Political Science Students Leave the Classroom to Shape Public Opinion on
Intercontinental Cry

Students enrolled in the class "Indigenous World Politics" with Professor Manuela Picq (Fall 2016) showed what activist scholarship can look like.  They transformed theoretical debates in the classroom in influential research published on Intercontinental Cry, an online publication of the Center for World Indigenous Studies.  Students reported on the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline and the events at Standing Rock, addressing broken treaties, lack of media coverage, legal battles, and pipeline leakages.  Then they published their own research, which addressed a broad range of issues from how to bring indigeneity to the digital world (Lauren Tuiskula) to struggles for self-determination in the Philippines (Cristina Rey).  Some pieces generated so much interest that they were translated into Spanish and reposted by other media venues like Truth-Out.  For instance the stories on the erasure of indigenous presence in New England (Sam Spurrell) and on how indigenous concepts of rights of nature are reframing state law (Kiana Herold).

More info:  https://intercontinentalcry.org/activism-journalism-academica-collide/

Professor Manuela Picq joins the Editorial Board of Intercontinental Cry, a publication of the Center for World Indigenous Studies.

Professor Ruxandra Paul's article "Welfare Without Borders:  Unpacking the Bases of Transnational Social Protection for International Migrants" has been published in Oxford Development Studies (special issue, Peggy Levitt and Jocelyn Viterna eds.).

It's now available online and will appears in print soon (Volume 45, Issue 1 of the journal).  If you want to read more, you can download the full article for free in PDF format here:

http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/YaBg7zA7rVdHXEMdzahk/full

Amherst College's Seminar on helping new students to adapt was featured in the Boston Globe.

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/01/01acclimating-amherst-college-after-orientation-ends/JniVmj50FCPt1tHC7V8fbP/story.html

                                                         Visiting Faculty for Spring Semester 2017

Professor Jessica Lake, Karl Loewenstein Fellow

Dr. Jessica Lake is a Lecturer in Law at Swinburne University and researches in the areas of privacy law, intellectual property, and American legal history, with a particular focus on gender.  She has an LBB (Hons) and PhD from the University of Melbourne.  Her PhD thesis, 'Privacy and the Pictures:  the photographed and filmed (women) who forged a right to privacy in the United States (1880-1950)', demonstrated that women forged a 'right to privacy' in the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries by bringing cases protesting the unauthorised use and abuse of images of their faces and bodies.  Her PhD is published as a book, The Face that Launched a Thousand Lawsuits, by Yale University Press, 2016.  Jessica has published her work in journals and newspapers, and presented at conferences in Australia and the United States.  She is also a qualified lawyer, and practised for many years in the area of media and entertainment law and commercial litigation at a Melbourne law firm.  She is teaching POSC/SWAGS 261, Privacy and Gender.

Professor Sayres Rudy, Visiting Professor

Sayres Rudy specializes in comparative political economy and philosophy, with a regional focus on the Global South.  He has written on Islamism and globalization, sovereignty and the war(s) on terror, and violence and regimes, and is now working on the politics of adoption, suicide, and tragedy.  In addition to "canonic" theorists, he reads and teaches "counter-enlightenment" authors, especially Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, Freud, Foucault, Mariategui, Marcos, Fanon, Gandhi, Dostoyevsky, Hemingway, Kincaid, Cassavetes, and Haneke.  He has taught social theory at Harvard and politics at Hampshire College and Amherst College where, from 2002-2007, he offered courses on Islamism, Ideology, Social Movements, Partition, Evil, Palestine, and the State and Violence.  He has researched and resided in Europe and the Middle East/North Africa.  Sayres studied at Davidson College (BA), Johns Hopkins (MA), and Columbia (PhD, political science).  He is teaching POSC 159, The State and Violence.

Professor Manuela Picq, Visiting Professor

Professor Picq is teaching two courses during the Spring 2017 semester.  POSC 160/SWAGS 160 Sexualities in International Relations and POSC 307 States of Extraction:  Nature and World Politics in the Americas.

                                                New Political Science Courses Offered for Spring 2017

POSC 144, Work, Professor Kristin Bumiller

POSC 261/SWAGS 261, Privacy and Gender, Professor Jessica Lake

POSC 270, European Union Politics:  Integration and Disintegration, Professor Ruxandra Paul

POSC 307, States of Extraction:  Nature and World Politics in the Americas, Professor Manuela Picq

POSC 317, International Political Theory, Professor Pavel Machala

POSC 324, Power and Violence in America:  An Historical Approach to Politics, Professor Jonathan Obert

POSC 470, International Migrations and Politics in the Era of Globalization, Professor Ruxandra Paul

   International Relations Certificate Courses in Political Science Offered for Spring 2017

POSC 154, The State, Professor Corrales

POSC 160/SWAAGS 160, Sexualities in International Relations, Professor Manuela Picq

POSC 207/SWAGS 207/ASLC 207, The Home and the World:  Women and Gender in South Asia, Professor Basu

POSC 231, The Political Economy of Petro States:  Venezuela Compared, Professor Javier Corrales

POSC 270, European Union Politics:  Integration and Disintegration, Professor Ruxandra Paul

POSC 307, States of Extraction:  Nature and World Politics in the Americas, Professor Manuela Picq

POSC 317, International Political Theory, Professor Pavel Machala

POSC 467/SWAGS 467, Social Movements, Civil Society and Democracy in India, Professor Amrita Basu

POSC 470, International Migrations and Politics in the Era of Globalization, Professor Ruxandra Paul