Anthony Bishop Receives Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award

December 2, 2010

Anthony Bishop, associate professor of chemistry, is one of just six chemistry professors nationwide to receive a 2010 Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award. The award provides Bishop with a $60,000 unrestricted grant that will be used for project titled “Target-Specific Control of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (PTP) Activity: Chemical-Genetic Tools for the Study of PTP-Mediated Cell Signaling.”

Black Studies and History Professor’s Book Wins Prize

November 19, 2010

Schooling Citizens: The Struggle for African American Education in Antebellum America, by Hilary Moss, assistant professor of black studies and history, has been honored with the History of Education Society’s (HES) 2010 award for the year’s most outstanding book on the history of education.

The HES Book Prize Committee annually solicits nominations for the award, and this year, 22 publications were nominated. The group first narrowed their choice to five finalists and then reread these volumes carefully, evaluating each book’s thesis and supporting arguments, the work’s significance to the field, its use of sources and its aesthetic qualities. Schooling Citizens came out on top because the committee believed it to be “an important contribution to the historiography of American education, focusing as it does on the purpose of public education,” said HES Book Prize Committee Chair Amy Thompson McCandless, professor of history and dean of the Graduate School at the College of Charleston, in an announcement about the prize. “Well-argued and well written, it deals with issues of race, class, ethnicity, religion and gender that continue to confront educators from pre-school to post-doctoral levels in the 21st century.”

Rick A. López Publishes Crafting Mexico

November 10, 2010

Rick A. López ’93, an associate professor of history at Amherst, is the author of Crafting Mexico: Intellectuals, Artisans, and the State after the Revolution (Duke University Press). In this new book, scheduled for release on Nov. 11, 2010, López explores how, after Mexico’s revolution of 1910–1920, its artists and intellectuals used dance, music and handicrafts to formulate a unified cultural identity for the Mexican people and to symbolize the nation’s modernity. Lopez will appear in the Mead Art Museum to discuss and sign his book on Nov. 17 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Simpson Lecturer Melia to Edit New Astronomy Journal

Fulvio Melia

Fulvio Melia, distinguished professor in the Physics, Astronomy and Applied Mathematics departments at the University of Arizona, who is visiting Amherst this fall as a John Woodruff Simpson Lecturer, has been named editor of a recently launched astronomy journal.

Melia was appointed editor-in-chief of European Astronomy Studies Development, an open access journal that seeks to publish high-quality, peer-reviewed, original manuscripts in all fields of astronomy and astrophysics, with a particular focus on computational astronomy: mathematical and astronomy techniques and methodology, simulations, modeling and numerical results and computational techniques in instrumentation.

Alexander George Receives 2011-12 Romanell-Phi Beta Kappa Professorship

Alexander George

Phi Beta Kappa, the nation’s oldest academic honor society, has awarded its 2011-12 Romanell Professorship to Amherst College Professor of Philosophy Alexander George. As part of this prestigious professorship, George is to deliver three public lectures on the Amherst campus, all on a unified theme of his choosing. “I expect to talk about belief in miracles,” George says, “via a consideration of the views of David Hume and of Ludwig Wittgenstein.”

“This honor recognizes your distinguished achievements within the field of philosophy, as well as your vast contributions to the understanding of philosophy by the public,” wrote Phi Beta Kappa Secretary John Churchill in a letter notifying George of his professorship. George’s achievements and contributions include establishing the Amherst Lecture in Philosophy series; launching the website AskPhilosophers.org and its companion book, charity and mobile app; and writing and editing numerous books and articles on philosophy (among other subjects). When asked why he believes it is important for the general public to have access to and understanding of philosophical discussions, George says, “Philosophical thought is one of the gems of human creation. A culture is impoverished in so far as they are kept out of sight, under lock-and-key in the vaults of universities.” He has taught at Amherst since 1988, holds degrees from Harvard and Columbia Universities and is himself a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

Allen Guttmann Receives Antemortem Recognition

Allen Guttmann, Professor of English and American Studies

At its annual conference on May 31, the North American Society for Sport History (NASSH) waived a rule that former presidents are not eligible for awards and surprised Allen Guttmann, professor of English and American Studies, with an award in recognition of his “outstanding leadership in sport history with the publication of numerous books, service on journal editorial boards, teaching, writing and general service to the profession.”

Then, at a special ceremony convened on August 6, the Faculty of Social and Behavioral Science at Tuebingen University (Germany) conferred upon Guttmann an honorary doctorate for “his many contributions to the study of sports history and the Olympic Games and for his extensive documentation of the global development of modern sports. Professor Guttmann’s work, which is recognized throughout the world, has greatly influenced research at Tuebingen University.”

Grant Awarded to Amherst Archives to Process Papers of Key WWII Rebuilders

Amherst College Archives & Special Collections

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), a unit of the National Archives reporting to the Archivist of the United States, has awarded $56,744 to Frost Library’s Archives and Special Collections to process the personal papers of three men who played key roles in the economic and political reconstruction of belligerent nations after World War II. The materials belonged to Charles R. Kades, one of the writers of the Japanese constitution; Karl Loewenstein, a legal scholar instrumental in developing a constitution and civil administration in Germany and professor in Amherst’s political science department from 1936 to 1961; and Willard L. Thorp ’20, assistant secretary of state for economic affairs under President Truman and one of the principal architects of the Marshall Plan, who taught in his alma mater’s economics department from 1927 to 1936 and also served as a trustee. The NHPRC funding will enable the library staff to arrange and describe the papers according to current professional standards and apply existing in-house procedures for processing, said Michael Kelly, head of Archives and Special Collections.

Professor Christian Rogowski Publishes Book on Weimar Cinema

Rogowski

Professor of German Christian Rogowski is editor of the new book The Many Faces of Weimar Cinema: Rediscovering Germany’s Filmic Legacy (Boydell & Brewer). Published on June 15, 2010, the book presents up-to-date perspectives on German filmmaking from the years of the Weimar Republic (1919-1933).

Traditionally, Weimar cinema has been viewed reductively—equated with only a limited number of canonical films (for example, Robert Wiene’s The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and F.W. Murnau’s Nosferatu), several auteurist filmmakers and the expressionist film style. But in recent decades, researchers have uncovered a wealth of source material that shows Weimar cinema to be richer and more diverse than typically thought. The new book’s 18 contributors, including Rogowski himself, highlight lesser-known directors and producers, popular genres, nonfiction film and experiments in the artistic avant-garde. “The essays collected in the volume seek to redress the neglect such genre films have suffered,” he says. “Few have survived; even fewer are available outside archives, with English subtitles, for an international audience.” The essays also discuss Weimar films in terms of broader issues such as gender and sexuality; national identity and transnational collaboration; filmmaking technologies, including the introduction of sound to films; and connections with other media and art forms.

Environmental Studies, CCE Receive $35,000 Grant from Henry David Thoreau Foundation

The college’s Environmental Studies Program and Center for Community Engagement have received a $35,000 grant from the Henry David Thoreau Foundation supporting the development of a collaborative project titled Environmental Leadership in the 21st Century.

Ilan Stavans Publishes Gabriel García Márquez: The Early Years

Ilan StavansIlan Stavans, the Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College and Five College 40th Anniversary Professor, has published Gabriel García Márquez: The Early Years (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, $25 hardcover). The book is a comprehensive reexamination of the early life of García Márquez, the celebrated Colombian writer, up until the 1967 publication of his novel One Hundred Years of Solitude.

Born in 1927, García Márquez began his career as a journalist and later took to writing short stories, novellas and novels. He is credited with popularizing the literary style known as magical realism, and he went on to win a Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982 and to publish Love in the Time of Cholera in 1985. Stavans plans to detail the latter part of the author’s life in a second book.

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