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Alumni

Reunion 2009 Schedule

Wednesday, May 27, 2009
9. a.m. - 4 p.m. Archives and Special Collections
Open for viewing. 
Robert Frost Library, Level A
9 a.m. -
5 p.m.
Mead Art Museum
The Mead Art Museum holds Amherst College's distinguished collection of more than 16,000 works of art representing virtually every historical period, national school and artistic medium. Highlights appear in changing displays. Admission is free. The Museum is fully accessible.
Coffee drinks are available at the new Mead Cafe.
11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Museum of Natural History
The Amherst College Museum of Natural History houses outstanding collections and exhibits that include vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and around the world since 1825. Some displays illustrate the evolution and ecology of major groups of animals, and others describe the geological processes which have formed the earth and local structures. Particularly noteworthy is the world-famous dinosaur track collection from the sedimentary rocks of the Connecticut Valley.
11 a.m. - 4 p.m. The Emily Dickinson Museum
The Museum offers several tour options, including a 90-minute tour of both the Homestead and The Evergreens, a 40-minute tour of the Homestead and a landscape audio tour narrated by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Richard Wilbur '42.  Tours are offered throughout open hours; tour size is limited, and tours are filled on a first-come, first served basis. A daily tour schedule is posted at the Museum.  Wear your Amherst College name tag for half-price admission. Admission ranges from $4 (youth)-$10 (adult).  There will be a special open house on Saturday, May 30, from 2-4 p.m. There is no charge for the open house.
280 Main Street, Amherst
2-9 p.m. Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542-2065
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
2 p.m. Star Show and History of the Bassett Planetarium
Join Steve Sauter, director of the Preston Rogers Bassett Planetarium, for a lively look at the night skies and the history of the Bassett Planetarium. We will learn how to identify the bright constellations of the summer sky and hear the mythologies behind them. Using the projector, we can experience the rotation of the Earth and see what the sky looks like from any place on the planet. Come in and get an intimate look at the projector and learn about the history of planetariums and the contributions of Preston Rogers Bassett '13.
Morgan Hall, Bassett Planetarium
6 p.m. Alumni Holiday Reception
Enjoy this opportunity to socialize with classmates and Amherst College administrators and celebrate the beginning of Alumni Holiday and Reunion. All are welcome to attend. Cocktails and light hors d'oeuvres will be served.
Lewis-Sebring Commons, Valentine Hall
Thursday, May 28, 2009
8 a.m. - 10 p.m. Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542-2065
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9 a.m. Yūshien Garden
Yūshien (roughly translated as “Garden of Friendship”) is a contemplative garden in the Japanese style that celebrates the strong ties between Amherst College and Doshisha University in Japan. Come see this lovely spot and learn about the history of Amherst’s relationship with Japan during a guided tour with Ray Moore P '81, professor emeritus of history and Asian languages and civilizations, and Joel Upton, professor of art and the history of art. The tour is limited to 15 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center. Tours will also be offered on Friday and Saturday at 9 a.m.
Enter Y
ūshien through Webster Hall (former biology building).
9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Archives and Special Collections
See the description on Wednesday at 9 a.m.
Robert Frost Library, Level A
9 a.m.
-4 p.m.
Eli Marsh Gallery, Fayerweather Hall
Visit the gallery to see works by Damon Lehrer '89.
9 a.m. -
5 p.m. 
Mead Art Museum
See the description on Wednesday at 9 am.
9 a.m. From Hot Flashes to Bones Crashing: Estrogen's Multifaceted Role in Development and Aging
Estrogen is a signaling hormone secreted into the blood that binds to protein receptors at remote locations in the body. Properly interpreting this signal is key for normal cell development and function. Estrogen has been known for decades to be important for stimulating development of secondary sexual characteristics during puberty and in regulating human reproductive health. More recently, estrogen has made the medical headlines for a role in such diverse functions as cardiovascular health, bone strength, and neural development. The decline of estrogen production in menopause is correlated with higher rates of heart attacks, osteoporosis and Alzheimer's disease. Pat O'Hara, the Amanda and Lisa Cross Professor of Chemistry, will discuss how estrogen can act in such a multifaceted role and will introduce the two estrogen receptors responsible for the interplay between systems. Subtle differences in the binding sites of these receptors explain the varied effects of some drugs that prevent breast cancer but stimulate endometrial cancer, and will be important in developing new drugs to prevent heart disease and maintain bone health without stimulating breast cancer.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
9:30 - Noon
1 - 4:30 p.m.
Open Sesame! A Private Viewing
(Advance Notice Required)

The Mead Art Museum's William Green Study Room will be open by appointment. To arrange to see a work of art not currently on display in the museum, visitors must contact Inga Stevens, assistant collections manager, at 413-542-2971 no later than Friday, May 22. To learn what the museum's collection holds, and which of those artworks are already on public view, visit the Mead Art Museum Collection online.
William Green Study Room, Mead Art Museum
10:15 a.m. The Teaching Gap: Good Teaching, Poor Teaching and Educational Policy
Steven Rivkin, professor of economics, will examine variations in teacher effectiveness in public elementary and secondary schools and the implications for educational policy.
Pruyne Lecture Hall (Room 115), Fayerweather Hall
11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Museum of Natural History
See the description on Wednesday at 11 a.m.
11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

The Emily Dickinson Museum
See the description on Wednesday at 11 a.m.

11 a.m Hendrick Goltzius's Life of the Virgin: Surpassing Tradition
Join Susan Anderson, interim Andrew W. Mellon Coordinator of College Programs, for this tour.
Mead Art Museum
11:30 a.m. Where is American Education Heading in the Next Three Decades?
Peter Esty '59, P'87, current consultant to two new San Francisco high schools and previous school head in the Bay Area, New York City, Connecticut and Italy, will moderate and speak on the secondary school years. Robert F. Dalzell, Jr. '59, professor of history at Williams College for over 40 years, will speak of today's changes in first-year college students. Allan R. Cohen '59, professor and dean at Babson College with a focus on business-oriented undergraduate and graduate students, will address the liklihood of a growing split between the elite residential schools and the lower cost delivery of education and the growing use of technology. Presented by the Class of 1959.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1 p.m. Legs and Legacies: Dinosaur Tracks
Join Steve Sauter, education coordinator for the College's Museum of Natural History, for the story of Edward Hitchcock, founder of the Museum's collections. You will get a close look at the world's largest collection of dinosaur footprints and examine the skin and possible feather impressions left behind in the Amherst area 200 million years ago and collected by Hitchcock (1836-1864). Meet in the Main Exhibit Hall. The tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center. (Another tour is offered at 9 a.m. on Friday.)
Museum of Natural History
1 p.m. Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
An opportunity to tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command's (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history. The bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the College in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the bunker.
(A tour is also offered on Friday at 11 a.m.)
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
1:30  p.m. Professor Thomas Dumm on President Obama and the Question of American Renewal
In his inaugural address, President Obama invoked the need to return to enduring values, saying, "[T]hose values upon which our success depends - honesty and hard work, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism - have been the quiet force of progress throughout our history." Stirring words, indeed. But they also seem to invoke the old notion of "American exceptionalism," that he sees as persisting into the future. Yet, the idea of American exceptionalism, an idea that has inspired some of the best, but also the worst, of this country's actions throughout history, may be exhausted. And that may not be a bad thing. Is there something new in the return to the enduring values President Obama invoked in his speech? Or is the gap between where we are now as a country and our old aspirations too wide to bridge?
Stirn Auditorium
2:45 p.m. Changing Landscapes in Life Sciences
Following DNA: The past 50 years have been a golden age of discovery in biology, beginning with the discovery of the structure of DNA and leading to the sequencing of the human genome. Tom Benjamin '59, professor, Harvard Medical School, will discuss his research using genetics and molecular biology to understand how a small virus can cause cancer. Using methods of analysis of "ancient DNA," he has joined forces with a historian and an anthropologist in pursuit of questions about the human past.
 
The Rise of Viagra and Other Wonders of Modern Molecular Biology: When we left Amherst, the frontier of modern biological science and genetics was biochemistry. Steve Cederbaum '59, professor, UCLA, will discuss how, in the ensuing 50 years, molecular genetics redefined the paradigm and led to personal and professional reinvention and unimagined scientific and medical advances.
 
A Molecular Biologist Returns to Nature: For the past 50 years, Bob Zimmermann '59, professor, UMass, has studied the machinery that translates the genetic code into proteins. Today he has joined biologists -molecular or otherwise - in thinking about ways in which we can use our knowledge of the biosphere to reverse the rapid degradation of life on Earth by uncontrolled population growth, destruction of habitat, exhaustion of natural resources and extinction of species.
Presented by the Class of 1959
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4 p.m.

Mozart Clarinet Quintet, Part 1
Re-live a session of your favorite music appreciation course in college or come get a taste of what you may have missed as David Schneider, associate professor of music, teaches you what to listen for in one of W.A. Mozart's greatest pieces of chamber music. This will be an "ears-on" guide to some of the most important principles of composition in the late 18th century and to the subtle and ingenious touches that make this work for clarinet and string quartet a true gem. There will be a live performance of the complete work in Buckley Recital Hall at 8 p.m. (See the description below.)
Arms Music Center Room 3 

4 p.m. A New Mead for the Next Generation: Art's Central Role in the Amherst Education
Join Elizabeth Barker, director of the Mead Art Museum, for a tour and discussion of the museum's educational role.
Mead Art Museum 
7:30 p.m. Star Show and History of Bassett Planetarium
See the description on Wednesday at 2 p.m.
Bassett Planetarium, Morgan Hall
8 p.m. Screening of Tell No One by Harlan Coben '84
Harlan Coben '84 is the award-winning author of more than a dozen international best-selling thrillers. His first book to be turned into a movie is Tell No One - A French movie nominated for nine Cesars and winner of four. Tell No One is "Vertigo meets The Fugitive by way of The Big Sleep," writes Stephen Holden in The New York Times. "Beautifully written and acted, (it) is a labyrinth in which to get deliriously lost." Harlan will sign copies of his recently released novel Long Lost, which just reached the top spot on the New York Times Bestseller list, at 2 p.m. on Friday at Amherst Books, 8 Main Street. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Keefe Campus Center Theater
8 p.m. Mozart Clarinet Quintet, Part 2
Clarinetist David Schneider, associate professor of music, will be joined by Smith faculty members Joel Pitchon and Sara Briggs, violin, Joseph Jewett, viola, and Volcy Pelletier, cello, in a performance of Mozart's Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, K.581 (1789).The 40-minute performance may be combined with Schneider's afternoon lecture on this work (see Mozart Clarinet Quintet, Part 1, above) or enjoyed on its own.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Friday, May 29, 2009
8 a.m. - 10 p.m. Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542-2065
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street 
8:30 a.m. Dean's Day, sponsored by the Admission Office
Led by Dean of Admission and Financial Aid Tom Parker, and Director of Admission Katie Fretwell '81. Sons and daughters of Amherst alumni who will be seniors in 2009-10, and their parents, are invited to learn more about Amherst, its admission policies and the application process in general. There will be a tour of the campus for the students and useful information for parents and students alike. A light breakfast and lunch will be served; the program will end after lunch. Pre-registration is required before May 27; please call Flora Chamlin at (413) 542-2328.
9 a.m. Yūshien Garden
Guided tour led by Wako Tawa, professor of Asian languages and civilizations. See the description on Thursday at 9 a.m.
Enter Yūshien through Webster Hall (former biology building).
9 a.m. The United States, Israel and Prospects for Peace in the Middle East
Remember those days in "Diplo" (American Diplomatic History) with N. Gordon Levin Jr., Dwight Morrow Professor of American History and American Studies? Here is your chance to be in Professor Levin's class again - for an hour - and you don't have to feel guilty that you didn't finish all the homework. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
9 a.m.

Legs and Legacies: Dinosaur Tracks
See description on Thursday at 1 p.m.
Museum of Natural History

9. a.m. - 4 p.m. Archives and Special Collections
See the description on Wednesday at 9 a.m.
Robert Frost Library, Level A
9 a.m.
- 4 p.m. 
Eli Marsh Gallery, Fayerweather Hall
Visit the gallery to see works by award-winning painter Damon Lehrer '89.
9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Museum of Natural History
See the description on Wednesday at 11 a.m.
9 a.m. -
5 p.m.
Mead Art Museum
See the description on Wednesday at 9 a.m.
9:30 - Noon
1 - 4:30 p.m.
Open Sesame! A Private Viewing
(Advance Notice Required)

The Mead Art Museum's William Green Study Room will be open by appointment. To arrange to see a work of art not currently on display in the museum, visitors must contact Inga Stevens, assistant collections manager, at 413-542-2971 no later than Friday, May 22. To learn what the museum's collection holds, and which of those artworks are already on public view, visit the Mead Art Museum Collection online.
William Green Study Room, Mead Art Museum
10 a.m. Representations of Muhammad in Islam
Tariq Jaffer, assistant professor of religion, will examine the image of Muhammad in the eyes of the Muslim community, the crucial events of Muhammad's life, the veneration of Muhammad in Muslim piety and the role of Muhammad in Islamic mysticism.
Stirn Auditorium
11 a.m. Nazi Perpetrators: The Case of Arthur Greiser
Catherine A. Epstein, associate professor of history, will discuss her research on Arthur Greiser, a Nazi leader in occupied Poland, who carried out extraordinary ethnic cleansing measures involving Germans, Jews and Poles.
Stirn Auditorium
11 a.m. Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
See the description on Thursday at 1 p.m.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

The Emily Dickinson Museum
See the description on Wednesday at 11 a.m.

11 a.m. The Poet in Her Bedroom
This new 30-minute documentary about Emily Dickinson was written and produced by the Amherst film-making team of Ernest Urvater and Terry Allen. It captures the essence of the poet in her own words in an inviting style for all ages and audiences. It was created under the auspices of The Emily Dickinson Museum, which is owned by Amherst College.
Keefe Campus Center Theater
Noon Association Officers Meeting and Lunch
There are close to 50 Amherst College Associations across the country and abroad that offer a variety of ways to connect with other Amherst graduates, parents, families and friends. If you are interested in volunteering for or learning more about your local association, come join current association officers and Alumni Office staff for an informational lunch.
Valentine Hall, Mullins-Faerber Room
1 p.m. Amherst 1959 Study Project
LeRae M. Jome, associate professor, department of educational and counseling psychology, University at Albany, State University of New York, will present research conducted during the past year on volunteers from the Class of 1959, and compare it to research conducted by Amherst professors before and after the class's graduation. The study focuses on career choices and satisfaction over the last 50 years, as compared to personality and preference inventories that were taken during the 1950s. Presented by the Class of 1959.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1 p.m. Why the Founding Matters
 In the late 18th century a small group of American political leaders invented the recipe for the liberal nation-state. How did they do it? And what difference does it still make? Joseph Ellis, professor of history at Mount Holyoke College, will discuss these questions. Ellis won the Pulitzer Prize in 2001 for his book Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation. Presented by the Class of 1949.
Stirn Auditorium
1 p.m. Extraordinary Art for a Great College: Highlights of the Mead Art Museum
Join Elizabeth Barker, director of the Mead, for a tour of some of the highlights of the collection.
Mead Art Museum
2 p.m. The Search for the USS Grunion
An Amazing Story of Collaboration, History, Technology Love and Luck
The USS Grunion, under the command of Lt. Cmdr. Mannert L. Abele, set sail on December 22, 1941 with 70 crew members aboard. On July 30, 1942, the submarine reported intensive antisubmarine activity and was ordered back to base off the Aleutian Islands. The Grunion was never heard from again. Mannert's son John Abele '59 will tell the story of how he and his brothers, teaming up with Yutaka Iwasaki from Japan, launched a search for the missing sub that culminated in its discovery 64 years after it disappeared. John Abele is the founding chairman, retired, of the Boston Scientific Corporation. Presented by the Class of 1959.
Stirn Auditorium
2 p.m. A Celebration of 40 Years of the Amherst ABC Program
The Amherst ABC (A Better Chance) Program was founded 40 years ago as a part of the national program to prepare academically talented African American, Latino, Asian and Native American students for college and future leadership roles. In its senior year, the Class of 1969 chose to divert its yearbook funds to ABC. Panelists will recall the events leading up to the class's decision and the need for such programs then and now. Participants will be Frank Anderson, one of ABC's founders; John L. Callahan Jr., general secretary at Amherst from 1962 to 1986; Richard Aronson '69; Michael Hawkins, associate dean of admission and president of the ABC board of directors; Frederick Hoxie '69; and Jay Silverman '69. The panel will be followed by a reception at ABC House (see description at 3 p.m.). Presented by the Class of 1969.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
2 p.m. Poker in America Today
Ashley Adams '79, author of Winning 7-Card Stud and dozens of articles about poker on his online site The Poker Forum, will talk about poker in America today - including the most recent information on the legality of Internet poker, the rise of the tribal and non-tribal poker room and where players can go to find the best games. Time permitting, Ashley will also give some tips on how to get started in poker. Presented by the Class of 1979.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2 p.m. What Arnie Arons Didn't Tell Us in Physics 1-2 and How It Relates to Today's Energy Decisions
William Tucker '64, author of Terrestrial Energy: How Nuclear Energy will lead the Green Revolution and End America's Odyssey, will give a brief tour of 20th century physics and how it leads to a world run on nuclear energy. Presented by the Class of 1964.
Pruyne Lecture Hall (Room 115), Fayerweather Hall
2 p.m.

Book Signing with Author Harlan Coben '84
Harlan Coben '84, award-winning author of more than a dozen international best-selling thrillers including Tell No One, will sign copies of his latest book, the #1 New York Times Bestseller Long Lost, released in March. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Amherst Books, 8 Main Street, Amherst

3 p.m. Globalization: In a World in Crisis, Is It a Cause, a Solution or an Unindicted Co-conspirator?
John W. Dower '59 is a professor of Japanese history at MIT and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II.  Claude E. Erbsen '59 is a retired vice president of the Associated Press and a senior consultant with the INNOVATION International Media Consulting Group. Mark Selden '59 is the coordinator of Asia-Japan Focus, an electronic journal, and a senior research associate in the East Asia Program, Cornell University. Joseph Tulchin '59 is senior scholar of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and former director of the center’s Latin American program. Presented by the  Class of 1959.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
3 p.m. Writers/Writings: Authors of '64
Authors will bring copies of their books for signing, for discussion, and possibly for readings. Featured authors will include Jesse Brill, Craig Hoyt, Alan Houston, Charles Lewis, David Scribner, David Stringer and Bill Tucker, all from the Class of 1964.
O'Connor Commons, Charles Pratt Dormitory
3 p.m. Reception at ABC House
A celebration of the A Better Chance of Amherst organization's 40th anniversary.
74 North Pleasant Street
3 p.m. The Present and Future of Television Programming
Greer Shephard '89, Tim Bohn '89, Chris Glowacki '89 and Eric Zicklin '89, all veterans of the television industry, will share their insights. Shephard is co-founder of The Shephard-Robin Company and executive producer of Nip/Tuck, The Closer, and the recently premiered Trust Me. Glowacki spent a decade as a business development executive at NBC and is now leading one of the most innovative concepts in media at Plum Media Group. Zicklin has been writing sitcoms in Los Angeles since 1996 for shows such as Frasier. Bohn, who has performed on stage, in film and on television, will share the actor's perspective. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
3 p.m. Treasures in Our Midst
Join a tour led by Randall Griffey, curator of American art at the Mead.
Mead Art Museum
3 - 5 p.m.

Men's Soccer Reunion Game
Lord Jeff's Legions and Coach Justin Serpone will sponsor a game between odd and even class soccer alumni. Bring your cleats and shin guards - we'll supply shirts, shorts and socks. RSVP to Dave Wilson '82 so we have a head count - and spread the word to your classmates and teammates! Plan to come to the men's locker room at 2:15 p.m. to pick up your uniform.
Hitchcock Field

4 p.m. Shakespeare's "Cocky" Heroines: Gender Confusion and that Pesky English 1 Question: "Who Am I?"
Professor Tom Blackburn '54 and Professor Herb Coursen '54 will be looking at such double-cross-dressing heroines as Viola in Twelfth Night, both as problems in performance and as examples of the rich complexity of Shakespeare’s portrayal of character. Attendees might want to watch beforehand the film version of Twelfth Night directed by Trevor Nunn with Imogen Stubbs playing Viola. Presented by the Class of 1954.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4 p.m.

Russian Ballet and Culture
Stanley J. Rabinowitz, Henry Steele Commager Professor and professor of Russian, will speak about Ballet's Magic Kingdom; Selected Writings on Dance in Russia, 1911-1925, by Akim Volynsky, which Rabinowitz edited and translated. Recently hailed in a New York Times Books Review cover story as "a fantastic book," Magic Kingdom is the first English-language edition of the writings of Volynsky, "one of the greatest writers on ballet … in the whole 350 or so years of the art form’s relatively brief history." The talk will take place in the Amherst Center for Russian Culture, generally considered one of the largest private holdings of rare Russian books, manuscripts, newspapers, and periodicals in the United States. The original collection was acquired through the generous gift of Thomas P. Whitney '37. Professor Rabinowitz is the curator of the collection and director of the Center. Rabinowitz will be available to sign copies of his book after his talk. This lecture will be repeated on Saturday at 10 a.m.
Center for Russian Culture, Webster Hall Second Floor

4 p.m. What I Believe: Living "Right" in the Age of Obama
James Warren '74, MSNBC political analyst and Huffington Post columnist, will moderate this panel of three alumni who will discuss their conservative principles in the context of their diverse lives. Bill Tucker '64 writes for national magazines on such topics as crime, housing and environmentalism, and was Newt Gingrich's collaborator on the book To Renew. Richard Lipton '74, P'12, '08 is a partner at Baker & McKenzie, in Chicago, who writes frequently about tax and fiscal matters. Susannah Black '99 is a test writer for Pearson Education and a pro-life advocate.  Presented by the Classes of 1964, 1974 and 1999.
Stirn Auditorium
4 p.m. Queer Religion
Reverend Malcolm Himshoot '99, transgender ordained minister in the United Church of Christ, shares his reflections on the growing momentum of LGBT-positive Christianity, worldwide ecumenical conversations on sexuality, and interfaith transgender organizing. Himshoot's transition from female to male and his personal faith journey is featured in the 2005 documentary film Call Me Malcolm. Call Me Malcolm was co-produced by the United Church of Christ and is an intimate look at soul-searching that's universal to us all. The local First Congregational Church of Amherst U.C.C. will be showing Call Me Malcolm on Friday night at 8 p.m. at 165 Main Street. Presented by the Class of 1999.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center 
4:30 - 5:30 p.m. Reception for Professor Norton Starr
Norton Starr, Brian E. Boyle '69 Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, retires this year after 43 years at Amherst. Join us to honor Norton's other-worldly sense of humor and astonishing dedication to his students. Light refreshments and reminiscences by some former students will be offered.
George D. Olds Library (Level 5), Seeley G. Mudd Building
5 p.m. New Multicultural Resource Center Open House
Come learn more about the resources and history of diversity focused groups at Amherst, including La Causa, Black Student Union, Asian Students Association, Pride Alliance, women's groups and the International Students Association. The co-directors and student members of many of these groups will be available, and light refreshments will be served.
Ground Floor, Keefe Campus Center
8:30 p.m. Wilder Observatory Open House
When the Amherst College Wilder Observatory was built in 1903, the telescope was one of the largest in the world, and it remains one of the largest refractors. Join Steve Sauter, director, Bassett Planetarium, to learn more about the history of this telescope and, weather permitting, to take a look at the night sky.
Wilder Observatory, Snell Street
Saturday, May 30, 2009
8 a.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542-2065
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street 
9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Archives and Special Collections
Open for viewing.  See the description on Wednesday at 9 a.m.
Robert Frost Library, Level A
9 a.m. Yūshien Garden
Guided tour led by Timothy Van Compernolle, assistant professor of Japanese in Asian languages and civilizations. See the description on Thursday at 9 a.m.
Enter Yushien through Webster Hall (former biology building).
9 a.m. XC and Track Reunion Fun Run (5K)
Open to all returning alumni, the purpose of this event is to bring together as many cross-country and track alumni as possible. Start and finish will be on the field behind the gym. The course will traverse the trails and field loop that the cross-country team uses for training. Prizes will be awarded to the winning man and woman. If you have an old Amherst jersey, be sure to wear it! Contact Ned Nedeau, cross-country and track coach, for more information or to volunteer to help.
Memorial Field

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Mead Art Museum
See the description on Wednesday at 9 a.m.
9 a.m.  - 5 p.m. Museum of Natural History
See the description on Wednesday at 11 a.m.
9 a.m. Stroller Boot Camp
Strap on your sneakers, strap in the kids and come join us for a tour of the campus as Professor Catherine Sanderson leads the group in an aerobic workout that incorporates your stroller. Professor Sanderson is an associate professor of psychology, an exercise enthusiast and the author of Slow and Steady Parenting: Active Child-Raising for the Long Haul and From Birth to Age 3: Avoiding the Short-Term Solutions That Lead to Long-Term Problems. Presented by the Class of 1999.
Meet in the Freshman Quad by Johnson Chapel
9 a.m.

Math-Physics Guys Look Both Ways While Crossing the Centuries
What Can You do With a Degree in Physics? Thomas Greenslade '59, professor of physics emeritus at Kenyon College, has investigated how physics was taught from 1850 to 1950, resulting in a museum, a large Web site on historical scientific instruments and a new life after retirement.
Combinatorists Do It Discretely: Mark Watkins '59, professor of mathematics at Syracuse University, will speak about how combinatorics (discreetly) attempts to unify a wide variety of discrete mathematical situations. Named by Leonhard Euler about 300 years ago, it has only in recent decades become a major player on the blurry border between pure and applied mathematics.
Physics and Cosmology Since 1959 - A Conservative Revolution
:  William Weisberger '59, professor of physics emeritus at Stony Brook University, will speak about the 50 years since graduation and the great progress in understanding both the fundamental forces of nature on the subatomic scale and the history and behavior of the universe on the cosmic scale. Presented by the Class of 1959.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall

9 a.m.

To the Ends of the Earth: Adventures of an Expedition Photographer
Gordon Wiltsie '74, a National Geographic photographer, will present a collection of images and stories, many from his recent book of the same title, spanning the growth of his career from a childhood dream to its fruition after years of struggle (often at great risk to his life). His stories will take us to ever remoter places, from the Antipodes to Himalaya, Antarctica to the North Pole, Andean mummy tombs to the wilds of Central Asia - often in the company of famous explorers of our time. Presented by the Class of 1974.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center

 
9 a.m. International Medicine
Panelists are Dr. Sarah Kidd '94, who works for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Global Immunization Division; Dr. Julia Kim '94, a pediatrician at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Health and formerly with the Pediatric AIDS Corps, Baylor International Pediatric AIDS Initiative; and Jesse Bump '94, PhD, MPH, currently at the Harvard School for Public Health, where he analyzes priority-setting and the politics of global health, primarily in the sub-Sahara. Presented by the Class of 1994.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
9 a.m. Elder Care Planning
Bill Moriarty, MD '79, a general internist and part-time nursing facility medical director, Matt Martland '79, a residential care home owner/manager, and David Cagle '84, an attorney specializing in estate planning and elder law, will explore preparing financially, legally, mentally and emotionally for the care that will be needed as we become elderly.This will also be useful to those who care for elderly family or friends. Jeff Birnbaum '79, a financial adviser experienced in estate planning, will moderate. Presented by the Classes of 1979 and 1984.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
9 a.m. Not Everyone Gets a Trophy: Managing Generation Y
Join Bruce Tulgan '89, author of Not Everyone Gets a Trophy and other best-selling books, as he shares his entertaining trademark presentation based on more than a decade of research, debunking the myths about today's young workers. If you were born after 1977 or have children or coworkers born after 1977, come hear what Bruce has taught leaders from the U.S. Army to Aetna, General Electric, Johnson & Johnson and Walmart. Find out why most of the "experts" have it wrong. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Stirn Auditorium
9 a.m. Relaxation 101: How Do I Manage Stress?
Rob Feeley '04 will lead us through simple techniques to increase energy and focus, improve mood, and decrease stress. This one-hour session will consist of gentle yoga, followed by breathing techniques, and will finish with a guided meditation. Make sure to wear loose and comfortable clothing, and bring a yoga mat if you can. Presented by the Class of 2004.
Conway Classroom, Alumni Gym
9:30 - Noon
1 - 4:30 p.m.
Open Sesame! A Private Viewing
(Advance Notice Required)

The Mead Art Museum's William Green Study Room will be open by appointment. To arrange to see a work of art not currently on display in the museum, visitors must contact Inga Stevens, assistant collections manager, at 413-542-2971 no later than Friday, May 22. To learn what the museum's collection holds, and which of those artworks are already on public view, visit the Mead Art Museum Collection online.
William Green Study Room, Mead Art Museum
10 a.m. - Noon

Hike the Emily Dickinson Trail
Join Dottie Case of the Emily Dickinson Museum on a nature walk on the Emily Dickinson Trail at Groff Park in Amherst. She will discuss the flora and fauna on view, and also describe Amherst's natural world in the poet's time. Quotations from Dickinson's poetry and letters will be used throughout the tour. The trail is relatively flat. Bring binoculars for bird-watching. Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to the trail. Directions will be available at the Alumni House Reception Center, and a car pool will meet in front of the Alumni House. Rainsite: The Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street, Amherst.
Meet at the Alumni House

10 a.m.

Russian Ballet and Culture
Stanley J. Rabinowitz, Henry Steele Commager Professor and professor of Russian, will speak about Ballet's Magic Kingdom; Selected Writings on Dance in Russia, 1911-1925, by Akim Volynsky, which Rabinowitz edited and translated. Recently hailed in a New York Times Books Review cover story as "a fantastic book," Magic Kingdom is the first English-language edition of the writings of Volynsky, "one of the greatest writers on ballet … in the whole 350 or so years of the art form’s relatively brief history." The talk will take place in the Amherst Center for Russian Culture, generally considered one of the largest private holdings of rare Russian books, manuscripts, newspapers, and periodicals in the United States. The original collection was acquired through the generous gift of Thomas P. Whitney '37. Professor Rabinowitz is the curator of the collection and director of the Center.
Center for Russian Culture, Webster Hall Second Floor

10 a.m. The Cost Effective Use of Solar Energy in Fueling Your Home
Brian Boyle '69 has spent the past five years building a home on Cape Cod. He will give the history of the project, its energy saving and cost goals, some basic scientific principles, and practical strategies for cost-effective use of solar energy in a northern climate. Steve Collins '69 will share his experience using solar energy in his own home in Los Angeles. Some equipment will be available for demonstration as will information on how to go solar yourself. Presented by the Class of 1969.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
10 a.m. Fifty Years of Political Influence on the U.S. Supreme Court's Constitutional Decisions
David Borden '59, and Paul Dodyk '59 will discuss the relationship between politics and United States Supreme Court over the past 50 years. David was an associate justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court for many years, and authored opinions on some of the most controversial issues of the day. Paul served as a law clerk for Associate Justice Potter Stewart on the Supreme Court, and, as a litigator, was involved in many significant cases before the Court. They will focus on the increasing impact of politics on the Court, and vice-versa, during the past five decades, including a look at the confirmation process and such cases as Roe v. Wade, Lawrence v. Texas and Bush v. Gore. Presented by the Class of 1959.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
10 a.m. Inspiring Our Adolescents to Meet Modern Challenges
Pam Krupman Allyn '84, executive director of LitLife and author of What to Read When, Kathy McLean Matthias '84, college guidance counselor, Loyola Blakefield School, and John Polstein '84, chief executive officer at Kaplan Test Prep, discuss testing, preparing, counseling and aiding teens today as they navigate the teenage years and seek admission to college. Allyn will be available to sign her book after the panel. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
10 a.m. Important Medical Breakthroughs: The First Cancer-Prevention Vaccine and the Short Happy History of Coronary Angioplasty
Douglas R. Lowy '64, chief, Laboratory of Cellular Oncology and deputy director, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, and David L. Pearle '64, professor of medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, will discuss the astonishing progress of medical science. Doug has pioneered development of the HPV vaccine, which targets cervical cancer, the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide. His work exemplifies progress from bench to bedside in medical research. David will discuss the history and development of coronary angioplasty (PCI) as therapy for coronary artery disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. Presented by the Class of 1964.
Stirn Auditorium
10 a.m. Mister G's Music and Educational Programs for Kids
Ben Gundersheimer '89, a.k.a "Mister G," will perform songs from his new children's music CD, including "Pizza for Breakfast." He will tell stories and offer a taste of his songwriting workshops for children of all ages. Ben has a masters degree in education from Smith College, more than 20 years experience as a performing and recording artist, and has been featured in television programs around the world. Bring your children and enjoy. Presented by the  Class of 1989.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
10 a.m. Hiking the Notch
Meet at the Notch Visitors Center for either a guided tour of the Laurel Loop trail, or a more strenuous self-guided tour to either the top of Bear Mountain or Mt. Norwottuck where you can enjoy breathtaking views of the Pioneer Valley. Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the Notch Visitors Center. Presented by the Young Alumni Classes.
Notch Visitors Center, 1500 West Street (Route 116), Amherst
10 a.m. The Golden Years of the Broadway Musical: 1940 - 1960
We will play some 200 snippets of musical and video from hit shows, works by Richard Rodgers, Oscar Hammerstein, Lorenz Hart, Cole Porter, Kurt Weill, Leonard Bernstein, Frederick Loewe, Alan Joy Lerner, Frank Loesser, Stephen Sondheim (Williams '50) and more. Performers will include Ezio Pinza, Gertrude Lawrence, Ethel Merman, John Raitt, Barbara Cook, Mary Martin, Richard Burton and Julie Andrews. The audience will have the option of taking a written quiz on the titles, composers and performers as the music is played, and prizes will be awarded. Or you can just listen nostalgically. Presented by the Class of 1954.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
10 a.m. Non-Traditional Careers, Quarter-Life Transitions and What Drives "Generation Me"
Almost as impressive at dinner parties as the term"post modern," the "quarter-life crisis" has become a catchall phrase for the life and career trials and tribulations of current twenty-somethings. Join us as we readdress the question "what do I want to be when I grow up?" The current economic crisis and social climate places our generation in a unique position to explore mid-life career transitions. Bess Kargman '04 and Matthew Murumba '04 will share how the "quarter life crisis" has actually played out in their daily lives, with other classmates talking about their choices of less traditional careers. Presented by the Class of 2004.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center

11 a.m.

Conversation with President Anthony W. Marx and Annual Meeting of the Society of the Alumni and the Alumni Council
Richard Ammons '74, president of the Society of the Alumni, will announce the Society's newly elected committee members and officers. Distinguished Service Awards will be presented, and the recently elected alumni trustee will be announced. President Marx will follow with an update on the College, featuring information about Amherst's response to the economy. For more on that topic, please visit the College's Web site (www.amherst.edu/aboutamherst/economy).
Johnson Chapel

11 a.m. - 4 p.m. The Emily Dickinson Museum
See the description on Wednesday at 11 a.m.
12:15 p.m. Procession of Classes and Reunion Luncheon on the Valentine Quad
Led by bagpiper and Amherst College employee Ryan S. Willey, alumni will proceed from the Conversation with President Marx/Meeting of the Society of the Alumni and the Alumni Council to the complimentary luncheon on the Quad.
Valentine Quad
1:30 p.m. Alumni Football Gathering
Head coach, E.J. Mills hosts a gathering for football alumni
Friends of Amherst Athletics Room, Alumni Gym
1:30 p.m. Opening Reception and Artist Talk: Damon Lehrer '89
Award-winning painter Damon Lehrer '89 will discuss his work, including the several paintings exhibited in the Eli Marsh Gallery during Reunion. Damon has been a visual artist for more than two decades and his work has received wide acclaim. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Eli Marsh Gallery, Fayerweather Hall
1:30 p.m. Stigma and Prevention in Mental Illness: Patient Stories and Alternative Medicine Through Acupuncture
Sometimes, in our health care system, sociological, political or communication issues hinder optimum treatment and recovery. This panel will address this and look at alternative approaches that are promising. Panelists are Alan Blum '69, professor of family medicine at the University of Alabama; Harvey Kaltsas '69, doctor of Oriental medicine at the Healing Center, Inc. in Sarasota, Fla; and Rob Simpson '69, CEO of the Brattleboro Retreat in Vermont. Presented by the Class of 1969.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1:30 p.m. The Architecture of Amherst: The Past, The Future - And the Enduring Principles
The Amherst campus has evolved over the course of nearly two centuries - guided by ideas that are hidden in plain sight. What are the essential features that make it work? How should the College develop in the future? Join Blair Kamin '79, Chicago Tribune architecture critic; Hong ("Tony") Chen '79, associate principal, Steinberg Architects; and Cullen Murphy '74, editor-at-large at Vanity Fair, Amherst trustee and chair of the Amherst Buildings and Grounds Committee. Presented by the Classes of 1974 and 1979.
Stirn Auditorium
1:30 p.m. Rugby Reunion Touch Sevens
Gather at the foot of Memorial Hill for a casual game of touch sevens. Open to all, especially alumni of men's and women's rugby teams. Presented by the Class of 1994.
Memorial Field
1:30 p.m. Sustaining Meaning in the Face of Loss in Later Life
One of the most striking health features of later life is the vast difference that may exist between two people of the same age - the heterogeneity of aging. What enables a person to confront the life cycle challenge of inevitable losses, but at the same time continue to find meaning in later life? Panelists Tony Mason '64, associate professor of family practice at Albany Medical College; David Pearle '64, professor of medicine at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C.; and Rabbi Peter Rubinstein '64 of Central Synagogue in New York City, will discuss these issues from the point of view of both medical and spiritual practice. Presented by the Class of 1964.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
1:30 p.m. Darfur Now
Dean Schramm '84, literary and talent agent and co-producer of Darfur Now, a documentary about the genocide in the Darfur region of Sudan, will show excerpts from the film, which was directed by Ted Braun '83. There will be time for questions. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1:30 p.m. What is Your Worldview and Why Does It Matter?
A conversation between Richmond Mayo-Smith '44, P'76, trustee of the Mindshift Institute, and Michael Mannion, a principal of the Institute. Your worldview determines the choices you see as possible and is a most precious possession. How might we embody a worldview which resonates with the wisdom of the mystics and the recent findings of mathematicians and scientists? Audience participation is welcome. Presented by the Class of 1944.
Pruyne Lecture Hall (Room 115), Fayerweather Hall
1:30 p.m. Williams Reunion Jazz  Band
Originally four jazz-loving kids from Williams who formed a Dixieland band know as Phinney's Favorite Five, the Williams Reunion Jazz Band returned to their campus in the 70s for a reunion and have been playing ever since. Today they are joined by three other classic jazz masters including lead cornet player John Bucher, Amherst '52. The band plays at special  occasions all over the east as well as aboard cruise ships and, perhaps most notably, with the Boston Pops at Symphony Hall. Presented by the Class of 1959.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
1:30 p.m.

How Debt and Equity Capital Raising Has Changed Post Recession
Jay Moore '94 is the president and CEO of Romherst, Inc, which raises debt for lower middle market and small businesses and equity for  early stage of start-ups. He also invented the Living Life game. He will discuss how the corporate lending environment and general capital raising has changed for small companies post-recession and will suggest tips on raising money in this environment. Michael Cippoletti '94 is an executive director at Morgan Stanley, where he runs U.S. energy equity capital markets. He will discuss how the financial crisis has changed operating and growth strategies for even the largest, most well-capitalized companies in the world, and share perspectives from Morgan Stanley's global macro strategists. Brian Shactman '94 is an anchor and reporter for CNBC who has covered the World Series, the World Cup and the slightly less enjoyable World Financial Meltdown. Presented by the Class of 1994.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center

2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Open House at the Emily Dickinson Museum
The Emily Dickinson Museum invites alumni and families for self-guided tours of the Homestead, home of the poet Emily Dickinson, and The Evergreens, home of her brother Austin.  The Open House is free.  The Museum is open for regular guided tours throughout Reunions.  Please see daily museum listings for admission information.
280 Main Street, Amherst
2:30 p.m. View from the Front Lines: How Obama Beat Clinton and McCain -- And What's to Come
Chuck Lewis '64 was an active supporter of Obama's Senate campaign and an early proponent of his run for president. He was on Obama's national finance committee and has written 40 commentaries on the Obama campaign and administration. Terry Segal '64 is the former campaign manager and press secretary for U.S. House Speaker Tip O'Neill and the 1968 advance man for VP nominee Ed Muskie. He worked in New Hampshire for law school classmate Sen. Joe Lieberman and for Sen. John Kerry in 2004 and Obama in 2008. Jesse Brill '64 is an expert on and critic of excessive executive compensation and chair of CompensationStandards.com, The Corporate Counsel, and the National Association of Stock Plan Professionals. They will give the insider's view of lessons learned during the primary and general election, including the misreported Texas results, caucuses vs. primaries, fund raising, Reverend Wright, Bill Ayres, the Democratic National Convention and Governor Palin. Jesse will speak about his efforts to put language in the TARP legislation that would have avoided the AIG debacle. They will all comment on where we go from here. Presented by the Class of 1964.
Stirn Auditorium
2:30 p.m. Working in Hollywood
Aina Abiodun '94, a movie producer, and Justin Ware '94, a screenwriter, will compare notes on working in Hollywood. Presented by the Class of 1994.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
2:30 p.m. The Class of 1969 Project: A New Role for Alumni to Promote "Lives of Consequence"
This project, started in 2006 by Justin Grimes '69, organizes opportunities for Amherst alumni to inspire and equip students and young alumni with tools to make a difference in the world. "Through their hard work ('69 alumni) have brought a number of fantastic programs to campus - including a program of inter-faith, inter-generational dialogue and an inspired colloquium that resulted in the formation of a student-led public health collaborative," wrote an '08 graduate. Working with established departments at the College, the project is opening doors for alumni to "give" to the College through involvement with students. Panelists are Molly Mead, director of the Center for Community Engagement; Chris Dole, assistant professor of anthropology; Boris Bulayev '07; Josh Stanton '08; and Jodie Simms '09. Facilitated by Richard Aronson '69. Presented by the Class of 1969.
Pruyne Lecture Hall (Room 115), Fayerweather Hall
2:30 p.m.

Participation, Civic-Mindedness and Democracy in Central America: Assessing the Impacts of Community-Managed Schools
Since 2006 Javier Corrales, associate professor of political science, and Daniel Altschuler '04, doctoral candidate in politics at the University of Oxford, have studied parent-run schools in rural Honduras and Guatemala. Their work focuses on whether and how parent participation affects civil society and the quality of local democracy in these areas. Does helping to manage schools encourage parents to join other groups, organize meetings and participate in politics more frequently? Do these school councils affect how parents and their communities interact with the state, potentially contributing to increased accountability of local government? They will present the initial findings of their comprehensive survey of parents, the first-of-its-kind study of the spillover effects of civic participation. Presented by the Class of 2004.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall

2:30 p.m. The 45-Year Old Freshman: A Conversation with Amherst's Oldest Student
Michael Kirtley '99 is now the founder and president of the Friendship Caravan, Inc., a non-profit organization that promotes media-friendly cross-cultural communication in the aftermath of 9/11, especially between the West and the Islamic world. In 1995 he was 45 years old and a successful international photojournalist with children enrolled at Dartmouth and Yale. Why then did he leave his career to enroll at Amherst? Join Michael for a light-hearted discussion of his reasons, the social and academic challenges he faced upon arriving (What to wear? Could he date? Should he attend TAP?) and where his experience led him. Classmates Kate Hersey '99 will recall her fond and funny memories of possibly the oldest student to ever attend Amherst. Presented by the Class of 1999.
Lecture Hall 3, Merrill Science Center
2:30 p.m.

Keeping the Lights On: The Promises and Pitfalls of Alternative Energy
Tony Gordon ’84, managing director, energy and infrastructure at Och-Ziff Capital Management Group, and Greg Donat ’84, director, power, energy and infrastructure at Lazard Frères & Co., discuss the operational, political, and financial challenges associated with alternative energy.  Topics will include the challenges to implementing wind, solar and other renewable generation; issues associated with carbon cap-and-trade systems; the potential impact of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and the “smart grid”; successes and failures that have occurred as utilities, energy companies and technology entrepreneurs pursue opportunities in alternative energy; and the role that the economic crisis, the stimulus and other factors will play in shaping alternative energy policy and implementation. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center

2:30 p.m. The Artistic Vision of Thomas Cornell '59: A Conversation
Elizabeth E. Barker, director of the Mead Art Museum, and Thomas Cornell '59, artist-in-residence at Bowdoin College, will discuss visual culture and Cornell's art, featuring his work in the Mead. Cornell seeks to develop narrative content, showing that art can stimulate social well being. Beauty and environmental design will be discussed in relation to the artist's vision, which started with the 1959 publication of The Monkey, celebrating evolution, when Cornell was a senior. Paintings such as "Bathers" and the "Birth of Nature" series will be discussed, as well as the painting on exhibition through June 10 at the National Academy Museum in New York City, "The Education of Nature." Presented by the Class of 1959.
Mead Art Museum Study Room 
3:30 p.m. Who's Right on Global Warming: The United Nations' IPCC or the Skeptics?
Robert A. Knox '64, researcher and associate director emeritus of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Harvey M. Sheldon '64, an environmental lawyer with Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP, will discuss the significance (or not) of human-produced greenhouse gases toward global climate change. Knox will argue that human emissions are significant and the evidence is credible, Sheldon will give a skeptic's view. Richard E. Sparks '64, researcher with the Great Rivers Research and Education Center, will moderate. Presented by the Class of 1964.
Stirn Auditorium
3:30 p.m. Education and Social Change
Many Amherst alumni go into education to make a change in our world. Access to quality education for all is the major civil rights battle of our time. Hear from Jessica Allen '04, Luke Swarthout '04 and Helen Dole '04 about the change they are creating in various areas of education. What can we all do to support this work? Presented by the Class of 2004.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
3:30 p.m. New Hips, New Knees: Innovation and Technology in Total Joint Arthroplasty
Everything you need to know about hip replacement and knee replacement. Dr. William Healy '74 is chair of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Lahey Clinic, Burlington, Mass. Presented by the Class of 1974.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
3:30 p.m. Russia: The Battle for Memory and Its Impact on the Present
Andy Nagorski '69, vice president and director of public policy, EastWest Institute, and author of The Greatest Battle: Stalin, Hitler, and the Desperate Struggle for Moscow that Changed the  Course of World War II, served as the Moscow bureau chief of Newsweek in the early 1980s (resulting in his expulsion) and again in the mid-1990s. His reporting has spanned the era from Brezhnev to Putin. William Taubman, Bertand Snell Professor of Political Science, won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography in 2003 and the Pultizer Prize for biography in 2004 for Khrushchev: The Man and His Era. Professor Taubman is currently working on a biography of Gorbachev. Together they will reflect on the men who led Russia, their influence on present Russian leadership and politics and their effect on the geopolitical events of the day. Presented by the Class of 1969.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
3:30 p.m. Lighting Africa's Future - A Documentary by Educate! on Empowering Young Leaders in Africa
Educate! is a non-profit organization founded and run by current and recently graduated Amherst students.  Educate! aims to educate and empower the next generation of socially responsible leaders in Africa.  In Lighting Africa's Future, the organization describes its success to date and the new programs it launched in March to work with 375 promising young leaders in 25 schools across Uganda. 
Keefe Campus Center Theater
3:30 p.m. Family Concert with Aric Bieganek of Recess Rock
Join the 10th and 15th year Reunion classes and their children for a rockin' musical performance by Aric Bieganek of Recess Rock! Known locally as "The Jack Black of Kids' Music," Aric's concert promises to get everyone up and dancing. Presented by the Classes of 1994 and 1999.
Class of 1994 Reunion Tent, Freshman Quad
4:30 p.m. Joe Stiglitz '64: The Shape of the Recovery
What will our economy and financial system look like after the dust clears? What has to change to make it work? How will that change affect what we do, what we have and how we finance our homes and businesses? How do we harness financial innovation so it works for us, rather than destabilizing markets and economies? Joseph Stiglitz '64, Nobel laureate and University Professor at Columbia University, will be interviewed by Mitch Berns '74, litigation partner at Lane Sash & Larrabee LLP and former regulator of the Federal Home Loan Banks. Presented by the Classes of 1964 and 1974.
Stirn Auditorium
4:30 p.m. National Security and the Future of the Global War on Terror
As sophomores at Amherst we watched the twin towers crumble on television. Since that moment our national security landscape has changed in major ways. Jacob Heim '04 has conducted studies for a wide range of Department of Defense sponsors, designed crisis simulations and directed studies assessing future geopolitical scenarios. A member of the Military Operations Research Society, he has published and lectured on American grand strategy and military transformation. James B. Sexton '04, is a Middle East security analyst with the federal government. They will discuss these changes and what the future may hold. Presented by the Class of 2004.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
4:30 p.m. From Amherst to First-Time Novelist: The Writing of A Thread of Sky
Join Deanna Fei '99 as she talks about the process of writing and publishing her first novel. In A Thread of Sky, three generations of Chinese American women reunite to explore their ancestral home and find the roots of a dark, long-held secret that has shaped each of their lives. Professor Barry O'Connell, James E. Ostendarp Professor of English, will join Deanna as she relates how Amherst helped launch her into the writing life, as well as her experiences earning her MFA at the Iowa Writers' Workshop and as a Fulbright Scholar in Shanghai. A Thread of Sky is to be published by Penguin Press in April 2010. Presented by the Class of 1999.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:30 p.m. Middle Age Schmiddle Age - How to Stay Healthy as You Approach 50
Join Jim Greenberg '84, OB-GYN, Myles Keroack '84, gastroenterologist, Kathleen LeMaitre '84, OB-GYN and Joe Shrager '84, thoracic surgeon for the latest discoveries in medicine and to learn what you should be doing to protect yourself. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:30 p.m. Life as Organic Farmers
Paul Lacinski '89 and Amy Klippenstein '89, founders and owners of Sidehill Farm, will discuss their award-winning dairy and vegetable farm nestled on the eastern slopes of the Berkshire Hills just west of Amherst. They will explain their organic farming philosophy and share samples of their vegetables, fruit and dairy. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Pruyne Lecture Hall (Room 115), Fayerweather Hall
4:30 p.m. Treasures in Our Midst: American Art at Mead Art Museum
Join a tour led by Randall Griffey, curator of American art at the Mead.
Mead Art Museum
4:30 p.m. Volunteering and Community Service
This program will explore volunteering and community service from three perspectives: adults volunteering in the community, getting teenagers involved in community service and techniques for organizing people to fight for what they believe. Mark DeWaele '79 volunteers as chairman of the Town Council of New Canaan, trustee of the Cristo Rey, NY, high school, and a member of the Connecticut State Office of the Health Care Advocate and the Defense Orientation Conference Association. Gordie Sands '79 has been volunteering in his hometown for more than 20 years, and has two teens who have chosen to make volunteering a large part of their own lives. Ashley Adams '79 has been a union organizer and community activist since graduation, helping workers and residents fight for better working and living conditions. He now works for the Massachusetts Teachers' Association and is active in the Greater Boston Interfaith Organization. Presented by the Class of 1979.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
5:30 p.m. GALA Reception
All alumni and guests are welcome. Sponsored by the Gay and Lesbian Alumni Association. Refreshments will be served.
Rainbow Room, Morrow Dormitory Basement
5:30 p.m. Catholic Mass
Roman Catholic Mass with Fr. Richard Gross S.J., celebrant, and Dr. Elizabeth Carr, Catholic religious adviser. All alumni and their families are welcome.
Chapin Chapel
5:30 p.m. Alumni Educators Network Reception

Meet and network with alumni in education and learn more about the College’s initiatives to support students and alumni in education.Visit the Alumni Educators Web site for online resources.

Converse Hall Lobby
5:30 p.m. Class Receptions and Dinners
Detailed information will be provided by your Class.
9 p.m. Zumbyes A Cappella Concert
With a Special Appearance by Bluestocking Alumnae
The Amherst College Zumbyes perform old and new favorites. Joining them on stage for a song or two will be alumnae celebrating the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Bluestockings. All former Zumbyes and Bluestockings are invited to join in the singing.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Sunday, May 31, 2009
7:30 a.m. Pioneer Valley Bike Tour
Bring your bike and join us for a morning nostalgia/hangover-helper ride.  All classes, friends, and family are welcome. The route will be determined by the group, with the goal of a 25-30 mile ride returning to campus around 9:30 a.m.  Fast riders can charge off to the front, but there will definitely be a “C” pace group (i.e. 13-15 mph) bringing up the rear; no rider left behind. If you want to join us, e-mail us so the group won't leave without you. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Meet on the steps of Frost Library
8 a.m. - noon Alumni House Reception Center Open
Please stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542-2065
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9 a.m. Service of Remembrance and Community
Please join us for an ecumenical service to remember the lives of those alumni we have lost this year. Reverend Brent Alderman Sterste '00 will officiate.
Memorial Hill, War Memorial (Rain Site: Johnson Chapel)
9 a.m. Amherst Crew Reunion Row
Head Coach Bill Stekl will give an update on Amherst’s current rowing program. We urge all former coxswains and rowers—men and women, lightweight and heavyweight, young and old, fit and not-so-fit—to attend. Assemble at the boathouse, ready to row (preferably in Amherst rowing attire from your era). Refreshments (and oxygen) will be available at the conclusion of our workout.
Amherst College Boathouse (Sportsman’s Marina, Route 9 at Coolidge Bridge)
9 a.m. -  1 p.m. Archives and Special Collections
Open for viewing.  Please description on Wednesday at 9 a.m.
Robert Frost Library, Level A
9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Mead Art Museum
See the description on Wednesday at 9 a.m. 
9 a.m.  - 5 p.m. Museum of Natural History
See the description on Wednesday at 11 a.m.
11 a.m. - 4 p.m. The Emily Dickinson Museum
See the description on Wednesday at 11 a.m.
 

Upcoming Events

Virtual Lecture - Prof. Austin Sarat
April 24, 2014 | 4:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Southern Connecticut - Reception with President Biddy Martin
April 24, 2014 | 6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

New York - NESCAC Alumni Happy Hour
April 24, 2014 | 7:00 - 10:00 p.m.

Philadelphia - RESCHEDULED Evening of music by the Chamber Music Society
April 24, 2014 | 8:00 p.m.

Amherst Today
April 24 - 25, 2014

Reunion
May 28 - June 1, 2014

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Main Phone: 413.542.2313

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