Can You Reinvent Your Career Over 50?

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Traditional retirement is no longer affordable or desirable for an increasing number of baby boomers. Inadequate retirement savings, ongoing responsibilities to aging parents and adult children, plus a need to stay engaged with work and life, are prompting more and more people to try to extend their careers past 65, with, in many cases, no plan to retire at all. But the economy is pushing back, with antiquated policies, unfounded beliefs and ageism erecting obstacles and discouraging older workers from staying in the workforce. With support from the four baby boomer classes at this year’s Reunion, John Tarnoff ’73, a former entertainment industry exec who reinvented his own career, will discuss the takeaways from his 2017 author, Boomer Reinvention: How to Create Your Dream Job Over 50, and engage with fellow boomer alumni who have successfully made their own transitions to second-act careers: Tom Cliff ’68, Bill Woolverton ’73, P’17,’12, David Whitman ’78 and Danny Bernstein ’83. Presented by the Classes of 1968, 1973, 1978 and 1983.

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Audio icon 180526_1500 REINVENT YOUR CAREER.mp382.79 MB

From Anita Hill to #MeToo: Transforming our Campuses and the Workplace

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Over 20 years ago, Anita Hill brought into the limelight the subject of sexual harassment in the workplace. In recent years, Amherst and other colleges and universities have also found themselves dealing with scrutiny over how they treat sexual assault on campus. With the chain of prominent men across a number of industries stepping down due to harassment and assault scandals, has anything really changed in the decades since Anita Hill? What needs to happen so that in another 20 years, this panel will not be needed? We are honored to have moderating the panel Jodi Kantor, the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter who helped break the Harvey Weinstein story that led to the global rallying cry of #MeToo. Ms. Kantor is the spouse of Ron Lieber ’93. Join in this important conversation with panelists Nichelle Carr ’98, a member of the Board of Directors of the ACLU Foundation of Southern California and a former NBCUniversal executive; Monica Snyder ’08, a management-side employment attorney with an expertise in issues involving sexual harassment; and Dana Bolger ’14E, co-founder of Know Your IX, which educates students about their Title IX right to an education free from sexual violence. Presented by the Classes of 1993, 1998, 2008 and 2013.

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Audio icon 180526_1500 FROM ANITA HILL.mp385.67 MB

“Nonprofessional” Graduate School for Professionals

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Did you leave Amherst knowing you wanted to go onto a professional track, like being a lawyer or doctor? That’s great! If NOT, this panel is for YOU! Join Ashley Finigan ’08 as she moderates a panel of alumni who will share their experiences in transitioning into careers such as education, design and academia. Panelists include Katherine Abrikian ’08, Camila de Vedia-Helm ’08, Chris Gillyard ’08, Paola Ligonde ’08 and Lucy Sheehan ’08. Presented by the Class of 2008.

OUR Robert Frost: The Voice of Amherst

Saturday, May 26, 2018

A talk by Howie Wolf ’58, to be followed by a reading and discussion of some Frost poems by members of the Class of 1958 in which the relevance of his work to the main issues of our generation will be highlighted. We will also discuss the significance of Frost’s history as an Amherst teacher and poet who helped make Amherst one of America’s most distinguished literary colleges. Howie Wolf is the author of Home at the End of the Day: An American Family Drama in Three Acts; Far-Away Places (travel essays); Broadway Serenade (a novel); and the forthcoming Ends and Other Beginnings (short stories). Presented by the Class of 1958.

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Poetry Reading

Saturday, May 25, 2018

Julie Kramer ’88 and Cindy McGean ’88 will read recent work. Julie is a resident of San Francisco, having moved there on a one-way ticket after graduating from Amherst. She became involved in the spoken-word scene in SF in the 1990s and was a featured poet at several venues in the city. After a hiatus, she began writing again in 2017. Her work is fairly emotions-based and tries to paint images with words, while being accessible to all readers. Cindy is an educator, writer and theater artist with a background in social services. After graduation, she almost ran away to join the circus, but she moved to Portland, Ore. instead. Her work spans a wide range of genres, including short stories in publications such as SQ Magazine, VoiceCatcherKaleidotrope and The Saturday Evening Post, as well as stage and radio scripts that pop up periodically around the country. The current political climate has had a potent impact on her life as a third grade teacher at a Title I school and poetry and performance have become her venues of choice for expressing and exploring that. Presented by the Class of 1988.

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The State of Race in America: Are We at an Impasse?

Saturday, May 26, 2018

“The problem of the 20th century,” said W.E.B. Dubois, “is the problem of the color line.” It remains a problem for the 21st century. From the nation’s founding, to the Civil War, to Reconstruction, to Jim Crow, to the civil rights era, to affirmative action, to calls for greater diversity and inclusion, to Black Lives Matter, to the racialization of immigration, America continues to struggle to reconcile its promises of equality with the persistent inequities between its white majority and its peoples of color. We are in another moment when questions of race and racial equality dominate national discussions. Ten years after the election of the nation’s first black president, today’s discussions on race seem so different from those during our time at Amherst. Is there still a national commitment to racial equality, or are we doomed forever to be a nation divided by race? Panelists include Julie Ajinkya ’03, Ph.D., Vice President of Applied Research, Institute for Higher Education Policy; Mark Beckwith ’73, Bishop, Episcopal Diocese of Newark; Travis J. Bristol ’03, Ph.D., Peter Paul Assistant Professor, Boston University, School of Education; Lonnie Isabel ’74E, Senior Lecturer, Columbia School of Journalism, and former Deputy Managing Editor, Newsday; and Stephen Keith ’73, M.D., MSPH, Chief Business Development and Medical Officer, Evanston Technology Partners. Moderated by George Johnson ’73, P’03, Professor of Law and Dean Emeritus, Elon University. Presented by the Classes of 1973 and 2003.

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Audio icon 180526_1345 RACE IN AMERICA.mp381.49 MB