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Alumni

Class of 1973 40th Reunion

Registered:

James Barrett

Alston Beinhorn

Christopher Bennett

John Black

Ellen Blood

Thomas Brennecke

Allan Brodie

David Brown

I. Foster Brown

Webster Bull

Peter Butler

David Conger

Steven Coulter

John Cuddy

John D'Andrea

Robert Dean

Julian Decyk

Stephen Dibble

David Downes

Lee Ewing

David Fernald

John Fox

Edward Galloway

Richard Gentilli

Mark Gerchick

Alan Goodman

David Hackett

Jonathan Hayden

Bob Hicks

Lloyd Jaeger

George Johnson

Eric Johnston

Thomas Kemp

Steven Klugman

Paul Kowal

Charles Lachman

Robert LaVigne

Theodore Levin

Thomas Libby

David Margulies

Robert McCreary

Jim Mixter

Paul Murphy

Carl Nelson

Ira Neustadt

James O'Brient

Bruce Ourieff

Ross Read

Alan Rich

Samuel Rosenberg

Edward Rosenthal

Mark Russo

Stephen Ryan

Richard Sailor

Leonard Samela

Michael Sarsynski

Peter Scheer

Steven Scheinman

Frederick Schneider

John Shuck

Edward Smith

Jeffrey Squire

Chester Stern

Jay Swanson

John Tarnoff

James Telfer

David Tinker

Richard Tonino

Charles Unfug

David Ware

W. Scott Wheeler

Stockton Williams

William Woolverton

Charles Wright

Paul Yock

Jeffrey Zurkow

 

 

Who Says They Might Attend (Call Them Up and Tell Them You Want to See Them!)

Bob Blackstone
Andrew Caffey
Jaap Ketting
Paul Reingold
George Shulman
Peter Smith
Donald Waller
Jim Wyman

1973 40th-Year Reunion
May 29 - June 2, 2013

Schedule of Events
Headquarters – Mayo Smith

All open class programs are 55 minutes long unless otherwise noted

WEDNESDAY, May 29

2 p.m. - 9 p.m.
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street, (413) 542-2065

5 p.m. -  6:30 p.m.
Dinner
Valentine Hall (Adults - $6, Children [12 and under] - $3)

5:30 p.m. -   7:30 p.m.
A Night at the Museum
Mingle beneath the mammoths, delight in the new dryosaurus, enjoy libations in the shadow of ancient footprints and renew old friendships amidst Amherst’s extraordinary collection of vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and around the world since 1825. The Bluestockings will perform at 5:45 p.m. At about 6:20 p.m., Fred Venne, science educator, will speak briefly about the last ice age, the great mammals and their extinction. Informal tours will be available.
Beneski Museum of Natural History

THURSDAY, May 30

8 a.m. -    10 p.m.
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street, (413) 542-2065

All Day
College programs (See Final Reunion Brochure for details.)

6:15 p.m.
Reception in Honor of Retiring English Department Faculty
The English department and the college celebrate the careers of eight retiring or recently retired faculty:  Professor of English Jack Cameron; Chick Chickering, the G. Armour Craig Professor of Language and Literature; Allen Guttmann, the Emily C. Jordan Folger Professor of English and American Studies, Emeritus; Barry O’Connell, the James E. Ostendarp Professor of English; Dale Peterson, the Eliza J. Clark Folger Professor of English and Russian; Bill Pritchard ’53, the Henry Clay Folger Professor of English; Kim Townsend G’11, the Class of 1959 Professor of English, Emeritus; and Helen von Schmidt ’78, Senior Lecturer in English, Emerita.
Most living Amherst alumni have studied with one or more of these teachers; all are invited to the party, whether or not your class is having a reunion this year. Remarks will begin at 7 p.m. Refreshments will be served.
Dickinson Ballroom, Lord Jeffery Inn

8 p.m.
Buckley Chamber Players present: A Concert of French Chamber Music: Franck and Fauré
The concert will include two of the great works of the French chamber music repertoire, the dramatic Piano Quintet by César Franck and the sublime Piano Trio by Gabriel Fauré, as well as violin duos written by Five College composers.
Buckley Recital Hall

FRIDAY, May 31

8 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street, (413) 542-2065

All Day    College programs (See Final Reunion Brochure for details.)

3 p.m.
Reflections on Post-Conflict Kosovo and Realities and Prospects on Both Sides of the Jordan River
Robert Dean ’73, chief of party in the Rule of Law Program in Amman, Jordan, was a prosecuting attorney in Maryland for three decades before turning to international work. Since 2005 he has prosecuted war crimes in Kosovo as part of the United Nations and European Union missions there; he has directed a Rule of Law project in Ramallah, West Bank, funded by the U.S. State Department to enhance the criminal investigation skills of Palestinian police and prosecutors; and he currently directs a USAID-funded Rule of Law project to modernize the courts and improve the functioning of judges and prosecutors in Jordan. He will share his experiences living and working in Kosovo, the West Bank and Jordan. He will reflect on America’s goals in the Middle East and how U.S. policies at times work at cross-purposes to those goals; the sentiments, hopes and disappointments of people in that region; and his thoughts on prospects for the future in these areas. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Stirn Auditorium

4 p.m.
Digital Era Paradigm Shifts: New Ways of Looking at Media, Content and Creativity
As digital technology has taken over the ways we create, market and consume information and entertainment, a set of paradigm shifts has altered the nature of our relationship to media content and how we connect to audiences and communities. Hollywood studio executive and digital entrepreneur John Tarnoff ’73, CEO of Newspeak Media LLC, has been at the leading edge of the media/entertainment digital revolution over the last 25 years. He offers observations on this phenomenon to help us all navigate the next 25 years, both on and off our screens. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Stirn Auditorium

5 p.m. -  6:15 p.m
Reception with President Biddy Martin and Administrators
Join President Biddy Martin and others from the college under the tent at the Lord Jeffery Inn for conversation and celebration. All are welcome.
Garden Tent, Lord Jeffery Inn

5:30 p.m.
Cocktails
Mayo Smith Tent

7:30 p.m.
Dinner
Mayo Smith Tent

SATURDAY, June 1

8 a.m. -  9:30 p.m.
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street, (413) 542-2065

All Day
College programs (See Final Reunion Brochure for details.)

9 a.m.
Beyond Boundaries: From 20th-Century to 21st-Century Music
The Class of 1973 arrived at Amherst clutching vinyl records and cassette tapes. Classical music reigned in Buckley and dominated the music department curriculum. The works of the great 20th-century modernists—Schoenberg, Berg, Webern, Bartok, Stravinsky—were presented not only as models for fledgling composers but as a stylistic culmination of music history. Could music—or at least “serious” music—possibly evolve any further? And if so, how? Such questions fueled many late-night conversations in the music building. Forty years later, it’s clear that anxieties about “the end of music” were unwarranted. This panel of superannuated music majors—Theodore Levin ’73, the Arthur R. Virgin Professor of Music at Dartmouth College; Scott Wheeler ’73, professor of performing arts at Emerson College; and Gregory Hayes ’73, senior lecturer at Dartmouth College—will share examples of their own work, performed live and on recordings, that illustrate their own contributions to our changing musical life. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Buckley Recital Hall

10 a.m.
The Outlook for Energy: A View to 2040
Energy is a serious topic. It is also a topic subject to sound bites and all-too-quick assumptions. The world’s largest nongovernment energy company, ExxonMobil, studies energy trends and uses its findings to guide its investments in the oil and gas business around the world. Since the 1960s the company has published its outlook in an effort to increase understanding of energy trends and the issues associated with them. What do you know or think you know about energy? Will global energy use be increasing or decreasing in the next several decades? Are high energy prices good or bad for the world? Are we running out of fossil fuels? To what extent can carbon-free energy sources replace fossil fuels? What is the outlook for global CO2 emissions? Jim Mixter ’73, who retired in 2009 after a 34-year career with ExxonMobil, will present ExxonMobil's current energy outlook and engage in conversation on energy issues. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center

11 a.m.
A Conversation with President Biddy Martin and the Annual Meeting of the Society of the Alumni and the Alumni Council
President Martin will speak, to be followed by William A. Woolverton ’73, chair of the Executive Committee of the Alumni Council, who will present the motion on annotations to the bylaws.
Johnson Chapel

12:15 p.m.
Reunion Luncheon on the Valentine Quad
Join us for a complimentary luncheon on the Quad. Look for your classmates under the decade signs! 
Valentine Quad (Rain Site: Valentine Dining Commons) 

1:30 p.m.
Politics Then and Now
When the Class of ’73 was at Amherst, there were protests in the streets and political divisions ran deep. Today we can all choose our news sources, and politicians choose their voters. If there was once a shared culture, it no longer exists, or at least it is not the same. The Internet has allowed for an explosion of information, much of it unfiltered, which is difficult for governments and editors to control, contributing to social upheaval across the world. Class of 1973 members George Johnson Jr., dean of Elon University School of Law in Greensboro, N.C., and  Peter Scheer, executive director of the First Amendment Coalition,  will attempt to make some sense of these trends. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall

2:30 p.m.
Health Care in America: First, the Good News
Changes in the science of medicine and the delivery of care have been dizzying. In our professional lifetimes we’ve seen new, major diseases arise and spread and then yield to new treatments. Health care has become a dominant force in the economy and a heavy burden on individual and corporate budgets. The panelists, Dr. Steven Coulter ’73, president of The Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee Health Institute; Dr. David Margulies ’73, assistant professor of medicine in the Faculties of Genetics, Bioinformatics and Developmental Medicine at Harvard Medical School; and Dr. Steven Scheinman ’73, president and dean of The Commonwealth Medical College, will share their perspectives on the direction of change and speculate on what health care will look like in the coming generation. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall

3:30 p.m.
Class Memorial Service
Join us in remembering our classmates who have died since the last reunion.
War Memorial, Memorial Hill (Rain Site: Chapin Chapel)

4:30 p.m.
John Stringer’s Amherst: Drugs and Rebellion, Sickness and Joy
John Stringer ’73, an anthropology major at Amherst and captain of the crew team, fought drug abuse and mental illness for decades. His brother, David ’64, will reflect on John’s years at Amherst and the climate of drugs and rebellion that he embodied. He will read from his book, What’s My Zip Code?: The Promise of My Brother’s Life, His Descent into Mental Illness, and His Brutal Murder. The session will include an open discussion of the Amherst that John experienced the role of the family in dealing with young men and women like John and the difficult relationship between mental illness and substance abuse. In exploring the question “Who was John Stringer?” the session will address issues of freedom and identity. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Lecture Room 1, Merrill Science Center

5:30 p.m.
Zumbyes Performance
Mayo Smith Tent

6 p.m.
Cocktails
Mayo Smith Tent

7 p.m.
Dinner
Mayo Smith Tent

Evening:     Election of Class Officers

  
SUNDAY, June 2

8 a.m. - noon
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street, (413) 542-2065

8 a.m. on
Drop-in breakfast
Mayo Smith

9 a.m.
Service of Remembrance and Community
Please join us for an ecumenical service to remember the lives of those alumni we have lost this year.  Officiants: Rabbi Brenner Glickman ’93 and the Rev. Frank Poole ’63.
War Memorial, Memorial Hill (Rain Site: Chapin Chapel)

Amherst '73 Souvenirs

Submitted by Robert C. Hicks on Saturday, 4/6/2013, at 8:01 PM

Thanks to our Class Souvenir maestro, Fred Schneider, we will have Amherst '73 souvenirs from past reunions at our 40th.  You will be able to pay for them using a credit card and Square - an iPhone app.

We might even find a few of the '73 umbrellas!

See you at Reunion

CD Wallet.jpeg

Amherst '73 CD Wallet

Kite.jpeg

Amherst '73 Kite

Photo Album.jpeg

Amherst '73 Photo Album

Reunion Programs

Submitted by Robert C. Hicks on Tuesday, 4/2/2013, at 8:50 PM

Digital Era Paradigm Shifts: New Ways of Looking at Media, Content & Creativity

As digital technology has gradually taken over all of the ways in which we create, communicate, market, distribute and consume information and entertainment, a set of paradigm shifts has all the nature of relationships and the concepts by which we understand productivity, responsibility and accountability. As a closet geek and media/entertainment veteran,

John Tarnoff '73, Facto! Newspeak Media LLC, has both witnessed and participated in the digital revolution in media/entertainment over the last 25 years. He offers up a series of observations on this phenomenon to hopefully help us all navigate the next the next 25 years, both on and off our screens.

The Outlook for Energy: a View to 2040

 Energy is a serious topic. It is also a topic subject to sound bites and all-too-quick assumptions by influential people and institutions. The world's largest non-government energy company, Exxon Mobil, studies energy trends and uses its findings to guide its investments in the oil and gas business around the world. Since the 1960s the company has published its outlook in an effort to increase understanding of energy trends and the issues associated with them. What do you know or think you know about energy? Will global energy use be increasing in the next several decades or will its growth peak and begin to decline? Are high energy prices good or bad for the world? Are we running out of fossil fuels? How rapidly and to what extent can carbon-free energy sources replace fossil fuels? Are CO2 emissions in the U.S. and Europe increasing or decreasing, and what is the outlook for global CO2 emissions?

Jim Mixter '73 will present Exxon Mobil's current Energy Outlook and engage in conversation on energy issues.

Beyond Boundaries: From 20th-Century to 21st-Century Music

The class of 1973 arrived at Amherst clutching vinyl records and cassette tapes. Classical music reigned in Buckley Recital Hall and overwhelmingly dominated the Music Department curriculum. The works of the great twentieth-century modernists—Schoenberg, Berg, Webern, Bartok, Stravinsky were presented not only as models for fledgling composers but as a stylistic culmination of music history. Could music—or at least “serious” music—possibly evolve any further? And if so, how? Such questions fueled many late-night conversations among denizens of the music business.

Forty years later, it’s clear that anxieties about “the end of music” were unwarranted. Not only music itself but the broader world of music production, presentation, dissemination, and reception has changed in ways that were all but unimaginable in 1973.

This panel of superannuated music majors, Theodore Levin '73, Arthur R. Virgin Professor of Music, Dartmouth College, Scott Wheeler '73, Professor of Performing Arts, Emerson College and Gregory Hayes '73, Senior Lecturer, Dartmouth College will share examples of their own work, performed live and on record that illustrate their own contributions to our changing musical life.

Health Care in America—First, the Good News

Changes in the science of medicine and the delivery of care have been dizzying. In our professional lifetimes we’ve seen new, major disease scourges arise and spread, and then yield to new  treatments. Health care has become a dominant force in the economy, and a heavy burden on individual and corporate budgets. Our experiences as patients in some ways have changed dramatically, and in other ways not at all.

The panelists, Steven Coulter ‘73, M.D.,President, Blue Crodd Blue Shield of Tennessee Health Institute, David Margulies ‘73, M.D. Executive Director, The Gene Partnership, Children's Hospital Boston; Faculties of Bioinformatics, Genetics and Developmental Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Steven Scheinman ’73, M.D. President and Dean, The Commonwealth Medical College, and Paul Yock ‘73, M.D. Martha Meier Weiland Professor of Bioengineering and Medicine and Director, Program in Biodesign, Stanford University, leaders in bioengineering, informatics, genetics, education, and financing, will share their perspectives on the direction of change and speculate on what health care will look like in coming generation.

Politics Then and Now

When the class of ’73 was at Amherst there were protests in the streets and political divisions ran deep. We now live in a time when we can all choose our news sources, and politicians choose their voters. If there was once a shared culture, it no longer exists, or at least is not the same. Our political discourse seems as polarized as ever. The internet has allowed for an explosion of information, much of it unfiltered, that is difficult for governments and editors to control, and has contributed to social upheaval across the world. The medium may not be the whole message, it certainly does shape it. The center of gravity of American politics has shifted to the right, while our society in other ways continues to evolve progressively – for example in supporting gay marriage, and in electing, twice, a black man as President.

This panel of George Johnson, Jr., 73, Peter Scheer ’73 and George Shulman '73 will attempt to make some sense of these trends.

Reflections on Post-Conflict Kosovo and Realities and Prospects on Both Sides of the Jordan River

 Robert Dean ’73, Chief of Party, Rule of Law project (USAID funded), Amman, Jordan, was a prosecuting attorney in Maryland for three decades before turning to international work. Since 2005 he has prosecuted war crimes in Kosovo as part of the United Nations and European Union missions there; has directed a Rule of Law project in Ramallah, West Bank, funded by the U.S State Department to enhance the criminal investigation skills of Palestinian police and prosecutors; and currently directs a USAID funded Rule of Law project to modernize the courts and improve the functioning of judges and prosecutors in Jordan. Mr. Dean will share his experiences on what it is like to live and work in a post-conflict area (Kosovo), and about life as an American in the West Bank and Jordan. He will reflect on America’s goals in the Middle East and how US policies at times work at cross-purposes to those goals; the sentiments, hopes, and disappointments people in that region; and his thoughts on prospects for the future in these areas.