Spanish
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Amherst College Spanish for 2009-10

01 Elementary Spanish

Grammar, pronunciation, oral practice, and reading. Major emphasis on speaking and on aural comprehension. Three hours a week in class, plus two hours with a teaching assistant and regular work in the language laboratory.

For students without previous training in Spanish. This course prepares students for Spanish 03.  Limited to 15 students. Fall semester: Lecturer Nieto-Cuebas, Visiting Lecturer Twardy and Assistants. Spring semester: Lecturer Nieto-Cuebas and Assistants.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

03 Intermediate Spanish

A continuation of Spanish 01. Intensive review of grammar and oral practice. Reading and analysis of literary texts. Three hours a week in class plus one hour with a teaching assistant. Prepares students for Spanish 05.

For students with less than three years of secondary school Spanish who score 3 or 4 on the Advanced Placement Examination.  Limited to 15 students. Fall semester: Lecturers Maillo and Garcia, and Assistants. Spring semester: Lecturers Ferrer-Medina and Garcia and Assistants.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

05 Advanced Spanish

While expanding on the grammar essentials covered in Spanish 3, this course helps the student further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish.  It is directed toward students who already have a good linguistic-communicative competency, broadening their contact with different kinds of texts, deepening their grammatical understanding, and enabling them to communicate through a variety of forms and registers.  Upon completing the course, students should be able to make themselves understood with accuracy and fluency and participate easily in a wide range of formal and informal communicative situations.  An array of literary texts and readings, not ordinarily considered literature and films, will be used.  Three hours a week in class plus one hour with a language assistant.  Conducted entirely in Spanish.  Prepares students for Spanish 7 and literature courses. This course counts for the major.

Requisite: Spanish 3 or permission of Language Coordinator. Limited to 15 students. Fall and spring semesters. Lecturer Maillo and Assistants.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

06 Spanish Conversation

This course emphasizes fluency speaking and is designed to provide students the opportunity to practice the language through discussion of selected texts and topics of interest.  Spanish 6 prepares students to express opinions, ideas, points of view and critiques on debates, readings and films.  With this goal in mind, this course will also provide exposure to other language skills important to the development of fluency in speaking Spanish. The course will meet for three hours per week with the instructor and one hour with a teaching assistant. This course counts for the major.

For students who have completed Spanish 05 or with permission of Language Coordinator. Limited to 15 students. Fall semester:  Visiting Lecturer Twardy and Assistants.  Spring semester: Lecturer Ferrer-Medina and Assistants.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

07 Spanish Composition

In this course students will learn how to approach writing as a process.  The emphasis is on writing as a communicative act rather than as a mere language exercise.  As such, emphasis is given to the interaction between the author and the text, the target audience, and the purpose and message of the final product.  In order to develop the necessary skills that good writers should have, the course will focus on expanding vocabulary, exploring rhetorical techniques for organizing information, developing strategies for writing, and characterizing the target audience(s).  At the same time we will insist upon critical readings, and the processes of revising and editing.  In addition, this course includes the study of written texts (narrative, description, poems, reports, essays, letters, etc.), and of literature's many genres and subgenres (prose, poetry, drama, etc.).  This course counts for the major.  Conducted entirely in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 05 or with permission of Language Coordinator. Limited to 15 students. Fall and spring semesters. Lecturer Garcia.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

09 Spanish for Heritage Speakers

This course is designed specifically for native or heritage speakers of Spanish with oral proficiency but little or no formal training in the language. Generally, these are learners who were raised in homes where Spanish was spoken. The course is designed to build on the language base students already possess. Spanish-speaking students are not viewed as using an “improper” form of Spanish that is incorrect or needs to be eliminated. Rather, their language is viewed as an extremely valid means of oral communication. The primary purpose of this course is to develop reading and writing skills, although all of four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are emphasized via cultural and community activities.

Limited to 15 students. Fall and spring semesters.  Lecturer Nieto-Cuebas.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

11 Readings in Hispanic Literature

This course gives students the tools and critical vocabulary for advanced work reading the canon of Hispanic literatures (Spain, Latin America, and the Caribbean Basin).  Students will be able to identify aesthetic trends and historical periods such as the Golden Age, the Romantic era, the Generation of 1927, and "El Boom."  The syllabus will include a wide variety of authors of different national, political, and artistic persuasions.  A medium- to high-level knowledge of the Spanish language and reasonable proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish are required.  This course counts for the major.  Conducted entirely in Spanish.

Requisite:  Spanish 7 or with permission of the Language Coordinator.  Limited to 15 students.  Fall semester: Professor Suárez.  Spring semester:  Professor Brenneis.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

12 Hispanic World: Past, Present and Future

A survey course that provides an understanding and appreciation of the Spanish-speaking world (including both North and South America and Spain) through language, geography, history, economics, sociopolitical issues, folklore, literature and art. The different units in this course are geographically oriented, and they will focus on individual countries or particular Hispanic groups. Writing skills will be refined by the completion of research papers, and communication skills will be developed further by class discussions and oral presentations. Comprehension will be enhanced by presenting students with literary texts, movies, documentaries and periodicals. The course is conducted entirely in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 07 or consent of Language Coordinator. Limited to 15 students. Spring semester. Lecturer Maillo.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

16 Introduction to Spanish Literature

A study of Spanish consciousness from the beginning through the Golden Age. Emphasis on the chivalric and picaresque traditions, mystical poetry, sacred and secular drama, and the invention of the novel. Conducted in Spanish.

For students who have completed Spanish 05, or the equivalent in secondary school Spanish (advanced standing or a score of 5 on the Advanced Placement Examination).  Limited to 25 students. Spring semester. Professor Maraniss.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2010

20 Introduction to Modern Spanish Literature

Readings from major writers of the Spanish generations of 1898 and 1927: Baroja, Machado, Valle-Inclán, Miró, García Lorca, Salinas, Alberti, Guillén, Cernuda. Conducted in Spanish.

Omitted 2009-10. Professor Maraniss.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Spring 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2012

23 Caribbean Women Claiming Their Islands

This course will explore the works of 19th- and 20th-century women writers, who through homesickness, and political commitment, passionately re-wrote the histories of their islands based on their personal stories of love and belonging. We will focus on the Spanish Caribbean and its diverse diasporic experiences in Paris, Madrid, and New York. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 07 or consent of the instructor. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Suarez.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2008

32 Women Writers of Spain

Twentieth-century Spanish women writers have carved out a particular niche in the canon of Spanish literature. Often envisioned as a single entity, they have, however, distinguished themselves as just as unique as individual writers as their male counterparts. This course will consider contemporary novels, short fiction, essays and poetry authored by women with an overarching question of how one defines an escritura femenina in Spain and what - if anything - differentiates it as a gendered space from other modes of writing. While the course will focus on women writers and the representation of the feminine in Spanish writing, we will also examine texts that present an un-gendered space as a point of comparison and contrast. Conducted in Spanish. 

Requisite: Spanish 7. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Brenneis.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2013

33 Spanish Film

This course features Luis Buñuel, his early association with the Spanish literary and artistic vanguard (Valle-Inclán, García Lorca, Dalí), his life and his work within surrealism in France, commercialism in Hollywood, exile in Mexico, and later apotheosis as an old master of European cinema. Conducted in English.

Limited to 35 students. Spring semester. Professor Maraniss.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Spring 2010

35 Arts and Human Rights in Latin America

This course is a dynamic, highly interactive, experimental class that seeks to examine the role different art forms (crafts, dance, graffiti, poetry, theater, etc.) have played and continue to play in the arena of human rights and citizenship building. The arts have been important in bringing down (or at least contesting) dictatorial regimes, and shaping processes of democratization. Arguably, art is foundational to re-visiting history, building citizenry, and inspiring communities and nations.

Both artistic expression and human rights compose vast fields of their own. To study the production and impact of the arts on socio-political conditions in Latin America, we will view films, read history, theory, and poetry. In particular, this semester, we will focus on the socio-political interventions made by artistic expression in Chile, Argentina, and Brazil. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 05 or equivalent. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Suárez.

 

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008

36 Representation and Reality in Spanish Cinema

A critical overview of the role filmmakers from varied backgrounds have taken in interpreting similar trends in contemporary Spanish culture and society. By analyzing recent Spanish cinema along with selected fictional and non-fictional texts on current issues in Spain, we will explore such questions as women's roles in contemporary society, immigration and exile, globalization, and experiences of war and violence, among other themes. This course will take a transatlantic approach, examining how these issues are imagined within Spain as well as by filmmakers and writers from the Americas, and study the sociological, cultural and political forces that have inspired such cinematic representations. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 5, 7 or consent of the instructor. Fall semester. Professor Brenneis.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Fall 2009, Spring 2013

44 The Spanish Civil War: Art, Politics, and Violence

Seventy years ago, the Spanish Second Republic was engaged in a civil conflict that had become a holy war to the European left and right. This course will examine the effects of the war and its passions upon the lives and works of several exemplary writers and artists in England (Orwell, Auden, Romilly, Cornford), France (Malraux, Bernanos, Simon), Spain (Machado, Hernández, Lorca, Picasso), the United States (Hemingway, Dos Passos), and South America (Neruda, Vallejo). Students are encouraged to read texts in the original languages whenever possible. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 7 or equivalent. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Maraniss.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2008, Spring 2011

46 Cuba after 1989: Culture, Film, and Literature

(RC) In 1989 the Berlin Wall was chiseled away, changing global culture and politics forever. In Eastern Europe, the rhetoric and divisions necessitated to fuel the cold war were transformed into new discourses of democracy and capitalist opportunities. In contrast, Cuba, remaining an iron-clad communist state, fell into a deep “periódo especial,” which ushered in a two-tiered economy greatly dependent on the European tourist industry. The revolutionary dream, many would argue, was then voided. Arguably, “fin-de-siglo” Cuba is a state in crisis. And a new, rich, often hypnotic, production of culture, film, and literature is available to give us a sensational glimpse of the latest of Cuban conditions. In this class we will be reading and screening some of the most outstanding materials from this period. Authors will include Abilio Estévez, Zoe Valdés, Pedro Juan Guttiérez, and Daína Chaviano. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 7 or consent of the instructor. Limited to 15 students. Fall semester. Professor Suárez.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2009, Fall 2012

51 Dominican Configurations: Diaspora, Music and History

In this seminar, we will analyze several contemporary Dominican and Dominican Diaspora novels and short stories to learn about the history of Dominican lives on the island and in the diaspora. We will read critical and theoretical materials to better understand the role that literature plays in creating a national narrative of Dominican-ness; we will also explore how it is that Dominicans are an important, formative sector of Latino/a reality in the United States. Particular emphasis will be placed on debunking myths and engaging the hard realities imposed by a long history of violence. Race, gender, class as viewed and reviewed by diaspora authors will be contextualized within the larger framework of post-colonial studies and dictatorship literature. Music will be examined as a form of national, and contestatory narrative. Conducted in Spanish. All writing is in Spanish. Reading materials, due to their availability, will be in Spanish and English.

Requisite: Spanish 7 or equivalent. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Suárez.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007

52 Barcelona

As a global city with a local identity, Barcelona resides both literally and figuratively at the border between Spain and the rest of the world. This interdisciplinary course will explore the in-between space this vibrant city inhabits at the turn of the 21st century, at once imagined as a tourist's playground in films and popular novels, while also actively guarding its particular Catalan cultural roots. Students will study architectural, literary, cinematic, linguistic and political movements set amid the urban cityscape of Barcelona, focusing on the city's role in the exportation of a unique Spanish and Catalan identity beyond Spain's borders. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 7 or equivalent. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Brenneis.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2011

55 Madrid

Considered the heart of Spain by some and an authoritative figurehead by others, Madrid is unquestionably a space of cultural and political conflict while serving as a visible intermediary between the Iberian Peninsula and the world. Incorporating an interdisciplinary study of film, popular music, fiction, plastic arts, political movements, history and topography of the city, this course will seek to explore the place of Madrid in the Spanish and global popular imagination. Although we will delve into the city’s history, the course will place particular emphasis on the 1980s movida madrileña through the present-day role of Madrid in global politics, particularly as pertains to the 2004 terrorist attacks and their political and cultural aftermath. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 7 or consent of the instructor. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Brenneis.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2009, Spring 2012

56 Puerto Rican Flows

In this class we will study Puerto Rico's Commonwealth Status, its implications, and the resulting diasporas, film, and literature. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 7 or consent of the instructor. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Suárez.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2009, Spring 2012

60 Jorge Luis Borges

A comprehensive study of the style, originality and influence of the contemporary Argentine author (1899-1986). His essays, poetry, and fiction will be discussed in the context of Latin American and international literature. Conducted in Spanish.

Requiste: Spanish 07 or equivalent. Open to juniors and seniors or consent of the instructor. Limited to 20 students.  Omitted 2009-10. Professor Stavans.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2008, Spring 2012

62 Pablo Neruda

An exploration of the life and work of the prolific Chilean poet (1904-1973) and recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature. His work will be read chronologically, starting with Twenty Love Poems and a Song Of Despair and ending with his five posthumous collections. Special attention will be paid to Residence On Earth and Canto General. The counterpoint of politics and literature will define the classroom discussion. Neruda’s role as witness of, and sometimes participant in, the Spanish Civil War, the Cuban Revolution, the workers’ and students’ upheaval in Latin America in the sixties, and the failed presidency of Salvador Allende in Chile will serve as background. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 07 or equivalent. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Maraniss.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Fall 2013

63 One Hundred Years of Solitude

(RC) A detailed study of the novel by Gabriel García Márquez, published in 1967. Although other works written by the Colombian author will also be discussed (stories, essays, reportage, and fragments of other novels), the course will concentrate on the structure, style, motifs, historical and aesthetic context of the masterwork that brought him the Nobel Prize in Literature. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 12 or consent of the instructor. Limited to 25 students.  Fall semester. Professor Stavans.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2009, Spring 2013

64 Don Quixote

A detailed textual and historical analysis of Cervantes' masterpiece, first published in two installments, the first in 1605, the second in 1615. The course will place the novel in the context of the Renaissance, reflecting on the way it showcases ideas on politics, philosophy, and art. Also, students will contemplate its impact on world literature, from Sterne's Tristram Shandy to Dostoievski's Crime and Punishment, as well as on the works of Borges, Milan Kundera, and Salman Rushdie, among others. Conducted in Spanish.  Not open to students who have taken Spanish 65.

Requisite: Spanish 07 or equivalent. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Stavans.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008

65 Cervantes

(RC) Don Quixote de la Mancha and some of Cervantes' "exemplary novels" will be read, along with other Spanish works of the time, which were present at the novels' birth.  Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite:  Spanish 05 or equivalent.  Not open to students who have taken Spanish 64.  Limited to 25 students.  Fall semester.  Professor Maraniss.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2009, Fall 2010

77, 78 Senior Departmental Honors

One single course.

Fall semester. The Department.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

81 Contextualizing Motherhood: Representation and Reality in Latino/a and Latin American Literatures

This is a reading and writing intensive course that demands that students think inter-textually, inter-disciplinarily, and globally. While the larger part of readings and films will focus on Latino/a and Latin American literatures, we will read French feminist narratives, psychoanalysis, and sociological surveys to understand the dynamics of representation of motherhood in reality, as represented by the media, and as exposed via autobiographical writings. We will explore the theme globally (within an international context) and locally (within the Americas, with specific focus on different national, ethnic, and racial cases). Through a collection of voices and views, I ask the students to explore their own relationship (personal, critical, sociological, and theoretical) to the theme.

How is motherhood defined? How do we think of motherhood in sociopolitical terms? What effects do negative and/or positive representations of motherhood have on women and the Latino/a community? Are representations of motherhood in Latino/a and Latin American literature restrictive or expansive. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 07 or equivalent. Limited to 20 students. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Suárez.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007

83 Testimonio: Stories of Truth and Memory in Latin America

The goal of this class is to analyze the historical and political production and use of testimonio literature in Latin America. In the last 20 years testimonio literature has been the topic of heated debate ranging from scholars claiming its importance as a political tool presenting the voice and circumstances of marginalized and oppressed peoples to critics deriding it as lies.

We will explore the forms in which literature is testimonial, as well as the ways testimonial exposure has succeeded in, or failed to, enact political change and social awareness. Some of the many questions to be addressed include: What are the distinctions between testimonial literature and legal testimony? Can testimony be equivalent to truth? What role do memory and political agendas play in the production of testimonial literature? What do we expect from testimonial literature? How did the Rigoberta controversy affect the way other testimonial literature is read? Can fiction be testimonial?

Through journal writing, class presentations, film viewing, and debates, we will be able to arrive at our own conclusions. All classes and most readings will be conducted in Spanish.

Requisite:  Spanish 07 or consent of the instructor.  Omitted 2009-10. Professor Suárez.

2014-15: Not offered

84 Love

(Offered as Spanish 84 and European Studies 33.) This panoramic, interdisciplinary course will explore the concept of love as it changes epoch to epoch and culture to culture. Poetry, novels, paintings, sculptures, movies, TV, and music will be featured. Starting with the Song of Songs, it will include discussions of Plato, Aristotle, Catullus, and other Greek classics, move on to Dante and Petrarch, contemplate Chinese, Arabic, African, and Mesoamerican literatures, devote a central unit to Shakespeare, continue with the Metaphysical poets, and move on to American literature. Special attention will be paid to the difference between love, eroticism, and pornography. Multilingual students will be encouraged to delve into various linguistic traditions, in tongues like French, Russian, German, Yiddish, and Spanish. Conducted in English.

Omitted 2009-10. Professor Stavans.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2014

88 Argentina, Brazil, Chile: Film and Politics of Democratization

(Offered as Spanish 88 and Political Science 25 [CP, GP].) This team-taught course will examine processes of democratization through the interdisciplinary lenses of political science and cultural/literary theory. By reviewing films, critical texts, cases, and causal arguments, we will explore the history of repressive regimes, the transitions to democracy, and the challenges of enhancing the "quality" of democracy in contemporary Argentina, Brazil and Chile.

The course will be taught twice a week. One day a week, the entire class will meet in one room. The other day, the class will break into two discussion groups, one of which will be conducted entirely in Spanish and will count specifically for Spanish majors. Command of Spanish is not required except for students interested in receiving credit for their Spanish major.

Requisite: Spanish 7 or consent of the instructor. Limited to 40 students. Omitted 2009-10. Professors Corrales and Suárez. 

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2008

89 Postwar Spain and the Novel

Postwar Spanish novelists were often subject to censorship and overt oppression by the Franco dictatorship while they struggled to understand their own history and translate it onto the page. In this course, we will study the historical and cultural background of dictatorship and democratic Spain (1940-present), reading novels and short fiction that reflect the diversity of modern Spanish literature and its authors. In addition, students will read historical accounts and critical/theoretical materials in order to gain a more complete understanding of how scholars approach the era and its reflection in literature, and view films that attempt to grapple with questions of history and narration in postwar Spain. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite:  Spanish 11, 12 or consent of the instructor.  Spring semester.  Professor Brenneis.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2013

90 Spanish Detectives and the género negro

An examination of the Spanish detective narrative as a manifestation of Transition-era Spanish society’s struggles with social and political chaos. The course will incorporate short narrative from Latin America as well as comparisons to British and American conventions in order to convey the unique nature of the Spanish género negro during and after the Franco dictatorship, as well as in present-day popular works. It will include a critical examination of a genre that has both resided on and represented the margins of Spanish society and its foray in recent years into a mainstream and highly exportable cultural phenomenon. Where possible, film and other media will be incorporated. Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite: Spanish 07 or consent of the instructor. Omitted 2009-10. Professor Brenneis.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Fall 2008, Fall 2012

91 Exile in Spain and Latin America

"Exile" is both a person who is forced to leave his or her native country and a state of exclusion; both an individual and an experience.  In this course, our study of exile will encompass the individual writers, artists and thinkers who were exiled from their homelands as well as the reasons, confusions and consequences that the experience of exile produces.  We will trace poets such as Cristina Peri Rossi, the authors Jorge Semprún and Gabriel García Márquez, works of art like Pablo Picasso's Guernica, and films such as Luís Buñuel's Viridiana, among other examples, as they enter into states of exile and self-consciously examine their own limbo between two countries.  Many of these individuals and works of art left Spain or Latin America because of their political opposition to the ruling regime; we will delve into the historical, political and cultural backgrounds that resulted in their exile.  In addition, we will linger over the larger questions exile raises:  Can the exile ever return home?  Are the children of exiles also exiles?  Can we generalize about the exile experience?  Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite:  Spanish 5, 7 or consent of the instructor.   Omitted 2009-10.  Professor Brenneis.  This course will be taught in English as a First-Year Seminar in 2009-10.  

 

2014-15: Not offered

92 Latin American Short Story

(RC) A Talmudic reading of the short-story tradition in Latin America.  Although the course starts with 19th- and early 20th-century pioneers, special attention is given to the masterful practitioners who were writing from the 1940s onward (Borges, Rulfo, Hernández, Carpentier, Cortázar, García Márquez).  Contemporary authors (Allende, Bega, Bolaño, Aira) and even younger voices are also contemplated.  The focus is on appraising a tradition constantly being revamped through its promiscuous relationship with other literary genres (essay, novel, poem, reportage, crónica, testimonio).  Students reflect on structural and linguistic devices as well as on rivalries within the tradition and foreign influences (Poem, Maupassant, Chekhov, Hemingway, et al).  Conducted in Spanish.

Requisite:  Spanish 11, 12 or consent of the instructor. Limited to 25 students. Spring semester.  Professor Stavans.

2014-15: Not offered
Other years: Offered in Spring 2010

93 Latina Women Writers - Memory, Political Voice and New Identities

This course will examine the role that Latina women writers play in keeping the memory of Latin American and Caribbean countries alive, forging politics of human rights and civil rights, and creating new bi-cultural identities in an increasingly complicated global market of national definitions and diasporic realities.  Conducted in English.

Requisite:  Spanish 07 or consent of the instructor.  Omitted 2009-10.  Professor Suárez.

2014-15: Not offered

94 Spanglish

A cultural study of language in the Hispanic world (Spain, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States), this course spans almost five hundred years, from the arrival of Spanish to the Americas with Columbus' first voyage, to present-day "pocho lingo" in Los Angeles.  It focuses on the verbal interactions of the missionaries to Florida and the Southwest, the linguistic repercussions of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo of 1848, the age of acculturation in the early half of the 20th century, the political agitation of the Chicano Movement as manifested in word games, and the hip-hop age of agitprop.  Students will analyze works by Junor Díaz, Giannina Braschi, Susana Chávez-Silverman, Luis Humberto Crosthwaite, and others.  Topics like translation, Bilingual Education, lexicography, and the social impact of mass media will be contemplated.  Emphasis will be made on the various modalities of Spanglish, such as Dominicanish, Cubonics, and Nuyorican.  Plus, the development of Spanglish as a street jargon will be compared to Yiddish, Black English, and other minority tongues.  Conducted in English.

Limited to 25 students.  Fall semester.  Professor Stavans.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014
Other years: Offered in Fall 2009

97, 98, 97H, 98H Special Topics

The Department calls attention to the fact that Special Topics courses may be offered to students on either an individual or group basis.

Students interested in forming a group course on some aspect of Hispanic life and culture are invited to talk over possibilities with a representative of the Department. When possible, this should be done several weeks in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken.

Fall semester.

2014-15: Offered in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015
Other years: Offered in Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014
 

Barrett Hall