Music

2024-25

117 Popular Music and Social Justice

Can a song change the world? We know that lyrics can convey a message, but what about distribution strategy or performance venue? How are subcultures and styles used by artists and record companies to exercise or resist power? From the gramophone to TikTok, popular music has played a unique role in political and social discourse. In this class we try to understand what makes popular music different from other forms of political speech. By reading historical and ethnographic case studies from the eras of blues, soul, punk, rock, EDM, and hip hop, we will gain an understanding of music’s potential as an agent of social change. In this discussion-based class we will pay specific attention to gaining a wholistic understanding of popular music as protest.

Spring semester. Professor Krishnaswami

2024-25: Not offered

129H Glee Club

The Amherst College Glee Club, founded in 1865, is the fifth oldest collegiate choral ensemble in the United States. In this course, the ensemble will meet twice a week to develop the skill and knowledge to perform a wide range of musical styles and genres. Participation in this course will help singers develop their vocal ability in a positive environment, interact with living composers on newly composed repertory, as well as engage in the study of repertory from the Western and non-western choral canon. The ensemble frequently interacts with other choral ensembles, visiting instructors and guests, locally and on tour, both domestically and internationally. Students enrolled in this course must have some experience with music notation and the ability to match pitch, though experience singing in a choral setting is not required. 

Lecturer Arianne Abela. Fall and Spring Semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

211 Exploring Music

Through composition, analysis, listening practice, and performance, we will build a solid working understanding of many principles of music common in Western musical traditions. The course aims to develop comfort and dexterity in engaging with music via listening, analysis, and creative work. Assignments include harmonizing melodies, writing short melodies and accompaniments, creative representation and listening projects, and annotated analysis. On several occasions we will use our instruments and voices to bring musical examples to life in the classroom. Three class meetings and one ear training section per week.

Students who have not previously taken a course in music theory at Amherst College are encouraged to take a self-administered placement exam available on reserve in the Music Library and on the Music Department Website (www.amherst.edu/~music/TheoryPlacement.pdf ). Students are also encouraged to discuss placement in music theory with a member of the Music Department. This course or MUSI 213 is considered a point of entry to MUSI 341 and serves as a prerequisite to many other Music Department offerings.

Requisite: MUSI 111, or equivalent ability gained by playing an instrument or singing. Limited to 18 students. Fall and Spring semester: Instructor TBD.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2022, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

213 Jazz Theory and Improvisation I

This is a beginner-level course designed to explore jazz harmony and improvisation from theoretical and applied standpoints. Students will study common harmonic practices, modes and their related chords, rhythmic practices, 32-measure song form, and the blues, and will learn the historical contexts in which these practices have developed. An end-of-semester group performance of material studied during the semester will be required alongside an individual performance evaluation. One-hour ear training sections will be scheduled outside of regular class meetings. Two class meetings and one ear training section per week. This course is considered a point of entry to MUSI 341 and a pre-requisite of MUSI 246.

Prior performance experience on a harmonic instrument or voice at a basic proficiency level is assumed and necessary to fully participate in the learning examples and outcomes. Feel free to inquire about your own experience level and how it relates to the course content.

Students who have not previously taken a course in music theory at Amherst College are encouraged to take a self-administered placement exam by filling out this Google Form. Students are also encouraged to discuss placement in music theory with a member of the Music Department. Limited to 12 students.

Fall Semester. Senior Lecturer Diehl. 

Other years: Offered in Fall 2022, Fall 2023, Fall 2024

221 Voices from a Bygone Time

(Offered as MUSI 221 and EUST 221) Monks living in monastic seclusion, troubadours serving their ladies and fighting wars, mad princes writing complicated polyphonic music, male castrato singers celebrated as the pop-stars of opera houses are just a few of the fascinating characters who participated in music making from the Middle Ages until the middle of the eighteenth century in Europe. The music they produced is frequently called "early music," a falsely unifying label that hides the kaleidoscopic nature of this fantastic repertory, ranging from monophonic chant to opera. In this course we will study how the invention of musical notation affected the development of music, turning an oral tradition of chant into a written tradition of complex polyphonic textures unimaginable without the help of notation. Reading historical documents and listening to selected pieces of music, we'll visit the soundscape of this bygone time that still influences our thinking about music. Assignments include listening, reading, and short papers. Knowledge of musical notation at least at the rudimentary level is recommended.

Requisite: MUSI 211 or consent of the instructor. Professor Móricz.

Other years: Offered in Spring 2013, Fall 2014, Spring 2017, Fall 2018, Spring 2021, Fall 2022, Fall 2024

228 Rhythm

What is musical rhythm and why does it matter? How is rhythm perceived, measured, notated (or indicated) and performed in different musical cultures and what does rhythm “mean” within each system?  In this course we will examine rhythmic traditions within their historical, social, and cultural contexts, develop ways of understanding rhythms across cultures and traditions, and learn how to hear and perform rhythms of various traditions. We will use staff notation of Western music as an analytical tool and comparative model to investigate rhythmic complexity, polyrhythm, cross rhythm, mixed and odd meters, groove, incremental repetition and ecstaticism induced by rhythm. We will also use pedagogical and conceptual models from musics beyond the Western tradition, such as solkattu from South Indian Carnatic music, but also concepts like quantization in MIDI programming, transcription, and time unit box notation systems (TUBS). Coursework will include reading, listening, and viewing assignments, learning and performing rhythmic exercises discussed in class, brief writing and class presentation projects, and a final project. While there are no course prerequisites for this class, students should be familiar with basic rhythmic concepts of Western staff notation.

Professor Robinson.

Other years: Offered in Spring 2023, Fall 2024

230H Jazz Ensemble

The Amherst College Jazz Ensemble meets a minimum of 2X per week in rehearsals and gives a minimum of three performances each semester. Membership is possible for those who perform on traditional jazz instrumentation (saxophones, brass, piano, guitar, bass, drums, vibes) as well as vocalists. An exciting opportunity each year is the chance to give a world premiere of a piece composed especially for the membership of the jazz ensemble. This always current piece goes along with other repertoire that is chosen from the last 100 years of jazz. Students are also encouraged to create original compositions and arrangements. May be repeated for credit.

Half credit. Fall and spring semesters.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2022, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

231H Jazz Combo

Participation in a jazz combo involves 2 coached sessions per week and a minimum of 3 performances each semester. Players are placed in groups according to their ease with the skill of improvisation. Repertoire is taken from traditional, standard jazz resources as well as more popular music and original compositions. Though prior experience is helpful, we can find a place for virtually all who wish to be a part of this vibrant program. Establised in 2021-2022, Jazz@Friedmann Room provides a club-like atmosphere for our students to share their musical progress. We encourage membership in groups to be the same from Fall into Spring semester. May be repeated for credit.

Half credit. Fall and spring semesters.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

232 Listening, Hearing, and the Human

(Offered as MUSI 232 and ANTH 233) If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? A provisional answer from the field of sound studies is: no, the falling tree produces vibration, but does not make a sound absent a listening, hearing human subject. Take another step, and we arrive at ethnomusicologist John Blacking’s time-honored (but not unproblematic) definition of music as “humanly organized sound” and “soundly organized humanity.” In this course, we linger at the intersections of sound and music, listening and hearing to learn about the human. What happens as we encounter music, sound, and voice as forms of vibration available to our senses rather than as texts and sonic objects? How are listening and hearing culturally specific practices shaped by particular histories, identities, technologies, hierarchies of the senses, capitalist desires, human ecologies, concepts of ability and disability, and the work of performers, scholars, and sound artists? In addressing these questions through listening exercises and readings in music, sound, media studies, and anthropology, and listening exercises, we will employ what Pauline Oliveros calls “Deep Listening” (an ethical practice of listening to other humans and non-humans and to music) as a research methodology. Ultimately, this course will attune us to the urgency of listening to the sounds of protest, hearing voices speaking and singing across differences of power and privilege, and attending to what the sounds of the Anthropocene signal.

Limited to 25 students. Professor Engelhardt. 

Other years: Offered in Spring 2021, Spring 2023

232H Symphony Orchestra

The Amherst Symphony Orchestra is open by audition to all students regardless of major.  It rehearses twice a week from 7-930pm on Tuesday and Thursday evenings and performs three concerts per semester.  Membership ranges in size from fifty to eighty.  Repertoire includes overtures, concertos, symphonies and tone poems by canonic composers from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Modern periods in addition to works by a diversity of historically underrepresented artists. The Symphony Orchestra also occasionally performs film music, operas and musicals, and appears on tour at universities such as Stanford and venues such as Symphony Space in New York City. Close listening, collaborative and interpretive skills are developed and refined, and historical, biographical, analytical and stylistic knowledge is acquired. Consistent, conscientious and punctual attendance as well as part preparation is required. 

Lecturer Swanson. Fall and Spring Semester. May be repeated for credit.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

233H Chamber Music Performance

Many young musicians find the close collaboration and artistic give-and-take of chamber music to be uniquely rewarding. Possible chamber music configurations include but are not limited to string quartets, piano trios, woodwind and brass quintets, and other ensembles with piano. Both self-formed and instructor-suggested groups are feasible, and enrollees are permitted to select repertoire from an array of choices recommended by the instructor. Groups typically meet twice a week for at least an hour per session--once on their own and once with a coach (either the instructor or another member of the Music Department faculty). Opportunities for coaching by visiting professional artists on the prestigious Music at Amherst series are often also available. Culminating performances of selected movements or entire works are presented in varying venues both within the Department and on campus, as well as off campus. Consistent, conscientious and punctual attendance as well as part preparation is required. Participation in Symphony Orchestra by auditing or registration is a co-requisite, except for pianists. Lecturer Swanson. Fall and Spring Semester. May be repeated for credit.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

238 Soundscapes of the Connecticut River Valley

(Offered as MUSI 238, ANTH 239 and FAMS 312) This course is about exploring, participating in, and documenting the musical communities and acoustic terrain of the Connecticut River Valley. The first part of the course will focus on local histories and music scenes, ethnographic methods and technologies, and different techniques of documentary representation. The second part of the course will involve intensive, sustained engagement with musicians and sounds in the Amherst vicinity (and beyond). Course participants will give weekly updates about their fieldwork projects and are expected to become well-versed in the musics they are studying. There will be a significant amount of work and travel outside of class meetings. The course will culminate in contributions to a web-based documentary archive of soundscapes projects. We will also benefit from visits and interaction with local musicians. Two class meetings per week. Visit http://www.valleysoundscapes.org/ for more information.

Limited to 12 students. Professor Engelhardt.

Other years: Offered in Spring 2012, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2017, Fall 2018, Spring 2023, Fall 2024

239H Concert Choir

The Amherst College Concert Choir is the premier performing and touring ensemble at Amherst College. Singers will learn to refine aural and vocal skills while singing challenging music from all genres and styles in this chamber setting. Participation in the Glee Club is a co-requisite for Concert Choir. Meets twice a week for 90 minutes and once a week for 30 minutes. Lecturer Arianne Abela. Fall and Spring Semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

253 Music and Sound for Media

This course considers the practice and aesthetics of music and sound design in film, television, video games, advertising, podcasts, and other multi-disciplinary art forms. Students will learn about synchronization techniques in linear media as well as techniques for non-linear media such as games. We will read key theoretical texts in the world of sound for film including Michel Chion and Claudia Gorbman. We will also study different techniques for sound design including foley, synthesis, and working with libraries. Students will design and execute a final creative project individually or in small groups. This course is open to students who have taken MUSI 115, or a similar audio production class, or by permission of the instructor, based on knowledge of a Digital Audio Workstation and/or experience with music composition.

Fall semester. Professor Krishnaswami

Other years: Offered in Spring 2015, Spring 2017, Fall 2019, Spring 2021, Fall 2024

269 Composition I

What does it mean to compose? What do you need to know in order to do it? We will investigate the practice of music composition across recent decades and create original work inspired by the music and techniques we encounter. We will study the use instruments and voices, how to provide a clear musical score for interpretation by performers, and how improvisation and technology can inform and become part of a composition. Students may bring any style or tradition to the table. The class will focus especially on three lineages through the twentieth century into the twenty-first: modern Western art music, instrumental music from the African-American tradition, and the gamut of American popular song. Each composition will be presented in class, with the assistance of performers from inside and outside the class. We will develop the skill of providing one another constructive feedback. The class will culminate in a concert performance of final compositions.Two class meetings per week.

Requisite: MUSI 111, some background playing an instrument or singing, or consent of the instructor. Limited to 10 students. Fall semester. Instructor TBD. 

Other years: Offered in Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022, Fall 2023, Fall 2024

270 Hip Hop Production

How is hip hop made, and why does it sound the way it does? In this course, we will examine the history of hip hop production by creating hip hop, analyzing how technological inventions and changing aesthetic practices have contributed to the sound and style of hip hop’s beats. Through close listening, together with reading first-person accounts, critical reviews, musical instrument manuals, ethnographies, and musical analyses, students in this course will develop a historical understanding of the aesthetics and musical contributions of important hip hop producers and how these producers have embraced new technologies and instruments. Informed by this historical background, students will compose hip hop beats using a variety of instruments and software and using celebrated tracks by producers such as Rick Rubin, the Bomb Squad, the Dust Brothers, Organized Noize, J Dilla, and Metro Boomin as models for their compositions.

Requisite:  Limited to 15 students. Professor Coddington.

Other years: Offered in Spring 2023

310 Performance Workshop

Members of the class will be assigned to chamber ensembles, mastering a range of repertory choices from the past and present. On occasion groups may include both student and artist musicians, preparing works together for performance through class sessions and private coachings. Intensive class analysis and workshop-style critique will serve as the basis of musical expression and interpretation. This course is open to singers and instrumentalists. This course may be repeated.

Admission with consent of the instructor. Spring Semester. Professor Schneider.

2024-25: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2024

341 Tonal Harmony and Counterpoint

Whether it’s a rapper lyrically flowing over a looped breakbeat or a Bach fugue’s imitative melodic lines helping determine the piece’s structure, most of the music we interact with on a daily basis involves the careful interplay of two or more musical elements. Putting musical lines in conversation creates grooves, harmonies, and complex timbral sonorities. But how do musicians and listeners make sense of the relationship between simultaneously sounding musical ideas?

In this class, we study how simultaneously sounding musical ideas interact, by examining the ideas of counterpoint and harmony within four distinct musical traditions. We begin the semester by exploring species counterpoint, a European pedagogical compositional technique popularized in the 18th century by Austrian composer Johann Joseph Fux. From there, we analyze ideas of counterpoint in hip hop from the United States, looking at the relationship between flow, beats, and rhyme schemes. Then, we engage with the harmonic language of two tonal music traditions: Western art music of the 18th and 19th centuries, and American popular music of the last 60 years. Through composition, analysis, dictation and performance, we will develop theoretical and practical tools to cultivate a deep understanding of the conventions of counterpoint and harmony across these styles.

This course is the first of the required music theory sequence for majors. Three class meetings and two ear-training sections per week. Students who have not previously taken a course in music theory at Amherst College are encouraged to take a self-administered placement exam available on the Music Department Website. Students are also encouraged to discuss placement in music theory with a member of the Music Department.

Requisite: MUSI 211 or consent of the instructor. Limited to 18 students. Professor Coddington. Fall and Spring semesters.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

342 Harmony, Structure, and Expression

How can a piece of instrumental music with no words tell a story? How can a song with words convey a sense of perfect abstract design? Musical form is an interaction of melody, harmony, rhythm, and other musical parameters that can be used to structure a temporal experience into a narrative experience. We will consider several genres across musical eras and traditions, including Baroque counterpoint, classical sonata forms, and American popular song forms, seeing how the shaping of common practice harmony gives voice to many shades of individuality within each tradition. Students will have the opportunity to get inside of each stylistic language by writing guided compositions inspired by the models we study. Fulfills one of the required music theory sequences for majors. Two lectures and one ear-training section per week.

Requisite: Music 341 or consent of the instructor. Spring semester. Professor Sawyer.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2023

343 Jazz Form and Analysis

An upper level theory course designed for majors or students wishing to develop an understanding of theoretical concepts in jazz. Students do not need a background in jazz to enroll in this course, and this course satisfies the analysis requirement for the music major.

Among the topics to be explored in the course will be melodic, harmonic and formal concepts from: hot jazz of the 1920s, big bands of the 1930s and 1940s, bebop of the 1940s, the post-bop legacies of hard bop, cool jazz and their manifestations today, as well as the jazz avant-garde and fusion of the 1960s and 1970s. Students will gain an understanding of the formal principles of various types of small and large ensemble jazz composition and improvisation.

Required coursework will include melodic, harmonic and formal/structural analysis of compositions, arrangements, and improvisations from various historical and stylistic periods within the development of jazz. We will carry out these investigations through listening, transcription, and composition/writing projects. This is not a performance course; however, certain assignments will require basic performance exercises on piano and/or another instrument with which the student is familiar (including voice).

Requisite: MUSI-111 or the equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Professor Robinson.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2022, Fall 2024

371 Seminar in Composition I

Immersive composition projects tailored to the needs and experience of the individual student, deepening the experience gained in creative courses like Music 269. One class meeting per week and one individual meeting per week. Group meetings will include discussions on compositional topics, study of repertory from a wide range of styles and traditions, and sharing of music by students and visitors in a workshop environment. The semester includes partnerships to write for professional musicians, as well as a final class concert. This course may be repeated as topics and projects change each semester. Music 387 and Music 388 need not be taken in order.

Requisite: MUSI 269 or the equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Fall semester. Professor Sawyer.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2022, Fall 2023, Fall 2024

372 Composition Seminar II

A continuation of MUSI 387. One class meeting per week and weekly private conferences. This course may be repeated. 

Requisite: MUSI 269 or the equivalent and consent of the instructor. Spring semester. Instructor TBD.

Other years: Offered in Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2023, Spring 2024

385 Music Technology from Analog to AI

Musical instruments are some of the oldest examples of technical interfaces across cultures. Music theory, notation, and recording, are some of the earliest tools for inscribing, storing, and sharing data. This seminar considers how key moments in the evolution of music technology have reflected historical, social, cultural, and political contexts. Histories of acoustics, the telephone, and radio inform the platforms and tools we use today. In considering the most recent developments in music technology and generative AI, students will also read work interrogating algorithms, data, surveillance, and platforms. This class will include weekly reading responses and a final paper and conference-style presentation that presents novel research or responds critically to one or more class readings.  

Fall semester. Professor Krishnaswami

Other years: Offered in Spring 2013, Spring 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2024

420 Seminar on Opera and Musical Theatre

(Offered as MUSI 420, EUST 320 and THDA 320) This course examines the genre of lyric theater commonly known as opera with special attention to composers’ musical characterizations of the women and men who populate them. The first part of the class will focus on case studies of works by Mozart, Verdi, and Puccini, and may include some discussion of the classic American musical. Analyzing these works will help us develop an understanding of how composers work with conventions of vocal type and musical gesture to define character. The second part of the class will be devoted to developing independent research projects. Conditions permitting, some of the works studied will be chosen in coordination with performances we can attend in New York or Boston. This course can satisfy one of the major seminar requirements for the Music Department.

Professor Schneider.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2011, Fall 2019, Spring 2022, Fall 2024

443 Seminar in The Virtual Realities of Romantic Music

Romantic composers loved to escape from the realities of every life into the perilous virtual worlds they created in their music. How can we explore these worlds and understand the technical means with which they were created? How can we interpret the splendid sound of music by using words whose discursive strength seems to endanger music's ephemeral nature? Through close reading of nineteenth-century music by Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, and Brahms, we will explore the possibilities of musical expression and meaning, searching for parallels between poetic and musical interpretation. Works will be considered from a number of different analytical perspectives including methods current in the nineteenth century and those developed more recently. Writing assignments will combine technical analysis with interpretation.

Two class meetings and two ear-training sections per week. Fulfills the departmental seminar requirement for the major.

Requisite: MUSI 342, 343, or 344. Professor Móricz.

Other years: Offered in Spring 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2016, Fall 2017, Spring 2020

498, 498D Senior Departmental Honors

Advanced work for Honors candidates in music history and criticism, music theory, ethnomusicology, composition, or performance. A thesis, a major composition project or a full-length recital will be required. No student shall elect more than one semester as a double course. A full course.

Fall semester. The Department.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016, Fall 2017, Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2021, Fall 2022, Fall 2023, Fall 2024

Introductory Courses

111 Introduction to Music

This course is intended for students with little or no background in music who would like to develop a theoretical and practical understanding of how music works. Students will be introduced to the technical details of music such as musical notation, intervals, basic harmony, meter and rhythm. Familiarity with basic music theory will enable students to read and perform at sight as well as provide an introduction to the composition of melodies with chordal accompaniment. The music we analyze and perform will draw from folk, popular, and concert traditions. Assignments will include oral and written exercises, and preparation of music for class performance. This course serves as a requisite for many Music Department offerings. Students with some musical experience contemplating MUSI 111 are encouraged to take a self-administered placement exam available at the Music Department website. Students are also encouraged to discuss placement in music theory with a member of the Music Department. Two class meetings and one ear training section per week.

Limited to 20 students. Fall semester: Professor Engelhardt. Spring semester: Professor Moricz. 

Other years: Offered in Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

Special Departmental Courses & Seminars

449 Seminar in the Anthropology of Music: Voice

(Offered as MUSI 449 and ANTH 449) This seminar explores the sound and significance of the human voice in broad perspective. What do we communicate with our voice? Why are certain voices powerful or unforgettable? How are voices culturally shaped and constrained? How do people use their voice along the continuum between speech and song? What happens when the voice turns text into sound? What does it mean in terms of politics and personhood to have a voice? How does vocal sound relate to knowledge of the body and ideas about race, gender, and identity? To engage these questions, we will begin by examining the classic premise that the voice is a sonic medium for music, language, and other forms of communicative expression whose production (singing, speaking, vocalizing) and uptake (listening, recognizing, empathizing) are basic to social life and inhabiting one's environment. Throughout the term, we will push this premise in critical new directions by remembering that song and language affect us because the voice is not merely a medium. What Roland Barthes famously describes as "the grain of the voice" is its profound, compelling sonic presence beyond its role as a medium. Thinking about the significance of vocal sound and timbre in this light, we will explore a host of voices and vocal styles from throughout the world, including how we use our own creatively, in performance, and relative to the constraints of a voice-impacting global pandemic. We will listen and read widely, benefiting from each others' experience and insights as well as those of singers and scholars who will join us. Fulfills either the departmental seminar requirement or the comprehensive exam requirement for the major.

Spring semester. Professor Engelhardt. 

Other years: Offered in Spring 2017, Spring 2018, January 2021, Fall 2022

Music Lessons

151H Classical Piano Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in piano with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

152H Classical Voice Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in voice with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

153H Violin Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in violin with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

154H Viola Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in viola with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

155H Trumpet Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in trumpet with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

156H Drumset Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in percussion with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical or jazz tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

157H Saxophone Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in saxophone with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical and/or jazz tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

158H French Horn Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in French horn with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

159H Clarinet Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in clarinet with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

160H Cello Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in cello with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

161H Classical Guitar Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in guitar with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

162H String Bass Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in string bass with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

163H Flute Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in flute with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

168H Jazz Piano Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in piano with a focus on repertoire from the jazz tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

169H Jazz Voice Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in voice with a focus on repertoire from the jazz tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

170H Jazz Guitar Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in guitar with a focus on repertoire from the jazz tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

171H Jazz Bass Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in bass with a focus on repertoire from the jazz tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

172H Bassoon Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in bassoon with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

175H Trombone Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in trombone with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical and/or jazz tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

176H Harp Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in harp with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

177H Oboe Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in oboe with a focus on repertoire from the Western classical tradition. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

181H Improvisation Performance Instruction

This course provides individual performance instruction in improvisation with a focus to be determined by the instructor. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated. Half Credit. Fall and spring semester.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Spring 2020, Fall 2020, Spring 2021, Fall 2021, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024

182H Digital Music Production and Recording

(Offered as MUSL 182H and THDA 182H) This course provides individual performance instruction in digital music production and recording including sound capture, mixing, mastering, and use of Digital Audio Workstations (DAW) to create music. Students have weekly lessons with the instructor with an expectation of five hours per week of practice. The course is open to students of any level, beginning to advanced, and it may be repeated.

Admission with consent of the instructor. Fall and spring semesters.

Other years: Offered in Fall 2022, Spring 2023, Fall 2023, Spring 2024, Fall 2024