Writing Center
workshops

August      September     October     November     December

January     February         March       April             May

2008-2009

August


Face-time 

How do I get the most out of my time in the classroom and office-hours? A panel discussion with Prof. Stephen George (Biology), Prof. Hilary Moss (Black Studies), Prof. Catherine Sanderson (Psychology), Kelly Rich '08 (Writing Fellow), Jordan Brower '07 (Writing Fellow), and Crystal Edwards '11.  No preregistration is necessary.   

Wednesday, August 27, 2:00-3:30

Porter Lounge, Converse Hall, third floor

 

Aggressive Reading

Yes, you've been reading since you were four, but do you really know how to read? A panel discussion with Prof. J. Celso Castro-Alves (Black Studies), Prof. Carol Clark (Art and History of Art), Prof. Matthew Silverstein (Philosophy), Lisa Moore (ESL Counselor), Michael Donovan '08 (Writing Fellow), Andrew Lundstrom '09, Ayanda Bam '10, and Hannah Merves '10.  No preregistration is necessary.

Thursday, August 28, 2:00-3:30

Porter Lounge, Converse Hall, third floor

 

Writing at Amherst

How is writing at Amherst different from writing in high school? What will your professors expect of you.  A panel discussion with Prof. Michele Barale (English and WAGS), Prof. Nicola Courtright (Art and History of Art), Prof. Jyl Gentzler (Philosophy), Prof. Rick A. Lopez (History), Lisa Moore (ESL Counselor),  Jordan Brower '07 (Writing Fellow), Michael Donovan '08 (Writing Fellow), Kelly Rich '08 (Writing Fellow), and Alex Guevarez '10.  No preregistration is necessary.

Friday, August 29, 2:00-3:30

Porter Lounge, Converse Hall, third floor

September

Self-Presentation

Wrestling with descriptions of who you are (Amherst grad, thesis writer, tutor, intern, champion runner) and arguments for why you are perfect (for this job or that fellowship, for graduate/ medical/ law school) can seem as much fun as nailing your foot to the floor.  No one can write "Personal Statements"  for you, but we can offer advice and suggestions that will help you get started or improve your next draft.  A panel discussion with Prof. Michele Barale (English and WAGS), Carolyn Bassett (Co-director of the Career Center and Health Professions Advisor), Michael Donovan '08 (Writing Fellow), Denise Gagnon (Fellowships Coordinator), and Michael Keezing (Writing Associate).
Space is limited to 25 students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

Friday, September 5, 2:00-3:00

Porter Lounge, Converse Hall, Third Floor

 

Where does all the time go?

With all that you have to do, when do you find time to sleep?  Learn the secrets of time-management from Dean Boykin-East. 

Please click HERE to preregister.

Tuesday, September 16, 4:00-5:30

Webster 217

October

The Fine Art of Sentence Diagramming:  A Lesson in Five Parts

Gertrude Stein once commented, “I really do not know that anything has ever been more exciting than diagramming sentences.  I suppose other things may be more exciting to others when they are at school but to me undoubtedly when I was at school the really completely exciting thing was diagramming sentences and that has been to me ever since the one thing that has been completely exciting and completely completing.”  In addition to such delights, sentence diagramming offers us insights into the intricacies of English grammar.  Since all sentences that we will diagram in this workshop will be drawn from Henry James’ A Portrait of a Lady, familiarity with this novel will offer additional pleasures, but is not required. Taught by Prof. Howell Chickering (English) and Prof. Jyl Gentzler (Philosophy).

          diagram2
 

Space is limited to twelve students. This workshop has reached its enrollment limit.

Fridays, October 17-November 14, 2:00-3:00

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

      

Managing your Thesis Research  

Students writing a thesis encounter a writing and research process more expansive, demanding, and particular than their previous projects required. In this workshop, students will discuss how they have done research in the past and how it might be different for a thesis. We'll describe tools, strategies, and services available to them. Students will develop a personal plan for figuring out what they know, what they need to know, where and how to find it, how not to lose it, and how to effectively organize it.  Taught by Douglas Black (Reference Librarian, Frost Library) and Jessica Gorman (Writing Associate).

Space is limited to twelve students. Please click HERE to preregister. 

Tuesday, October 21, 7:00-8:30

             The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A 

    

Becoming Your Own Best Reader   

This is a hands-on revision workshop that will offer you strategies for recognizing what needs work in your writing, as well as for improving it. You will develop your skills as a reader of your own writing by responding both to your own paper and to a partner’s. We will focus on paragraphing, signposting, and organization, as well as on development, synthesis, and support of ideas.  Bring two copies of a 2-5 page paper, either a complete draft or a paper that you have turned in but know could have been stronger. You will also need paper and a writing utensil. A laptop might be useful as well.  Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate).  Light refreshments will be served.

Space is limited to twelve students. Please click HERE to preregister. 

Wednesday, October 22, 4:00-6:00

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

November

Getting Started:  A Workshop for Thesis Writers

Have you started writing your thesis yet? Does there always seem to be one more article you have to read before you can start writing? The time to start writing is now! This workshop will offer you strategies to break the barrier between researching, thinking, and writing and to thus avoid that terrifying moment when your research and thinking are done and you find yourself sitting before a blank screen.  Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate).  Light refreshments will be served.

Preregistration is required and is limited to twelve students. Please click HERE to preregister. 

Wednesday, November 5, 4:00-5:30

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

   

Extending the Model: Strategies for Writing Effective Conclusions

As writers, many of us receive little instruction on how to write a conclusion beyond “summarize your argument and restate your thesis.” Unfortunately, this “summarize/restate” strategy, while useful in some contexts, is profoundly limited as a guide to writing thoughtful, compelling, satisfyingly closural conclusions for the types of writing one undertakes at the college level and beyond. This workshop explores both the theory and practice of effective conclusion writing, presenting no fewer than eight practical conclusion strategies applicable to a wide range of essay lengths and types, and offering hands-on practice with these strategies. Much as the modern physics community has extended the Standard Model of physics to better account for the actual observed universe, this workshop will extend your model of conclusion writing, providing you with a robust set of tools for bringing your every composition to an effective conclusion. Taught by Michael Donovan (Writing Fellow) and Michael Keezing (Writing Associate).   

Preregistration is required and is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister.  

Wednesday, November 12, 7:00-8:30

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

December

First Impressions: A Two-Part Workshop on Introductions

Your mother told you that it is important to make a good first impression, and, as usual, she was right. The first paragraph of your paper reveals a great deal not only about your paper’s character, but also about your own.  Make sure that it gives the impression that you want. 

Part I: On Tuesday, December 2, 1:00-2:00, we will talk about the function of introductions to academic papers.  Through an examination of representative “do’s and don’t’s,” we will talk not only about how to avoid making a bad first impression, but also about how to stun and charm your reader with your good sense, taste, and wit.

Part II: On Thursday, December 4, 1:00-2:00, we will look at introductions to papers that you have written, explore our first impressions of them, and experiment with ways to improve them.

Taught by Jyl Gentzler (Associate Director and Professor of Philosophy) and Kelly Rich (Writing Fellow).  

Preregistration is required and is limited to twelve students.  All participants must participate in both sessions. Please click HERE to preregister.

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

Turning Over a New Leaf:  Part I

This workshop is the first in a series designed to help students who are not performing up to their potential because of an aversion to writing. If the thought of writing makes you anxious, or if you are writing your papers at the last minute, late, or not at all, this workshop is for you. Participants will be introduced to strategies for avoiding procrastination and writer’s block, as a preliminary step towards establishing productive work habits and making the idea of sitting down to write seem less dreadful, and perhaps even something you look forward to.  If you have an assignment due soon, please bring it, along with any work you have done on it. Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate). 

Preregistration is required and is limited to twelve students.  This workshop has reached its enrollment limit.

Wednesday, December 3, 4:00-6:00

 The Writing Center, 101 Charles Pratt Hall

January

An Audience of One: Creative Prose Writing Practice

This course offers an alternative to the workshop model of creative writing instruction: rather than meeting with a group to take turns critiquing one another’s creative prose, participants will come together for a single group meeting, then pursue a four- to six-session one-on-one tutorial with a creative writing instructor. The introductory group meeting will explore the intertwined, recursive, sometimes messily overlapping stages of the creative writing process—pre-writing, organizing, drafting, revising, editing, and presenting—to lay the groundwork for a four- to six-session tutorial focused on your creative prose (short story, personal essay, novella, novel, or dramatic writing for stage or screen) over the final two weeks of interterm.  Depending on your individual interests and goals, you may devote your tutorial to revising existing creative work, starting a new project, or writing in response to structured assignments from the instructor. 

  

Introductory Workshop: Tuesday, January 6, 10:00-11:30.  Taught by Michael Keezing (Writing Associate).

Individual Sessions: Four to six 45-minute sessions, meeting twice or three times weekly with instructor (self-scheduled during the second and third weeks of Interterm).

Pre-registration is required, and enrollment is limited to six students.  This workshop has reached its enrollment limit.

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

Getting Started/Moving Forward (for Thesis Writers)

Have you started writing your thesis yet? Does there always seem to be one more article you have to read before you can start writing? Or have you been writing all along but wish that writing weren’t so hard or that you were making more progress? Come learn new ways to keep your creative juices flowing by using writing as a tool for exploration and discovery, rather than writing only when it’s time to produce a finished product. This workshop will offer you strategies to break the barrier between researching, thinking, and writing and thus to avoid that terrifying moment when your research and thinking are done and you find yourself sitting before a blank screen. Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate). 

 Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

   

Tuesday, January 6, 1:00-3:00

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

Retrain Your Thesis Brain

Are you always talking about your thesis but never actually working on it? Do you spend more time talking about how stressed you are than about your latest brilliant ideas? Are you working on your thesis so much that you have forgotten your friends’ names and can’t remember the last time you had any fun? Whether you are avoiding your thesis or grinding away at it, has your thesis begun to take over your whole being? If you have been experiencing these symptoms for two weeks or more, you may well be suffering from a case of thesis brain. Once thesis brain has set in, it may be impossible to fully cure, but there are a number of strategies that can provide some relief.

Using resources from books such as The Artist’s Way, Living Juicy, Heart Steps, The Now Habit, and The Feeling Good Handbook, this two-day workshop introduces strategies for avoiding procrastination and writer’s block, as well as for restoring creativity and finding joy in your work. Through writing, drawing, and perhaps games, participants will develop their own individual plans for practicing habits for creativity, productivity, and possibly even sanity. Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate).

Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to twelve students.  Those who enroll must attend both sessions.  Please click HERE to preregister.

  

Wednesday, January 7, 12:30 –2:00  and Friday, January 9, 12:30-2:00

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A 

Personalizing the Process:  One-on-One Academic Writing Study 

The aim of this course is to provide a focused program of instruction addressing your individual needs and goals as an academic writer. The course begins with an introductory, one-time workshop investigating the writing process —pre-writing, organizing, drafting, revising, editing, and presenting—to provide you with a well-equipped conceptual toolset for (a)  cultivating an effective personal writing process, and (b) working one-on-one with your instructor during a four- to six-session tutorial over the final two weeks of Interterm. At the outset of your tutorial, you and your instructor will jointly assess the current state of your writing (please bring your recent papers), identifying strengths, weaknesses, and tipping points where focused effort might enable major gains. Together with your instructor, you will set specific sentence-, paragraph-, composition-, and process-level goals, and then pursue them in the optimal learning environment that one-on-one instruction provides for  developing one’s writing.  

Introductory Workshop: Thursday, January 8, 10:00-11:30. Taught by Michael Keezing (Writing Associate).  

Individual Sessions: Four to six 45-minute sessions, meeting twice or three times weekly with a member of the Writing Center’s senior staff (self-scheduled during the second and third weeks of Interterm).

Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to twelve students. Please click HERE to preregister.

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

What is Style and How Do I Get It?  

Do you know it when you see it? And if you see it, what do you call it? If your professors regularly write “AWK” in the margins of your papers, or if you struggle with sentence variety, there is a solution.  Before you can talk about some new thing, you need a vocabulary. Only when you can name a textual feature, when you are able to identify it and see how it works, can you make use of it yourself.

This 4-part workshop will offer writers (and readers) a vocabulary with which to discuss the architecture of writing, from kinds of diction (Latinate, connotative, formal) and types of sentences (compound, complex, periodic, balanced) to methods of sentence variety, expansion, and articulation.  We will look at samples of short texts (Max Beerbohm, Malcolm X, George Eliot, William Hazlitt, Annie Dillard) as well as samples of your own writing in order to name parts, identify structures, and begin to shape and reshape your own prose.   Taught by Michele Barale (Director and Professor of English and WAGS).

  Session 1: Diction and vocabulary,  Monday, January 12, 1:00-2:00

Session 2: Sentence types, Tuesday, January 13, 1:00-2:00

Session 3: Sentence expansion, Wednesday, January 14, 1:00-2:00

Session 4: Your prose, Thursday, January 15, 1:00-2:00

Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to ten students.  Those who enroll must attend all four sessions.  Please click HERE to preregister.

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

Becoming Your Own Best Reader: The Thesis Edition

Designed for thesis writers who have completed an entire chapter or a substantial portion of a chapter, this two-day workshop will offer you strategies for becoming a strong critical reader of your own writing, for responding to readers’ feedback, and for strengthening the shape and development of your argument. Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate). 

Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to twelve students.  Those who enroll must attend both sessions. Please click HERE to preregister.

Wednesday, January 14, 10:00 –11:30  and Friday, January 16, 10:00-11:30

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A 

Orchestrating the Dialogue: Integrating Research into your Thesis Writing

One of the challenges of writing a senior thesis lies in adopting a professional, academic prose style. Such a style often feels particularly elusive when it comes time to integrate others' words with your own.  This workshop will help thesis writers become more comfortable with managing other people's ideas; seamlessly integrate quotations, paraphrases, and data into your prose; balance your ideas with others'; avoid accidental plagiarism; and engage your sources in a dialogue, rather than letting them speak for you or overshadow your own ideas.  Led by Jessica Gorman (Writing Associate) and Douglas Black (Reference Librarian.) 

Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

Wednesday, January 21, 2:00-3:30

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

February

Turning Over a New Leaf: Part I   

This workshop is the first in a series designed to help students who have not been performing up to their potential because of an aversion to writing. If the thought of writing makes you anxious, or if you tend to write your papers at the last minute, late, or not at all, this workshop is for you. Participants will be introduced to strategies for avoiding procrastination and writer’s block, as a preliminary step towards establishing productive work habits and making the idea of sitting down to write seem less dreadful, and perhaps even something you look forward to.  If you have an assignment due soon, please bring it, along with any work you have done on it. Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate).

Preregistration is required and is limited to twelve students. This workshop has reached its enrollment limit.  If you would like us to offer another session of this workshop, please email Kristen Brookes.

Saturday, January 31, 12:00-2:00 pm

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

Getting Started/Moving Forward (for Thesis Writers)  

Have you started writing that next thesis chapter yet? Does there always seem to be one more article you have to read before you can start writing? Or have you been writing all along but wish that writing weren’t so hard or that you were making more progress? Come learn new ways to keep your creative juices flowing by using writing as a tool for exploration and discovery, rather than writing only when it’s time to produce a finished product. This workshop will offer you strategies to break the barrier between researching, thinking, and writing and thus to avoid that terrifying moment when your research and thinking are done and you find yourself sitting before a blank screen. Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate).   

Preregistration is required and is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

Friday, February 6, 2:00-4:00 pm

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

The Writing Process for Writing Theses   

Good instincts, clear thinking, and a sense of academic style may be enough for a writer to produce first-rate college papers, but to succeed at the greater challenge of writing a multi-chapter thesis, an informed approach to the craft of writing may be helpful. This workshop offers an exploration of the writing process as defined by its stages of pre-writing, organizing, drafting, revising, editing, and presenting. The twofold aim of the workshop is to equip you with (a) a conceptual toolset for cultivating an effective personal process for completing a complex, well-developed, well-integrated thesis, and (b) a common vocabulary for working productively one-on-one with a Writing Mentor from the senior staff of the Writing Center. Following the workshop, we invite you to work on an ongoing weekly or bi-weekly basis with your Writing Mentor in developing your writing craft, and in harnessing it to the particular challenges confronting you as a thesis writer.

Preregistration is required and is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

Workshop: Thursday, February 19, 7:00-8:30 pm. Taught by Michael Keezing (Writing Associate).

Individual Thesis Mentoring Sessions: Ongoing, by appointment with a member of the Writing Center’s senior staff (self-scheduled following the workshop)

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

Retrain Your Thesis Brain  

Are you always talking about your thesis but never actually working on it? Do you spend more time talking about how stressed you are than about your latest brilliant ideas? Are you working on your thesis so much that you have forgotten your friends’ names and can’t remember the last time you had any fun? Whether you are avoiding your thesis or grinding away at it, has your thesis begun to take over your whole being? If you have been experiencing these symptoms for two weeks or more, you may well be suffering from a case of thesis brain. Once thesis brain has set in, it may be impossible to fully cure, but there are a number of strategies that can provide some relief.

 Using resources from books such as The Artist’s Way, Living Juicy, and The Feeling Good Handbook, this two-part workshop introduces strategies for avoiding procrastination and writer’s block, as well as for restoring creativity and finding joy in your work. Through writing, drawing, and perhaps games, participants will develop their own individual plans for practicing habits for creativity, productivity, and possibly even sanity.   Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate).  

Preregistration is required and is limited to twelve students.  Participants must attend both meetings.  Please click HERE to preregister

 

Friday, February 20,  2:00-3:30  pm

Friday, February 27,  2:00-3:30 pm

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

Reading, Reading, Reading: Plan, Do, and Review   

Sir Francis Bacon wrote, "Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man." Of course that sounds nice, and it may well be true, but what happens when academic reading starts to overwhelm you? This workshop will examine some basic strategies to improve your reading efficiency and to manage your academic reading workload. The following topics will be covered: pre-reading plans (what to do before you read), reading strategies (what to do while you read), and post-reading tasks (what to do after you read). The aim of this workshop, which is designed primarily for first-year students, is to help you develop your own unique reading system that will be effective for you in college and beyond.  Taught by Kabria Baumgartner (Writing Associate). 

Preregistration is required and is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister   

Monday, February 23, 2:30-3:30 pm

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

Personalizing the Process:  One-on-One Academic Writing Study  

This workshop/tutorial provides a focused program of instruction addressing your individual needs and goals as an academic writer. The course begins with a one-time workshop investigating the writing process—pre-writing, organizing, drafting, revising, editing, and presenting—aimed at providing you with a well-equipped conceptual toolset for (a) cultivating an effective personal writing process, and (b) working one-on-one with a writing instructor during a weekly or bi-weekly tutorial to follow. At the outset of your tutorial, you and your instructor will jointly assess the current state of your writing (please bring your recent papers), identifying strengths, weaknesses, and tipping points where focused effort might enable major gains. Together with your instructor, you will determine how many times you will meet, set specific sentence-, paragraph-, composition-, and process-level goals, and then pursue them in the optimal learning environment that one-on-one instruction provides for  developing one’s writing. 

 Preregistration is required and is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister

Introductory Workshop: Thursday, February 26 7:00-8:30 pm. Taught by Michael Keezing (Writing Associate)

 Individual Sessions: Three or more 45-minute sessions, meeting once or twice weekly with a member of the Writing Center’s senior staff (self-scheduled following the workshop meeting).

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A


March

Turning Over a New Leaf: Exploratory Drafts   

This workshop and writing instruction program are part of a series designed to help students who are not performing up to their potential because of an aversion to writing. This hands-on workshop aims to modify your thinking about the writing process by helping you to distinguish between the roles of creator and critic, as well as to rethink the idea of a draft—both the purpose of a draft and what a draft might look like.  You are welcome to stay afterwards to write an exploratory draft of an upcoming paper. This workshop is especially aimed at students who have been struggling to find a less painful and more productive writing process. No prior workshop participation is necessary.

You will be encouraged to follow the workshop with a series of individual sessions, designed to analyze and address your specific writing challenges, as well as to guide you in completing a particular assignment.

Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

Introductory Workshop: Monday, March 9, 6:00-7:30 pm. (Please note that this is not the time that it was originally scheduled to meet.)  Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate) and Michael Donovan (Writing Fellow).

Individual Sessions: Two to three 45-minute follow-up sessions with a writing instructor.

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

An Introduction to Close Reading:  

This workshop will provide an introduction to close reading, an analytical method governed by the belief that the way in which a text is written contributes to what it means.  We will discuss strategies for approaching a difficult piece of writing so that a rich understanding of the material may be achieved. Although this workshop will focus specifically on the close reading of a piece of literature (most likely, a poem), we will extend our discussion to consider how these techniques may be applied generally. This workshop may be most useful to first- and second-year students, but all are welcome. Taught by Jordan Brower (Writing Fellow) and Prof. David Sofield (English). 

Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

Thursday, March 5, 4:15-5:30 pm

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

Thesis Connections:  

By studying examples academic writing, we will work on ways to make clear the logical connections between sections and chapters in your theses. Students are invited  to bring sections of their own senior projects in order to use one another as readers.  Taught by Michele Barale (Director and Professor of English and Women and Gender Studies). 

 Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to eight students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

Wednesday, March 18, 1-2:30pm (Spring Break).

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

Orchestrating the Dialogue: Integrating Research into your Writing: 

One of the challenges of academic writing lies in adopting a professional prose style, which can feel particularly elusive when it comes time to integrate others' words with your own.  This workshop will help writers become more comfortable with managing other people's ideas; seamlessly integrate quotations and paraphrases into your prose; balance your ideas with others'; avoid accidental plagiarism; and engage your sources in a dialogue, rather than letting them speak for you or overshadow your own ideas.  Participants are asked to bring 1 or 2 pieces of their writing from a past or current research paper that use either a quotation, paraphrase, or summary (i.e., some kind of reference to an outside source), as well as a copy of the original source (if possible).  Taught by Jessica Gorman (Writing Associate) and Douglas Black (Reference Librarian, Frost Library).

Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

Monday, March 30, 2:00-3:30 pm

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

April

Turning Over a New Leaf: Part One  

This workshop is the first part in a series designed to help students who are not performing up to their potential due to an aversion to writing. If even the thought of writing makes you anxious or if you are writing your papers at the last minute, late, or not at all, this workshop is for you. This workshop introduces strategies for avoiding procrastination and writer’s block, as well as for restoring creativity and finding joy in your work. Through writing and perhaps drawing, participants will develop their own individual plans for practicing habits for creativity, productivity, and possibly even sanity. Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate).  

Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

Friday, April 3,  2:00-3:30  pm.

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

Creating a Great PowerPoint Presentation   

Do you have an upcoming PowerPoint presentation? Learn how to use what you know about good writing to create an effective and interactive talk. In this workshop, we will discuss tips and strategies for writing a strong presentation, designing professional-looking slides, and engaging your audience. Bring your lunch and a PowerPoint-in-progress (notes and/or drafts would be fine too)! All participants should have basic knowledge of PowerPoint or similar presentation software. Taught by Jessica Gorman(Writing Associate) and Kabria Baumgartner (Writing Associate).

Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

Tuesday, April 7, 1:00-2:00 pm.

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

 

Turning Over a New Leaf: Exploratory Drafts  

This workshop and writing instruction program is designed to help you to find a less painful and more productive writing process, as well as to produce papers that reflect the complexity and brilliance of your thought, which may not be showing up on the page. In addition to discussing the distinctions between the roles of creator and critic, we will rethink the idea of a draft—both the purpose of a draft and what a draft might look like. Exploratory Drafts is part of a series created to aid students who are not performing up to their potential because of an aversion to writing, but it may also reduce the angst and improve the performance of even the most successful student. No prior workshop participation is necessary.

You will be encouraged to follow the workshop with a series of individual sessions, designed to analyze and address your specific writing goals and challenges, as well as to guide you in completing a particular assignment.

Introductory Workshop:  Taught by Kristen Brookes (Writing Associate), with Michael Donovan (Writing Fellow).  

Monday, April 13, 4:00-5:30 pm.

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A

Individual Sessions: Two to three 45-minute follow-up sessions with a writing instructor.

Pre-registration is required and enrollment is limited to twelve students.  Please click HERE to preregister.

 

Storytelling and Self-Presentation: The Art of the Personal Statement  

The personal statement is a particularly difficult genre.  Located somewhere between a cover letter and a personal essay—while requiring the same quality writing as an academic paper—it’s an amalgamation of the personal and professional, with its own concerns about tone, audience, structure and style.

The aim of this workshop is twofold.  In the first session, we will discuss key elements and tensions specific to the genre of personal statements, gathering a collective sense of what makes for a successful piece.  From there we will walk through the process of crafting a statement (especially in light of our own work and writing habits) as we address how matters of prewriting, organization and revision can lead to a compelling and effective narrative.  You will have a week in between sessions to produce a first version of your work, and then in our second session, we will workshop what you have written.

This workshop is primarily intended for juniors and seniors applying to graduate school and fellowship competitions, although all are welcome.  Taught by Kelly Rich (Writing Fellow), with Michael Keezing (Writing Associate).  

Pre-registration is required.  Please click HERE to preregister.

Thursday, April 16 and 23, 7:00—8:30 pm.

The Writing Center, Charles Pratt Hall 101A