Download our new mobile app - details here
Alumni
Wednesday, May 25, 2011
2:00 PM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542–2065
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
5:00 PM
Valentine Dining Commons Open for Dinner
Stop by for dinner before or after the evening reception at the Mead Art Museum. Valentine will be open for meals during Reunion, except during Saturday Reunion Luncheon and Saturday evening class banquets. See hours and prices here.
5:00 PM
An Evening at the Mead
Meet, mingle and renew old friendships amidst Amherst’s extraordinary art collection at this wine reception featuring gourmet hors d’oeuvres hosted by Director Elizabeth Barker and the museum’s curators.
Mead Art Museum
8:00 PM
The Buckley Chamber Players Present The French-American Connection
Amherst College Professor David Schneider, clarinet, Boston Conservatory faculty member Lila Brown, viola, and Amherst College instructor of piano, Alissa Leiser will perform Claude Debussy’s Premiere Rhapsodie for clarinet and piano and two pieces by the great British-American composer and violist Rebecca Clarke: the lush, impressionistic Sonata for viola and piano (1919)  and her recently re-discovered Prelude, Allegro, and Pastorale for clarinet and viola. The jazz-influenced Trio for clarinet, viola and piano by prize-winning Amherst College Professor of Composition Eric Sawyer concludes the program. This concert is free and open to the public.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Thursday, May 26, 2011
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542-2065
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Community Engagement at Amherst College: Telling Our Stories
Amherst opened the doors to its new Center for Community Engagement in the fall of 2007.  But students have been engaging in communities near and far throughout the history of our college. The CCE invites you to help us collect and tell our “engagement” stories. All we require is 15 minutes and a willingness to think back in time. We will record your story and include it in a collection on the CCE website. If you would like to sign up for a time slot ahead of time, please contact Zoë Jacobs (zjacobs@amherst.edu) in the CCE. Recording times: Thursday: 9 a.m.-noon; Friday: 9 a.m.-noon; Saturday: 9 a.m.-noon.
Center for Community Engagement, Keefe Campus Center
10:45 AM
Hitler's Tour: Imagining the Occupation of Paris, 1940-1944
"We'll always have Paris," Rick says to Ilsa in Casablanca. But, for a while, someone else did. Adolf Hitler visited Paris only once, on June 28, 1940, a scant two weeks after his troops had first occupied it. Like any tourist, he wanted to see the monuments and vistas he had read about for decades. The Fuehrer's tour predicted the complicated four years that were to follow. Ronald C. Rosbottom, professor of French and European Studies and Winifred Arms Professor in the Arts and Humanities, will take you stop-by-stop along Hitler's route. Using photographs and film clips, he will explain what the Occupation meant to Parisians and how the Germans themselves felt about it for 1500 nights and days.
Stirn Auditorium
11:00 AM
Exhibition Tour of Orra White Hitchcock: An Amherst Woman of Art and Science
Led by Randall Griffey, curator of American art.
Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Re-Inventing Tokyo: Japan's Largest City in the Artistic Imagination
Tokyo is the political, cultural and economic center of Japan, the largest urban hub on the planet, holding 35 million people, fully one-fifth of Japan's population. The city has continually reinvented itself since its founding over 400 years ago, when a small fishing village became Edo, the castle headquarters of the Tokugawa shoguns.  Samuel C. Morse P'14, professor of art and the history of art and Asian languages and civilizations, will focus on portrayals of Tokyo and its reinventions as depicted by print makers, photographers and artists from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day.  Many of the images will be included in an exhibition to be held at the Mead Art Museum in the fall of 2012: Re-Inventing Tokyo:  Japan's Largest City in the Artistic Imagination, planned in conjunction with an Amherst class.
William Green Study Room, Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
An opportunity to tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command's (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history. The bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the college in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the bunker.
(Other tours are offered on Friday at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.)
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
2:30 PM
A Tale of Two Cities: The Christchurch, NZ and Sendai, Japan Earthquakes and Their Collateral Damage
Tekla Harms, professor of geology, reviews the causes and consequences of this year’s two devastating earthquakes, and the scope, benefits, and costs of earthquake preparedness. Can enough ever be enough?
Paino Room (Room 107) Beneski Geology Building
3:00 PM
Exhibition Tour of How He Was to His Talents: The Work of Ernest Haskell
Led by Katrina Greene, Andrew W. Mellon Post-baccalaureate Curatorial fellow.
Mead Art Museum
4:00 PM
Poet Richard Wilbur '42, P'73, GP '13
Winner of the  Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1957 and again in 1989, and the 1987 United States Poet Laureate, Richard Wilbur, John Woodruff Simpson Lecturer at Amherst College, will read from his poems and translations. Wilbur will be introduced by David Sofield, Samuel Williston Professor of English. Wilbur will remain after the reading to sign copies of his work.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
7:30 PM
Screening of The Da Vinci Code
Based on the book by author Dan Brown ’86. His book Angels and Demons was also made into a film, and a film version of The Lost Symbol is due out in 2012. The Da Vinci Code runs for 149 minutes. Presented by the Class of 1986.
Keefe Campus Center Theater
Friday, May 27, 2011
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542-2065
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
The People Shall Dwell Alone: An Observation from Israel
Walter Zanger ’56, a scholar, guide, historian, television personality and long-term resident of Israel, will discuss what he sees as a growing world-wide campaign to deny the whole existence of Israel as a legitimate sovereign nation in the Middle East, a campaign that involves not only the Arabs, but the Americans and the Europeans too. To complicate matters, the Government of Israel is, by its very nature, making the problem both better and worse. How do the changes in the Arab Middle East look from his perspective? Is the change in Egypt an opportunity for better relations with Israel, or are the new authorities that are likely to appear a different risk for the Israelis? Are there opportunities to reach out toward other of the new leaders in the Middle East? Is there anything for Israel to do other than to sit and wait to see what finally shakes out? Presented by the Class of 1956.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
9:00 AM
Breaking the Cycle of Poverty: The One-Generation Solution
Young people who grow up in America's inner cities face a cycle of poverty and failure that prevents them from achieving their potential. This is not only a tragedy for the Americans who are directly affected; it is a national tragedy as well. The Harlem Children's Zone (HCZ) is demonstrating how to break the cycle of poverty with a program centered on education, beginning even before birth. Bob Shoemaker '61, an emeritus professor at Stern School of Business (NYU);  Robert Kuklis '61, an education consultant, former teacher and administrator and co-author of Transforming Schools: Creating a Culture of Continuous Improvement; William Rapp '61, economist, lawyer, banker, consultant, professor and author of numerous books and articles on economics and law; and Martin Lowy, lawyer, entrepreneur, and author of books on economic history and corporate governance, will argue that a federal initiative based on the HCZ model should be a national priority. Presented by the Class of 1961.
Stirn Auditorium
9:00 AM
Community Engagement at Amherst College: Telling Our Stories
Amherst opened the doors to its new Center for Community Engagement in the fall of 2007.  But students have been engaging in communities near and far throughout the history of our college. The CCE invites you to help us collect and tell our “engagement” stories. All we require is 15 minutes and a willingness to think back in time. We will record your story and include it in a collection on the CCE website. If you would like to sign up for a time slot ahead of time, please contact Zoë Jacobs (zjacobs@amherst.edu) in the CCE. Recording times: Thursday: 9 a.m.-noon; Friday: 9 a.m.-noon; Saturday: 9 a.m.-noon.
Center for Community Engagement, Keefe Campus Center
9:00 AM
A Conversation at the Yūshien Garden
Roughly translated as “garden of friendship,” Yūshien is a contemplative garden in the Japanese style that celebrates the strong ties between Amherst College and Doshisha University in Japan. Come see this beautiful spot and learn about the history of Amherst’s relationship with Japan with Timothy Van Compernolle, assistant professor of Japanese literature in the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations. The event is limited to 15 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center. This program will also be offered on Saturday at 9 a.m.
Enter Yūshien through Webster Center.
10:00 AM
Questions, Not Answers: Psychospiritual Inquiry
Richard Grossinger '66 and Elliott Isenberg '66 will explore the nature of awareness and the path of inquiry leading to spiritual growth. Richard Grossinger will discuss the theosophical tradition, the relationship between science and hermeticism, the role of consciousness in a material universe and alternative modalities of healing. He will explain the notion that all paths are spiritual, even anti-spiritual ones, and that the universe itself is an experiment in transferring meaning and value into matter. Elliott Isenberg will explain how Richard Grossinger taught him the meaning of the “unconscious” in Leo Marx’s English 1 class. Elliott’s talk will elucidate the nature of “not knowing” and the paradox that more knowledge consists in “not knowing” rather than in “knowing.” Elliott will also discuss how Byron Katie’s teachings pointed the way to “know no thing” and how her inquiry can assist individuals in knowing less and less each day. Presented by the Class of 1966.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:00 AM
Old Bones and Fantastic Footprints
Join Andee McEvoy ’11, docent, for a walk through the Beneski Museum of Natural History, which houses outstanding collections and exhibits that include vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and around the world since 1825. Particularly noteworthy is the world-famous dinosaur track collection. Each tour is limited to 25 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Beneski Museum of Natural History
10:00 AM
* Same Sex Marriage on Trial
Recent debates over same-sex marriage have made the issue a political football in election after election, a cultural touchstone for anxieties about the status of the American family, and a signal moment in the history of civil rights litigation in the United States. In this lecture, Martha Umphrey, professor of  law, jurisprudence and social thought, and Emily Griffen '96, a lawyer in California who is legally married to her wife, will review debates--particularly those internal to the gay rights community--about the value and meaning of pursuing the right to same-sex marriage, and will discuss the pros and cons of trials as a forum for public deliberation on the subject. This lecture is a part of the 25th Anniversary of the Gay and Lesbian Alumni (GALA) Celebration.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
10:00 AM
Documentary Film on Niijima Jo
Come watch a documentary on Niijima Jo (Amherst class of 1870), the founder of the Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan. A question-and-answer session with Wako Tawa, professor of Japanese in the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations, will follow.
Webster Center 101
11:00 AM
Museum Tour Who’s Afraid of the Weaker Sex? Images of Women at the Turn of the 20th Century
Led by Bettina Jungen, Thomas P. Whitney ’37 curator of Russian art.
Mead Art Museum
11:00 AM
Coping with the Loss of A Loved One
Skip Corson '56 will lead an informal discussion with members of the Class of '56 who have had to deal with the death or incapacity of a spouse or partner.  Presented by the Class of 1956.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
11:00 AM
Screening of Seeing New Englandly and Q&A with Filmmakers
Seeing New Englandly (2010) is the second program in the series Angles of a Landscape: Perspectives on Emily Dickinson. It explores the poet’s education, her lifelong interest in science and literature, her fascination with the search for the Northwest Passage and her response to the tragedy of the Civil War. The program is lushly illustrated by the paintings of artists who, like Dickinson, probed the natural world in their work: Thomas Cole, Frederic Edwin Church, George Inness, John Kensett, Elbridge Kingsley and other painters of the Hudson River and Luminist schools. Several images from the Mead Art Museum are featured.  The program was written and narrated by poet Susan Snively, edited and produced by Ernest Urvater and created under the auspices of the Emily Dickinson Museum.  Snively and Urvater will be present at the showing to answer questions and discuss the film.
Stirn Auditorium
11:00 AM
* Noah's Ark: Judith Frank Reads from Her Novel In Progress
Noah’s Ark centers upon a gay couple who become the guardians of two small children when one’s brother and sister-in-law, who live in Jerusalem, are killed in a café bombing.  The novel is about the firestorm that erupts in the families when they learn that these bereaved Israeli children are going to be raised by gay men in the U.S.; about mourning a death from terror when one finds the cultural scripts offered by the “war on terror” toxic; and about the predicament of two gay men becoming immersed in the culture of parenting they have spent much of their lives making fun of. This program is a part of the 25th Anniversary of the Gay and Lesbian Alumni (GALA) Celebration.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
11:00 AM
Unresolved Conflicts in the Balkans: Amherst Alumni and Students Making a Difference
When a genocidal war ended in Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1996, Christopher Bragdon ’86 traveled there with donated cash in his boots to see how he could help. Today, 15 years later, he is the director of the non-profit organization Bosnia Initiatives for Local Development (BILD), which he and Bosnian colleagues established to help people rebuild their lives and their communities. Amherst College has joined this effort through the Center for Community Engagement, which sends student teachers each summer to one of BILD’s programs, the Tuzla Summer Institute, a multiethnic educational program implemented at the Behram-begova medresa in northeastern Bosnia. Chris will discuss the conflict in Bosnia, how the effort to establish lasting peace has evolved since 1996 and how Amherst alums and students are making a difference.  Presented by the Class of 1986.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
11:00 AM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
An opportunity to tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command's (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history. The bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the college in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
12:00 PM
Transfer Student Reunion Lunch
Join other transfer student alumni for an informal lunch. Plan to go through the regular line and look for the “Transfer Alumni” sign. If you have questions you may contact Karl A. Hakkarainen ’79 at 508-829-5825 or kh@queenlake.com.
Valentine Hall
1:00 PM
The Evolution of God and Religious Thought Since 1956
Jim Blackburn '56 and classmates Ned Edwards, Bill Fish and Tom Johnston, all of whom have spent distinguished careers in the ministry, will consider the case for God, and try to evaluate how our thinking about God has changed in the more than half century since we graduated.  Presented by the Class of 1956.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
1:00 PM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
An opportunity to tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command's (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history. The bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the college in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
1:00 PM
Lessons from the Learning Center
Why do some brilliant students struggle so much in a traditional school setting? What can students and teachers do to facilitate learning and understanding? How can confidence be reinforced and developed when success is so difficult? Katey Alexander '86 will discuss the lessons she has learned from her years as a teacher and parent of children with learning differences.  Presented by the Class of 1986.
Stirn Auditorium
1:00 PM
Museum Tour: Extraordinary Art for a Great College: Highlights of the Mead Art Museum
Led by Elizabeth Barker, director and chief curator of Mead Art Museum.
Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Shakespeare at Amherst: "Of an Age" or "For All Time"?
How has "Shakespeare," both the Amherst course and the figure in our culture, changed in the past half century? In a Shakespeare class, to what extent should students be readers of poetry? Historians of theater and film? Observers of the uses of Shakespeare in constructing the cultures of our world? Why should non-academics care?  Peter Berek '61, P'92 professor of English at Mount Holyoke College; William Pritchard '53, Henry Clay Folger Professor of English at Amherst and Anston Bosman, associate professor of English at Amherst, will discuss these questions. Presented by the Class of 1961.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:00 PM
Is America Going Broke?
President Obama's  National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform reported in December 2010 on steps that must be taken to get the nation off "an unsustainable fiscal path."  Panelists who have spent their careers  teaching, researching and practicing economic policy will discuss U.S. fiscal policy and the economy. Van Ooms '56 has worked on the Senate and House budget committees, in the Carter White House and as director of research into economic policy at the Committee for Economic Development.  Rob Hollister '56 has taught economics at Swarthmore for nearly four decades and is an expert on labor markets, social programs and program evaluation. Presented by the Class of 1956.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
2:00 PM
Exhibition Tour of Orra White Hitchcock: An Amherst Woman of Art and Science
Led by Daria D'Arienzo, co-curator of the Hitchcock exhibition and co-author of the catalog.
Mead Art Museum
2:00 PM
Old Bones and Fantastic Footprints
Join Andee McEvoy ’11, docent, for a walk through the Beneski Museum of Natural History, which houses outstanding collections and exhibits that include vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and around the world since 1825. Particularly noteworthy is the world-famous dinosaur track collection. Each tour is limited to 25 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Beneski Museum of Natural History
2:00 PM
Politics and Media: What the Coming Change Means
New media are a powerful way to disseminate information and to organize people for political purposes. New media are also an effective way to spread misinformation, as well as outright lies.  Mark Fernald '81, of Sharon, N.H., was the first Democrat elected to the New Hampshire State Senate from his district since before the Civil War. In 2002, he was the Democratic nominee for governor (he came in second place). George Witwer '81 owns a small daily newspaper in Bluffton, Ind. He ran for governor in the Republican primary in 1996, and was the Republican candidate for Lt. Governor in the general election. They will explore how new media have changed politics, the future of new and old media, and how politics has changed both. Moderator Kevin Ellis '81 is an award-winning former journalist and a senior partner at KSE Partners, a leading government and public relations firm. Presented by the Class of 1981.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
2:00 PM
Teacher and Student--35 Years Later: A Conversation with Professor Barry O'Connell and Members of the Class of '76
Amherst prides itself on the rich encounters between teachers and students that, as a small liberal arts college, it can offer.  But it can be hard to put one’s finger on exactly what goes on in such encounters and how they do or do not live on in one’s later life. In September 1972, as the Class of '76 arrived at Amherst, so did a new assistant professor by the name of Barry O'Connell. On the occasion of the class’s 35th Reunion and Barry's imminent retirement as James E. Ostendarp Professor of English, he and four former students—Robert Green ’76, Robert Howard ’76, John Kordalewski ’76, and Alex Palacios ’76—reflect on the dynamics, anticipated and unanticipated, of the teacher-student encounter at Amherst and how they reverberate through time. Presented by the Class of 1976.
Stirn Auditorium
3:00 PM
The Impact of Technology on Post-Secondary Education: 50 Years of Change
Since 1962 technology has greatly affected undergraduate education, both positively and negatively. Three educators from different disciplines, who together have been associated with a wide range of higher-education institutions, will present their thoughts on how technology has influenced academia. Dusty Dowse '66 is a professor of biology at The University of Maine.  He has also taught courses in mathematics and art.  Frank Hubbard '66 is the dean of science and humanities at Husson University.  Before assuming his present position, Frank chaired the Department of Humanities at Georgia Perimeter College, one of the largest community colleges in the United States.  Dan Regan '66 earned advanced degrees in sociology from Yale.  He is the dean of academic affairs at Johnson State College.  He had previously taught and been an administrator at the University of Pittsburgh and Lewis-Clark College. The panel will be moderated by John McKenzie '66.  Presented by the Class of 1966.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
3:00 PM
Boys' Night Out
Featuring Roger Williams '56 on guitar, Mike Ritter '56 on bass and Fred Nelson on mandolin/guitar,  Boys' Night Out will delight with a mixture of bluegrass, folk and "old-timey" music. They may work in a few Irish songs and sea shanties, and will definitely include some catchy fiddle tunes to get your toes tapping. Presented by the Class of 1956.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
3:00 PM
“Not Busted but Medallioned”: Robert Louis Stevenson and the St. Gaudens Medallion, 1887
Robert-Louis Abrahamson '71, life-long devotee of Stevenson and editor of a five-volume collection of Stevenson essays for Edinburgh University Press, will speak in front of the large, bas relief medallions of Stevenson by August St. Gaudens, the most famous sculptor in America towards the end of the nineteenth century.  He will tell the story of the creative friendship between this legendary author and the artist and will recreate the posing session by Stevenson in a messy New York hotel room, as well as examining the medallion itself.  Presented by the Class of 1971.
Mead Art Museum
3:00 PM
Men's Soccer Reunion Game
Lord Jeff's Legions and Coach Justin Serpone will sponsor a game between odd and even class soccer alumni. Bring your cleats and shin guards - we'll supply shirts, shorts and socks. RSVP to Shane Rineer so we have a head count - and spread the word to your classmates and teammates! Plan to come to the men's locker room at 2:15 p.m. to pick up your uniform.
Gooding Turf Field
3:00 PM
Beating the "Insanely Busy" Trap
Are you “insanely busy” most of the time and feel like your life is passing you by? Would you like to slow down but feel like that is totally unrealistic given your commitments? If so, this workshop, led by Mary Allen Gorham '81, executive coach, will help you:
•Understand what’s really making you insanely busy;
•Assess what works and what doesn’t work for you about your current approach;
•Learn where your own biggest opportunities for improvement are;
•Gain new tools and techniques to do what really counts;
•Design next steps that will increase your effectiveness, satisfaction, and energy both short-term and long-term. Presented by the Class of 1981.
Chapin 201
3:00 PM
A Future for Academic Libraries
What is the role of academic libraries, and what does it mean to enable and support scholarship, given the revolutionary changes afoot in the production and distribution of information, the shifting assumptions and research habits of those we serve, and a transformed media landscape?  With Bryn Geffert, librarian of the college, and Charles Husbands '61, former senior systems librarian at Harvard.  Presented by the Class of 1961.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
Stalemate in Washington: Why I Left the Congress
Tom Davis ’71 (R-VA), a leading moderate Republican member of the House of Representatives from 1995-2008, will discuss how the gridlock and increasing polarization of the Congress led to his frustration and ultimate resignation from the House.  He will also give his thoughts on the upcoming 2012 election.  Presented by the Class of 1971.
Stirn Auditorium
4:00 PM
Learning From YouTube
YouTube is a mess. YouTube is for amateurs. YouTube dissolves the real. YouTube is best for corporate-made community. YouTube is badly baked. These are a few of the things Alexandra Juhasz '86, Pitzer College media studies professor, and her class, learned about YouTube when she taught a course about and on YouTube. Learning from YouTube, the first video-book published by the MIT Press (2011), thinks critically about what actually happens within new media settings that proclaim to be radically "democratized." Why is what could be a tool for political change used mostly to spoof mainstream media? What happens when we do more and more of our learning online? Juhasz will give a lively and loud talk about YouTube, digital pedagogy and new forms of online writing.  Presented by the Class of 1986.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
The Arts of Aging: An Artist's Talk by Bessie Young '11
During the past year Bessie Young '11 conducted a photographic exploration of senior living facilities in Turkey, France and the United States for her interdisciplinary thesis. She will give a talk and answer questions about her experiences, which resulted in a photo book, Painted Window, recommended for summa cum laude honors. Young will be pursuing a similar project in Japan next year as a Luce Scholar. Selections of her photographs are on display in the first floor Fayerweather hallway and on the second floor of Frost Library.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
4:00 PM
Hamdan vs. Rumsfield: Fighting Military Tribunals and Other Government Intrusion
Steve Vladeck '01, professor of law at American University Washington College of Law, was part of the legal team that successfully challenged the Bush Administration's use of military tribunals at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in Hamdan vs. Rumsfield, 548 U.S. 557 (2006). In addition, he has coauthored amicus briefs in a host of other lawsuits challenging the U.S. government's surveillance and detention of terrorism suspects. Steve will discuss his work on Hamdan as well as the current detainee litigation and the ongoing debate over military commissions and indefinite detention. Steve graduated from Yale Law School in 2004, where he was executive editor of the Yale Law Journal and then clerked for the Honorable Marsha S. Berzon on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and the Honorable Rosemary Barkett on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. Presented by the Class of 2001.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
Stearns Steeple Tour and Chimes Concert
Aaron Hayden will give a short talk on the history of the Stearns Steeple, its place on campus in the formative years of the college and the Howe Chimes that are in its belfry. The church was donated by the son of President William Augustus Stearns to be an important centerpiece on campus and in campus life.  The chimes were donated in honor of the members of the Amherst College community who died in the “Great War” between the states.  Aaron will also play tunes on the chimes that might have been played when they were new - and tunes that he likes. Aaron is  the campus utilities engineer and, when he is not playing the bells, he works on energy matters at the college, among other things.
Neuhoff Sculpture Courtyard in front of Mead Art Museum
4:00 PM
The Aftermath of the Financial Crisis: Capital Markets and Investing in the New Environment
Geoffrey Woglom, the Richard S. Volpert '56 Professor of Economics;  Barry Volpert '81, P'14, chairman of Crestview Partners, L.P. in New York City; Joe Spalluto '81, P'12, executive vice president at Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, Inc.; and Dave Bailin '81, managing director of Global Head Managed Investments at Citi Private Bank, will discuss  the financial crisis. What has changed for investors, intermediaries, regulators and the economy?  Does it matter? Is the U.S. and global economy at greater risk the next time? Presented by the Class of 1981.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
Buildings of Consequence: Tour of the New Campus
Check out the new and renovated buildings on campus with a tour led by Jim Brassord, director of facilities and associate treasurer for campus services. Learn more about the college’s future plans, and reclaim that prospective student feeling. This tour is limited to 15 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center. Presented by the Class of 2006
Meet at the steps to Frost Library
4:00 PM
Polishing Your Personal Brand
In an economy where more and more people have multiple jobs—and even multiple careers—during the course of a lifetime, one of your most valuable resources is your own personal brand. Creating a personal brand is about unearthing your unique attributes and using them to stand out from peers or competitors. Wendy Mantel ’76, a certified career and personal branding strategist and president of Mantel Coaching, Inc., will coach you through a hands-on workshop for defining and communicating your personal brand, whether you are a seasoned professional, someone contemplating a midlife career change, or are planning to re-enter the workforce after an extended absence. This workshop is limited to 20 people; please sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center. Presented by the Class of 1976.
O'Connor Commons, beneath Charles Pratt Dormitory
4:00 PM
Understanding Cancer
Dr. Jonathan Lee '91, assistant professor of surgical oncology at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, will review what we know about cancer, how our understanding has changed over the past few years, and where research is heading in fighting this disease. Presented by the Class of 1991.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
5:00 PM
Henry Steele Commager, John Moore, and John William Ward: What Qualities Place Each In the Pantheon of Amherst Greats?
Rick Teichgraeber ’71, a professor of history at Tulane University who has studied the letters and unpublished manuscripts of John Moore, former Amherst professor of classics; Rob Hawkins ’71, an assistant to and close personal friend of Henry Steele Commager, former Amherst professor of history; and Kim Townsend, Class of 1959 Professor of English, emeritus, who is writing a book on John William Ward, former Amherst College president, will discuss the special qualities and attributes of these three powerful educators as reflected in their writings, teaching and actions. Presented by the Class of 1971.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
5:00 PM
Screening of Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room
Jason Kliot ’85, who co-produced this documentary for which he was nominated for an Academy Award, will give an introduction. Based on the best-selling book of the same name, it examines one of history’s greatest business scandals, the 2001 collapse of the Enron Corporation. Jason will also be speaking on Saturday at 4:30 p.m. in Lecture Hall 1 of the Merrill Science Center.  The film runs for 110 minutes. Presented by the Class of 1986.
Stirn Auditorium
8:00 PM
* Lawrence Axelrod '81 in Concert
Lawrence Axelrod '81 is a composer, pianist and conductor, whose compositions have been performed by Pinotage, The Lincoln Trio, The Duo Ahlert/Schwab, the Ensemble JungeMusik Berlin and The Verdi String Quartet in recent seasons. As a pianist and composer, he has presented concerts around the United States and internationally. He will perform his works Mandala No. 2 (1995), Love Letters (2005) and Solar Cycle (1994). In addition, he will play Wonderer (2005) by composer Lewis Spratlan, Peter R. Pouncey Professor of Music, Emeritus and winner of the 2000 Pulitzer Prize in music. He will also discuss each of the works he performs. This concert is a part of the 25th Anniversary of the Gay and Lesbian Alumni (GALA) Celebration.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
9:00 PM
* GALA 25th Anniversary Reception
Join us for a celebration of LGBTQA culture and history at Amherst, 25 years after the announcement of the first Gay and Lesbian Alumni (GALA) association. Refreshments.
Arms Music Center Lobby
Saturday, May 28, 2011
7:15 AM
Alumni Fun Run -- Get Your Purple On!
Come one and all, young and old. At a little over 3.6 miles, this will be a tad more than a 5K, much less than a 10K, and fun for all. No timing, no places, no prizes, just purple fun. Wear your purple (or white), be it old Amherst regalia, new Amherst regalia, vintage athletic department issue, retired varsity uniforms or just purple or white t-shirts for a run down memory lane and then back up the new-to-some bike path. This should be undertaken with the understanding that no liability is accepted or assumed by any single organizer, class, class officer or educational institution. Route 116 is a busy road and will not be closed for this run; please take appropriate cautions. We'll assemble at 7:15 a.m. to depart at 7:30 a.m. and plan to make it to Valentine for breakfast before it closes at 9:30 a.m.  The route is a modified Grist Mill run, down Route 116, left on Mill Lane, left on the paved bike path, and right back up into campus. Click here for a map.  Presented by the Class of 1991.
Meet in Webster Circle, in front of Morris Pratt Dormitory
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542-2065
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Entrepreneurs In The New Economy
Ten years after the "dot com" bubble has burst, it's easier than ever to start your own business.  Our panelists have started, among them, a language school, a law firm, a venture capital fund and almost a dozen Internet start-ups.   Some of the ventures have been successful, some have failed, some are still "in progress."  We'll discuss the lessons we've learned along the way, share advice we wished we had known at the beginning, and discuss how the "teens" will be different than the "aughts" for entrepreneurs.  Panelists, all from the Class of 1991, are Eric Satz, Manolo Espinosa, Angela Reddock and Melissa Lawrence-Apfelbaum. Presented by the Class of 1991.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
9:00 AM
Yoga
Join Natalie (Brumblay) Mason ’02E for a playful yoga-flow class set to music, designed to create (re)union for your whole being. The translation of Yoga from sanskrit is “to yoke” or to bring together—the mind, heart, body, breath and spirit. Asana (poses) are practiced with close attention to alignment and anatomy, and philosophy is infused throughout the sequence so that when you leave your mat you can take with you a new way of seeing and being in the world. Natalie uses her background in social anthropology (MA Harvard University ’05) to help her students learn about themselves and the human condition in all its diversity. She holds her 200-hour certification from YogaWorks (2009) and is completing her 500th hour training through Long Island Yoga School. All levels welcome to come sweat, explore and breathe. Presented by the Class of 2001.
Conway Classroom, Alumni Gym
9:00 AM
Heart Health
We all need to think about our heart health. Dr. Jeffrey R. Winterfield '96, fellow, Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and Dr. Joy M. Gelbman '96, assistant attending physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital and assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, will discuss prevention of heart disease, explain atrial fibrillation and more. Presented by the Class of 1996.
Lecture Hall 3, Merrill Science Center
9:00 AM
Are Newspapers Obsolete?
Henry Goldman ’71 reporter for Bloomberg News, Tom Tolan ’71, reporter and editor at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, and Smokey Robinson ’71, vice chairman of the Amherst Student 40 years ago, discuss whether newspapers are dying; whether they will be available at our 2021 Reunion; and what the effect of digital media transcending print will be on how news is gathered and how information will flow to the public in the future. Moderated by George Freeman ’71, vice president and assistant general counsel of The New York Times.  Presented by the Class of 1971.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
9:00 AM
The College Crucible: What Really Happens During Those Four Years?
A $250,000 investment (more or less) should produce some return. Well, there are those four congenial years, with the accompanying recollections. We're also told we become more cultured, thoughtful, informed individuals. Is there evidence to back up those assertions?  Graduates tend to differ in diction and demeanor from their high school age-mates. Is it only style, or something more substantial?  Andrew Hacker '51, professor of sociology at Queens College, CUNY, will examine what we know--and don't know--about how much college changes people. Presented by the Class of 1951.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
9:00 AM
Community Engagement at Amherst: Telling Our Stories
Amherst opened the doors to its new Center for Community Engagement in the fall of 2007.  But students have been engaging in communities near and far throughout the history of our college. The CCE invites you to help us collect and tell our “engagement” stories. All we require is 15 minutes and a willingness to think back in time. We will record your story and include it in a collection on the CCE website. If you would like to sign up for a time slot ahead of time, please contact Zoë Jacobs (zjacobs@amherst.edu) in the CCE. Recording times: Thursday: 9 a.m.-noon; Friday: 9 a.m.-noon; Saturday: 9 a.m.-noon.
Center for Community Engagement, Keefe Campus Center
9:00 AM
Graduate School Social Hour
An informal gathering for prospective/current/past graduate students of all fields. Share your own journey in school selection and career development with fellow alumni. Bring your stories and business cards! Donuts and coffee will be provided. Presented by the Class of 2006.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
9:00 AM
DIY (Do It Yourself) Nonprofits: The Nuts and Bolts of Starting and Succeeding with a Non-Profit Organization
If you fall asleep at night wondering how to make a difference, this panel is for you. We will cover the nuts and bolts of forming your own nonprofit; discuss the challenges of funding a nonprofit in today’s economy and consider alternative ways of giving back. Panelists are: Jim Ansara ’82, of the Ansara Family Fund at the Boston Foundation and director of construction for Mirebalais Hospital in Haiti; David Gottlieb ’81, founder and executive director of Full Circle Communities, Inc., a self-funded nonprofit dedicated to the development and preservation of affordable housing and the provision of supportive services; and Ellen Peck ’81, a nonprofit consultant, former director of development for Save the Children and associate producer of the film Born in Brothels. Virginia “Ginger” E. Howard, ’81, nonprofit counsel, will moderate. Presented by the Class of 1981.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
9:00 AM
A Conversation at the Yūshien Garden
Roughly translated as “garden of friendship,” Yūshien is a contemplative garden in the Japanese style that celebrates the strong ties between Amherst College and Doshisha University in Japan. Come see this beautiful spot and learn about the history of Amherst’s relationship with Japan with Timothy Van Compernolle, assistant professor of Japanese literature in the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations. The event is limited to 15 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Enter Yūshien through Webster Center.
9:00 AM
The Health Care Challenge Part I: Diagnosis and Treatment
In the first of two related sessions on this subject, Hali Hammer, MD '86, medical director of SFGH Family Health Center and Urgent Care and professor of clinical family medicine at UCSF, and Eric Radin, MD '56 will discuss why health care is so expensive and what is being tried to make it more effective and efficient.  Presented by the Classes of  1956, 1961, 1986 and 1991.
Stirn Auditorium
10:00 AM
Where is America's Space Program Going After the Space Shuttle Stops Flying?
Jeffrey Hoffman '66, a former NASA astronaut and now professor of aerospace engineering at MIT, will discuss the end of the space shuttle era and what is likely to follow. One of the great accomplishments of the shuttle was enabling servicing missions to the Hubble Space Telescope, and this talk will include a Hubble retrospective. Jeff will also talk about the transformation of the International Space Station from a construction project to an orbiting laboratory, and he will look at the possibilities for commercial space flight. Presented by the Class of 1966.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
10:00 AM
Good Intentions: Are They Enough?
Amherst alumni and current students are marked by a strong desire to make the world a better place, to work effectively and collaboratively on some of the globe’s most pressing problems. But good intentions are not enough. Sadly, there are too many stories of how “help” goes awry, international aid to Haiti being the most recent example. Molly Mead, director of the Center for Community Engagement, with Jeff Hall ’86 and Michael Ketover ’86, will discuss lessons learned about what does and does not work to provide effective help to others. Molly will share highlights from current student perspectives that have emerged over two years of teaching a course at the college called Giving. Jeff, a former Peace Corps volunteer and now chair of OneVillage Partners, will share the impact of simple, practical solutions that can be measured at the grassroots. Michael, also a former Peace Corps volunteer, will tell stories from his work with the Peace Corps, UNICEF and Crisis Corps.
Johnson Chapel 21
10:00 AM
Reunion Hike to the Notch and a Taste of Flayvors Ice Cream
Join us for views of the Pioneer Valley, the Connecticut River and the farmland of bucolic New England. Meet at the Notch Visitor’s Center (1500 West Street, Amherst) for a two-hour round trip hike to the top of Mt. Norwottuck. Then descend for a cone of freshly churned homemade ice cream from a charming local farm. Presented by the Class of 2006.
The Notch, 1500 West Street (Route 116), Amherst; Flayvors at Cook Farm, 129 S. Maple St, Hadley
10:00 AM
What Did Amherst Do Right? You Tell Us, in Under 60 Seconds
What aspect of your time at Amherst has been most helpful to the life you've led since then? Was it a class, a professor, an assignment, a roommate, a sport, a performance, casino night, a walk through the woods, a pizza, a late night discussion?  Did you recognize at the time how valuable that moment was? Everyone is invited to step up to the microphone and give their point in 60 seconds or less. We're looking for a symphonic experience, but will accept a cacophony. Moderated by Cam Hutchins '81, class secretary, and Katie Fretwell '81, director of admission at Amherst. Presented by the Class of 1981.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
10:00 AM
Documentary Film on Niijima Jo
This documentary examines the life of Niijima Jo (Amherst class of 1870), the founder of the Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan. A question-and-answer session with Wako Tawa, professor of Japanese in the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations, will follow.
Webster Center 101
10:00 AM
The Health Care Challenge Part II: Economic and Political Ramifications
In the second part of this two-part session Lara Shore-Sheppard '91, professor of economics at Williams College, and Landis Olesker '61, attorney and volunteer at the Medicare Rights Center in New York, will discuss the economic and political ramifications of health care reform. Presented by the Classes of 1956, 1961, 1986 and 1991.
Stirn Auditorium
10:00 AM
Amherst Christian Fellowship Alumni Gathering
A chance for alumni to meet, catch up, hear about current Christian life on campus, have some food and pray for one another and Amherst.  All are invited.
Cadigan Center for Religious Life, 38 Woodside Avenue
10:00 AM
* Being Gay at Amherst: Voices Through Time
Louis Dolbeare '40; Folger Cleaveland '67; Steve Cadwell '72; Larry Axelrod '81; Pem Brown '06 and others will reflect on what being a student who did not identify with the heterosexual norm was like when they were students here.  Others are welcome to tell their stories as well.  This program is part of the 25th Anniversary of the Gay and Lesbian Alumni (GALA) Celebration.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:00 AM
Museum Tour: Highlights Around Curriculum
Led by Maggie Dethloff, Andrew W. Mellon Post-baccalaureate Curatorial Fellow, with 2010 Wise Prize winner Mike Greenberg '10.
Mead Art Museum
10:00 AM
Simulating Catastrophe
Society is vulnerable to large-scale catastrophic threats:  infectious-disease pandemics, major toxic chemical spills, serious earthquakes and nuclear or biological terrorism. A new “transdiscipline” studies the complex dynamics of such threats. It combines insights and techniques from economics, behavioral science, supercomputing, emergency medicine and disaster health to create “agent-based” models (ABMs), computer-based worlds populated by virtual people that mimic how people respond to real or imagined threats. ABMs can model how large populations and complex social systems are likely to behave and, in this way, contribute to smarter planning and more effective strategies. Joshua Epstein ’76, an internationally recognized pioneer in the field, will demonstrate some ABMs and describe their applications. Joshua is professor of emergency medicine, with joint appointments in economics, biostatistics, and environmental health sciences and is director of the Center for Advanced Modeling in the Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Presented by the Class of 1976.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
11:00 AM
An Amherst Conversation and Annual Meeting of the Society of the Alumni and the Alumni Council
Jide Zeitlin ’85, chair of the Amherst College Board of Trustees and the presidential search committee, will give an update on the college, along with remarks from President Marx.  As part of the Annual Meeting,  Distinguished Service Awards will be presented and  names of the recently elected alumni trustees and committee members and officers of the Society of the Alumni will be announced.
Johnson Chapel
12:15 PM
Baseball Alumni Gathering
All baseball alumni are invited to an informal gathering at Memorial Field. Come anytime. Snacks provided – bring your glove and we’ll supply the rest! Questions? Contact Head Coach Brian Hamm at bhamm@amherst.edu.
Memorial Field
12:15 PM
Reunion Luncheon on the Valentine Quad
Join us for a complimentary  luncheon on the Quad. Look for your classmates under the decade signs!
Valentine Quad (Rain Site: Valentine Dining Commons)
1:30 PM
The Da Vinci Code: Publishing, Religion and Hollywood
Dan Brown '86 is the bestselling author of five novels, which have been translated into more than 50 languages around the world. He will speak briefly about book publishing, movie-making and religion, followed by time for questions from the audience. Presented by the Class of 1986.
Johnson Chapel
1:30 PM
Dedication of the Class of 1946 World War II Study Room
In celebration of our 65th Reunion and to commemorate the remarkable service of our class and Amherst College during World War II, the Class of 1946 has funded and will dedicate a new study room in the Frost Library, to communicate to a new generation the story of Amherst and its students and faculty during WWII. Our keynote speaker is Jacob Worrell ’12E, combat veteran of the Iraq War. He is among the first veterans supported by Amherst College’s Veterans Scholarship Fund, and an active leader of the Amherst College Veteran’s Association. A brief tour and light refreshments will follow. Architectural plans and a selection of images from the Archives chosen to decorate the room also will be on view. Presented by the Class of 1946.
Robert Frost Library
1:30 PM
The Two Party System: A Duopoly In Need of Revision?
Does the two party system work well or is it anachronistic in the 21st century? Ignoring the doctrinal issues that inspire new parties, what are the practical problems faced by a group of citizens who wish to offer an alternative to the major parties? How do they raise money? How do they get heard? How do they find lists of voters to contact? What are the nuts-and-bolts requirements to get themselves on the ballot? Martin Honigberg ’81, an attorney who has worked in and around New Hampshire's election system, including the ballot access process, and Dave Schwartz ’56, vice chair of the Westchester chapter of the Working Families Party in New York and a member of the advisory committee of the state party, will share their practical experiences in this candid discussion. Presented by the Classes of 1956 and 1981.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
1:30 PM
The Middle East Upheaval and the Future of Oil
Michael Klare, Five Colleges professor of peace and world security studies, will examine how the global oil equation will likely be impacted by recent turmoil in the Middle East. Because the Middle East houses such a large proportion of the world's untapped petroleum and supplies so much of the world's exportable oil, the outcome of developments there will determine the shape of oil markets for years to come. Presented by the Class of 2001.
Stirn Auditorium
1:30 PM
Football Alumni Gathering
Head coach E.J. Mills hosts a gathering for football alumni.
Friends of Amherst Athletics Room, Alumni Gym
1:30 PM
What Asia Expects of America for the Next Ten Years
Jose Faustino '61, former professor of marketing at the Asian Institute of Management in Manila, will examine how America's role as a world power, trading partner and ally in Asia has changed over the last couple of decades, and explore what Asians expect of America in the near future. Currently a visiting professor of Asian history at Leiden University in The Netherlands, he has taught and consulted all over the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Japan, Australia, Germany, the U.S.A. and India. Presented by the Class of 1961.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1:30 PM
The Baby Boomers' Guide to the Science and Medicine of Alzheimer’s Disease
More than 5.3 million Americans currently suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, the most common degenerative disorder of the brain. Since age is the biggest risk factor and since there are currently no effective treatments, the graying of the baby boomers and increasing longevity mean that this number will likely double by 2030. Robert Green ’76, associate professor of medicine at Harvard-Partners Center for Personalized Genetic Medicine,  Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and Edward Koo ’76, professor of neurosciences at Shiley-Marcos Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at the University of California, San Diego, two physician-scientists on the forefront of research about Alzheimer’s, will discuss the latest thinking on the causes, diagnosis, and prospects for effective treatment or prevention of the disease.  Presented by the Class of 1976.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:00 PM
Open House at the Emily Dickinson Museum
The Emily Dickinson Museum invites alumni and families for self-guided tours of the Homestead, home of the poet Emily Dickinson, and The Evergreens, home of her brother Austin. The Open House is free. The museum is open for regular guided tours throughout Reunion. Please see daily museum listings for admission information.
280 Main Street, Amherst
2:30 PM
Is It Easy Being Green? Addressing Climate Change Through Business and Policy
Chris Taylor '91, chief development officer, Element Power, and Homer Robinson '91, senior project manager in the Albuquerque office of the Jonathan Rose Companies, will discuss how we can combat climate change through economic action and what the state of the "green economy" really is. This talk is based on their experiences developing wind and solar energy and building affordable green housing.  Presented by the Class of 1991.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
A Children's Magic Show
Ed Popielarczyk is a professional magician and entertainer whose true magic is in the laughter he brings. The show will run about 50 minutes and is appropriate for all ages of children. Presented by the Class of 1996 Children's Program.
Charles Pratt Dormitory (tent)
2:30 PM
A Chamber Music Hour
Enjoy selections from opera and musical theater, including  works by Brahms, Mozart, Schubert, Sondheim and more. Performers include 1986 classmates Vanessa Adler, mezzo-soprano; Christopher Barber, piano; Carol Chickering Burden, soprano; Peter Clark, baritone and Jonathan Hirsh, violin. Presented by the Class of 1986.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:30 PM
“Enduring Impressions”: A Reception for Dr. Sanford Sternlieb ’46
Join Charles Eldredge '66, Hall Distinguished Professor of American Art and Culture, and Randall Griffey, curator of American art at the Mead, to learn about modernist American prints and raise a glass to Dr. Sanford Sternlieb ’46 P'69. We will celebrate Dr. Sternlieb's recent gift of works by John Sloan, Edward Hopper, John Marin and Jack Levine, which will be featured in a special exhibition at the Mead this summer. Presented by the Classes of 1946 and 1966 and the Mead Art Museum.
Mead Art Museum
2:30 PM
Amherst Crew Reunion Row
Head Coach Bill Stekl will give an update on Amherst’s current rowing program. We urge all former coxswains and rowers—men and women, lightweight and heavyweight, young and old, fit and not-so-fit—to attend. Assemble at the boathouse, ready to row (preferably in Amherst rowing attire from your era). Refreshments (and oxygen) will be available at the conclusion of our workout.  In addition to our bravest efforts to take stabs at the water while diligently striving to remain poised and correct, we will also be celebrating the contribution of Kim Li Spencer '86 to the women's program by christening our new women's shell named for her. Please join us for our row and celebration.
Amherst College Boathouse (Sportsman’s Marina, Route 9 at Coolidge Bridge)
2:30 PM
Up and Coming: Young Artists Gallery and Showcase
Check out works of visual art and performances by talented young alumni in a cool gallery setting. From New York to L.A. and places in between, young alumni are making waves as professional musicians, photographers, stage performers, designers and more. Others have day jobs but keep a love of arts alive through side gigs or as a serious hobby. Come and see who from Amherst is up and coming! Presented by the Class of 2006.
Eli Marsh Gallery, Fayerweather Hall
2:30 PM
An Afternoon of Mindreading, Magic and Mentalism
Bill Herz '79 is a corporate magician who began performing when he was 8 years old. He wowed us all at Amherst (when we should have been in class) and has since created a successful business performing for corporations and at private events all over the world. He travels over 200 days a year, and has performed for four U.S. presidents, Hollywood royalty and hundreds of Fortune 500 companies, among others. This fun interactive program will make you laugh and think twice about what's real and what isn’t. Presented by the Class of 1981.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
2:30 PM
Education at Amherst (and Other Elite Schools): Is It Worth the Price?
Is the investment in the education offered by highly selective (and, candidly, expensive) colleges worth it, particularly as compared to the education offered  by other institutions? Jim White '56, professor at the University of Michigan Law School, and Charlton Copeland '96, assistant professor at the University of Miami School of Law, will discuss. Presented by the Classes of 1956 and 1996.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
2:30 PM
My 37 Years In Prison
A discussion of the role of a prison ombudsman, criminal justice policy, correctional management, prison issues and inmate life, possibly with a few anecdotes mixed in.  With Jim Bookwalter ’61, who served as the Connecticut Correctional Ombudsman from 1973 until 2010. Presented by the Class of 1961.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
3:30 PM
The United States and the Arab World: From 9/11 to Tahrir Square
In a brief four weeks last winter, two long-time allies of the United States in the Arab world were forced from power by peaceful popular uprisings. These developments raise profound questions about U.S. foreign policy in the region. What does it say about our foreign policy that an ally such as Hosni Mubarak was so hated by his own people? Is it possible to reconcile our national interests in the region with treasured American values such as democracy and human rights? Is our embrace of Arab potentates in the name of peace with Israel and the “war on terror” hard necessity or dysfunctional delusion? Andrew Steinfeld ’76, a 30-year veteran of the U.S. Foreign Service and recent director of Arabian Peninsula Affairs in the Near East Bureau at the State Department, will lead a  discussion on key questions facing U.S. foreign policy in this critical part of the world. Presented by the Class of 1976.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
3:30 PM
Samuel E. Bartos '66 in Concert
Works performed will include: Johann Sebastian Bach, Preludes and Fugues in Bb Minor and A Major from Book II of the Well-Tempered Clavier; Maurice Ravel, "Une Barque sur L'Ocean" from "Miroirs"; Franz Schubert, Impromptu in C Minor, Op. 90, No. 1; and Frederic Chopin, Polonaise-Fantaisie, Op. 61.  Presented by the Class of 1966.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
3:30 PM
Law and Justice
Five seasoned federal and state prosecutors will provide insights into the course of a case from investigation through sentencing, the impact of technology and social media on the criminal justice system and the impact of economic challenges facing the system. Speakers are Cassandra Abodeely '96, assistant district attorney, the Bronx; Ashley Lunkenheimer '96, assistant U.S. attorney, Pennsylvania; Samantha Rein '96, civil litigator (moderating panel); Jerry Sullivan '81, assistant U.S. attorney, Rhode Island; and Paul van de Graf '81, assistant U.S. attorney, Vermont.   Presented by the Classes of 1981 and 1996.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
3:30 PM
Dying for Dummies
Is there such a thing as “dying well” as an extension of “living well"? What does “dying with dignity” mean?  How do we confront our deaths and the end of life of those we love? Dr. Timothy Quill ’71, who was the lead plaintiff in a case heard by the U.S. Supreme Court challenging the law prohibiting physician–assisted death; Rev. Tom deBree ’71, a hospice chaplain in a team providing end-of-life care for patients and their families, and Dr. Corey Lerner ’71, a cardiologist; will discuss medical, ethical and spiritual challenges and personal considerations that human beings encounter in facing end-of-life decisions.  Moderated by Dr. Russ Ryan ’71.  Presented by the Class of 1971.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
3:30 PM
Activism Across Borders: Working for Social Justice Internationally
Susan Banki '91 will discuss Doing No Harm to Harmed Populations--refugee advocacy and the ethics and the tensions around it, the difficulty of "objective" research and the potentials and pitfalls of the United Nations. Melinda Burrell '91 will offer thoughts on supporting efforts to develop civil society in the Middle East, with the accompanying opportunities and dilemmas for the United States. Michael Ketover '86 will discuss international community development through the work of the Peace Corps, the U.S. Agency for International Development and UNICEF. Presented by the Classes of 1991 and 1986.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
3:30 PM
The Common and Lauren Groff '01: A Conversation
This spring, The Common, the new Amherst-based literary magazine founded by Jennifer Acker '00, published its debut issue featuring a new short story by Lauren Groff '01, author of the novel The Monsters of Templeton and the short story collection Delicate Edible Birds. Join Jen and Lauren for a short reading of the new story, a conversation about writing and editing and the role of Amherst in their literary work. Presented by the Class of 2001.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
3:30 PM
The Art and Politics of Science
Science is an art that challenges the imagination of individuals attempting to understand the natural world, but it is also a community effort that reaches consensus and acts politically to seek funds, promote exchanges of information and materials and develop complex research programs. Dr. Harold Varmus '61 will discuss these aspects of scientific life based on his experience as a cancer researcher, an institutional leader and an "open access" publisher of scientific work. Presented  by the Class of 1961.
Stirn Auditorium
4:30 PM
Ethics in the Modern Age
Dr. Karen Hendershott '91, a surgeon at Cooper University Hospital in New Jersey, and David Taube '91, assistant general counsel in the ethics program of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, will discuss ethics from multiple perspectives - professional ethics for doctors and lawyers, bioethics and government ethics (which might not mean what you think it means). We'll discuss both the institutions created to resolve ethical questions and specific applications of ethical principles. If time permits, Dr. Hendershott will transplant a kidney from one audience member to another. Presented by the Class of 1991.
Stirn Auditorium
4:30 PM
The Sound of Broadway: A Songwriting Workshop with Alan Zachary '96
Alan Zachary ’96  will offer tips on songwriting and examples of the kinds of tasks he has had as a songwriter for Broadway and Disney and how he has approached them. Alan is a recognized songwriting talent whose many credits with writing partner Michael Weiner include performing their songs alongside Stephen Schwartz (Wicked) at the world-renowned Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. as part of their Broadway Today & Tomorrow celebration of the next generation of Broadway songwriters. They are currently composing the score for a Broadway-bound musical adaptation of the New Line Cinema film Secondhand Lions with book by playwright, novelist and songwriter Rupert Holmes. Simultaneously, they are hard at work on an original new musical entitled First Date, a show exploring the contemporary world of dating, which will have its world premiere next year at the 5th Avenue Theatre in Seattle where Broadway’s Hairspray began. For more on Alan's background go to www.zacharyandweiner.com. Presented by the Class of 1996.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
4:30 PM
Did Our Generation Screw Up?
We left college after the tumultuous '60s idealistic, non-materialistic, demonstrating for peace and active in bettering our communities.  As a generation in power, we have waged two wars and have been generally criticized for our cynicism, greed and narcissism.  Did we fail, and, if so, why? 1971 classmates John Ahern, Bob Ellenport, Richard Sandhaus, Chuck Sims and Win Smith will discuss this question.  Presented by the Class of 1971.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
4:30 PM
A Life in Independent Film
Jason Kliot ’85, Academy Award-nominated producer of over 40 feature films by such acclaimed directors as Jim Jarmusch, Miguel Arteta, Brian DePalma, Steven Soderbergh and Todd Solondz, has produced innovative works by first-time filmmakers while championing the distinctive visions of established directors. Kliot has produced a wide variety of films, ranging from auteur-driven projects to successful commercial box-office hits, as well as award-winning theatrical documentaries.  He will show clips and share stories about his life as an independent filmmaker and answer questions. Presented by the Class of 1986.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:30 PM
A Musical Pot Pourri Served up by Chris Grose ’61, Bill Keith ’61, Jim Rooney ’60 and Friends
Bill Keith '61 is widely known as a bluegrass banjo performer, innovator and teacher. Jim Rooney '60 is the leader of Rooney's Irregulars and a Grammy-winning producer of many well known artists, and has been making music with Bill Keith since his Amherst days. He was honored in 2009 with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Music Association. Chris Grose '61 is a veteran harpsman in the blues clubs of West LA and the Seattle bluegrass community. Their friends include Chris Brashear on mandolin, fiddle and guitar; Sam Grose on bass; and singer Julie Grose. Presented by the Class of 1961.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
4:30 PM
Winning and Losing with American Health Care
Who are the winners, and who are the losers, under the current American health care system? 1966 classmates Dr. Paul Butler, Dr. David Greenblatt, Dr. Richard Klein, Dr. Richard Rubenstein and Dr. Jon Wolpaw, and Dr. Jane Deane Clark (wife of Russ Clark '66),  will discuss. Presented by the Class of 1966.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
4:30 PM
Back to School: Conversations with Amherst Faculty
Reignite your intellectual engagement and creativity at this interdisciplinary faculty panel. Join professors Amelie Hastie, associate professor of English and program chair of Film and Media Studies; Kannan Jagannathan, Bruce B. Benson '43 and Lucy Wilson Benson Professor of Physics; and Catherine Sanderson, professor of psychology and 2006 Senior Assembly keynote speaker, as they share their latest research and publications, as well as offer their reflections on the college’s current and future academic priorities and direction. Acquaint yourself with professors who have recently joined the faculty and rekindle your connections with favorites from our time at Amherst. Presented by the Class of 2006.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:30 PM
Amherst College Architecture Past and Present
Join architect Chip von Weise '86, founding principal of von Weise Associates, a Chicago-based architecture and design studio, as he discusses the history and architecture of the Amherst campus and takes participants on a walking tour of the main quadrangle. Presented by the Class of 1986.
Meet in the Main Quad, by Johnson Chapel
5:30 PM
Class Receptions and Dinners
Detailed information will be provided by your class.
5:30 PM
Catholic Mass
Roman Catholic Mass with Fr. Richard Gross S.J., celebrant, and Chris Clark, DHM, Catholic religious advisor. All alumni and their families are welcome.
Chapin Chapel, Chapin Hall
8:00 PM
Transcendence: The 13th Annual Apocalypse Party
Apocalypse is a party for people who don't like parties. Hosted by Planworld. Come on by, play intellectual games, have conversations and enjoy a heart-stopping Black Sheep cake and other tasty refreshments. All who enjoy fine company are invited. We will continue until people stop talking.
Moore Dormitory, 2nd Floor
9:00 PM
Zumbyes A Capella Concert
The Zumbyes welcome Zum-alums, friends and fans in Buckley Recital Hall to celebrate the 61st year of the Zumbyes with a concert of both new and classic songs and of course our beloved college songs.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Sunday, May 29, 2011
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
We’ll be open for you to drop off your keys or answer last-minute questions before you head home. Telephone: (413) 542-2065
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Service of Remembrance and Community
Please join us for an ecumenical service to remember the lives of those alumni we have lost this year. Rabbi Hara Person '86, P'14, and Rev. Edward Dibble '56, will officiate.
Memorial Hill, War Memorial (Rain Site: Johnson Chapel)

Reunion 2011 Schedule of Events

 Using the form below, you can search for events by day, time, class, location, speaker, and keyword.  

 

Upcoming Events

Northern California - NESCAC Spring Happy Hour
April 17, 2014 | 6:00 - 9:00 p.m.

New York - Cabaret
April 17, 2014 | 8:00 p.m.

Virtual Lecture - Prof. Austin Sarat
April 24, 2014 | 4:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Southern Connecticut - Reception with President Biddy Martin
April 24, 2014 | 6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

New York - NESCAC Alumni Happy Hour
April 24, 2014 | 7:00 - 10:00 p.m.

Philadelphia - RESCHEDULED Evening of music by the Chamber Music Society
April 24, 2014 | 8:00 p.m.

Amherst Today
April 24 - 25, 2014

Reunion
May 28 - June 1, 2014

MORE EVENTS »

Contact Us

alumni@amherst.edu
Main Phone: 413.542.2313

STAFF DIRECTORY »