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Theater & Dance Events

All performances are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted. For more arts events across campus, view the full Amherst Arts calendar

Follow us on Facebook and Instagram, and add THDA Public Events to your Google calendars!


Upcoming Events

Performance Project
November 19, 4-5:30 p.m., on Zoom
Join us on Zoom! 

Come Sit By Me
November 20, 3:00 p.m.
Please register in advance for the Zoom link!

 

October 2020

Fri, Oct 16, 2020

Kyle Marshall dancing in a studio

Masterclass with Kyle Marshall

The Department of Theater and Dance is thrilled to host a Zoom masterclass in contemporary dance with Kyle Marshall!

Choreographer and dancer Kyle Marshall is a 2018 Juried Bessie Award winner, New Jersey State Council on the Arts Fellow and 2020 Dance Magazine Harkness Promise Awardee. His company, Kyle Marshall Choreography, has performed at venues including BAM Next Wave Festival, Jacob’s Pillow Inside/Out, Joe’s Pub at the Public, Actors Fund Arts Center, NJPAC, and NYC SummerStage. Commissions have included Dance on the Lawn: Montclair's Dance Festival, NJPAC and Harlem Stage. He has received residencies from the 92nd Street Y, Mana Contemporary, CPR and Jamaica Performing Arts Center. Kyle graduated from Rutgers University with a BFA in dance.

Register in advance. Zoom link and password will be sent on the day of the event. This event is sponsored by the Eastman Lecture Fund.

Registration Required

Thu, Oct 22, 2020

Making Dances, Doing Research and Problem-Solving During the Zombie Apocalypse

The Department of Theater and Dance welcomes Chris McMillan to host a Zoom workshop, "Making Dances, Doing Research, and Problem-Solving During the Zombie Apocalypse"! McMillan’s workshop will frame creative research (choreography) as multifocal compositional process(es) that can be mobilized as a problem-solving tool. The workshop will seek to answer the question: How does the making of choreography complicate, probe and deconstruct questions of power as they relate to race, class and gender?

The “body,” in study, and in life more generally, is at the center of the arts and humanities. For what can one do without a body? Dance's focus on the body makes critical choreographic study a uniquely situated lens from which to engage all disciplines (probably). We will look at artists/theorists such as Beyonce, Kendrick Lamar and bell hooks, and consult cultural products such as The Night of the Living Dead / The Walking Dead to playfully come up with artistic problem-solving and world-making techniques that might save lives (in theory).

Christopher-Rasheem Mcmillan is a performance-related artist and scholar. He has a joint appointment between dance and gender, women's and sexuality studies at the University of Iowa. McMillan has an MFA in experimental choreography from the Laban Conservatoire, London (2011), and his Ph.D. in theology and religious studies from King’s College, London (2017). His writing has been published in The Journal of Dance, Movement & Spiritualities, Kinebago and Contact Quarterly. Currently, Mcmillan is a visiting assistant professor and fellow at The Institute of Sacred Music at Yale University

Registration Required

Thu, Oct 29, 2020

Headshot of Ariel Nereson

Dr. Ariel Nereson: "Dancing Democracy: Empathy and Community in Bill T. Jones’ Contemporary Work"

The Department of Theater and Dance invites you to "Dancing Democracy: Empathy and Community in Bill T. Jones’ Contemporary Work," a talk by Dr. Ariel Nereson.

In our contemporary moment, with its resurgence of populism and stark ideological oppositions within diverse democratic formations, many commentators, including activists, scientists, politicians, educators, and community members and organizers, are turning to the language of empathy to describe what is missing in our current discourse. This talk looks to artists, particularly the renowned choreographer Bill T. Jones, for practices of empathy-building that align with current cognitive scientific understandings of how humans relate to others whom they perceive as different from themselves. Exploring movement-based works as experiments in empathy-building and community development may offer tactics for revitalizing democratic principles toward practices of equity and differentiated solidarity.

Ariel Nereson is an assistant professor of dance studies and director of graduate dance at the University at Buffalo - SUNY. Her current book project, Democracy Moving: Bill T. Jones, Contemporary American Performance, and the Racial Past, analyzes the choreography of Bill T. Jones as public intellectual labor, Black aesthetic praxis and historical knowledge. She sits on the board of the American Theatre and Drama Society and is the book review editor for Theatre History Studies. Her publications can be found in Theatre Journal, Theatre Survey, American Quarterly, Studies in Musical Theatre and forthcoming in Dance Research Journal, amongst others. She is also a choreographer and dramaturg.

Registration Required