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2012 Reunion Schedule

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Wednesday, May 23, 2012
5:30 PM
A Night at the Museum

Mingle beneath the mammoths, enjoy libations and hors d'oeuvres in the shadow of ancient dinosaur footprints and renew old friendships amidst Amherst’s extraordinary collection of vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and around the world since 1825. The Bluestockings will perform at 5:45 p.m. At about 6:20 Fred Venne, science educator, will speak briefly about the last ice age, the great mammals and their extinction. Informal tours will be available.

Beneski Museum of Natural History
Thursday, May 24, 2012
1:00 PM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
An opportunity to tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command's (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history with Aaron Hayden, the college’s capital projects manager and the unofficial authority on the history of the bunker as well as Stearns Steeple. The Bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the college in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the Bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
1:30 PM
The Impact of Climate Change on Pre-Modern Europe
Over the last two millennia, Europe has experienced major changes in climate, including two extended periods of exceptionally wet winters and cold summers: one between the fifth and seventh centuries, the other beginning with a great famine in 1314–1315 and ending at the beginning of the 18th century (the “little ice age”). What were the consequences for European society? What might we learn from those experiences? Fred Cheyette, professor emeritus of history, will discuss his research, funded by the Mellon Foundation.

Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
4:00 PM
Resilience of the U.S. Economic Recovery Points to Optimism for the Future
The U.S. economy has bounced back from the most serious and disruptive recession in post-World War II economic history. However, there are major questions with respect to the strength and sustainability of this recovery. What have been its key features? What has been working, what has not? Fiscal consolidation and restraints on government spending have been significant factors. Uncertainty about federal tax, spending and regulatory policies is creating anxiety in the business sector, yet the health of the business sector is critical for the recovery. We are seeing a number of structural changes in the economy, particularly in the employment market, and an increasing gap between the “haves” and the “have-nots.” There appears to be a leadership vacuum in terms of confronting these deeper structural issues, as the various estates in the economy focus on their narrow self-interests. Brian Bethune, a visiting professor of economics and a frequent commentator in the media on economic issues, will examine these issues. This talk will also be broadcast as a virtual lecture series; click here to register or for more information,
Stirn Auditorium
Friday, May 25, 2012
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542–2065
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Biomathematics: Proteins, Graphs and Clocks, Oh My!
Exciting new technologies let us glimpse some of the amazing biological micro machines at work in our bodies. For example, proteins fold and unfold as they carry out important tasks inside cells. One of these tasks is to keep track of time each day—that is, to generate an internal clock. Advanced statistical and mathematical methods are needed in conjunction with the new experimental methods to help us understand these complex biological processes. The Four College Biomathematics Consortium brings together faculty and students from diverse backgrounds to collaborate in biomathematics research and to train students through coursework, seminars, mentoring and research opportunities. Amy Wagaman, assistant professor of statistics, and Sheila Jaswal, assistant professor of chemistry, are currently collaborating on projects involving protein folding and energy landscapes, while Tanya Leise, assistant professor of mathematics, studies biological oscillators, such as the mammalian circadian clock, with a collaborator in neuroscience at Smith College.
Paino Room (Room 107), Beneski Geology Building
9:00 AM
Tiptoeing Through the Tulips While Peering Into the Murky Future
A whimsical attempt to understand and effectively deal with the challenges of 21st-century American life, with an emphasis on health care. Hear from Stephen P. Grayer ’57, who spent over 40 years toiling in the vineyards of surgery, with a pit stop in Vietnam during the “police action.” Presented by the Class of 1957.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
9:00 AM
Community Engagement at Amherst College: Telling Our Stories
Amherst opened the doors to the Center for Community Engagement in the fall of 2007.  But students have been engaging in communities near and far throughout the history of our college. The CCE invites you to help us collect and tell our “engagement” stories. All we require is 15 minutes and a willingness to think back in time. We will record your story and include it in a collection on the CCE website. If you would like to sign up for a time slot ahead of time, please contact Zoë Jacobs in the CCE. Recording times: Thursday: 9 a.m.-noon; Friday: 9 a.m.-noon; Saturday: 9 a.m.-noon.
Center for Community Engagement, Keefe Campus Center
11:00 AM
Old Bones and Fantastic Footprints
Join Fred Venne, museum educator, for a walk through the Beneski Museum of Natural History, which houses outstanding collections and exhibits that include vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and around the world since 1825. Particularly noteworthy is the world-famous dinosaur track collection. Each tour is limited to 25 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.

Beneski Museum of Natural History
12:00 PM
Stearns Steeple Tour and Chimes Concert
Aaron Hayden will give a short talk on the history of the steeple, its place on campus in the formative years of the college and the Howe Chimes that are in its belfry. The church was donated by the son of President William Augustus Stearns to be an important centerpiece on campus and in campus life. The chimes were donated in honor of the members of the Amherst College community who died in the “Great War” between the states. Aaron will play tunes on the chimes that might have been played on them when they were new—as well as some tunes that he just likes. Aaron is the college’s capital projects manager, and he also leads tours of the Amherst Bunker.
Neuhoff Sculpture Courtyard, in front of the Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Making Better Teachers
How valuable is a good teacher? How do we decide what makes a good teacher? Join Jonah Rockoff ’97, the Sidney Taurel Associate Professor of Business at Columbia Business School, as he discusses his research on the lasting economic and educational impact of teacher performance. Jennifer Wallace Jacoby ’97, doctoral candidate at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, will explore how the education field is working to prepare new teachers and provide better professional development for veteran teachers. How can Amherst help encourage and shape tomorrow’s teachers? Presented by the Class of 1997.
Stirn Auditorium
1:00 PM
Successful Aging (Revisited): Revitalizing the Vulnerable Venerable
What are the secrets to getting the best out of life and our bodies as we age? Cardiologist James Gault ’57 will moderate a panel on this topic, joined by James Vernon ’57, clinical professor of surgery,Tufts University School of Medicine; Pierce Gardner ’57, professor of internal medicine and public health at Stony Brook University School of Medicine; Howard Bellin ’57, founder, director and plastic surgeon at CosMedica in New York City; and Howard Rotner ’57, an endocrinologist at the Lahey Clinic. They will provide an interactive inquiry into practices and techniques to enhance our lives in the years to come. This is a repeat of a panel from five years ago with the same panelists, which received rave reviews. Presented by the Class of 1957.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
2:00 PM
Artists Ralston Fox Smith '87 and Eric Goulder '87
Join sculptor Eric Goulder 87 and painter Ralston Fox Smith 87, along with Lizzie Barker, director and chief curator of the Mead Art Museum, for a conversation devoted to the arts. The artists will show slides of their work and discuss the role of their Amherst education in their development as artists. Fox, of Asheville, N.C., is a contemporary landscape painter who works in oil. Eric, of Virginia and Italy, is a contemporary figurative sculptor whose materials include bronze, crystal, silver and marble. Lizzie, the Mead’s director since 2007, is a scholar of British art who’s working to integrate Amherst’s art collection meaningfully into teaching and research across the disciplines. Presented by the Class of 1987.
Mead Art Museum Study Room
3:00 PM
A Life in the Arts
Tim Fort, head of drama at Queen’s University and producing director at Weston Playhouse; Peter Trencher, actor; Tom Brady, painter; and Jay DeMartine, painter, all from the Class of 1972, will reflect on their careers and life journeys as artists, actors, directors, writers and filmmakers. Presented by the Class of 1972.
Stirn Auditorium
3:00 PM
Old Bones and Fantastic Footprints
Join Fred Venne, museum educator, for a walk through the Beneski Museum of Natural History, which houses outstanding collections and exhibits that include vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and around the world since 1825. Particularly noteworthy is the world-famous dinosaur track collection. Each tour is limited to 25 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.

Beneski Museum of Natural History
3:00 PM
Science Since Arnie Arons
How is science taught at Amherst today? A discussion led by Gerry Fink 62, MIT professor and former director of The Whitehead Institute, with David Hall 91, professor of physics; Dick Goldsby, the Thomas B. Walton Jr. Memorial Professor of Biology, and Scott Kaplan 95, professor of computer science and chair of the computer science department. Presented by the Class of 1962.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
3:00 PM
Beethoven's Shadow: Why There is a Creative Crisis in 21st Century Music
There is substantial evidence of a creative crisis in contemporary musical life: e.g., the lack of post-1950 orchestral and operatic standard repertoire and the lack of a new style in popular music comparable to the revolutionary breakthroughs of the 1920s and 1960s. The musical landscape is fragmented at all levels of discourse, and no compelling new direction has emerged to create a widely accepted common ground among musicians and audiences. Michael Campbell ’67, retired professor of music at Western Illinois University, will outline the historical developments that have led to the current impasse. He will highlight the crucial contributions that common practices have made to collective creativity and their potential for revitalizing musical life in our time. Presented by the Class of 1967.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
4:00 PM
The (Very) Big Business of Professional Sports
Sports is the universal language that excites our passions and connects us all. Hear about the topics of the day (including work stoppages, the price of winning, concussions and player safety, enhanced fan interaction through social media and historic broadcast contracts) in baseball, basketball, football and soccer from the perspectives of the following alumni: Ken Catanella ’97, director of basketball operations for the Detroit Pistons; David Downs ’77, commissioner of the North American Soccer League; Jean Fugett ’72, former Pro Bowl tight end for the Dallas Cowboys and Washington Redskins; and David Wolff ’62, partner, the San Francisco Giants and AT&T Park. Presented by the Classes of 1962, 1972, 1977 and 1997.
Stirn Auditorium
4:00 PM
The Longest 90 Miles: An American in Havana
With very few exceptions, Cuba has been closed to Americans for 50 years. By all accounts, it’s a fascinating land, with two currencies, two economies and a tremendously ingenious people. But our knowledge of Cuba is secondhand at best. Katie Merrell ’82—who will have just arrived back from an officially sanctioned trip to Cuba—will take you behind the curtain to look at the reality of today’s Cuba as seen by artists, urban farmers and economic planners, among others. Presented by the Class of 1982.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
Thoughts on My Career in Higher Education
Dick Allen ’52, retired professor of history at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Earl Taft ’52, professor of mathematics, Rutgers University, will discuss their chosen careers. Their academic longevity implies they must be doing something right. But are there pitfalls as well as rewards?  Listen as they each describe their own experiences in higher education. Presented by the Class of 1952.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
5:15 PM
Reception for Friends of Amherst Athletics
All members of the  Friends of Amherst Athletics, and everyone who would like to become a member, are invited to come hear about the Amherst athletic program.
Merrill Beach (Rain site: O'Connor Commons)
Saturday, May 26, 2012
9:00 AM
Changing the World at Home and Abroad: Class of 1987 Reformers Part 1
Seven Amherst 1987 graduates who are at the forefront of international and domestic reform movements will frame issues they are currently working on, including reducing environmental degradation in Third World countries; addressing economic development and basic needs in African communities; remedying unfair corporate business practices in the U.S. and abroad; providing HIV/AIDS medical, prevention and advocacy services locally and internationally; increasing accessibility of affordable housing in New York and preventing foreclosures; and reducing family instability and substance abuse in poor communities in major U.S. cities. Panelists are Eva Neubauer Alligood ’87, urban planning and community development consultant; James Fahn ’87, executive director of the Earth Journalism Network at Internews; Chris Jochnick ’87, director of the private sector department at Oxfam; Tom Myers ’87, general counsel and chief of public affairs at the AIDS Healthcare Foundation; Wanda Mial ’87, principal at Mialstones Consulting; Jeffrey Wright ’87, actor, vice chairman of Taia Lion Resources and chairman of Taia Peace Foundation; and Josh Zinner ’87, co-director of the Neighborhood Economic Development Advocacy Project. Presented by the Class of 1987.
Stirn Auditorium
9:00 AM
Insurance and Philanthropy: How to Have Your Cake and Eat It Too
You work throughout your whole life to build your estate. You should have control over what happens to it upon your death. Building a lasting legacy takes more than simply accumulating a large portfolio. You need a solution that remains flexible enough to allow you to maintain maximum control of your assets and enjoy them during your lifetime, while you prepare for the efficient transfer of those assets after you die. Hear how from Scott H. Nagle ’85, financial representative of Northwestern Mutual and charter member of the Amherst College Gift Planning Council.
Friendly Reading Room, Robert Frost Library
9:00 AM
Consumer Reports: The Inside Scoop on an American Icon
What are some of the more unusual tests that Consumer Reports performs in its 50 product-testing labs? How often is the organization sued by unhappy manufacturers? How will Consumer Reports survive in the digital age of Google, Amazon, Facebook and all those free websites with user reviews and “expert” opinions? What happens to products after they’ve been tested, what’s the skinny on “secret shoppers” and what new information products and services are in the works? What is the 76-year connection between Consumer Reports and Amherst College? Get answers to these and other questions from Jim Guest ’62, president and CEO of Consumer Reports. Presented by the Class of 1962.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
9:00 AM
A Conversation at the Yūshien Garden
Yūshien (roughly translated as “Garden of Friendship”) is a contemplative garden in the Japanese style that celebrates the strong ties between Amherst College and Doshisha University in Japan. Come see this lovely spot and learn about the history of Amherst’s relationship with Japan during a guided tour with Trent Maxey, assistant professor of Asian languages and civilizations and history. The tour is limited to 15 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center. A tour will also be offered on Friday at 9 a.m.
Enter Yūshien through Webster Center
10:00 AM
Amherst Christian Fellowship Alumni Gathering
A chance for alumni to meet, catch up, hear about current Christian life on campus, have some food and pray for one another and Amherst. All are invited.
Cadigan Center for Religious Life, 38 Woodside Avenue
10:00 AM
Medical Careers: Some Different Choices
Happy Manstein ’72 has been a plastic surgeon for the past 27 years in Philadelphia. Although a large part of his private practice has focused on aesthetic and cosmetic surgery, he has served as a medical missionary in underserved countries such as Vietnam and Eritrea and has recently completed two tours in earthquake-ravaged Haiti. Dick Aronson ’69, now the health professions advisor and assistant dean of students at Amherst, is a pediatrician whose career in public health has involved a series of collaborative and community-based efforts to address the social and economic injustice that is at the root of health inequality in the U.S. and the world. Together they will discuss what led them to use their medical training in nontraditional ways. Presented by the Class of 1972.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
10:00 AM
Julian Locke d’Este Jr. ’42, Ensign and Enigma
On December 8, 1941, Julian d’Este pinned on his gold Naval Aviator wings and received his commission. On February 13, 1942, while ferrying a new Grumman F4F-4 fighter, d’Este disappeared in the mountains of Southern California. The mystery of what happened that day (and the fate of four other pilots and aircraft) is only now explained by Alan Fraser Houston ’64. Alan graduated from Boston University School of Medicine and served in the United States Navy as a flight surgeon from 1970 to 1972. Presented by the Class of 1942.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:00 AM
Amherst Mommies Speak Out: A Candid Discussion on Juggling Family and Career
Democratic strategist Hilary Rosen reignited the “Mommy Wars” debate with her recent comment about Ann Romney. Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg recently spoke about why there are so few women leaders and the difficult choices women must make. Four Amherst alumnae will discuss their lives as working parents and the multiple challenges (yes, even academic challenges) we face while juggling other priorities. Most of us have taken our Amherst education into the workplace, started families and now find ourselves doing double duty: maintaining a career and maintaining some sense of sanity at home. Panelists are Ann Lundberg ’89 (moderator), Vanessa Villaverde Sammy ’02, Windy Taylor ’02 and Maren Vitousek ’02. We’ll toss around these topics with a bit of humor about what it’s really like to be living the dream of being an Amherst Alumna Mommy. Presented by the Class of 2002.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
10:00 AM
Documentary Film on Niijima Jo
This documentary examines the life of Niijima Jo (Amherst class of 1870), the founder of the Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan. A question-and-answer session with Trent Maxey, assistant professor of Asian languages and civilizations and history, will follow. This film will also be shown Friday at 10 a.m.
Room 101, Webster Center
11:00 AM
A Conversation with President Biddy Martin and the Annual Meeting of the Society of the Alumni and the Alumni Council
Betsy Hastings Block ’87, president of the Society of the Alumni, will announce the name of the recently elected alumni trustee, as well as the Society's newly elected committee members and officers, and will recognize our returning alumni. Remarks by President Martin will follow.
Johnson Chapel
1:30 PM
War, Law, Sex and Alcohol: A Fresh Look at the National Anthem
You know the national anthem, right? “The Star-Spangled Banner” is not easy to sing, but it’s a familiar part of our national heritage. We learn it in grade school and then sing it at least a few times a year for the rest of our lives. No big-league baseball game or U.S. Olympic victory is complete without it, and neither is the Fourth of July. We’re Americans; this is a song we all know. Or do we? In fact, there’s a rich story behind this song that most of us don’t know, about the composer, his star-crossed family, the dramatic battle that inspired him to write it and the meaning Americans attached to the words of his song when he composed it 198 years ago. It’s a fascinating story full of surprises. Join Dave Collins ’67 to have some fun and learn something new about this familiar old friend, “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Presented by the Class of 1967.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
1:30 PM
Training Your Head to Think On Its Feet: Or, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Reunion
How can you incorporate the skills of improvisation into your work and everyday life? Chet Harding ’92, co-owner and founder of Improv Asylum, a nationally acclaimed comedy theater based in Boston, has performed in hundreds of shows all over the country. He also heads up Improv Asylum's corporate training program, which combines his stage experience with his background working at Leo Burnett Advertising and as Polaroid's advertising director. He will demonstrate how to work off of others' ideas on the spot to create bigger, better solutions and results. All of this will be done in an engaging, effective way, without any group hugs, awkward trust falls or boring slide show presentations! So take a break from trying to impress your classmates and come laugh with them and at them instead. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
1:30 PM
Reading Route 9: Change, Memory and the Meaning of Place
The once bucolic road linking Amherst and Northampton now glitters with shopping malls and fast food outlets. What happened? And how does it affect us when a landscape loses its character? A conversation about the campus and its surroundings, about memory and nostalgia, about what is “real” and what is “fake” in the world around us. Speakers: Jill Ker Conway, author and former president of Smith College; Jan E. Dizard, the Charles Hamilton Houston Professor in American Culture; and Richard Todd ’62, author of The Thing Itself, On the Search for Authenticity. Presented by the Class of 1962.
Stirn Auditorium
1:30 PM
Healing Minds, Rebuilding Lives
Mental health challenges, addiction and grief can touch any life at any time. Unlike physical ailments, though, the symptoms of mental illness can be hard to detect, and treatment often requires the patient’s conscious cooperation. This panel will address the various ways of healing those invisible but insidious injuries that afflict so many, and give insight into how society’s attitudes toward these challenges have changed over the last 30 years. Panelists are Catherine Lycett Hogan ’82, grief recovery specialist; Kim Kusiak ’82, medical director of the 3East Adolescent DBT Day Treatment Program at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass.; Kimberlyn Leary ’82, director of psychology with Cambridge Health Alliance at Harvard Medical School in Boston; and Annie Ramniceanu ’82, associate executive director of clinical programs at Spectrum Youth & Family Services (moderator). Presented by the Class of 1982.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
Positive Impact: Stories from Amherst's Social Entrepreneurs
A panel discussion on social entrepreneurship across the philanthropic and for-profit spectrum, and an opportunity to hear from Amherst alums who are giving back in unique ways. The panel will be moderated by Molly Mead, director of community engagement at Amherst. Panelists will include Adrian Talbott ’02, founder of Generation Engage and former program director of the Clinton Global Initiative Lead Program; Phil Cameron ’02, executive director of Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition; and Bill Orum ’02, partner at Capricorn Investment Group, which integrates sustainability into investment strategy and works with the Skoll Foundation and Skoll World Forum on Social Entrepreneurship. Organized by Meg Hely Walsh ’02, public and charitable service manager at Holland & Knight LLP and author of a blog about products that give back. Presented by the Class of 2002.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
2:30 PM
Open House at the Emily Dickinson Museum
The Emily Dickinson Museum invites alumni and families for self-guided tours of the Homestead, home of the poet Emily Dickinson, and The Evergreens, home of her brother Austin. The open house is free. The museum is open for regular guided tours throughout Reunion. Please see daily museum listings for admission information.
280 Main Street, Amherst
2:30 PM
The Malbec Boom and the Rise of Argentine Wine
Until the late 1980s, Argentina had long produced oceans of wine, but it wasn't particularly good. Oxidized, rustic and often made with a low-class French grape called Malbec, it couldn't be sold outside the country. But today, Argentina and its signature Malbec are on the tip of every smart oenophile’s tongue. How did this happen? Join Ian Mount ’92, author of the recently published The Vineyard at the End of the World: Maverick Winemakers and the Rebirth of Malbec, as he unravels the fascinating, 400-year history of how a wine Mecca arose in the Andean desert. Profiling the larger-than-life figures who fueled the Argentine revolution—including celebrity oenologist Michel Rolland, acclaimed American winemaker Paul Hobbs, and the Mondavi-esque Catena family—he describes the backbreaking work, brilliant innovations and backstage drama that put Argentina on the map. The author will sign copies of his book after his talk. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
Can't Afford to Get Sick - Can't Afford to Get Well
When we were at Amherst, we were young and relatively healthy, and Milliken Infirmary was included in our tuition. Now health care for our families and ourselves is increasingly necessary—and increasingly challenging. Medical costs are also a major contributor to the federal budget crisis. This diverse panel of medical experts will explore what can be done to best reconcile access to care, its quality and whether and how it might be kept affordable. Panelists are Gary Cohan ’82, who has a private practice in internal medicine in Beverly Hills, Calif. and is chief medical officer at TotipotentRX Regenerative Medicine (panel chair); Adrienne White-Faines ’82, vice president and chief health officer at the American Cancer Society of Illinois; Tom Cronin ’82, former CEO, Neighborhood Diabetes; and Katie Merrell ’82, senior research scientist, Social & Scientific Systems, Inc. Presented by the Class of 1982.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
3:30 PM
Rewriting Hallowed Text: Lessons in Plain Legal Language from the New Federal Court Rules
Joe Kimble ’67 led the work of redrafting the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (effective December 2007) and the Federal Rules of Evidence (effective December 2011). The two projects took 10 years. He will describe the redrafting process, tell a few good stories and show some before-and-after examples. He'll also make the case for plain—or plainer—language in law and legal writing, a cause that he has been involved in for 25 years. The world might change in dramatic ways if lawyers would start to embrace plain language. This session should interest not only lawyers but also anyone interested in clear public communication. Presented by the Class of 1967.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:30 PM
Connecting People with Environmental Science
Thoughtful debate on the world’s environmental problems demands a common understanding of basic conservation research. How do we make Americans into better consumers of science? Learn about Amherst grads working to bring scientific research out of the lab and into the hands and minds of all Americans, from students to activists to resource managers. Panelists Sarah Carr ’97, marine ecosystem-based management coordinator at Natureserve; Jessica Green ’97, vice president of engagement for the National Audubon Society; and Sandy (Smith) Cunningham ’97, teacher at the Nichols School in Buffalo, N.Y., will talk about the different ways they are nurturing scientific understanding and what impact their liberal arts education has had on their ability to communicate science to a lay audience. Presented by the Class of 1997.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:30 PM
From Wall Street to Dirt Road: A Conversation with Social Entrepreneurs Pursuing Lives of Consequence
Bennett Rathbun ’07, Boris Bulayev ’07 and Karti Subramanian ’07 were successful professionals in New York City before quitting to start organizations that work for social change in the developing world. Bennett founded Hope on a String, an NGO using the power of music for social change in Haitian communities; Boris co-founded Educate!, a nonprofit working to develop young leaders and entrepreneurs in Africa; Karti founded Vera Solutions, a company building cloud and mobile data systems for international development organizations. They will share their respective stories about what motivated their career changes and what they are doing today. Presented by the Class of 2007.
Stirn Auditorium
5:30 PM
Catholic Mass
All alumni and their families are welcome! We will gather between 5 and 5:30 p.m. Sr. Chris Clark, D.H.M., will share a few observations about Catholic life on campus. At 5:30 p.m., we will begin Mass using the new translation. Missalettes will be provided.
Chapin Chapel, Chapin Hall
5:30 PM
GALA Reception
All alumni and guests are welcome. Refreshments will be served. Sponsored by the Gay and Lesbian Alumni Association.


Rainbow Room, Morrow Dormitory Basement
8:00 PM
Equilibrium: The 14th Apocalypse Party
Apocalypse is a party for people who don't like parties, hosted by Planworld. Come on by, play intellectual games, have conversations, and enjoy a heart-stopping Black Sheep cake and other tasty refreshments. All who enjoy fine company are invited. We will continue until people stop talking.

Moore Dormitory, Third Floor
9:00 PM
Zumbyes A Cappella Concert
The Zumbyes welcome Zum-alums, friends and fans in Buckley Recital Hall to celebrate the 61st year of the group with a concert of both new and classic songs and, of course, our beloved college songs.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
 

Upcoming Events

Virtual Lecture - Prof. Austin Sarat
April 24, 2014 | 4:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Southern Connecticut - Reception with President Biddy Martin
April 24, 2014 | 6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

New York - NESCAC Alumni Happy Hour
April 24, 2014 | 7:00 - 10:00 p.m.

Philadelphia - RESCHEDULED Evening of music by the Chamber Music Society
April 24, 2014 | 8:00 p.m.

Amherst Today
April 24 - 25, 2014

Reunion
May 28 - June 1, 2014

MORE EVENTS »

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Main Phone: 413.542.2313

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