constitutional law). Delaney begins by considering the pragmatics of nature in connection with the very idea of law and the practice of American legal theorization. He then traces a set of specific political-legal disputes and arguments. The set consists of a series of contexts and cases organized around a conventional distinction between 'external' and 'internal' nature: forces of nature, endangered species, animal experiments, bestiality, reproductive technologies, genetic screening, biological defenses in criminal cases, and involuntary medication of inmates. He demonstrates throughout that nearly any construal of 'nature' entails in interpretation of what it is to be (distinctively) human.

-- Cambridge University Press

Territory

 


David Delaney

Territory: A Short Introduction

This short introduction conveys the complexities associated with the term "territory" in a clear and accessible manner. It surveys the field and brings theory to ground in the case of Palestine.

  • A clear and accessible introduction to the complexities associated with the term “territory”.
  • Provides an interdisciplinary survey of the many strands of research in the field.
  • Addresses specific areas including interpretations of territorial structures; the relationship between territoriality and scale; the validity and fluidity of territory; and the practical, social processes associated with territorial re-configurations
  • Stresses that our understanding of territory is inseparable from our understanding of power.
  • Uses Israel/Palestine as an extended illustrative case study.
  • The author's strong legal and geographical background gives the work an authoritative perspective.

“This book is a brilliant, accessible excursion through the many dimensions of a key aspect of social space. Delaney weaves together provocative illustrations, detailed case studies, and an original theoretical synthesis in order to track the many ways in which territory structures our everyday lives. Thanks to Delaney's lucid writing style and his broad, interdisciplinary expertise, the book will be a tremendously useful resource for students at all levels.”

-- Neil Brenner, New York University

“Dividing ourselves up into territories is a pervasive but remarkably ill-understood feature of human life. This book succinctly and expertly explores why territory matters and surveys the ways in which we can better understand it.”

-- John Agnew, University of California, Los Angeles
 

Clark House