2016 Reunion Schedule

Programs are no longer than 60 minutes unless otherwise noted.

Find locations on our Campus Map. Use the fields below to search the Reunion Schedule.

Wednesday, May 25, 2016
2:00 PM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at 9 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
2:30 PM
Garden Tour of the Emily Dickinson Museum
Meet Jane Wald, Executive Director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, to hear about new projects, including the introduction of an orchard to the Dickinson property. Enjoy the museum’s garden tour audio wands free of charge.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
5:30 PM
Reunion Welcome Reception at the Mead Art Museum
Meet, mingle and renew old friendships at the Mead with a glass of wine and hors d’oeuvres. See the Shakespeare First Folio and the Mead collection. Performance by the Bluestockings. Gallery talk at 6 p.m. with Daniel De Simone, the Eric Weinmann Librarian at the Folger Shakespeare Library. Reception ends at 7 p.m.
Mead Art Museum
7:00 PM
Living and Degenerative Disease
Peter Sawyer ’66, Reunion Attendance Chair, will introduce a panel made up of Aaron Latham ’66, Evan Maurer ’66, John Vine ’66 and Bruce Leopold ’66, moderated by Aaron’s wife, Lesley Stahl of 60 Minutes. Aaron and Lesley’s schedule permits their joining us only on Wednesday, so we seized this opportunity. This will offer a compelling kickoff to our Reunion, as we join with the panel to explore living life to the fullest while confronting the hardest challenges ahead. Presented by the Class of 1966.
Stirn Auditorium
Thursday, May 26, 2016
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542-2065. Alumni House will close at 10 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
10:30 AM
Garden Tour of the Emily Dickinson Museum
Meet Jane Wald, Executive Director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, to hear about new projects, including the introduction of an orchard to the Dickinson property. Enjoy the museum’s garden tour audio wands free of charge.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
10:30 AM
Beneski Museum “Bones and Stones" Tour
Join Alfred Venne, Museum Educator, for a walk through the Beneski Museum of Natural History, which houses outstanding collections and exhibits that include vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and from around the world since 1825. Particularly noteworthy is the world-famous dinosaur track collection. Bring your cameras!
Beneski Museum of Natural History
11:00 AM
Archaeology at the Emily Dickinson Museum
The Emily Dickinson Museum is hosting the summer field school operated by the University of Massachusetts Archaeological Services. Observe the field crew in action as they dig test pits and search for relics of the past.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
11:00 AM
Meet the New Director - Storeroom to Galleries Tour
Behind the scenes tour with Director and Chief Curator, David E Little.
Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Shakespeare Effects: Page vs. Stage
Join Anston Bosman, Associate Professor of English, and actor Teresa Spencer ’06 to explore Shakespeare through reading and performance. Do drama and theater require different forms of literacy? Or is Shakespeare an early case of “media convergence”?
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
1:00 PM
Whither Divisions by Race, Ethnicity and Gender Going Forward (Including at the College)?
Sam Jackson ’66, will moderate a panel featuring Ted Rosengarten ’66, MacArthur Fellow and National Book Award winner for All God's Dangers (streaming live from a concentration camp in Poland); Larry Mead ’66, winner of the National Academy of Public Administration’s Louis Brownlow Book Award for Government Matters (and author of  works on citizenship, welfare reform and poverty); Paul Dimond ’66, winner of the American Political Science Association’s Ralph Bunche Book Award for Beyond Busing (and author of works on history and continuing application of Civil War Amendments and Civil Rights Acts, including on safety and security of person and property); and Catherine Epstein, Dean of the Faculty. Presented by the Class of 1966.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1:00 PM
From Amherst to Harvard to China to Harvard and Back to Amherst: What I Learned About Education from My Palindromic Career
Vanessa Fong ’96, Associate Professor of Anthropology, will discuss what she learned about educational values, purposes and outcomes through her palindromic journey, from studying at Amherst College; to studying at Harvard University; to teaching English and conducting research at a middle school, a vocational high school and a college prep high school in China; to teaching at the Harvard Graduate School of Education; and finally back to teaching at Amherst. She will reflect on how trends toward increased competition, globalization and neoliberalization have affected the teachers and students she worked with in her journey through these very different yet systematically interconnected schools, and how the excesses of these trends can be kept in check by Amherst’s tradition of humane and egalitarian values.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:30 PM
Julius Caesar: 1949
Michael Kelly, Head of Archives and Special Collections, tells the story of the first nationally broadcast production of Julius Caesar, staged at the Folger Shakespeare Library, sharing some of the College’s archival materials from the production and discussing Amherst’s connection to Shakespeare. His talk will be followed by a short break and a 3 p.m. screening of the 1949 production of Julius Caesar for those interested in seeing it.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:30 PM
American Art at Amherst: Highlights of the Mead Art Museum
Exploring Tom Friedman: Untitled with Vanja V. Malloy, curator of American art.
Mead Art Museum
2:30 PM
Words to Live By
Panelists John Kroll ’66 (also serving as moderator), Fred Mayo ’66, Sam Bartos ’66 and Phil Steele ’66 discuss passages from various sources, ranging from literature to cartoon captions, that have helped guide their lives for the past half century and may serve as guides in years ahead. Then audience members will be invited to do the same. Presented by the Class of 1966.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
The Right Wrong Man: John Demjanjuk and the Last Great Nazi War Crimes Trial
Join Lawrence Douglas, the James J. Grosfeld Professor of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought, for a discussion of his new book, named a New York Times Editor’s Pick and described by The Wall Street Journal as “masterful.” A signing will follow.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
7:00 PM
Emily Dickinson’s Shakespeare
Páraic Finnerty, Professor of English and American Literature at the University of Portsmouth, England, clarifies the essential role that Shakespeare had in Emily Dickinson’s life by locating her allusions to his writings within a nineteenth-century American context. In the process, he throws new light on Shakespeare’s multifaceted presence in Dickinson’s world: in education, theater, newspapers, public lectures, reading clubs and literary periodicals.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
Friday, May 27, 2016
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at midnight.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Sustainability at Amherst
Laura Draucker, Director of Sustainability, and Jim Brassord, Chief of Campus Operations, will review sustainability programs on campus and how this work connects with students and scholarship.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:00 AM
Journeys in Space and Memory: Urban Scenes and Landscapes by Russian Artists
Exhibition tour with Bettina Jungen, Thomas P. Whitney '37 Curator of Russian Art.
Amherst Center for Russian Culture Gallery, Webster Hall, Second Floor
10:30 AM
Helping the Next Generation of Students to Think with Data: Statistics at Amherst College
With Nicholas J. Horton, Professor of Statistics
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
10:30 AM
The Threat of ISIS and the Radicalization of Youth in the Balkans
How is ISIS gaining traction in the Balkans, and what can be done about it? From the perspectives of public school teachers, law enforcement, community leaders and Islamic leaders in Bosnia-Herzegovina (BiH), this presentation will describe specific efforts to confront the radicalization of youth and to respond to both short- and long-term threats posed by extremism in BiH. Join Christopher Bragdon ’86, Director of the Bosnia-based NGO BILD, who has lived in BiH since 1996 and worked closely with Bosnia’s highest-ranking Islamic leader. While repeatedly denouncing Islamic extremism, Reisu-l-ulema Husein Kavazović, the Grand Mufti of BiH, has been a consistent leader of interfaith initiatives promoting mutual respect and understanding among people of different cultures. This presentation will describe how an integrated approach working with the Islamic community of BiH can help respond to this growing threat at all levels of Bosnian society. Afterward, participants are invited to join a follow-up luncheon discussion in Valentine. Presented by the Class of 1986.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
10:30 AM
Those Who Teach and Those Who Learn: A Conversation with the Dean of the Faculty
Join Catherine Epstein, Dean of the Faculty and Professor of History, for a wide-ranging conversation about Amherst's academic landscape. Dean Epstein will discuss the ways in which the College is shaping the next generation of faculty and the ongoing comprehensive review of the curriculum. The Dean will also address pedagogical innovation and other academic initiatives at Amherst.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:30 AM
The Beatles Weren't Really So Great! (...Or Were They?)
From Beatlemania to Sgt. Pepper and beyond, The Beatles bracketed and defined the 60s, at Amherst as elsewhere. As a cultural phenomenon, they influenced everything from lifestyles to hairstyles to politics, to an extent that has no parallel before or since. But what about the music itself? Does it stand the test of time? Was it as good as we remember, or are our memories clouded by a haze of, ahem, nostalgia? Take our magical mystery tour of recorded and live musical examples and visual media as David L. Glass ‘68 explores the connections between the compositional techniques intuitively used by Lennon, McCartney and Harrison and those of the great composers we call “classical.” A splendid time is guaranteed for all!
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
10:30 AM
Campus Grown: Tour Book & Plow Farm with Farmer Pete
The unique relationship between Book & Plow Farm and Amherst College is flourishing. Come see what the farm is doing for its fourth year in operation and how it's supplying more hyper-local, fresh produce to Valentine, all while building community and providing an educational resource for students and faculty. This tour will be held rain or shine. Meet at the greenhouse at Tuttle Hill, or walk past the tennis courts along the road next to the railroad track and up the hill. A map to the farm is available at Alumni House.
Book & Plow Farm, 425 South East St., Amherst
11:00 AM
Archaeology at the Emily Dickinson Museum
The Emily Dickinson Museum is hosting the summer field school operated by the University of Massachusetts Archaeological Services. Observe the field crew in action as they dig test pits and search for relics of the past.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
11:00 AM
A Boeing 737, Virtual Reality and You
With the release of the new high-performance Oculus Rift Virtual Reality Headset, high-speed, high-resolution, judderless (nausea-free) VR has finally arrived. After a brief presentation on the history of the Boeing 737 and the evolution of flight simulation, we will continue with a demo of a final approach and landing at Bradley International Airport from the flight deck of the College’s simulated Boeing 737 (AC ONE). Here we will use the new high-res video system in Merrill 4, integrated with the latest version of Flight Simulator 2015. Once you don the comfortable headset (compatible with most eyeglass frames) graciously loaned to us by the IT Department, you will find yourself inside the flight deck of our Seven-Three-Seven as it makes its 11-mile final descent. Don’t worry—we’ll do the flying and perform the before-landing checklist procedures as you quickly acclimate to this breathtaking new dimension. If you have not experienced VR, this demonstration will leave you shaking your head in wonder. The future of VR within academia is bright and promising, with as yet unimagined applications just over the horizon. Because of the individual nature of headset use, we will limit this presentation to nine people per session. Preregistration is required. Presented by the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Henry Parker Hirschel, Instructor.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
11:00 AM
American Art at Amherst: Highlights of the Mead Art Museum
Exploring Tom Friedman: Untitled with Vanja V. Malloy, curator of American art.
Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Gravediggers Tale: An Interactive Retelling of Shakespeare's Hamlet
Conceived and directed by Robert Richmond and performed by Louis Butelli, this forty minute interactive audience experience combines the text from Hamlet with some original and traditional music. In Shakespeare's play, the Gravedigger appears briefly in Act V to perform a comic exchange with a fellow gravedigger before speaking to Hamlet and presenting him with the jester Yorick’s skull. Our Gravedigger arrives with a trunk and a book and answers “questions” from the audience with pieces of text from Hamlet
Kirby Theater
1:00 PM
Would You Counsel Your Grandchild to Follow Your Career Footsteps?
As Jeff Kalil ’56 (business), Steve McGeeney ’56 (law), Mike Rabbino ’56 (medicine) and John Stephens ’56 (education) look back over their careers and forward to what those careers may be like in the decades to come, we imagine conversations with our grandchildren who are asking for some perspective on what to do with their lives. What do you imagine the practice will be like? Will your career be outsourced? Will robots do the job you did? Will society create new rules and regulations that will help or hinder what you did? Will your grandchild be able to make a reasonable living to support a family? Presented by the Class of 1956.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
1:00 PM
An Amherst Family's Experience with Grassroots Earthquake Relief
The April 2015 Nepal earthquake killed over 9,000 people and injured more than 23,000. It also has revealed fault lines in Nepali society. On the one hand, a bureaucratic and unresponsive government largely failed in its responsibility to provide timely relief or long-term reconstruction support. On the other, a variety of grassroots civil society organizations quickly self-organized and raised funds to try to fill the gap. One such initiative is the Nepal Villagers' Earthquake Fund, led by Shakun Leslie, wife of Keith Leslie ’76. In this session, Keith—who has lived in Nepal for over 30 years, working for Save the Children, the U.N. and the World Bank—tells the story of how his family got involved in the immediate grassroots earthquake relief in some of the hardest-hit villages in rural Nepal. He also describes what the earthquake and its aftermath illustrate about the challenges and complexities in international development assistance—and also the opportunities for pursuing meaningful change in Nepal’s nascent democratic space but politically paralyzed society. Presented by the Class of 1976.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1:00 PM
Joint Operations: From the Operating Room to the Battlefield, Life of a Citizen-Sailor
Dr. James Bates ’86, Medical Director of Alvarado Advanced Spine & Joint Institute and Physicians Surgery Center in San Diego, is also Capt. Bates, serving in the United States Navy Reserve for the past 29 years—currently as Medical Department Head of USMC 1st Civil Affairs Group at Camp Pendleton. Capt. Bates was recently activated and deployed as commanding officer of a Forward Surgical Team in Afghanistan. He is a private-practice orthopedic surgeon specializing in advancements in joint replacement surgery using robots and computers. As a Navy Flight Surgeon, Diving Medical Officer and Submarine Rescue Officer, he has served in aviation units, Naval Special Warfare/SEAL Teams, U.S. Strategic Command and Submarine Rescue Command. Having lived a life balancing family and two careers—private-practice orthopedic surgeon and military reservist—in a country at peace and a country at war, Capt. Bates will provide insight into “special” operations, both to restore individual mobility and to restore and preserve world peace and order. Presented by the Class of 1986.
Stirn Auditorium
1:00 PM
Planetarium Program: We Are Part of This Universe
For over 55 years, the Bassett Planetarium has served the College well. This tool has helped countless individuals better understand their place in the universe. Join Fred Venne, Planetarium Director, as he uses the vintage Spitz A3P Starball to help recreate the night sky over Amherst. In addition, using a classic Orrery, participants will examine the plane of the solar system, the tilt of the Earth, day/night and seasons. The main takeaway from the planetarium visit was perhaps best expressed by Neil deGrasse Tyson when he said, “We are part of this universe, we are in this universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the universe is in us.”
Bassett Planetarium, Morgan Hall
1:00 PM
A Boeing 737, Virtual Reality and You
With the release of the new high-performance Oculus Rift Virtual Reality Headset, high-speed, high-resolution, judderless (nausea-free) VR has finally arrived. After a brief presentation on the history of the Boeing 737 and the evolution of flight simulation, we will continue with a demo of a final approach and landing at Bradley International Airport from the flight deck of the College’s simulated Boeing 737 (AC ONE). Here we will use the new high-res video system in Merrill 4, integrated with the latest version of Flight Simulator 2015. Once you don the comfortable headset (compatible with most eyeglass frames) graciously loaned to us by the IT Department, you will find yourself inside the flight deck of our Seven-Three-Seven as it makes its 11-mile final descent. Don’t worry—we’ll do the flying and perform the before-landing checklist procedures as you quickly acclimate to this breathtaking new dimension. If you have not experienced VR, this demonstration will leave you shaking your head in wonder. The future of VR within academia is bright and promising, with as yet unimagined applications just over the horizon. Because of the individual nature of headset use, we will limit this presentation to nine people per session. Preregistration is required. Presented by the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Henry Parker Hirschel, Instructor.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
1:00 PM
A Conversation with a Member of the Board of Trustees
Please join us for a casual conversation with David Sutphen '91, member of the Amherst College Board of Trustees, regarding his perspective on recent Trustee decisions, current and future priorities, and other issues of interest to the audience. Moderated by Daniel Burke '91. Presented by the Class of 1991.
Johnson Chapel
1:00 PM
Jeffery Amherst: The Man And The Song
William Rapp ’61, the Henry J. Leir Professor at New Jersey Institute of Technology, will discuss the life and career of Jeffery Amherst as presented in historical documents and a biography supported by the College in 1933. His talk will also explore the writing of the College song and the connections between the historical figure and the one described in the song. Presented by the Class of 1961.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1:00 PM
Living Full and Useful Lives Going Forward
An interactive discussion with Dave Morine ’66, who is living his passion as a keeper for the nation’s rivers; Dick Klein ’66, who is putting his professional skills to work volunteering to bring diabetic retinopathy screening and laser treatment to the rural population in Myanmar; Steve Murray ’66, who is delving deep into his Peace Corps experience; Tom Parson ’66,  who runs the nonprofit Letterpress Depot publishing project; and moderator Doug Dunlap ’66, who is tackling rural poverty and building community in northern Maine. Presented by the Class of 1966.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:00 PM
Queer Resource Center (QRC) Open House
Join the QRC for our annual Reunion Open House. Come meet with the QRC Director and student staff, learn about our programs and resources, and take the opportunity to connect with the Amherst College queer/trans community. Refreshments and hors d’oeuvres will be served. Program ends 4 p.m.
Queer Resource Center, basement of Morrow Residence Hall (enter from Valentine Quad)
2:30 PM
60 Years After Leaving Amherst: Is a Liberal Arts Education (Still) Worth the Time and Expense? Should a College Prepare Its Graduates for Careers? How did my Amherst Education Help (or Hinder) Me?
Bill Fish ’56, Woody Reichert ’56 and Larry Young ’56 will lead an open conversation around questions we often ask each other when we meet between Reunion years. Has the cost of a residential liberal arts education gotten out of hand? Is that cost driven by the current apparent imbalance between the number of persons teaching and the numbers providing administrative and related services? Would two years of long-distance learning and two years of residential college be enough? Should colleges try to guide students to career choices where financial success and security are higher probabilities? Should preparation for a career (other than passing the grad school admission hurdle) be included—for some or for all? Presented by the Class of 1956.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
2:30 PM
40 Years into the Games, Meets and Matches: How Much Has Changed in Women’s Athletics at Amherst?
On Nov. 2, 1974, the Board of Trustees voted: “Beginning with the academic year 1975–1976, Amherst College will admit women candidates for the B.A. degree.” These few words propelled our College forward and on to a significant number of new paths, including women’s athletics. In 1976, crew became Amherst’s first women’s intercollegiate sports program, followed shortly thereafter by field hockey, basketball and squash. Today, Amherst women participate and compete in 14 varsity sports programs, a large number of intramural undertakings and several club sports. The Friends of Amherst Athletics invite you to join a leading pioneer of this journey, Michelle Morgan, Professor of Physical Education and Athletics, along with student-athlete alumnae representing the past four decades of women athletes at Amherst, to hear their remembrances of “starting out,” challenges faced, successes achieved, memories made (and those hoped forgotten!) and wishes for Amherst’s women student-athletes for the next four decades.
Stirn Auditorium
2:30 PM
Made in Amherst
Made in Amherst is the title of the soon-to-be-published second memoir of Don Brown ’86. His path to Amherst was unique and seemingly impossible—but he succeeded in getting here. The book captures stories of the students, faculty and staff of Amherst from the perspective of the oldest student ever to graduate from the College. The memoir is about “the most special place on the face of the earth,” and promises to be an exceptional read, especially for all familiar with Amherst. Don’s first memoir, The Morphine Dream, which chronicles his journey in life as he literally walks across America, will soon be produced as a major motion picture. The screenplay has been accepted as an entrant in the upcoming Beverly Hills Film Festival, and Don has been traveling throughout the United States, Europe, the Caribbean and Asia in conjunction with its release. Don will be available immediately following the presentation to personalize copies of The Morphine Dream. Presented by the Class of 1986.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
2:30 PM
A Baby Boomer’s Guide to Investing for—and During—Retirement
It’s difficult enough to know how to invest one’s hard-earned assets in today’s volatile economic environment, with stocks and bonds fluctuating along with interest rates, commodity prices and real estate values. It’s especially difficult as baby boomers enter retirement and actually have to start making use of the income generated from their investments. What is the best way to maximize the assets that you have built up over a lifetime? What’s the right balance between growth and income during your retirement years? How do you know whether you have “enough,” and what do you do if you think you might not? Jordan Goodman ’76, “America’s Money Answers Man,” leads a panel of investment experts including Art Murphy ’76, Bill Peattie ’81 and Chris Petrik ’91 to address these and other questions. Presented by the Classes of 1976, 1981 and 1991.
Johnson Chapel
2:30 PM
On the Frontiers of Medical Research: Three ‘71ers Discuss the Medical Advances They Have Worked On
Three classmates discuss the medical research they have devoted their careers to: Bob Yarchoan ’71, development of the first AIDS drugs and therapies for cancers associated with AIDS; David Nathan ’71, development of novel interventions for the prevention and treatment of diabetes and testing their long-term effects (and spending your tax dollars); and Lou Matis ’71, harnessing the immune system to develop new therapies for inflammatory diseases and cancer. Presented by the Class of 1971.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
Amherst, Frost and the Wayside Poem
Recollections of Frost at Amherst (1957–61) and a look into his contributions to the wayside genre with Hugh Andrews '61. Presented by the Class of 1961.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
What Good Is a Liberal Arts Education Anyway? 50 Things You Can (or Can’t) Do with a History Major
It’s a war of words and wonks. With politicians and think tanks on one side questioning the value of a liberal arts major (not practical enough!) and corporate execs and think tanks on the other calling for us to double down (we need people who can help us think our way around problems we don’t yet know are problems!), what’s a history, philosophy, American studies or French major to do? We’ll hear from Les Boney ’81, Jerome de Bontin ’81, Candace Damon ’81 and Maggie Yarlott Brown ’81 about the unexpected directions their Amherst educations took them in, and what they think the value of a liberal arts education still is—and isn’t. Presented by the Class of 1981.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
4:00 PM
Dinner in Budapest
A staged reading of the new play by Roger Williams ‘56, Dinner in Budapest, will be the Class of 1956 featured offering during the Reunion Weekend. The new work imagines a December, 1944 dinner in which Raoul Wallenberg, Sweden's "Angel of Mercy", challenges Nazi bigwig Adolf Eichmann to abandon his plan to drive residents of the Budapest ghetto onto Auschwitz-bound trains. Besides making for lively theater, the imagined exchanges between the principals illuminate the motivations, compulsions, and fears embedded in a recent, vital chunk of human history. Some of the parts will be read by members of the class. Presented by the Class of 1956.
Kirby Theater
4:00 PM
Affirmative Action and Diversity after Fisher II
Bert Rein ’61 and Paul Smith ’76 will discuss and debate the future of affirmative action in college admissions, its legitimacy under American law, and the potential effects of the Supreme Court’s ruling in Fisher v. University of Texas II on highly selective institutions like Amherst. Earl Dudley ’61 will moderate. Presented by the Classes of 1961 and 1976.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
4:00 PM
Diversifying the Faculty: Women and Racial Minorities
A lecture with Elizabeth Aries, the Clarence Francis 1910 Professor in Social Sciences (Psychology). In the wake of the Amherst Uprising in November 2015, pressure has intensified to recruit more faculty of color to tenure-track positions at the College. A look back at the issues the first women faculty confronted in joining a mostly male faculty in the 1960s and 1970s has many parallels to the issues confronted today by colleagues from ethnic and racial minority groups who are joining a predominantly white faculty. As Amherst College approached coeducation in 1972, only five tenure-track women were teaching at the College. President J. William Ward argued that women should have equal opportunity not only to attend Amherst but to serve on its faculty. Over the next decade, 45 more women faculty were hired. However, many of these pioneer women found Amherst a difficult place to work and lead their professional lives, and few remained on the faculty long-term. What challenges did the pioneer women face at Amherst, and what lessons can be learned from their experiences for further diversifying the faculty?
Stirn Auditorium
4:00 PM
Adventures in Global Health: Can Africa Become AIDS-Free?
Although the global AIDS epidemic is now declining, 1.6 million people still die from the disease and 2.3 million additional people become infected with HIV every year. Seventy-five percent of those deaths and 70 percent of the new infections occur in sub-Saharan Africa. The Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has recently developed a plan to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030 through a combination of increased access to treatment, preventive treatment of pregnant women and voluntary circumcision of some 27 million men in the high-prevalence countries of eastern and southern Africa. Will this plan succeed? Dr. Peter Millard '76 spent eight years on the front lines of the fight, working as a doctor and epidemiologist in Zimbabwe and Mozambique, where he developed a minimally invasive technique for voluntary male circumcision. He discusses the opportunities and challenges to an AIDS-free Africa. Presented by the Class of 1976.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
4:00 PM
Welcome Back Dance Party (Family-Friendly!)
The Class of ’96 is hosting a “welcome back to campus” dance party! Bring your kids and your dancing shoes to get down to globetrotting beats supplied by DJ Mirissa Neff ’96. Presented by the Class of 1996.
Morris Pratt Circle
4:00 PM
How Might I Spend My Time in “Retirement” – and What Steps Should I Take Along the Way
Rob Hawkins ’71, Leigh MacKay ’71, Becky Rom ’71 and Jeff Cartwright-Smith ’71 discuss their decisions to retire and how they established their second careers and retirement activities – from volunteer community service to pro bono global legal lecturing to being a golf columnist. And Charles Merrill ’71 and Barry Roderick ’71 will give advice on retirement planning and financial issues. Presented by the Class of 1971.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
Class of '91 Creative Works Exhibition & Wine Reception
Come enjoy an eclectic collection of your class members' creative works and some wine. Works will include paintings, jewelry, knitting, fashion, font design and amateur sketches. Presented by the Class of 1991.
Gerald Penny ’77 Memorial Black Cultural Center (First Floor), The Octagon
4:00 PM
The More Contemplative Life Going Forward
A discussion with the Rev. Ken Sawyer ’66; one of our most determined classmates, John Vine ’66; and psychologist Elliott Isenberg ’66. RC Lyster ’66 will serve as moderator to help catalyze active exploration with all class members who want to share their thoughts or concerns. Presented by the Class of 1966.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
5:00 PM
Reception with President Biddy Martin
Join President Biddy Martin and others from the College for conversation and celebration. All are welcome. The reception will end at 6:30 p.m.
The Powerhouse
9:00 PM
Psychic Group Workshop
Richard Grossinger ’66 will lead a psychic group workshop for beginners. It will be completely open-ended and nonintrusive. We work with basic concepts, the most basic being that we each have a mind and energy of undetermined nature and range. We use simple techniques from Hindu, theosophical and Sethian systems to allow our basic everyday consciousness to recognize its innate psychic aspects. From there we explore how to use aspects to deepen personal experience and the capacity to address life dilemmas. It is not a self-help group; no one confesses. You keep your own story private. Those who are skilled at this or have more experience are welcome to co-lead. Presented by the Class of 1966.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
Saturday, May 28, 2016
7:00 AM
Birds and Breakfast
Come explore Amherst College’s beautiful Book & Plow Farm. Join Pete McLean for a guided walk along the farm fields in search of all things birdy (7–8:15 a.m.). Bobolinks, eastern meadowlarks, rose-breasted grosbeaks and indigo buntings have all been spotted on the farm, as well as many more. But the bird walk is a mere formality, really. The real treat is in the farm-fresh breakfast served at the top of Tuttle Hill, overlooking the Pelham Hills, at the conclusion of the walk (8:15–9 a.m.). The breakfast is sure to be the highlight of the morning, and the view unbeatable. Bring binoculars and a bird book if you have them. If not, we can share. Interested participants should meet at the top of Tuttle Hill. From there we’ll explore the Wildlife Sanctuary, cross the rail trail, scope out Book & Plow Farm’s land for birds and end up back at the top of Tuttle Hill. Bring your appetites! This program will end at 9:00 AM and requires pre-registration and a separate $30 registration fee. Signups are first-come, first-served here. We will walk rain or shine, bring shoes that can handle some wet terrain. Directions to the farm will be available at Alumni House.
Book & Plow Farm, 425 South East St., Amherst - Meet at the top of Tuttle Hill.
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at 9:30 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Arts-and-plants-and-crafts!
Never took a studio art class? Scared off by those three-hour painting sessions outside Keefe, in full view of your classmates? Same here. But Reunion is a time to hit those bucket list items you never accomplished during Senior Spring. And we have just the hangover art activity for you: wine-bottle succulent-planting. Make an Amherst-themed project that is fully alive! Feel free to join at any point during the event. Presented by the Class of 2011.
Class Tent, Soccer Field
9:00 AM
What's Up in Space?
Is there life out there? Why is Venus so different from Earth? What did we find at Pluto? Why do we keep discovering water on Mars? How many spacecraft are out there exploring how many different places? What are the questions that motivate space exploration, and what are we doing to answer them? Suitable for all ages of curious people, this presentation will explore what's up in the robotic exploration of our solar system. Emily Stewart Lakdawalla '96 is a planetary geologist and science journalist, Senior Editor and Planetary Evangelist for The Planetary Society, and author of the forthcoming book Curiosity Rover: Design, Planning, and Field Geology on Mars, due out from Springer-Praxis in 2017. Presented by the Class of 1996.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
9:00 AM
Moving Meditations: Yoga, Power and Flow
Start the day with some vinyasa and self-inquiry, as Natalie Mason ’02E combines her studies in social anthropology with a power yoga class. The purpose of doing the poses is to ground awareness in the breath and physical body—we act in order to experience. Then quiet moments of rest are woven in to allow for process—being present to all the stuff that arises from our actions. This practice is an invitation to ponder the question: How does power flow, within oneself, between selves, in a yoga class and off the mat? Presented by the Class of 2001.
Alumni Gymnasium
9:00 AM
Amherst Pioneers in Co-Education: Reflecting on the Past and the Journey Forward
Amidst the turmoil of the first years of coeducation, we embarked together as students, teachers, coaches and administrators to transform not only ourselves but also the College, in the spirit of Terras Irradient. Sabrina, the feminine muse, welcomed us to campus in 1977. In the spring of ’78, we celebrated AmHERst Women’s Week. The following year, the administration began its push to end the all-male Greek fraternity system. During our junior year, Mary Catherine Bateson was appointed Dean of the Faculty. An anthropologist and linguist, daughter of renowned anthropologists Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson, she was professionally trained to understand the pressures wrought during this time of integration. How does our experience as groundbreakers in coeducation, women and men who came of age in the ’70s, help us refine our current roles as wisdom-bearers nearing our 60th year? Join Dr. Bateson, whose most recent books focus on these very topics, and Becky Ballard DiLoreto ’81 in considering how we can view the years ahead as ones of immense opportunity. Presented by the Class of 1981.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
9:00 AM
Digital Journalism in the 21st Century
Journalism is not dead, but it does seem to be changing every six months, as social media platforms evolve into news services, magazines and newspapers experiment with new financial models, and new digital developments—from virtual reality technology to data analysis tools—change the ways information is shared. What does it mean to be a journalist in the 21st century? Aleszu Bajak ’06, a Senior Writer for Undark Magazine, who teaches journalism, design, data visualization and programming at Northeastern University and Brandeis University, and Bess Levin ’06, Editor of DealBreaker.com, discuss. Presented by the Class of 2006.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
9:00 AM
Friends of Amherst Squash Reunion Round Robin
Bring your racquet and squash shoes and head to the courts! Players of all ages and levels welcome. Questions? Contact Coach Peter Robson at phrobson@amherst.edu.
Davenport Squash Courts
9:00 AM
Law and Politics
What is the proper relationship between law and politics? Obviously, the two domains are intimately related, but where to draw the boundary between the two? From Bush v. Gore to Citizens United, the ObamaCare cases and beyond, accusations have flown that the Supreme Court is becoming increasingly politicized. Meanwhile, state judicial elections have become heavily financed pitched battles between plaintiff tort lawyers and their corporate targets. Has American law become nothing more than, adapting Clausewitz, “politics by other means”? And have courts begun to lose the respect and perceived legitimacy that allows the legal system to work? A panel consisting of Terry Fisher ’76, Professor at Harvard Law School; William Kayatta ’76, Federal Appellate Judge; Paul Smith ’76, Supreme Court Litigator; and David Tykulsker ’76, environmental and labor lawyer, address these issues. The panel will be moderated by Austin D. Sarat, the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science. Presented by the Class of 1976.
Stirn Auditorium
9:00 AM
Teens and Technology: The Impact of Social Media on Relationships, Friendships and Families
Social media is everywhere and has transformed how young people communicate. How does the use of digital technology affect young people’s friendships and ability to form and maintain relationships? Amanda Lenhart ’96 will share research on teens, technology and families from her 16 years as a Lead Researcher at the Pew Research Center, and more recently at Data & Society Research Institute. Learn effective practices for your own family and teenagers from parent coach and former teacher Amy Behrens ’91, who helps turns challenges into growth opportunities. These alumni panelists will be joined by Johnny McCarthy ’18, Connor McGann ’17 and Morgan McGann ’19E—current Amherst students and children of Susan Francis McCarthy ’86 and Joy McGann ’86—who will each provide a student’s perspective on the use of social media at Amherst. Presented by the Classes of 1986, 1991 and 1996.
Kirby Theater
9:00 AM
A Boeing 737, Virtual Reality and You
With the release of the new high-performance Oculus Rift Virtual Reality Headset, high-speed, high-resolution, judderless (nausea-free) VR has finally arrived. After a brief presentation on the history of the Boeing 737 and the evolution of flight simulation, we will continue with a demo of a final approach and landing at Bradley International Airport from the flight deck of the College’s simulated Boeing 737 (AC ONE). Here we will use the new high-res video system in Merrill 4, integrated with the latest version of Flight Simulator 2015. Once you don the comfortable headset (compatible with most eyeglass frames) graciously loaned to us by the IT Department, you will find yourself inside the flight deck of our Seven-Three-Seven as it makes its 11-mile final descent. Don’t worry—we’ll do the flying and perform the before-landing checklist procedures as you quickly acclimate to this breathtaking new dimension. If you have not experienced VR, this demonstration will leave you shaking your head in wonder. The future of VR within academia is bright and promising, with as yet unimagined applications just over the horizon. Because of the individual nature of headset use, we will limit this presentation to nine people per session. Preregistration is required. Presented by the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Henry Parker Hirschel, Instructor.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
9:00 AM
The New Curriculum: Toward an Oral History
From the late 1940s to the mid-1960s, all Amherst students took the same required courses as freshmen, including English, physics and calculus, and additional required courses as sophomores, including “Problems in American Civilization.” (Requirements seem to have loosened by the 1960s.) The goal of this Reunion program is to create, while we can, materials for an oral history of an important phase in the life of Amherst College. How did the “New Curriculum” affect our college experience? Our lives after college? Attendees will have an opportunity to offer their personal reflections during the program (which will be recorded) and (if they wish) to make individual StoryCorps-style recordings about the New Curriculum during the Reunion. Panelists: Robert Kuklis ’61, Jan Beyea ’61, Arnie Poltenson ’56, Harleigh V. S. Tingley ’51. Presented by the Classes of 1951, 1956 and 1961.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
9:45 AM
Reunion Tour of the Emily Dickinson Museum
See the birthplace and home of Emily Dickinson. Learn more about this fascinating poet and current special projects, including the restoration of Dickinson’s conservatory, in a special before-hours tour.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
10:30 AM
A Conversation with President Biddy Martin
The President’s remarks will be preceded by the annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni, presided over by Annette Sanderson '82, Chair of the Executive Committee.
Johnson Chapel
10:30 AM
Rugby Reunion Touch Sevens
Gather at the rugby pitch for a casual game of touch sevens. Open to all, especially alumni of the men’s and women’s rugby teams.
Base of Memorial Hill
10:30 AM
Walk on the Wild Side: Animal Adventures for Kids
Join us under the Class of ’96 tent for a true animal adventure. Meet exotic animals, such as alligator, large snakes, chinchilla, kinkajou, mountain coati and even a bush baby! Hear interesting stories and learn all about these unique animals from knowledgeable experts. You can even touch a few animals if you dare! Enjoy a fun and unique hands-on learning experience for kids of all ages. Animal Adventures is New England’s largest privately owned animal rescue center that is fully licensed to keep all of their animals. Educational programs like this one help fund the care for their animals. Presented by the Class of 1996.
Morris Pratt Circle
11:00 AM
Archaeology at the Emily Dickinson Museum
The Emily Dickinson Museum is hosting the summer field school operated by the University of Massachusetts Archaeological Services. Observe the field crew in action as they dig test pits and search for relics of the past.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
12:15 PM
Reunion Luncheon
Join us for a complimentary luncheon on the Quad. Look for your classmates under the decade signs!
Valentine Quad
12:30 PM
Meet the New Director - Storeroom to Galleries Tour
Behind the scenes tour with Director and Chief Curator, David E. Little.
Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Carnival Fun and Games
All are welcome to the carnival for face painting, balloon twisting, lawn games, cotton candy, spin art and bubbles. The carnival will close at 5 p.m. Presented by the Class of 1991.
Main Quadrangle
1:00 PM
Friends of Amherst Baseball: Celebration to Honor Coach Thurston and Alumni Baseball Game
Join us to honor legendary Amherst baseball coach Bill Thurston's legacy with the unveiling of a plaque, and his retired number "5" at Memorial Field. All alumni are welcome to participate in an alumni game to follow the celebration. Uniforms will be provided.

Coach Bill Thurston served as head coach of the baseball program from 1965 to 2009 and is the winningest coach in any sport in school history. He led Amherst to a staggering 811 victories (against just 471 losses and 12 ties) over 44 seasons. Widely respected as a teacher of baseball skills and techniques, his teams posted 22 consecutive winning seasons and cracked the 20-win plateau 21 times, including a streak of four straight 20-win seasons from 1988 to 1991 and from 2005 to 2008. In 2004, Thurston's club won its first-ever NESCAC Championship and appeared in the NCAA Tournament for the fourth time since 1996, repeating these achievements in 2005. Amherst also claimed the NESCAC West Division crown in 2003 and 2005. 

Questions? Contact Brian Hamm, Head Coach, at bhamm@amherst.edu.

Memorial Field
1:30 PM
It Ain't Over 'Til It's Over
A conversation among members of the Class of 1956 in which “superannuation” is redefined as “something we get to do for compensation that doesn’t show up in most measures of the GDP.” Lawyers, teachers, medical folks and others talk about how, when we have stopped doing what we were doing when we were in the cash economy, we undertook projects that really taught us the meaning of “Terras Irradient.” Conversation facilitated by Richard Volpert ’56. Presented by the Class of 1956.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
Family Circus Event
Join in a circus event for kids and families with performers from SHOW Circus Studio in Easthampton, Mass. See juggling and contortion and try out some tricks yourself! All kids must have parents or guardians with them at the program to sign a release form for participation.
LeFrak Gymnasium
1:30 PM
What's New in Cancer Research: Precision Medicine, Immunotherapy, "Moon Shots" and More…
After nearly five years as Director of the National Cancer Institute, Harold Varmus ’61 recently returned to New York City to work at the Meyer Cancer Center at Cornell and the New York Genome Center. He will describe some of the scientific, clinical, commercial, regulatory and political issues that are influencing efforts to control cancer more effectively, including Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative, Biden’s National Cancer Moonshot Initiative, the prospect of immunotherapy, and reimbursement for new tests based on genomic technologies. Presented by the Class of 1961.
Stirn Auditorium
1:30 PM
Chamber Music Concert
Where Are They Now? Um, at Buckley. Come hear these six alumni in an encore performance of vocal and chamber works after their Standing-Room-Only Concert in 2011: Vanessa Adler ’86, mezzo-soprano; Christopher Barber ’86, pianist; Carol Chickering Burden ’86, soprano; Peter Kendall Clark ’86, baritone; Jonathan Hirsh ’86, violinist; and Wright Moore ’88, tenor. Presented by the Class of 1986.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
1:30 PM
Memorial Field Fun with 2011
Ahhh… springtime in Amherst—the ideal time and place to meander and lounge with your friends, to indulge in tree-lined triangular hillscapes and wear sunglasses regardless of the weather. So bring some of your roommate’s snacks, slide into those flip-flops, cut off your sleeves, take your favorite coozy and best barbecue spork, and head on down for sun/grass/sky/kegs/snacks/games/friends/fun to watch the alumni baseball game. Bare feet, visors, sunglasses and boom boxes suggested. BYO friends! All are welcome and encouraged to join. Presented by the Class of 2011.
Base of Memorial Hill
1:30 PM
Filmmaking At and After Amherst
In 2010, Amherst launched a Film and Media Studies program and major, but young filmmakers were finding ways to get their start on campus well before that. Timothy Hahn ’06, former Pixar Animation Studios Production Coordinator and now co-founder of Kuku Studios (an independent animation studio based in Berkeley, California); Daniel Marks ’06, a Los Angeles-based cinematographer; and Aidan Sleeper ’06, a New York City-based producer and location scout, discuss how their careers got started at the College—and where they went from there. Presented by the Class of 2006.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1:30 PM
STEAM: The New Frontier in American Education?
The next big thing in education curricula, STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math), is everywhere, and its importance is growing. Is this the answer to America’s education woes? Will it prepare our students for the global, technology-driven job markets they’ll face? Have we been teaching the lessons of STEAM for years, or is this really a new paradigm? Is there a gap between learning opportunities and outcomes between the private and public institutions? Does this divide lead to deeper concerns for the future? How do we rectify the problem? Join us for a stimulating discussion on the future of education with Cassandra Abodeely ’96, Summer and Auxiliary Program Director at the Brimmer and May School in Massachusetts; John Abodeely ’01, Deputy Director for the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities; Karima Ravenell ’96, Founder and CEO of R8 Healthcare and Chair of the Board of The Learning Curve; and Greg Schneider ’96, Head of School at Berwick Academy in Maine. Presented by the Classes of 1996 and 2001.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
"What's Next?": Life in the Empty Nest and Beyond
With children nearly grown and either in college or out in the working world, how are we adjusting to this new life stage? This panel will explore later-in-life career changes, new or rediscovered passions/ hobbies/interests and bucket-list items, and discuss how our priorities have changed as we have aged. Michele Crames Zenkel ’81, empty-nest blogger and marketing consultant, will moderate the discussion, which will feature panelists Liz Hartzell DeSimone ’81, a progressive-school administrator longing to continue caregiving; Kevin Ellis ’81, a longtime PR executive who recently launched his own firm, serves on several nonprofit boards and leads an “urban renewal” movement; Cam Hutchins ’81, a former Madison Avenue copywriter who now uses his marketing expertise at a nonprofit that supports disadvantaged youth; and Erica Martin ’81, a 30-year environmental prosecutor who recently retired from her legal practice and has rediscovered her photography passion. This promises to be an illuminating conversation for anyone at or nearing a crossroads or transition and pondering “What’s next for me?” Presented by the Class of 1981.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
1:30 PM
Dickinson Meets Shakespeare in the Garden
Enjoy an afternoon performance in the garden at the Emily Dickinson Museum where actors bring to life scenes from Dickinson’s most beloved plays by William Shakespeare, interspersed with works by the poet inspired by Shakespeare.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
1:30 PM
The 2016 Presidential Election: Where (the Heck) Are We Going?
Tom Davis ’71, former moderate seven-term Republican Congressman from Virginia and former Chair of the Republican National Congressional Committee, will discuss the pending Presidential election campaign, the upcoming conventions and the depressing stalemate in Washington, and might even hazard a prediction as to what will transpire in November. Presented by the Class of 1971.
Johnson Chapel
1:30 PM
Social Entrepreneurship and Impact Investing
Learn how you can make a difference in the rapidly growing fields of social entrepreneurship and impact investing. Presenters will discuss, based on their experiences, what’s different about these companies and investments (private and public) and how they are changing the investment landscape. Topics include the challenges and opportunities surrounding startups, securing investors, defining social metrics and other current issues. Presenters include Georgette Wong ’91, CEO, Correlation Consulting; John Levy ’76, Chairman, BioLite Energy, goTenna and Hypres; and Al Greene ’76, D-Lab MIT, and Treasurer, St. Boniface Haiti Foundation. Presented by the Classes of 1976 and 1991.
Kirby Theater
1:30 PM
The Future of Health on Earth and Science in Space: What Amazing Stuff We Can Discover from Exploring Both!
Charles Firestone ’66, Aspen Institute expert on information and communications policy, will introduce Mike Merson ’66, world-acclaimed global health expert and infectious disease physician, and Jeff Hoffman ’66, extraordinary astrophysicist and astronaut. They will put on a show glimpsing into the future with respect to science in space, our health on Earth and what we may discover and learn from both. Presented by the Class of 1966.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
Amherst Alums in the Arts Mixer
Join in an Arts Mixer for returning alumni who have pursued careers in and supporting the arts. Come by to connect with fellow alums in the arts, and to find out what people have been working on in visual arts, performing arts, literary arts, arts institutions, and more. Presented by the Class of 1996.
Mead Art Museum
2:00 PM
Friends of Amherst Crew Reunion Row
If you peered between the trees along the riverbank, and were startled to see a rowing shell gliding across the face of the water, the urge to jump into the boat would be difficult to extinguish. How satisfying would it be to lean on the rudder again, and holler at individuals who are not your children, or press your weight against the foot-stretcher to leverage the shell forward? The experience would fill the hollowness that has ensued since the last time you sat in a boat. Please join us for an afternoon on the river for our annual Reunion gathering at the boathouse. Coach Bill Stekl will also give an update on the progress and success of the young men and women of the Amherst College rowing team who move boats faster than any of us.
Amherst College Boathouse (Sportsman’s Marina, Route 9 at Coolidge Bridge)
2:00 PM
Friends of Amherst Men's Soccer Reunion Game
The Men’s Soccer Alumni Group and Coach Justin Serpone will sponsor a game between odd-and even-class soccer alumni. Bring your black shorts, cleats and shin guards; we’ll supply shirts and socks. RSVP to Assistant Coach Eric Bracy (ebracy@amherst.edu) so we have a head count, and spread the word to your classmates and teammates. Plan to come to the men’s locker room at 1:15 p.m. to pick up your uniform.
Gooding Turf Field
2:30 PM
Family Swim
Have children with lots of energy? Come to Pratt Pool and have an afternoon swim! Each child must have a parent or guardian with them at the pool.
Pratt Pool, Alumni Gym
2:45 PM
A Business Born at Amherst: the Story of All College Storage
Hear the story of Parker Holcomb '11, who started All College Storage while in his sophomore year at Amherst. All College Storage generated sales of over $180,000 his senior year, and today provides its services to over 40 schools in 8 states while providing amazing opportunities for hundreds of college students. He will be joined in conversation with Eric Edelson '01, the CEO of Fireclay Tile. Eric joined Fireclay in 2009 to partner with its founder and help turn the fledgling business around. Today Fireclay is a leading tile brand, a B Corporation focused on using business as a force for good, and employs over 90 people in California with a direct-to-customer online focused business model. Hear their stories and lessons learned in their individual paths to entrepreneurship. Presented by the Classes of 2001 and 2011.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:45 PM
A Path Less Traveled
Instead of graduate school, Tony Brasunas ’96 left for China just after Amherst, and his experiences teaching English and traveling there completely changed his life. Brasunas will read from his 2014 book Double Happiness, an award-winning memoir recounting his experiences and journey. He’ll answer questions about learning Mandarin, meditating with Tibetan monks and locating the most mouth-watering dumplings in Guangzhou. Presented by the Class of 1996.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
2:45 PM
Will God Survive Science?
Best-selling author Dan Brown ’86 offers a talk and Q&A session centering on the potent influence of emerging science and technology on human philosophy and religion. Presented by the Class of 1986.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:45 PM
Follow the Water: the Ocean Worlds of Our Solar System
You’ve heard about the discovery of liquid water on Mars. But did you know that Enceladus, a small moon of Saturn, has geysers that spout liquid water into space, contributing to the formation of one of Saturn’s rings? That the condensation and freezing of water powers major storms on Saturn and Jupiter that thrust vertically over 100 miles in altitude and cover a surface area the size of our own planet Earth? That Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, has hydrocarbon lakes and maybe even an ocean of water deep below the surface? That NASA’s forthcoming Europa mission will probe that icy moon’s subsurface oceans for signs of primitive life? In this talk, Kevin Baines ’76, a scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, “follows the water” to describe what planetary scientists are learning about the ocean worlds of our solar system. Presented by the Class of 1976.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
2:45 PM
Insights on Key National Security Challenges
Conversation on national security with Stuart Johnson ’66, Director of International Studies at the RAND Corp., who formerly served on the staff of the Secretary of Defense and was Director of Force Planning at NATO Headquarters, and is currently leading a working group set up by the Secretary of Defense to determine what options the U.S. and its NATO Allies might employ to checkmate Russia’s aggression in its west and southwest border regions; John Merson ’66, author of the acclaimed book War Lessons; Bill Wise ’66, former Deputy National Security Adviser to the Vice President and Chief of Policy at the U.S. Pacific Command, now at Johns Hopkins; and, streaming live from China, Tom Plate ’66, former Editor of the Los Angeles Times and now a leading syndicated columnist and commentator on U.S. relations with China, Asia and the Pacific Rim. Presented by the Class of 1966.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:45 PM
Amherst Thanks: You've Got 60 Seconds!
What aspect of your Amherst experience are you most thankful for? Was it a class, a professor, an assignment, a roommate, a sport, a performance, casino night, a walk through the woods, a pizza, a late night discussion, an opportunity? Did you recognize at the time how valuable that moment was? Alums from all classes are invited to step up to the microphone and give their thanks in 60 seconds or less. We're looking for a symphonic experience, but will accept a cacophony. Moderated by Cam Hutchins '81, Class Secretary, and Katie Fretwell '81, Dean of Admission and Financial Aid at Amherst. Presented by the Class of 1981.
Johnson Chapel
2:45 PM
How Has the College Classroom Changed in the Past 25 Years?
Many members of our class were inspired to become professors because of the experience we had at Amherst. Yet higher education has undergone transformations we could not have imagined 25 years ago. Technological change offers one illustration: Professors can now creatively use content from the internet and offer courses entirely online; yet, at the same time, students have limitless ways to be distracted and disengaged from the learning process. This session draws on the diverse experiences of several members of our class to highlight salient patterns in today’s college students compared to prominent trends we were part of a generation ago. Presented by the Class of 1991.
Kirby Theater
2:45 PM
Three ’71 Adjunct Professors Give Snippet Highlights of their Best Classes
Three members of the Class of 1971 who each found teaching as a second career share highlights of their best classes. Doug Abbey ’71 gives a highlight of his best class (given at Stanford Business School) on “What Makes a City Great”; Mason Daring ’71 gives a snippet of his best lecture on “How to Write Musical Scores for the Movies”; and George Freeman ’71 gives a highlight of his best class (at Columbia Journalism School) on “How New York Times v. Sullivan Changed Libel and First Amendment Law.” Presented by the Class of 1971.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
2:45 PM
Race and Amherst: Looking Back and Moving Forward
This program will feature four members of the Class of 2006, who will share their experiences and thoughts relating to race and their Amherst experience 10 years ago. Moderator Tim Visser '06 will facilitate an open discussion between attendees and panelists regarding the experiences of '06 alums as Amherst students and as Amherst alumni addressing the Amherst Uprising. Presented by the Class of 2006.
Stirn Auditorium
2:45 PM
Legends of the Connecticut Valley
Joseph Moldenhauer ’56, retired from the faculty at The University of Texas at Austin, and James Freeman ’56, retired from the faculty at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, will share some accumulated arcana about the “Angel of Hadley,” a person who (or may not) have participated in a Hadley town meeting in the 17th century and who advised (or maybe didn’t advise) the persons present about the steps they should take to protect themselves from an anticipated attack. Prof. Moldenhauer will discuss “The Editing of Emily Dickinson,” topic that will touch on history, integrity and the remarkable achievements of the College’s neighbor. Presented by the Class of 1956.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
3:30 PM
Meet the New Director - Storeroom to Galleries Tour
Behind the scenes tour with Director and Chief Curator, David E. Little.
Mead Art Museum
4:00 PM
Corporate Values: Lip Service or Strategic Imperative?
Globalization, rapid technological change and disruptive business models increasingly threaten for-profit corporations, even entire industries. In places like Silicon Valley, the highest-performing employees routinely receive multiple job offers before lunch every day. And shareholder activism has become mainstream. As corporate leaders navigate this “flat world” environment to satisfy all stakeholders—investors, customers, employees and the communities in which they operate—how important are corporate values and culture? How can companies establish and maintain enduring values, and what are the broader implications for society? Charles Brewer ’81, Founder of the internet company MindSpring (which later merged with EarthLink); Sam DeSimone ’81, EVP and General Counsel of MindSpring/EarthLink; Jim Kennedy ’81, CEO of IT services company Network Support; and Barry Volpert ’81, Co-Founder and CEO of private equity firm Crestview Partners, will share their stories and perspectives. Presented by the Class of 1981.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
4:00 PM
9x6: Storytelling Hour
The Class of ’96 presents an hour of storytelling featuring the work of alumni writers, filmmakers, radio journalists and photographers. Come gather ’round as we experiment with narrative through visual, oral and mixed media. Some of the featured stories have never been told before, so join us as we unveil new work and offer a series of nine fiction and nonfiction stories that we’ve collected in the 20 years since we left Amherst. Speakers include Amanda Boggs ’96 (photographer and dancer), Tony Brasunas ’96 (writer), Kwame Brathwaite ’96 (presenting photography by his father, Kwame Brathwaite Sr.), Mirissa Neff ’96 (documentary filmmaker and radio producer), Bill Wasik ’96 (writer and editor), Soo Youn ’96 (writer) and surprise guests. Presented by the Class of 1996.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
4:00 PM
Legacy: Life Lessons from Amherst's First Women Graduates
After Amherst’s decision to go coed in 1975, nine women who were already on campus as part of the Twelve College Exchange program were admitted as transfer students and became members of the Class of 1976. The following year, they became Amherst’s first women graduates. Forty years later, Ruth Kremen ’76, Wendy Mantel ’76 and Dorothy Schatzkin-Higgins ’76 describe what they learned and continue to learn about men and women, work and love, career and family, and the role of Amherst in helping them make their mark and lead meaningful lives. Moderated by Martha M. Umphrey, the Bertrand H. Snell 1894 Professor in American Government and Director of the Center for Humanistic Inquiry. Presented by the Class of 1976.
Stirn Auditorium
4:00 PM
What Works and Is Replicable in Urban Education?
In this discussion, we'll hear from three school leaders who have worked to develop strong schools in Chicago, New York and L.A. We'll discuss the benefits and drawbacks of charter school models, and hear about what's working in large public school systems. With Amber Young Medina ’01, Managing Director of KIPP LA and founding principal of KIPP Raíces Academy; Nikki Huvelle Milberg '01, Principal of Mitchell Elementary School in Chicago; and Bob Kuklis '61, former Principal of New Rochelle High School and consultant to educational leaders in urban schools. Presented by the Class of 2001.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
The Frontiers of Science - Recent Research Breakthroughs from the Class of 1991
Members of the Class of 1991 are doing incredible work everywhere, including on the frontiers of science. Come hear classmates including Jen Smith ’91 and David Hall ’91 talk about their work in brief, TED-style presentations. Jen will be talking about her work in cancer research and David will finally teach you what quantum physics is, so that you can impress your friends and relatives. Presented by the Class of 1991.
Kirby Theater
4:00 PM
An Open Forum Between the Classes of ’71 and ’06: How Did Factors Outside Campus Such as Wars (Vietnam/Iraq) and the Economy (angst about getting jobs) Affect Your Amherst Experience
An open discussion between members of two Amherst classes 35 years apart on how the different eras influenced their college years. A member of each class will moderate. Presented by the Classes of 1971 and 2006.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
4:00 PM
Amherst Traditions: A Panel Discussion Hosted by the Youngest Reunion Class
We ’11s can, of course, recall the first snow’s sled down Memorial Hill, the Lip Sync competition for Room Draw and the booing of Williams at any opportunity. But what Amherst traditions skipped our four-year era? What has been changed, and what remains merely in memory? Come on by for a panel discussion about Amherst traditions then and now, featuring alums from the mid-20th century to today! Panelists include: John Kirkpatrick '51, Stuart Deane '61, Bennett Wilson '96, Andrew Zolot '11, Tessa McEvoy '16 and David Zheutlin '11 (moderator). Presented by the Class of 2011.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
5:30 PM
Reception in Honor of Architectural and European Studies Majors
Join us in celebrating alumni associated with the Architectural and European Studies Programs. Drinks and hors d’oeuvres.
Wine Lounge, The Lord Jeffery Inn
5:30 PM
GALA Reception
All alumni and guests are welcome. Refreshments will be served. Sponsored by the Gay and Lesbian Alumni Association and Alumni and Parent Programs.
Queer Resource Center, basement of Morrow Residence Hall (enter from Valentine Quad)
7:00 PM
Petrichor: The 18th Apocalypse Party
Apocalypse is a party for people who don't like parties, hosted by Planworld. Come on by, play intellectual games, have conversations, and enjoy a heart-stopping Black Sheep cake and other tasty refreshments. All who enjoy fine company are invited. We will continue until people stop talking.
Lounge, Newport House
9:00 PM
Night at the Observatory
The Astronomy Association, in collaboration with Amherst College Science Outreach, invite you to come observe the night sky through telescopes and binoculars while they guide you and teach you some astronomy as well. Tom Whitney of the Astronomy Association will be present to operate Amherst College’s own 19-inch Clark refractor telescope. This event is open to all, but it will be canceled if the weather is uncooperative (cloudy).
Wilder Observatory, Snell Street
9:00 PM
The Zumbyes' Reunion Show
The Zumbyes welcome all Zum-alums, Amherst alums, friends, fans and anyone else to Buckley Recital Hall to celebrate the 66th year of the group with a free concert of new songs, classic songs and, of course, our beloved College songs.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Sunday, May 29, 2016
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
We'll be open for you to drop off your keys or ask last-minute questions before you head home. Telephone: (413) 542-2065. Alumni House will close at noon.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Service of Remembrance and Community
Please join us for an ecumenical service to remember the lives of those alumni we have lost this year with the Rev. Kenneth Sawyer ’66, Minister Emeritus at First Parish in Wayland, Mass., and Rabbi Ilana Foss ’01 of Temple Beth Emunah, Brockton, Mass. The Amherst College Gospel Choir from the early 1990s will share their voices with us for this service.
War Memorial, Memorial Hill (Rain site: Chapin Chapel)