2018 Reunion Schedule

Programs will continuously be posted and updated as they are confirmed. Note that private class programs, including class dinners, do not appear on the public schedule. Please check back frequently to see what's new!

All programs are 60 minutes unless otherwise noted. Find locations on our Campus Map.
Use the fields below to search the Reunion Schedule.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018
2:00 PM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at 9 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
2:30 PM
Director’s Talk at the Emily Dickinson Museum
Meet Jane Wald, Executive Director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, to hear about new projects at the museum, including explorations in archeobotany and archaeology and the reconstruction of the Dickinson family conservatory in 2017.
The Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
5:30 PM
Reunion Welcome Reception at the Robert Frost Library
Meet, mingle and renew old friendships at the Robert Frost Library with a glass of wine and hors d’oeuvres. Visit the Center for Humanistic Inquiry and enjoy the main-floor gathering spaces and displays from Archives and Special Collections. The Bluestockings will perform at 6 p.m. Reception ends at 7 p.m.
Robert Frost Library
7:00 PM
Professor Ilan Stavans Reads from and Discusses His New Book of Poetry, The Wall

In the age of fake news, Ilan Stavans went to the U.S.-Mexico border to explore the juncture of aborted dreams and exacerbated realities. He traversed several portions of it with the help of old maps and impressionistic colonial accounts like Cabeza de Vaca’s Chronicle of the Narváez Expedition. He came back with a polyphonic epic poem in the tradition of Edgar Lee Masters’ Spoon River Anthology. The Wall is a poetic exploration—across time, space and language, real as well as metaphorical—of the U.S.-Mexican wall dividing the two civilizations; of similar walls (in Jerusalem, China, Berlin, Warsaw, etc.) through history; and of the act of separating people by ideology, class, race and other subterfuges. Poetry becomes a tool to explore raw human emotion in all its extremes. Ilan Stavans is the Lewis-Sebring Professor of Humanities, Latin American and Latino Culture. He is the editor of The Norton Anthology of Latino Literature and hosts the NPR podcast In Contrast.

Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
Thursday, May 24, 2018
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at 10 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
10:00 AM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
Tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command’s (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history, led by Aaron Hayden, the College’s Capital Projects Manager and the unofficial authority on the history of the Bunker. The Bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the College in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Please sign up in advance. If space is available, you may sign up on-site at the Alumni House Reception Center. Please note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the Bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
10:30 AM
Director’s Talk at the Emily Dickinson Museum
Meet Jane Wald, Executive Director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, to hear about new projects at the museum, including explorations in archeobotany and archaeology and the reconstruction of the Dickinson family conservatory in 2017.
The Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
10:30 AM
Tour of Fragmented Identities with Curator of American Art Vanja Malloy

Fragmented Identities: The Gendered Roles of Women in Art Through the Ages presents works from a variety of time periods and media to examine the ways in which women have been depicted around the globe. Join us for a gallery talk with Vanja Malloy, Curator of American Art, to learn how these portrayals of women can pigeonhole their subjects into gendered roles or, in other cases, challenge social constructs.

Mead Art Museum
10:30 AM
Freedom, Property and the State: A Neglected Alternative
American society (and political philosophy) is conflicted about the role the state ought to play in the economy. Egalitarians think that current levels of economic inequality are deeply unjust and so the state should redistribute resources through taxation. Libertarians think that any such redistribution is nothing more than government-enacted theft. They hold that the redistributive state destroys the idea of private property and the place of individual initiative in a free society. The conflict between these two camps seems to call into doubt our commitment to uphold both freedom and equality. Achieving equality necessitates violating freedom, and a free society will be profoundly unequal. But what if individual liberty, properly understood, depends for its coherence as a concept on some degree of economic equality? What if the moral justification of property ownership requires the welfare state? In that case, freedom and equality can be reconciled. In this talk, Rafeeq Hasan, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, attempts this reconciliation, drawing on the views of Immanuel Kant and, somewhat unexpectedly, F.A. Hayek.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
1:00 PM
Beneski Museum "Bones and Stones" Tour
Join Alfred Venne, Museum Educator, for a walk through the Beneski Museum of Natural History, which houses outstanding collections and exhibits that include vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and from around the world since 1825. Particularly noteworthy is the world-famous dinosaur track collection. Bring your cameras!
Beneski Museum of Natural History
1:00 PM
Amherst College Financial Update
Join Kevin Weinman, Chief Financial Officer, to learn more about Amherst’s financial model and outlook. Our thoughtful approach to investment, combined with the uniquely generous spirit of philanthropy Amherst inspires, has created one of the strongest financial portfolios in higher education.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
1:00 PM
Mammoths, Mascots and Digitizing College History
In the fall of 2017, Archives and Special Collections marked the launch of the new College mascot (Go, Mammoths!) with an exhibition titled Of Mammoths and Mascots. In this session, Mike Kelly, Head of Archives and Special Collections, will talk about the history of both mammoths and mascots at Amherst College. The Archives team has been working closely with several units on campus to prepare for the College’s bicentennial in 2021. Este Pope, Head of Digital Programs, will give an overview of the labor involved in digitizing College history, followed by a quick tour of the digital studio on A-Level in Frost Library.
Archives and Special Collections, Frost Library
2:30 PM
Professor William Taubman on His New Book, Gorbachev: His Life and Times
When Mikhail Gorbachev became leader of the Soviet Union in 1985, the USSR was one of the world’s two superpowers. By 1990, he, more than anyone else, had ended the Cold War, and in 1991, after barely escaping a coup attempt, he unintentionally presided over the collapse of the Soviet Union he had tried to save. In the first comprehensive biography of the final Soviet leader, Professor Taubman examines Gorbachev’s evolution and portrays the many sides of Gorbachev’s unique character, extending to his marriage and family life. William Taubman is the Bertrand Snell Professor of Political Science, Emeritus. His 2003 book, Khrushchev: The Man and His Era, won both the Pulitzer Prize for biography and the National Book Critics Circle Award for biography. Taubman’s new book, Gorbachev, was one of five finalists for this year’s National Book Critics Circle Award for biography. Presented by the Class of 1968.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:30 PM
Stearns Steeple Tour and Chimes Concert
Aaron Hayden, the College’s Capital Projects Manager, will give a short talk on the history of the steeple, its place on campus in the formative years of the College and the Howe Chimes in its belfry. The church to which the steeple was attached was donated by the son of President William Augustus Stearns to be a centerpiece on campus and in campus life. The chimes were donated in honor of the members of the Amherst College community who died in the “Great War Between the States.” Aaron will play tunes on the chimes that might have been played when they were new—as well as some other favorites.
Neuhoff Sculpture Court, in front of the Mead Art Museum
4:00 PM
Getting Our Hands Dirty: Studies of Wildlife to Understand Disease Transmission with Michael Hood, Professor of Biology
Research on the fundamentals of infectious disease is at the intersection between important health concerns and understanding primary forces driving ecological diversity in natural populations. Our investigations use a naturally occurring disease of wild alpine flowers, which present opportunities to study the spread of infections in a safe and experimentally tractable system. The "anther-smut disease" replaces pollen of the flower with pathogenic spores, and this somewhat silly name belies an impact on par with the infamous black death, affecting nearly a third of all host individuals and causing complete, lifetime sterility. We are working to determine how the disease spreads by a mixture of dispersal modes, via sexual transmission (the botanical analogy) and by contact between individuals in close proximity. These interactions parallel the discovery of mixed transmission mode of some of the most alarming epidemics of recent history, and we aim to reveal the basic ecological and evolutionary consequences that have relevance across diverse types of diseases.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
Guided Looking at the William Green Print Collection with Lesley Ham
Join Lesley Ham, Carpenter Fellow, for an inside look at highlights from the William Green Collection of Japanese Prints. Hear a brief history of Green’s print collection, and then experience a close-looking session led by Ham. Introduction will begin at 4 p.m. All are welcome to drop in anytime between 4 and 5 p.m.
Mead Art Museum
7:00 PM
Love Letters: A Play by A.R. Gurney

Audiences around the world have responded with both tears and laughter as Andy and Melissa recount their love story and reread their letters to each other from the second grade through adulthood. The unusual style of the play enhances its powerful effect on listeners. It allows the words, not the action, to recreate the story of this lifelong, tumultuous romance. With only two actors on stage, the audience is very soon drawn into the story as it unfolds and, by play’s end, have become completely caught up in the personality and destiny of each character. It’s a powerful night of theater and one you’ll long remember. Produced and directed by Dennis Helfand ’68. Performed by Dennis and Judith Helfand. The performance will run for approximately two hours, including a 10-minute intermission. Presented by the Class of 1968.

Kirby Memorial Theater
8:00 PM
The Amherst College DQ in Concert
See Amherst's oldest a cappella group perform!
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at midnight.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
The Role of Liberal Arts Education in an Age of Polarization
From college campuses to local communities and nations around the globe, citizens, institutions and political systems must deal with the turbulent effects of polarization. Undergraduates are keenly aware of the contentious debates over climate change, Red vs. Blue states, resurgent white supremacy, immigration, sexual harassment and gaping income inequality. Amherst College and other liberal arts institutions are not insulated from these deeply divisive contests of ideas, ideologies and worldviews. Yet experts warn that if mutual toleration and forbearance erode, extreme polarization can wreck even established democracies like ours. This panel will focus on the role of liberal arts institutions, and especially Amherst, in the age of polarization. How do contentious issues play out in the classroom and campus life? How does Amherst engage undergraduates in rigorous analysis of fractious issues while respecting intellectual freedom, fostering tolerance and preparing them for “principled lives of consequence” in a polarized world? Moderated by Hugh Price ’63, Former President and CEO of the National Urban League and author of This African-American Life. Panelists include Elizabeth J. Aries, the Clarence Francis 1910 Professor in Social Sciences (Psychology); Richard Freeland ’63, Ph.D., Former President of Northeastern University and former Commissioner of Higher Education for the State of Massachusetts; Norm Jones, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer at Amherst College; and Caryce Tirop ’17. Presented by the Class of 1963.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
9:00 AM
Baseball (and Amherst) Between Japan and the U.S.
Baseball has been the national pastime of both the U.S. and Japan since the late 19th century, but the game has developed differently in the two countries. As a cultural anthropologist who studies sport and society, Bill Kelly ’68 reflects on baseball’s place in the two countries. The sport, it turns out, is also one strand of the long relationship between Amherst and Dōshisha University, founded in Kyoto, Japan, by 1870 Amherst grad Joseph Neesima. Join Bill Kelly, Yale University Professor of Japanese Studies, and Trent Maxey, Associate Professor of Asian Languages and Civilizations and History at Amherst, as they share perspectives on baseball and Japanese society. Kelly is author of a forthcoming book about Japan’s second-favorite professional team, The Sportsworld of the Hanshin Tigers, and Maxey helped to organize the successful 2014 tour of Japan by the Amherst baseball team. Presented by the Class of 1968.
Stirn Auditorium
9:00 AM
Those Who Teach and Those Who Learn: A Conversation with the Dean of the Faculty
Join Catherine Epstein, Dean of the Faculty and Winkley Professor of History, for a wide-ranging conversation about Amherst’s academic landscape. Among other topics, Dean Epstein will discuss academic initiatives, pedagogical innovation and the changing faculty at the College.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
9:00 AM
Science for 2018 and Beyond
Following up on President Charlie Cole and Professor Arnold Arons, who boldly led us into Science 1, 2 in September 1954, we will present two cutting-edge scientific topics that we believe should be included in such a Science 1, 2 course for this fall’s entering first-year students at Amherst: (a) planets outside our solar system and the search for extraterrestrial life, and (b) the application of genomics and immunotherapy to the treatment of cancer. Come and find out about these fields which our Science 1, 2 course could never have even imagined. Presenters include Kate Follette, Assistant Professor of Astronomy, and Richard Goldsby, the Thomas B. Walton Jr. Memorial Professor of Biology, Emeritus. Presented by the Class of 1958.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
10:30 AM
The Meanings of Mobility: Family, Undocumented Immigration and the Rise of the New Latino Elite
In the current landscape of higher education, opportunities for the collective advancement of low-income youth, especially youth of color, appear limited. Latinos are faring worst; only 21 percent have bachelor’s degrees. Yet while collective mobility stagnates, endowment-funded diversity initiatives targeting high-achieving individuals are reshaping the race and class composition of the U.S. educational elite. Indeed, low-income Latinos now have a significant demographic and political presence at Amherst. Drawing on three years of ethnographic research and 30 life-history interviews, this talk will explore how Latino youth at Amherst are experiencing individual educational mobility as members of socially marginalized families and communities. Specifically, we analyze how having undocumented immigration status or undocumented family members shapes the ways in which Latino students experience an elite education and construct their future aspirations. Presented by Leah Schmalzbauer, Professor of American Studies and Sociology, and Aleli Andres ’17E, summa cum laude major in sociology.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
10:30 AM
Behind-the-Scenes Tour of the Mead with David E. Little
All are invited to a behind-the-scenes tour of the Mead Art Museum with David E. Little, Director and Chief Curator. Join us to explore our art storage facilities, underground classrooms and more!
Mead Art Museum
10:30 AM
Piano and Oboe Recital by John ’58 and Sally Davenport
Presented by the Class of 1958.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
10:30 AM
The Original, Grumpy Old Man
Join Jeremiah Mead ’68, P’09, a retired high school Latin teacher, for a casual lecture on the Roman author Phaedrus, who wrote fables in Latin, in verse—some hand-me-downs from Aesop, some his own. Topics include the little we know about him; political and social commentary in the fables; Phaedrus’ sense of his own importance and resentment of his critics; and his outlook late in life. Presented by the Class of 1968.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1:00 PM
Richard Wilbur: A Celebration of His Life and Work
Join moderator David Sofield, the Samuel Williston Professor of English, for a panel discussion in remembrance of former U.S. Poet Laureate and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Wilbur ’42, P’73, G’14. Panelists include Mary P’82 and Robert Bagg ’57, P’82, authors of Let Us Watch Richard Wilbur: A Biographical Study; William Pritchard ’53, the Henry Clay Folger Professor of English, Emeritus; and Ralph Hammann, director of the forthcoming documentary Richard Wilbur and the Things of This World. Excerpts from the film will be shown. Program ends at 2:15 p.m.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
1:00 PM
Planetarium Program: We Are Part of This Universe
For over 55 years, the Bassett Planetarium has served the College well. This tool has helped countless individuals better understand their place in the universe. Join Alfred Venne, Planetarium Director, as he uses the vintage Spitz A3P Starball to help recreate the night sky over Amherst. In addition, using a classic Orrery, participants will examine the plane of the solar system, the tilt of the Earth, day/night and seasons. The main takeaway from the planetarium visit may best be summed up by Neil deGrasse Tyson, who said, “We are part of this universe, we are in this universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the universe is in us.”
Bassett Planetarium, Morgan Hall
1:00 PM
Family-Friendly Tour of the Mead with the Education Department
All are invited to explore exhibitions on view now at the Mead with family-friendly conversations and activities.
Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
1) The Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis: Research that Won the Nobel Prize and 2) The Pathogenesis of Aging: Research that Will Win the Nobel Prize, with Dr. James L. Frey ’68
1) The first presentation explains the process called “hardening of the arteries,” graphically portraying the mechanism, emphasizing the central role of cholesterol. The history of medical inhibitors of cholesterol is chronicled. The research that led to the 1985 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is then explained and visually portrayed, but… there will be more, and that’s what’s exciting! 2) Aging is the disease with which we are all ultimately afflicted. The question is not “if”, but when. This presentation explores the usual suspects—genetics, geography, diet, activity. It then explains how these are only observations that have led to little more than speculations. Experiments in modern molecular biology and physiology are redefining aging. They now show us tantalizing research that writers of science fiction would envy. Presented by the Class of 1968.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
Learning Vocal Presence: The Craft of Speaking
Join Ron Bashford ’88, Associate Professor of Theater and Dance, for a talk and demonstration about his popular course “The Craft of Speaking.” Ron will describe the history and theory of the techniques he teaches to help students become more present, confident and powerful as speakers. The course is based on a long tradition of training for classical actors, adapted for liberal arts students of all kinds. Bashford will demonstrate some of the exercises in a studio setting—assuming there are willing volunteers among you! Limited to 30 participants, with up to 10 attendees participating in exercises related to improving vocal presence.
Studio 2, Webster Hall
2:30 PM
The Amherst College Greenway
By fall 2018, the eastern portion of campus will be transformed by the addition of a 250,000-square-foot Science Center, four new residence halls and an expansive Greenway for recreation and relaxation, running the full length of that landscape. The Greenway Projects are an expression of what Amherst believes about teaching, learning, living and interacting as a community. Join Jim Brassord, Chief of Campus Operations, to hear an overview of the project and its sustainability features, including new dorms completed in 2016; Science Center construction, scheduled for completion in summer 2018; and the outdoor spaces that will connect these projects with the main campus.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
Freedom of Speech and Freedom of the Press in the Age of Trump
You don’t need a weatherman to know that freedom of speech—our most precious, and also most fragile, liberty—faces strong headwinds. Donald Trump, our first president to successfully bypass the media (via Twitter), attacks news organizations as “enemies of the people” and purveyors of “fake news.” He has called for criminal investigation of leaks to journalists and stripping of constitutional defenses from libel law, while prejudging ongoing regulatory proceedings involving media companies that have dared to criticize him. The panel will explore the impact and implications of Trump’s scapegoating of journalists, as well as other free speech issues of the moment, such as constitutional protection for “hate speech”; efforts to curb propaganda and false news articles on Facebook and other social media; anonymous speech; and the battle over “dark money” in political campaigns. And, yes, we may also discuss suppression of speech and debate on college campuses. Panelists are First Amendment lawyers Peter Scheer ’73, former Executive Director of the First Amendment Coalition and General Counsel to the National Security Archive, and George Freeman ’71, P’15,’09, Executive Director of the Media Law Resource Center and former Vice President and Assistant General Counsel to The New York Times. Also on the panel is former Washington Post correspondent and medical doctor David M. Brown ’73, who has reported extensively about medical and health policy matters. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
Sex in Asian American Literature, Film and Performance
Originally for audiences in Japan and Taiwan, this show-and-tell is a response to a Japanese student’s question, “Why is sex so prominent in Asian American literature?” This leads to other questions concerning Asian American history and cultural portrayals by Asian Americans and in the mainstream. Don’t expect an academic lecture on sex, sexuality and gender. Have fun. Steve Sumida ’68, an Amherst-Dōshisha Fellow, has retired after nearly 50 years of teaching multicultural American and Asian American literature. Steve’s scholarly works include And the View from the Shore: Literary Traditions of Hawai‘i, other books and articles, and scores of talks in the U.S. and abroad. He’s received professional honors including presidency of the American Studies Association. He has also been creative in theater and other media, providing voiceovers for the PBS broadcast of the documentary Conscience and the Constitution: A Story of Japanese America and, currently in film festivals, Proof of Loyalty. Presented by the Class of 1968.
Stirn Auditorium
3:00 PM
Resource Center Reception
Join the Multicultural Resource Center, Queer Resource Center, Women’s and Gender Center, Center for International Student Engagement and Office of Campus Diversity and Student Leadership for a joint alumni reception. Meet the center directors and mingle with our growing community of Amherst alumni. Stop by to hear about the variety of programs, workshops and trainings we hold and to learn more about diversity and inclusion initiatives on campus. Wine, beer and appetizers will be served. Reception ends at 5 p.m.
Queer Resource Center, Keefe Campus Center 213
4:00 PM
Working for God and Finding Meaning in the Middle of Life
What does a life of religious service look like in an era where faith and reflection seem set against outrage and outbursts (not to mention middle-aged lives of overarching logistical insanity)? Rabbi Brenner Glickman ’93, who serves a thriving congregation in Sarasota, Fla., and The Rev. Megan Carr Holding ’93, the Episcopal Spiritual Advisor at Northeastern University in Boston, will share the stories of how (or if) they found God at Amherst and eventually landed in the clergy. (Megan is a reformed lawyer; Brenner is a Reform Jew.) Like many of the people they serve, you too may long for more spiritual connection in your life but may not participate in traditional worship communities as much as your parents did. Or perhaps the mere idea of God is off-putting. But all comers are welcome as we discuss where we fit in on faith and how to find what we’re searching for. Presented by the Class of 1993.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
Amherst in the Amazon: Nature and People in the World's Biggest Rainforest
Despite alarming headlines, huge strides have been made in protecting the greatest rainforest on Earth, which is integral to preserving the planet’s biodiversity and climate stability. Tens of millions of acres of protected areas and indigenous reserves have been established, and a deeper understanding has emerged of people’s needs and interactions with nature. Foster Brown ’73 is a Senior Scientist with the Woods Hole Research Center and also a faculty member at the Federal University of Acre in Brazil. Jonathan Putnam ’88 works in the U.S. National Park Service’s Office of International Affairs, responsible for the Western Hemisphere and natural World Heritage sites. John Reid ’88, P’20 is founder and former President of Conservation Strategy Fund, an NGO that works extensively in the Amazon. The panel will be moderated by Katharine Sims, Associate Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies. Presented by the Classes of 1973 and 1988.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
un/bodying/s : A New Cantata About the Quabbin Reservoir
Composer Greg Brown ’98 will speak about his new cantata—un/bodying/s—which addresses ideas of displaced peoples, particularly those of the former Swift River Valley, now the Quabbin Reservoir (not far from Amherst). The composer will present photographs, maps, historical background and audio clips from his recently released CD of the work with Philadelphia choir, The Crossing. Presented by the Class of 1998.
Stirn Auditorium
4:00 PM
Two Sides to Every Trade: Keeping an Open Mind When Investing Your Capital
Alex Bacu ’03 is a former investment banking analyst now working for Neuberger Berman. He works in portfolio management and equity research as part of a team managing ~$6 billion in assets under management. Alex will give a short presentation on the impact of a liberal arts education on investing, which will be followed by an audience Q&A. Presented by the Class of 2003.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
5:00 PM
Reception with President Biddy Martin
Join President Biddy Martin and others from the College for conversation and celebration. All are welcome. Reception ends at 6:30 p.m.
Valentine Quad
Saturday, May 26, 2018
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at 9:30 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
8:30 AM
Amherst Christian Fellowship Reunion
Come visit old friends and hear about what is going on in ACF. Drop by anytime between 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. Light breakfast foods will be provided. Hosted by Chris Gow ’16, ACF Advisor, and Paul Sorrentino, Director of Religious and Spiritual Life.
Pemberton Lounge (formerly Chapin Lounge), Chapin Hall
9:00 AM
Book & Plow Farm: Five Years Later
This program will feature the alumni founders of Book & Plow Farm in conversation with the current farm manager. Arne Anderson ’13, Diedre Nelms ’13, Alex Propp ’13 and Maida Ives will discuss the founding of the farm and what it looks like today. Presented by the Class of 2013.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
9:00 AM
Amherst’s Impact On My Activism
During the 1980s, Amherst College was a tumultuous place. There was a strong anti-apartheid movement, as well as numerous other struggles and protests hoping to make Amherst more racially and ethnically diverse and more accepting of women, gay and transgender students, faculty and scholarship. This discussion will examine how cultural and political movements influenced the current activism of several members of the Class of 1988. Panelists include Barbara Brousal-Glaser ’88, a performer, music teacher and City Councilor in Newton, Mass.; Julie Galdieri ’88, speechwriter, speech coach, performer and founder of Loquent, Inc.; Stanley B. Lemons ’88, author of Expanding College Opportunity and Speaker, Trainer and President of TheSecretToWriting.com; Charles Myers ’88, Chairman and Co-Founder of Signum Global Advisors; Nathan Newman ’88, professor, political research consultant, dad of two kids, J.D. and Ph.D.; and Erica Stracher Fields ’88, STEM education research and evaluation associate, poet/rapper/blogger. Moderated by Flora Stamatiades ’88, union organizer and negotiator, Yale School of Drama ’94 graduate, cat lover, Pilates fanatic and Bikram yogi. Presented by the Class of 1988.
Stirn Auditorium
9:00 AM
So You're a Doctor Now, Huh?
Have you ever wondered where your pre-med friends ended up? What career paths did they choose? Do they have any memorable stories? Come to hear Jose Abad ’03 (Family Practice), Katie (Gravel) Barker ’03 (OB-GYN), Robin Goldman ’03 (Hospitalist), John Downey ’03 (Radiology) and Erin Beaumont ’03 (ER) talk about life in medicine. We might even try to answer odd medical questions like “Why do men have nipples?” or “What’s the best way to stop hiccups?” Presented by the Class of 2003.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
9:00 AM
Our Next 10 Years According to Their Last 10 Years
Over the next 10 years, members of the Class of 1978 will live one of the most pivotal decades of our lives—our sixties—a decade in which decisions may be made and actions may or may not be taken that will greatly impact the remainder of our lives. To help us anticipate and navigate those next 10 years, we will hear from four members of the Class of 1968, back for their 50th Reunion and having just lived the decade we are about to live. Panel hosts: Ed Pitoniak ’78 and Artie Southam ’78, P’20. Panel contributors: Andy Achenbaum ’68, Tom Cliff ’68, Ed Savage ’68 and John Stifler ’68. Presented by the Classes of 1968 and 1978.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
9:00 AM
Tour and Planting Seeds at Book & Plow Farm
Farm, you ask? What farm? Amherst owns and runs a working farm, Book & Plow Farm. It grows all manner of produce and even supplies Valentine Dining Hall. And the produce is so local that the farm is just a 15-minute walk from campus. There, we’ll meet Kaylee Brow, Assistant Manager, for a tour of the Core Site and a (kid-friendly) winter squash seeding activity, which will continue until 11 a.m. We’ll go rain or shine, as we’ll be meeting at the greenhouse. Maps to the farm will be available at the Alumni House Reception Center, and parking is available for people who prefer to drive. Presented by the Class of 1993.
Book & Plow Farm Greenhouse on Tuttle Hill, 425 South East St, Amherst
10:15 AM
Yes We Catan!
In memory of Chris Herron ’98, we will play the classic board game Settlers of Catan. Experienced and new players welcome! A kind and brilliant social entrepreneur, Chris established a charitable competitive Catan league that fundraised for nonprofits. Help celebrate Chris and trade some sheep! If you have the game, please bring it so we can accommodate more players. Recommended for ages 10 and up. Presented by the Class of 1998.
O'Connor Commons, beneath Charles Pratt Dormitory (separate entrance)
10:15 AM
The Consequences of Truth: The Persecution of Andreas Georgiou ’83 for Reporting Accurate Statistics for Greece
In 2010, Andreas Georgiou ’83 resigned from the International Monetary Fund to return to his native Greece to become the head of the Greek statistics office. For years, Greece’s severe fiscal challenges were exacerbated by its production of inaccurate statistics. Under Andreas’ direction, the statistics office fundamentally changed its approach to producing statistics to conform to statistical principles and European Union law. As a result, the statistics revealed Greece’s true economic condition. This resulted in Andreas being aggressively criticized by Greek politicians. He has been charged in several criminal and civil actions, essentially for telling the truth. This program, introduced by Ted Truman ’63, P’93,’90 will explore Andreas’ ongoing ordeal, its causes and its far-ranging consequences, through a discussion with Geoffrey Woglom, the Richard S. Volpert ’56 Professor of Economics. Ted and Geof are among several Amherst alumni and faculty and many others around the world who are supporting Andreas as he defends himself against the ongoing prosecutions. Presented by the Classes of 1963 and 1983.
Johnson Chapel
10:15 AM
Tour of HOUSE: Selections from the Collection of John ’58 and Sue Wieland with David E. Little, Director and Chief Curator
HOUSE features 58 artworks that present provocative interpretations of the house in various shapes, sizes, materials and imaginative manifestations. All are invited to a gallery talk to learn more about this exhibition with Mead Director and Chief Curator David E. Little.
Mead Art Museum
10:15 AM
Poetry Reading
Julie Kramer ’88 and Cindy McGean ’88 will read recent work. Julie is a resident of San Francisco, having moved there on a one-way ticket after graduating from Amherst. She became involved in the spoken-word scene in SF in the 1990s and was a featured poet at several venues in the city. After a hiatus, she began writing again in 2017. Her work is fairly emotions-based and tries to paint images with words, while being accessible to all readers. Cindy is an educator, writer and theater artist with a background in social services. After graduation, she almost ran away to join the circus, but she moved to Portland, Ore. instead. Her work spans a wide range of genres, including short stories in publications such as SQ Magazine, VoiceCatcherKaleidotrope and The Saturday Evening Post, as well as stage and radio scripts that pop up periodically around the country. The current political climate has had a potent impact on her life as a third grade teacher at a Title I school and poetry and performance have become her venues of choice for expressing and exploring that. Presented by the Class of 1988.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:15 AM
“Nonprofessional” Graduate School for Professionals
Did you leave Amherst knowing you wanted to go onto a professional track, like being a lawyer or doctor? That’s great! If NOT, this panel is for YOU! Join Ashley Finigan ’08 as she moderates a panel of alumni who will share their experiences in transitioning into careers such as education, design and academia. Panelists include Katherine Abrikian ’08, Camila de Vedia-Helm ’08, Chris Gillyard ’08, Paola Ligonde ’08 and Lucy Sheehan ’08. Presented by the Class of 2008.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
10:15 AM
MINGUS!
Charles Mingus Jr. is one of the greats of jazz, but how well do we know him, really? In her book The Kind of Man I Am: Jazzmasculinity and the World of Charles Mingus Jr., Nichole Rustin-Paschal ’93 uses Mingus and his music as a leaping-off point to push the history of jazz in the post-World War II era through the prism of gender. Was Mingus the angry man many people portrayed him as, and how has this language of emotion been used in jazz as a shorthand for competing ideas about masculinity, authenticity and authority? Steve Edwards ’93, former drummer (and occasional singer) for the Amherst Jazz Ensemble and chief content officer at Chicago’s premier public radio station, WBEZ, will help lead the discussion. Presented by the Class of 1993.
Kirby Memorial Theater
10:15 AM
Walk on the Wild Side: Animal Adventures for Kids
Join us under the Class of 1998 tent for a true animal adventure. Meet exotic animals such as armadillo, porcupine and kinkajou! Hear interesting stories and learn all about these unique animals from knowledgeable experts. You can even touch a few animals if you dare! Enjoy a fun and unique hands-on learning experience for kids of all ages. Animal Adventures is New England’s largest privately owned animal rescue center that is fully licensed to keep all of their animals. Educational programs like this one help fund the care for their animals. Presented by the Class of 1998.
Morris Pratt Circle
10:15 AM
The Beatles Weren’t Really So Great! (or were they?...)
From Beatlemania to Sgt. Pepper and beyond, the Beatles bracketed and defined the 1960s, at Amherst as elsewhere. As a cultural phenomenon, they influenced everything from lifestyles to hairstyles to politics, to an extent that has no parallel before or since. But what about the music itself? Does it stand the test of time? Was it as good as we remember, or are our memories clouded by a haze of, ahem, nostalgia? Take our magical mystery tour of recorded and live musical examples and visual media as David L. Glass ’68 explores the connections between the compositional techniques intuitively used by Lennon, McCartney and Harrison and those of the great composers we call “classical.” A splendid time is guaranteed for all! Presented by the Class of 1968.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
11:00 AM
Hugh Price ’63: Archival Collection
Hugh Price ’63 has donated his professional papers to Archives and Special Collections in Frost Library. The collection spans his varied career as a legal services lawyer representing low-income people and community organizations in New Haven, Conn.; Executive Director of the Black Coalition of New Haven, which was established to help revive the inner-city neighborhoods and heal the city in the aftermath of the 1967 riot; Editorial Writer for The New York Times; Senior Vice President and head of the national division at WNET/Thirteen (the PBS station in New York City), which produces such acclaimed PBS series as Great Performances, Nature and American Masters; Vice President of the Rockefeller Foundation; originator of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, a quasi-military program for high school dropouts; and President and CEO of the National Urban League. The collection includes speeches, position papers, manuscripts, books, articles, videos and audiotapes of interviews and speeches, photos with luminaries, and pictures from his visit to South Africa during its historic transition in February 1990. The Archives staff has created a finding aid for the Hugh B. Price Papers. A cross-section of items from the collection will be on display until 4 p.m. From 2:30 to 3:30 p.m., Hugh Price will be on-site and available to discuss the display and its connection to the collection and his career. Presented by the Class of 1963.
Archives and Special Collections, Frost Library
11:00 AM
Bounce House
Bring your kids to the Bounce House for bouncing fun and to burn off some energy! All children must be accompanied by an adult. Available until 4 p.m. Presented by the Class of 2003.
Main Quadrangle
11:30 AM
A Conversation with President Biddy Martin and the Annual Meeting of the Society of the Alumni and the Alumni Council
Johnson Chapel
12:00 PM
Men’s and Women’s Soccer Reunion Game
The Amherst men’s and women’s soccer teams will sponsor a game between odd- and even-class soccer alumni. Bring your black shorts, cleats and shin guards; we’ll supply shirts and socks. RSVP to Coach Justin Serpone (jserpone@amherst.edu) so we have a head count, and spread the word to your classmates and teammates. Plan to come to the Alumni Gym at 11:15 a.m. to pick up your uniform.
Gooding Turf Field
12:00 PM
Annual Reunion Luncheon
Join us for a complimentary luncheon under the tent on the Valentine Quad. Look for your classmates under the decade signs!
Valentine Quad
1:00 PM
Physics and Astronomy Department Reception
The Physics and Astronomy Department will hold an informal reception for returning alumni and guests. It may be your last chance to come to a party in Merrill! Reception ends at 3 p.m.
First Floor Courtyard, Merrill Science Building
1:00 PM
Professor David Wills Retirement Reception
Please join the religion department in celebrating the career of David Wills, the John E. Kirkpatrick 1951 Professor of Religion, who is retiring after 46 years of teaching at Amherst. All current and former students, faculty and colleagues are welcome to attend. Reception will end at 2:30 p.m.
Pemberton Lounge (formerly Chapin Lounge), Chapin Hall
1:00 PM
Carnival Fun and Games
All are welcome to the carnival for face painting, lawn games, cotton candy, spin art and bubbles. The carnival will close at 5 p.m. Presented by the Class of 1993.
Main Quadrangle
1:45 PM
Amherst in War: The Stories of Four Generations
The Class of 1978 will host a panel on the Amherst experience of war as lived by four generations of Amherst soldiers: Jim Hamilton ’78 will tell the story of his Amherst grandfather, who was part of a World War I ambulance unit called The Black Cats of Amherst; Bob Brock ’68, P’00 will speak of his Amherst father’s experience of World War II and his own experience of Vietnam; and Paul Rieckhoff ’98, founder of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, will speak of our 21st-century wars. Moderated by Katharine Whittemore, Senior Writer in the College’s Office of Communications, who wrote the “Veterans’ Days” cover story in the Fall 2017 issue of Amherst magazine. A book signing and reception will be held outside of Johnson Chapel following the program. Presented by the Classes of 1968, 1978 and 1998.
Johnson Chapel
1:45 PM
Winning by Losing, Starting by Quitting
Christine Bader ’93 quit a big job at Amazon in corporate responsibility. Rufina Garay ’93 stopped practicing law and started cooking and teaching others to cook. Craig Johnson ’93 lost an election when neighbors pulled the lever for somebody else. And best-selling cookbook author Jenny Rosenstrach ’93 now seeks to write fiction (instead of writing for parents who can’t get their kids to eat good food). How do you get up the guts to ditch a great job and leave a promising career behind to do something else entirely? And what happens when that turn in the road is forced upon you? Radical career changes are possible, and you can indeed pass through them with grace. This quartet will tell us what works and what does not and fill us in on both the art and science of transition. Presented by the Class of 1993.
Kirby Memorial Theater
1:45 PM
Thriving in the Age of Disruption
We are living in a time of accelerating, abrupt and unpredictable change. It seems that every day, new technologies and other factors are touching every aspect of how we live, work and invest. For individuals, the pace of disruption can be both exciting and unnerving. For organizations, the reality is that many will be too slow to respond. Change-blindness and set ways of working stand in the way of adaptation. Despair not! There are ways to cope with disruption. Come hear what some of your classmates have to say on this important topic. Panelists include Allen Cutler ’83, Managing Partner, SoulFounders Ventures; Andy Kendall ’83, Henry P. Kendall Foundation; and Kate Fulton ’83, Managing Director, Global Public Policy, BlackRock. Moderated by Frits Dirk van Paaschen ’83, former CEO, Starwood Hotels and Resorts and author of The Disruptors’ Feast: How to avoid being devoured in today’s rapidly changing global economy. Presented by the Class of 1983.
Stirn Auditorium
1:45 PM
Ageless Vegan: My Top 10 Secrets for Living a Long and Healthy Plant-Based Life
Tracye McQuirter ’88, MPH, went vegan at Amherst 30 years ago, after a campus lecture by Dick Gregory—the global human rights leader and vegan activist—that changed her life. She went on to become a vegan trailblazer herself and has been teaching people how and why to go vegan for the past 25 years. In celebration of both her 30th vegan anniversary and 30th Reunion, Tracye will share her vegan transformation story and her top 10 tips on how you can transition to vegan foods successfully and how to up your game if you’re already a vegan. Tracye was named a national food hero, changing the way America eats for the better, by Vegetarian Times. She’s the author of the upcoming book Ageless Vegan (June 12), as well as the national best-seller By Any Greens Necessary, which established her as one of the most influential vegans in the country. She is a graduate of Sidwell Friends School, Amherst College and New York University, where she received a master’s degree in public health nutrition. Tracye will be introduced by Patty Spencer Favreau ’88, who has admired Tracye’s commitment to social justice and wellness since their days at Amherst. Presented by the Class of 1988.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1:45 PM
The State of Race in America: Are We at an Impasse?
“The problem of the 20th century,” said W.E.B. Dubois, “is the problem of the color line.” It remains a problem for the 21st century. From the nation’s founding, to the Civil War, to Reconstruction, to Jim Crow, to the civil rights era, to affirmative action, to calls for greater diversity and inclusion, to Black Lives Matter, to the racialization of immigration, America continues to struggle to reconcile its promises of equality with the persistent inequities between its white majority and its peoples of color. We are in another moment when questions of race and racial equality dominate national discussions. Ten years after the election of the nation’s first black president, today’s discussions on race seem so different from those during our time at Amherst. Is there still a national commitment to racial equality, or are we doomed forever to be a nation divided by race? Panelists include Julie Ajinkya ’03, Ph.D., Vice President of Applied Research, Institute for Higher Education Policy; Mark Beckwith ’73, Bishop, Episcopal Diocese of Newark; Travis J. Bristol ’03, Ph.D., Peter Paul Assistant Professor, Boston University, School of Education; Lonnie Isabel ’74E, Senior Lecturer, Columbia School of Journalism, and former Deputy Managing Editor, Newsday; and Stephen Keith ’73, M.D., MSPH, Chief Business Development and Medical Officer, Evanston Technology Partners. Moderated by George Johnson ’73, P’03, Professor of Law and Dean Emeritus, Elon University. Presented by the Classes of 1973 and 2003.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:00 PM
Amherst Crew Reunion Row
If you peered between the trees along the riverbank and were startled to see a rowing shell gliding across the face of the water, the urge to jump into the boat would be difficult to extinguish. How satisfying would it be to lean on the rudder again and holler at individuals who are not your children, or press your weight against the foot-stretcher to leverage the shell forward? The experience would fill the hollowness that has ensued since the last time you sat in a boat. Please join us for an afternoon on the river for our annual Reunion gathering at the boathouse. Coach Bill Stekl will also give an update on the progress and success of the young men and women of the Amherst College rowing team, who move boats faster than any of us.
Amherst College Boathouse (Sportsman’s Marina, Route 9 at Coolidge Bridge)
3:00 PM
LGBTQ+ Alumni Reception
Meet Jxhn Martin, Director of the Queer Resource Center, learn about programs and resources and connect with other LGBTQ+ alumni. View excerpts of Invisible No More: A Queer & Trans History at Amherst College, a documentary co-produced and directed by Saren Deardorff ’17 and edited by Bixie Eutsler ’20. This documentary is the culmination of a two-year project dedicated to centering the queer and trans experiences at Amherst College. The film highlights the historical and current narratives of our queer and trans students, staff, faculty and alumni over the years. Reception ends at 5 p.m.
Queer Resource Center, Keefe Campus Center 213
3:00 PM
Family Swim
Have children with lots of energy? Come to Pratt Pool and have an afternoon swim! Each child must have a parent or guardian with them.
Pratt Pool, Alumni Gym
3:00 PM
Can You Reinvent Your Career Over 50?
Traditional retirement is no longer affordable or desirable for an increasing number of baby boomers. Inadequate retirement savings, ongoing responsibilities to aging parents and adult children, plus a need to stay engaged with work and life, are prompting more and more people to try to extend their careers past 65, with, in many cases, no plan to retire at all. But the economy is pushing back, with antiquated policies, unfounded beliefs and ageism erecting obstacles and discouraging older workers from staying in the workforce. With support from the four baby boomer classes at this year’s Reunion, John Tarnoff ’73, a former entertainment industry exec who reinvented his own career, will discuss the takeaways from his 2017 author, Boomer Reinvention: How to Create Your Dream Job Over 50, and engage with fellow boomer alumni who have successfully made their own transitions to second-act careers: Tom Cliff ’68, Bill Woolverton ’73, P’17,’12, David Whitman ’78 and Danny Bernstein ’83. Presented by the Classes of 1968, 1973, 1978 and 1983.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
3:00 PM
From Anita Hill to #MeToo: Transforming our Campuses and the Workplace
Over 20 years ago, Anita Hill brought into the limelight the subject of sexual harassment in the workplace. In recent years, Amherst and other colleges and universities have also found themselves dealing with scrutiny over how they treat sexual assault on campus. With the chain of prominent men across a number of industries stepping down due to harassment and assault scandals, has anything really changed in the decades since Anita Hill? What needs to happen so that in another 20 years, this panel will not be needed? We are honored to have moderating the panel Jodi Kantor, the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter who helped break the Harvey Weinstein story that led to the global rallying cry of #MeToo. Ms. Kantor is the spouse of Ron Lieber ’93. Join in this important conversation with panelists Nichelle Carr ’98, a member of the Board of Directors of the ACLU Foundation of Southern California and a former NBCUniversal executive; Monica Snyder ’08, a management-side employment attorney with an expertise in issues involving sexual harassment; and Dana Bolger ’14E, co-founder of Know Your IX, which educates students about their Title IX right to an education free from sexual violence. Presented by the Classes of 1993, 1998, 2008 and 2013.
Johnson Chapel
3:00 PM
OUR Robert Frost: The Voice of Amherst
A talk by Howie Wolf ’58, to be followed by a reading and discussion of some Frost poems by members of the Class of 1958 in which the relevance of his work to the main issues of our generation will be highlighted. We will also discuss the significance of Frost’s history as an Amherst teacher and poet who helped make Amherst one of America’s most distinguished literary colleges. Howie Wolf is the author of Home at the End of the Day: An American Family Drama in Three Acts; Far-Away Places (travel essays); Broadway Serenade (a novel); and the forthcoming Ends and Other Beginnings (short stories). Presented by the Class of 1958.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
3:00 PM
The Amherst College DQ in Concert
See Amherst's oldest a cappella group perform!
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
4:15 PM
Scenes and Stories in Music and Words: Songs by Composers Scott Wheeler ’73 and Paul Salerni ’73
Among the texts set to music are poems by David Ferry ’46 and Richard Wilbur ’42, P’73, G’14, as well as settings of old Italian lyrics. Some songs have a pictorial component. Featured performers: Jessica Bowers, mezzo-soprano; Oren Fader, acoustic and electric guitar; and pianists Gregory Hayes ’73, Salerni and Wheeler. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
4:15 PM
Arts and Creativity: From Amherst to a Career
How have Amherst grads found their way from liberal arts education to careers in fine and performing arts? A multi-class panel spanning 30 years will share stories from the worlds of dance, drawing, photography, curating and selling fine art, reflecting on whether and how their college experience set them on their professional journeys. Panelists include Roger Creel ’13, a company artist with the Louisville Ballet and choreographer of Shakespeare-related ballets, soon to begin a geophysics Ph.D. at Columbia studying sea-level change; Loretta Howard ’83, owner of The Loretta Howard Gallery in Chelsea, NYC, which specializes in postwar American painting and sculpture; Erika Pettersen ’08, an administrator, curator and photographer who is committed to addressing social justice issues and promoting cross-cultural exchange via the arts; and Laura Scandrett ’88, a visual artist who has been based in Santa Fe for over 20 years and who exhibits her work nationally and internationally, including in the New Mexico Museum of Art. Moderated by David E. Little, Director and Chief Curator of the Mead Art Museum. Presented by the Classes of 1983, 1988, 2008 and 2013.
Kirby Memorial Theater
5:15 PM
Reception in Memory of Jeff Ferguson
Please join us for a reception in honor of Professor Jeffrey B. Ferguson, the Karen and Brian Conway '80, P'18 Presidential Teaching Professor of Black Studies, who passed away on March 11, 2018. Jeff's impact on the College as a teacher, scholar, and colleague was profound. His teaching changed the lives of many students and his scholarly vision shaped so much of the Black Studies Department curriculum, as well as the study of race and racism across the campus. Come celebrate his legacy and toast his memory.
Cooper House
7:00 PM
Revelation: The 20th Apocalypse Party
Apocalypse is a party for people who don't like parties, hosted by Planworld. Come on by, play intellectual games, have conversations, and enjoy a heart-stopping Black Sheep cake and other tasty refreshments. All who enjoy fine company are invited. We will continue until people stop talking. 
Second Floor Lounge, Building D, Greenway Dorms
9:00 PM
Night at the Observatory
The Astronomy Association, in collaboration with Amherst College Science Outreach, invite you to come observe the night sky through telescopes and binoculars while they guide you and teach you some astronomy as well. Tom Whitney of the Astronomy Association will be present to operate Amherst College’s own 19-inch Clark refractor telescope. This event is open to all, but it will be canceled if the weather is uncooperative (cloudy).
Wilder Observatory, 76 Snell Street
9:00 PM
The Zumbyes' Reunion Show
The Zumbyes welcome all Zum-alums, Amherst alums, friends, fans and anyone else to Buckley Recital Hall to celebrate the 68th year of the group with a free concert of new songs, classic songs and, of course, our beloved College songs.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Sunday, May 27, 2018
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
We'll be open for you to drop off your keys or ask last-minute questions before you head home.
Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at noon.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Service of Remembrance and Community
Please join us for an ecumenical service to remember the lives of those alumni we have lost this year with The Rev. John P. Potter '68 and The Rev. Megan Carr Holding '93.
War Memorial, Memorial Hill (rain site: Chapin Chapel)