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Alumni

2013 Reunion Schedule

All programs are 55 minutes long unless otherwise noted.

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Wednesday, May 29, 2013
2:00 PM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542–2065
Alumni House will close at 9 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
5:00 PM
Valentine Dining Hall Open for Dinner

Stop by for dinner before or after visiting the reception at the Beneski Museum of Natural History (see below). Valentine will be open for meals during Reunion, except during Saturday Reunion Luncheon and Saturday evening class banquets. See hours and prices here.

Valentine Dining Hall
5:30 PM
A Night at the Museum
Mingle beneath the mammoths, delight in the new dryosaurus, enjoy libations and hors d'oeuvres in the shadow of ancient footprints and renew old friendships amidst Amherst’s extraordinary collection of vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and around the world since 1825. The Bluestockings will perform at 5:45 p.m. At about 6:20 p.m., Fred Venne, science educator, will speak briefly about the last ice age, the great mammals and their extinction. Informal tours will be available. The reception will go until 7:30 p.m.
Beneski Museum of Natural History
Thursday, May 30, 2013
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542-2065
Alumni House will close at 10 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
11:00 AM
The Student Body: Doc Hitchcock and Physical Education in the Connecticut River Valley
Dr. Edward "Doc" Hitchcock Jr. (Class of 1849) is remembered as a pioneer in the introduction of health services and physical education at Amherst, at the forefront of a movement on college campuses to promote the integration of mind and body. Hitchcock's innovations were part of a larger focus on physical education across the region—including William Naismith's invention of basketball at the Springfield YMCA and the introduction of physical education at Smith College, where the first women's college basketball game was played. Local sports history provides a uniquely rich window into the social ideologies that informed the introduction of athletics in American colleges and also a context in which to understand the current prominence of athletic competition at Amherst—something Doc Hitchcock surely would bemoan. Explore pieces of Amherst College and regional history with Robert T. Hayashi, assistant professor of English and American Studies.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
11:00 AM
Museum Tour: From Assyria to Athens to Amherst: Ancient Art at the Mead
With Pamela Russell, head of education and Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Academic Programs

Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
An opportunity to tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command's (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history, led by Aaron Hayden, the college’s capital projects manager and the unofficial authority on the history of the Bunker and Stearns Steeple. The Bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the college in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the Bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
1:30 PM
Information Wants to Be Free: Founding the Amherst College Press
Bryn Geffert, librarian of the college, will speak about our brand new Amherst College Press.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
3:00 PM
Conflict, Gender and Development
What are the effects of violence in developing countries? Prakarsh Singh, a development economist and assistant professor of economics at Amherst College, will present his latest research on the gender-differential welfare impact of the Punjab civil war (1981-1993) that took more than 20,000 lives. The talk will be based on analysis carried out with a unique household-level data set. He will also give an overview of the economics literature of civil conflict as well as gender discrimination in developing countries. This talk will also be broadcast as part of the Virtual Lecture Series; click here to register or for more information.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
3:00 PM
Exhibition Tour: Art for All: Additions to the Collection from Antiquity to Today
With Elizabeth Barker, director of the Mead Art Museum
Mead Art Museum
4:00 PM
Amity Gaige Reads from Schroder: A Novel

Amity Gaige, visiting writer at Amherst, will read from her latest work, described on Amazon as alyrical and deeply affecting novel recounting the seven days a father spends on the road with his daughter after kidnapping her during a parental visit.” Books will be available for sale.

Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
4:00 PM
The Musical Davenports
Piano and oboe recital by John Davenport '58 and his wife, Sally Davenport. Presented by the Class of 1958.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
6:15 PM
Reception in Honor of Retiring English Department Faculty
The English department and the college celebrate the careers of eight retiring or recently retired faculty:  Professor of English Jack Cameron; Chick Chickering, the G. Armour Craig Professor of Language and Literature; Allen Guttmann, the Emily C. Jordan Folger Professor of English and American Studies, Emeritus; Barry O’Connell, the James E. Ostendarp Professor of English; Dale Peterson, the Eliza J. Clark Folger Professor of English and Russian; Bill Pritchard '53, the Henry Clay Folger Professor of English; Kim Townsend G'11, the Class of 1959 Professor of English, Emeritus; and Helen von Schmidt '78, Senior Lecturer in English, Emerita.
Most living Amherst alumni have studied with one or more of these teachers; all are invited to the party, whether or not your class is having a reunion this year. President Biddy Martin, Dean of Faculty Gregory Call and Professor Rhonda Cobham-Sander will give brief remarks beginning at 7 p.m. Refreshments will be served. To help with planning, please let us know whether or not you will attend by registering here. The reception will go until 9:30 p.m.
Dickinson Ballroom, Lord Jeffery Inn
8:00 PM
Buckley Chamber Players Present a Concert of French Chamber Music: Franck and Fauré
Elizabeth Chang (UMass), violin; Joel Pitchon (Smith College), violin; Volcy Pelletier (Smith College), cello; Ron Gorevic (Smith College), viola; and Alissa Leiser (Amherst College), piano, will perform. The concert will include two of the great works of the French chamber music repertoire, the dramatic Piano Quintet by César Franck and the sublime Piano Trio by Gabriel Fauré, as well as violin duos written by Five College composers. David Schneider, Amherst College professor of music, will introduce the program.
Buckley Recital Hall
8:00 PM
Screening of Force of Nature: The David Suzuki Movie

Screening of the documentary Force of Nature: The David Suzuki Movie. Presented by the Class of 1958.

Stirn Auditorium
Friday, May 31, 2013
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542–2065
Alumni House will close at Midnight
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
A Conversation at the Yushien Garden
Yūshien (roughly translated as “Garden of Friendship”) is a contemplative garden in the Japanese style that celebrates the strong ties between Amherst College and Doshisha University in Japan. Come see this lovely spot and learn about the history of Amherst’s relationship with Japan during a guided tour with Tim Van Compernolle, associate professor of Asian languages and civilizations. The tour is limited to 15 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center. A tour will also be offered on Saturday at 9 a.m.
Enter Yūshien through Webster Center
10:00 AM
Race and Class Diversity at Amherst College: Where We Were, Where We Are and Where We Go from Here
Elizabeth Aries, professor of psychology, will discuss her latest book, Speaking of Race and Class: The Student Experience at an Elite College.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:00 AM
Documentary Film on Niijima Jo
This documentary examines the life of Niijima Jo (Class of 1870), the founder of Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan. A Q&A session with Wako Tawa, professor of Asian languages and civilizations, will follow. The film will also be shown on Saturday at 10 a.m.
Room 220, Webster Center
11:00 AM
Museum Tour: The Last Ice Age
Come meet our new dinosaur and join Fred Venne, museum educator, for a journey back in time. This family tour will offer a chance to get up close and personal with some of the greatest mammals that roamed North America, learn about their habits and explore some of the possible reasons for their extinction. The tour will last about 40 minutes. Bring your cameras. This tour will also be offered again at 3 p.m. today.
Beneski Museum of Natural History
11:00 AM
Screening of My Business is to Sing, an Emily Dickinson Film, and Q&A with Filmmakers
My Business is to Sing, written and narrated by poet Susan Snively and co-produced with filmmaker Ernest Urvater, features hymns, popular songs, brass bands, ballet, concert pieces and opera. The poet, a lover of birds, wove their “dizzy music” into her writing, along with the familiar noises of cats, dogs, crickets, frogs and flies. The complex music of Dickinson's poems expresses the loves and losses of her secret “hymns.” Illustrating the poet’s Titanic Operas are works of artists such as E.A. Abbey, William Holbrook Beard, William Blake, Thomas Cole, Currier & Ives, Martin Johnson Heade, Thomas Nast, George Inness and Orra White Hitchcock. My Business is to Sing is based on Carolyn Lindley Cooley’s 2003 book, The Music of Emily Dickinson’s Poems and LettersA Study of Imagery and Form. In 2010, Urvater and Snively created Seeing New Englandly, the second in the Angles of a Landscape series, for the Emily Dickinson Museum in Amherst.
Stirn Auditorium
11:00 AM
Museum Tour: Extraordinary Art for a Great College: Highlights of the Mead Art Museum
With Elizabeth Barker, director of the Mead Art Museum
Mead Art Museum
12:00 PM
Transfer Alumni Lunch
If you transferred to Amherst from another school, you may have some special connections with others with the same experience. Catch up with fellow transfer students for a lunch; look for Karl Hakkarainen '79 in Weiller Wing between noon and 1:30 p.m. For more information contact Karl at kh@queenlake.com or 508-829-5825.
Valentine Dining Hall, The Weiller Wing
12:00 PM
Stearns Steeple Tour and Chimes Concert
Aaron Hayden will give a short talk on the history of the steeple, its place on campus in the formative years of the college and the Howe Chimes that are in its belfry. The church was donated by the son of President William Augustus Stearns to be an important centerpiece on campus and in campus life. The chimes were donated in honor of the members of the Amherst College community who died in the “Great War” Between the States. Aaron will play tunes on the chimes that might have been played on them when they were new—as well as some tunes that he just likes. Aaron is the college’s capital projects manager, and he also leads tours of the Amherst Bunker.
Neuhoff Sculpture Courtyard, in front of the Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Chocolate: Chemistry Made Delicious
Join chocolatiers Dr. Joal Fischer '68 and spouse Deborah Langsam for a guided chocolate tasting along with a botany and chemistry lesson nothing like what we had in the old chemistry building. You'll taste and compare a variety of chocolates, along with finished products from their company, Barking Dog Chocolatiers. What a sweet way to spend an hour! Participation will be limited to the first 75 people on a first-come basis. Presented by the Class of 1968.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
1:00 PM
Challenges to Higher Education in the Early 21st Century
Panelists Gregory Call, dean of the faculty; Richard Freeland '63, commissioner of education for Massachusetts; and Bruce Thompson '63, professor and former program director in the Milwaukee School of Engineering, will discuss areas of interest, challenge and concern in their field of expertise. Dean Call will address the future of liberal arts, especially at Amherst, in a world increasingly focused on online education. Freeland will address the many challenges facing public higher education and Thompson will focus on how best to evaluate the effectiveness of teachers and professors in an increasingly digital/instant-feedback world. Moderated by John Hawley '63, professor of religion at Barnard College. Presented by the Class of 1963.
Stirn Auditorium
1:00 PM
Exhibition Tour: Art for All: Additions to the Collection from Antiquity to Today
With Maggie Dethloff, acting curator of American art, and featured artist Elizabeth Hoak-Doering '88. Presented by the Class of 1988 and the Mead Art Museum.
Mead Art Museum
2:00 PM
Media, Technology and Change: A Look Ahead
In the last 25 years, new technologies have driven sweeping change in how news, entertainment and political information are created and consumed. But people still want a good story, and they still want to trust the source. Bill Burke, co-CEO of Argos Pictures; Jed Miller, internet director for the Revenue Watch Institute; Gordon Montgomery, vice president of marketing and public affairs for The Art Institute of Chicago; and David Nevins, president of entertainment for Showtime Networks, Inc., all from the Class of 1988, will illuminate the earth in the age of iPhones, online news and on-demand TV shows. Come prepared to join the conversation—in today’s media landscape, the audience is a big part of the story. Presented by the Class of 1988.
Kirby Theater
2:00 PM
Revolutionary Summer: How American Independence Really Happened
Joseph J. Ellis, Ford Foundation Professor Emeritus at Mount Holyoke College, New York Times best-selling author and Pulitzer Prize winner, will address the following questions:
1. Why is Independence Day celebrated on July 4?
2. Why is the first sentence of the Gettysburg Address historically incorrect?
3. How did Washington almost lose the war in August of '76?  
Presented by the Class of 1968.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:00 PM
Tour: Book & Plow Farm
Come tour Book & Plow Farm, Amherst College's most recent push towards a more sustainable future, and hear all about the inception of the idea; the current state of the project; its trajectory; its unique relationship with Valentine Dining Hall; and student, staff and faculty collaborations. Bring your walking shoes. Arrangements can be made at Alumni House for those with special accessibility needs. You will need to provide your own transportation to the farm. Another tour will be offered on Saturday at 2 p.m.
415 South East Street, Amherst
2:00 PM
Is the U.S. at a Tipping Point? A Political, Business/Economic and Sociological Perspective
Neale Adams '63, retired communications officer for the Anglican Diocese of New Westminster, Canada; Malcolm Johnson '63, vice president for the Dixie Chemical Company; and Hugh Price '63, former president and CEO of the National Urban League, will tackle such topics as whether the U.S. still holds its once untarnished premier leadership role in the international community, whether the red/blue divide will damage our democratic way of life, whether capitalism is fulfilling its dream or causing an ever greater 1 percent/99 percent gap and whether we are likely to see more integration or disintegration in our society as we move further into this century. Moderated by Edwin Truman '63, senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington, D.C. Presented by the Class of 1963.
Stirn Auditorium
2:00 PM
Whence and Whither: Where Did We Come From, How Did We Get Here, What Do We Know, What Do We Do Now, and Why?
Join Don Price '58 P'03, professor emeritus of history at the Univeristy of California, Davis; Michael Simon '58, professor emeritus of philosophy at Stony Brook University; Winthrop Smith '58, professor of physics at the University of Connecticut; and Edward Kleiner '16, undergraduate divestment activist in the Green Amherst Project, for a forum taking us from the Big Bang to global warming and the nationwide campus movement for divestment from the carbon fuel industry. We consider humanity’s origins and relations to the natural world and our biological and cultural evolution as consumers of energy and creators of value. Along the way, we consider the implications of the Higgs Boson and challenges to both scientific and faith-based understandings of ourselves and the world. Are we free and sentient beings, and how would we know? If so, what should we do and why? Finally, we take up the crisis in the immediate here and now created by our unsustainable exploitation of our environment and efforts to cope with it, including Amherst’s part in the divestment movement. Presented by the Class of 1958.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:00 PM
Men's Soccer Reunion Game
The Men’s Soccer Alumni Group and Coach Justin Serpone will sponsor a game between odd-and even-class soccer alumni. Bring your black shorts, cleats and shin guards; we’ll supply shirts and socks. RSVP to Tony Pacella (dpacella@amherst.edu) so we have a head count, and spread the word to your classmates and teammates. Plan to come to the men’s locker room at 1:15 p.m. to pick up your uniform.
Gooding Turf Field
2:00 PM
Terras Irradient Revisited
Since 1825, Terras Irradient has steadily appeared as the motto on the seal of Amherst College, but has also evolved as a metaphor for a variety of worthy causes Amherst graduates have served—as this panel will present. Monsignor Robert L. Stern '53, having worked for 25 years on behalf of the churches of the Middle East, India, Northeast Africa and Eastern Europe, will discuss his interest in bridging gaps there among the many cultures and religions. International lawyer Robert C. Helander '53, working in Tehran, Lima and New York, has been leading international development efforts for Nelson Rockefeller's International Basic Economy Corp. and for Accion International. Manson P. Hall '53 devoted a long career in the Boston area to public education as a history teacher and master of a house in Newton North High School and as principal of Watertown High School. In retirement he led programs for City Year, Boston's dropout-prevention program. Lawyer Philip S. Winterer '53 will explain his extracurricular experiences in the nonprofit world as trustee for Amherst College and a variety of other institutions, such as Balanchine's School of American Ballet and the Austen Riggs Center, a psychiatric hospital. Presented by the Class of 1953.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
3:00 PM
The Part and The Whole: An Assyrian Synedoche
Lindsay Oxx '14, unlocks a museum mystery by examining how and why one slab of the Mead’s renowned group Assyrian palace reliefs was incorrectly restored in the 1850s and does not belong with the others. She demonstrates how this “alien” element, only recently recognized, sheds light on how these reliefs were received and interpreted when they first arrived in bucolic Amherst from exotic Mesopotamia. In January, Oxx delivered a version of this lecture at the Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Seattle as part of its first Undergraduate Paper Session.
Mead Art Museum, William Green Study Room
3:00 PM
Museum Tour: The Last Ice Age
Come meet our new dinosaur and join Fred Venne, museum educator, for a journey back in time. This family tour will offer a chance to get up close and personal with some of the greatest mammals that roamed North America, learn about their habits and explore some of the possible reasons for their extinction. The tour will last about 40 minutes. Bring your cameras. This tour is also offered at 11 a.m. today.
Beneski Museum of Natural History
3:00 PM
The Dilemmas of Managing America's Wilderness
Chris Brown '68, former director of Wilderness and Wild and Scenic Rivers for the U.S. Forest Service, will speak on wilderness as place, experience and metaphor, foundational to the American landscape and our national psyche. One hundred ten million acres – 4 percent of the nation’s land base – are federally designated wilderness, and many millions more acres are wild lands. “Managing wilderness lands” is a paradoxical phrase, as these lands are supposed to be where the hand of man is least visible. Yet to insure that they stay wild requires some intervention. We will explore, through case examples, the dilemma for the wilderness manager who is trying to avoid intrusive management actions while meeting goals and legal requirements to “keep wilderness wild.” Presented by the Class of 1968.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
3:00 PM
Teaching Computers to Tutor Your Kids
Neil Heffernan ’93 will demonstrate revolutionary software that mimics human tutors to help children improve their math skills. Bring your kids, as some of them will be able to test the software themselves. Heffernan, associate professor of computer science at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, will describe the evolution of the software. His work has been featured in a New York Times Magazine article by noted science writer Annie Murphy Paul. Presented by the Class of 1993.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
3:00 PM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
An opportunity to tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command's (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history, led by Aaron Hayden, the college’s capital projects manager and the unofficial authority on the history of the Bunker and Stearns Steeple. The Bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the college in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the Bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
3:00 PM
The Impact of ObamaCare: What It Will Mean for Doctors, Patients and Medical Education in America
Dr. Lee Francis '83, president and CEO of the Erie Family Health Center in Chicago; Dr. Kip Webb '83, managing director of Accenture Clinical Services in San Francisco; and Dr. David Silbersweig, Dartmouth '82, chairman of the Department of Psychiatry, and co-director of the Institute for the Neurosciences at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School dean for academic programs at Partners HealthCare, will discuss what they believe the Affordable Care Act will mean for doctors, patients and medical education in America. Presented by the Class of 1983.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
3:00 PM
Biomedical Research: Opportunities and Challenges
Scientists today are answering questions that were recently intractable. The pace of discovery—how the body works, what goes wrong when it doesn’t work and how to prevent and cure disease—is unprecedented. But there are obstacles. Research depends on federal investments and our national effort is declining: 20 percent less research is being done now than a decade ago. In addition, complex ethical and safety questions are arising. This panel includes active biomedical researchers and members of the Class of 1988: Dr. Nicholas J. Kenyon, associate professor of medicine at the University of California, Davis; Dr. David F. McDermott of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Joseph P. Mizgerd, professor of medicine, microbiology and biochemistry at Boston University School of Medicine; Christina A. Scherer, manager, Infectious Diseases Biology at the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Mass.; and Dr. Benjamin T. Suratt, associate professor and associate chief of pulmonary and critical care medicine at the University of Vermont. They will discuss promising and exciting research and take a frank look at challenges to fully realizing the field’s potential. Moderated by David Quigley ’88, professor of history and dean of the college and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Boston College. Presented by the Class of 1988.
Kirby Theater
3:00 PM
Reflections on Post-Conflict Kosovo and Realities and Prospects on Both Sides of the Jordan River
Robert Dean ’73, chief of party in the Rule of Law Program in Amman, Jordan, was a prosecuting attorney in Maryland for three decades before turning to international work. Since 2005 he has prosecuted war crimes in Kosovo as part of the United Nations and European Union missions there; he has directed a Rule of Law project in Ramallah, West Bank, funded by the U.S. State Department to enhance the criminal investigation skills of Palestinian police and prosecutors; and he currently directs a USAID-funded Rule of Law project to modernize the courts and improve the functioning of judges and prosecutors in Jordan. He will share his experiences living and working in Kosovo, the West Bank and Jordan. He will reflect on America’s goals in the Middle East and how U.S. policies at times work at cross-purposes to those goals; the sentiments, hopes and disappointments of people in that region; and his thoughts on prospects for the future in these areas. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Stirn Auditorium
4:00 PM
Four Decades in the Trenches: Perspectives from the Bench, the Courtroom, Academia and the Performing Arts
Panelists Richard Booth '68, professor of city and regional planning at Cornell University; Peter T. Lobdell '68, senior resident artist in Amherst’s Department of Theater and Dance; Francis X. Spina '68, associate justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court; and Robert Taggart '68, professor of finance in the Carroll School of Management at Boston College, intend to examine cultural, market, financial and communication changes that have occurred in the last four decades and some of the specific consequences, with legal changes forming the backdrop. There will be particular emphasis on the consequences of communication and market changes and their effects on various endeavors over the years. Moderated by Robert L. Holloway Jr. '68, president of MacLean Holloway Doherty Ardiff & Morse, P.C. and president of the Massachusetts Bar Association. Presented by the Class of 1968.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
Women at Amherst: The Past, the Present, the Future
This is a multi-class program created by the Class of 1988 and featuring the Classes of 1978, 1983, 1988, 1993, 2003 and 2008. Sandra Hecker ’78, Sarah Bloom Raskin ’83, Flora Stamatiades ’88, Lisa Wolf ’88, Ingrid Katz ’93, Laura Swanson ’03 and Ashley Finigan ’08 will attempt to put in context the varying experience of young women at Amherst, from 1978 (the first graduating class that included women) through 2008 (here for their five-year reunion), with an eye to the future. Many of us came to Amherst not having given a second thought to being women on a campus that was all male for the majority of its history, and certainly not to how the culture of such an institution might need to change or might be changing. How did the environment change and grow—or not—during our time there and since? How did that affect us, both at college and since? And how can we, as alumnae, help the college move forward as an appropriately supportive environment for both women and men? Presented by the Class of 1988.
Johnson Chapel
4:00 PM
Digital-Era Paradigm Shifts: New Ways of Looking at Media, Content and Creativity
As digital technology has taken over the ways we create, market and consume information and entertainment, a set of paradigm shifts has altered the nature of our relationship to media content and how we connect to audiences and communities. Hollywood studio executive and digital entrepreneur John Tarnoff '73, CEO of Newspeak Media LLC, has been at the leading edge of the media/entertainment digital revolution over the last 25 years. He offers observations on this phenomenon to help us all navigate the next 25 years, both on and off our screens. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Stirn Auditorium
5:00 PM
Reception with President Biddy Martin
Join President Biddy Martin and others from the college under the tent at the Lord Jeffery Inn for conversation and celebration. All are welcome; please register here. The reception will go until 6:30 p.m.
Under the Tent, Lord Jeffery Inn
8:30 PM
Screening of The Invisible War
A screening and discussion of the critically acclaimed and Oscar-nominated documentary The Invisible War, which addresses the shockingly common, profoundly distressing problem of sexual assault in the United States military. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, after watching the film, was moved to change military policy. Filmmaker Amy Ziering '83, co-filmmaker with Kirby Dick, will introduce the film and entertain a post-screening Q&A. Presented by the Class of 1983.
Stirn Auditorium
Saturday, June 01, 2013
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.
Telephone: (413) 542–2065
Alumni House will close at 9:30 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Elixir of Youth: Snake Oil and Science
The marketing of advances in modern American medicine has been at once persuasive and pervasive, creating an almost religious faith that a modern medical center can guarantee survival. In this panel three distinguished medical doctors will look at the relationship of marketing and hype to the realities of modern health care and will try to shed some light on what is really of value to keep people in their 80s well. Topics will include exercise, socialization, nutrition, medications, procedures and tests, travel issues and end-of-life care. The presenters are Dr. William G. (Buck) Greenough III '53, professor of medicine and international health at The Johns Hopkins University, who also has a specialty in geriatric medicine and has worked in Bangladesh; Dr. Donald W. Sutherland '53, clinical associate professor emeritus of medicine in the division of cardiology at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, who practiced general and interventional cardiology and was chief of staff at his Portland hospital; Dr. Blake Cady '53, professor emeritus of surgery at Harvard Medical School and Brown Medical School, who has a special interest is surgical oncology - particularly in breast, gastrointestinal and thyroid cancers - and has been director of cancer centers; and Dr. Stephen N. Rous '53, clinical professor of surgery/urology at Brown University and professor emeritus of surgery/urology at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine, who has been chief of urology at several hospitals and active in medical publications. Presented by the Class of 1953.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
9:00 AM
Rethinking Health Systems
How can we create affordable health systems that can achieve the goal of providing basic universal health coverage? Join Barry R. Bloom ’58, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Joan L. and Julius H. Jacobson Professor of Public Health, as he examines health care systems in the U.S. and elsewhere. Health care in the U.S. is a complex system that most believe needs real change. In developing countries, health care is largely private, paid for in the most ineffective way – out-of-pocket - leading to catastrophic medical expenses and impoverishment. In 2000 the United Nations set Millennium Development Goals, with specific targets, including many for health. By 2015 the global community needs to redefine those goals, and one aspiration of many countries will be to provide basic universal health coverage. Presented by the Class of 1958.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
9:00 AM
Amherst Do-Gooders on Life in Government and Serving the Public Interest
Life in the public sector and serving the people has its ups and downs. Come hear from Amherst alumni Ethan Bernstein '98, chief strategy officer at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau; Nathan Hartshorn '98, Minnesota assistant attorney general; Irene Lin '98, state policy director of Obama for America - Iowa; Dermond Thomas '98, elected trustee for the Village of Valley Stream, N.Y.; and Shana Wallace '98 from the U.S. Department of Justice, Antitrust Division, all participants in local, state and federal government, about their experiences and how Amherst shaped their careers in government and public service. At a time when debates over the role, size and scope of government have caused intense paralysis in our political system, the panel will explore these questions as they play out in reality and not just in an Austin Sarat or Hadley Arkes class. Presented by the Class of 1998.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
9:00 AM
Hip-Hop Dance Class
Practice your hip-hop dance moves or learn some new ones with dance guru Chris Gillyard '08. Whether you're a seasoned dancer or a first-timer, this class will get you up and moving to some of today's top dance tunes with your fellow alumni. This is a cardio dance class, so be prepared to sweat. Wear loose-fitting clothing, and bring your best hip-hop attitude! Presented by the Class of 2008.
LeFrak Gymnasium
9:00 AM
The Politics of Climate Change
What is the history of attempts to address the issue of climate change, and what are some of the current efforts, on both the federal and local levels, that seek to address this issue? Where will the political debate go in the years to come? Panelists are Katherine Chia ’88, architect at Desai/Chia Architecture PC; Roger Sherman '88, chief counsel, Democratic Staff, U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce; Dan Tate ’88, founding partner at Forbes-Tate, LLC; and Dan Utech ’88, deputy director for energy and climate change with the White House Domestic Policy Council. Presented by the Class of 1988.
Kirby Theater
9:00 AM
A Conversation at the Yushien Garden
Yūshien (roughly translated as “Garden of Friendship”) is a contemplative garden in the Japanese style that celebrates the strong ties between Amherst College and Doshisha University in Japan. Come see this lovely spot and learn about the history of Amherst’s relationship with Japan during a guided tour with Tim Van Compernolle, associate professor of Asian languages and civilizations. The tour is limited to 15 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center. A tour will also be offered on Friday at 9 a.m.
Enter Yūshien through Webster Center
9:00 AM
Beyond Boundaries: From 20th-Century to 21st-Century Music
The Class of 1973 arrived at Amherst clutching vinyl records and cassette tapes. Classical music reigned in Buckley and dominated the music department curriculum. The works of the great 20th-century modernists—Schoenberg, Berg, Webern, Bartok, Stravinsky—were presented not only as models for fledgling composers but as a stylistic culmination of music history. Could music—or at least “serious” music—possibly evolve any further? And if so, how? Such questions fueled many late-night conversations in the music building. Forty years later, it’s clear that anxieties about “the end of music” were unwarranted. This panel of superannuated music majors - Theodore Levin '73, the Arthur R. Virgin Professor of Music at Dartmouth College; Scott Wheeler '73, professor of performing arts at Emerson College; and Gregory Hayes '73, senior lecturer at Dartmouth College - will share examples of their own work, performed live and on recordings, that illustrate their own contributions to our changing musical life. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
10:00 AM
Museum Tour: Russian Stories
With Bettina Jungen, the Thomas P. Whitney, Class of 1937, Curator of Russian Art
Mead Art Museum
10:00 AM
A Generational Collection: Howard R. Wolf '58 Papers
The Howard R. Wolf ’58 Papers (1971-present) contain manuscripts and publications, graphical material, cultural ephemera and 50 volumes of letters documenting the professional and personal life of writer, traveler, educator and critic Howard R. Wolf ’58, professor emeritus and senior fellow in the Department of English at SUNY Buffalo. The collection, held in Amherst’s Archives and Special Collections, also includes manuscripts and publications by Wolf’s contemporaries around the world and letters from established authors, former Amherst faculty and friends. Join Wolf and Peter Nelson, Amherst archivist, in a discussion of the collection, which documents one writer’s life but also, as a whole, functions as a generational memoir. Wolf will talk about the development of his collection over 40-plus years and the way it functions as a form of creative expression itself. Nelson will discuss the current exhibit and give his perspective on the unusual nature of this archival enterprise. Selections from the collection are on display in Frost Library. Presented by the Class of 1958.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
10:00 AM
Ordinary People Leading Extraordinary Lives: Life Events and Resilience
Each of the panelists - Dr. William Amend '63, P'84; Jane Bergner W'63, P'95, attorney; and H. Allan Oliver '63, retired art gallery owner - have faced a personal challenge: a cancer diagnosis, the death of a spouse and being gay in a hostile world. They will discuss how these challenges have affected them and how their responses have made them more resilient to meeting life's vicissitudes. Moderated by Frank Poole '63, pastoral counselor at Windows of Awareness. Presented by the Class of 1963.
Stirn Auditorium
10:00 AM
Game of Lawns: Battle of the Classes
Come for some friendly competition between the Class of 2003 and the Class of 2008. Games to include cornhole, horseshoes and dodgeball. Don't forget your lawn chair! Libations included. Presented by the Classes of 2003 and 2008.
Memorial Field
10:00 AM
A Year at Sea
Travel with the Rev. John P. Potter '68, pastor at the First Congregational Church in Wiscasset, Maine, from Maine to the Islands aboard his 39-foot ketch, Renaissance. John will share photos and tell stories that will include ducking two hurricanes, being accosted by pirates and being befriended by a drug smuggler in the Dominican Republic. He will also share some less terrifying tales that made his year at sea a life-changing event. Presented by the Class of 1968.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
10:00 AM
Family Concert with Barb Brousal '88
Barbara Brousal '88 sang and played with the family folk band Dan Zanes and Friends for seven years. Called "the best thing to happen to kids' music since Woody Guthrie," the band won a Grammy for Best Children's Album in 2006. Barbara will perform a set of family-friendly, highly sing-along-able songs for alumni and their little ones. Presented by the Class of 1988.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
10:00 AM
Kings of the Road: How Frank Shorter, Bill Rodgers and Alberto Salazar Made Running Go Boom
Cameron Stracher '83 will read from and discuss his new book about the golden years of American distance running. Books will be available for sale. Presented by the Class of 1983.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
10:00 AM
The Outlook for Energy: A View to 2040
Energy is a serious topic. It is also a topic subject to sound bites and all-too-quick assumptions. The world's largest nongovernment energy company, ExxonMobil, studies energy trends and uses its findings to guide its investments in the oil and gas business around the world. Since the 1960s the company has published its outlook in an effort to increase understanding of energy trends and the issues associated with them. What do you know or think you know about energy? Will global energy use be increasing or decreasing in the next several decades? Are high energy prices good or bad for the world? Are we running out of fossil fuels? To what extent can carbon-free energy sources replace fossil fuels? What is the outlook for global CO2 emissions? Jim Mixter '73, who retired in 2009 after a 34-year career with ExxonMobil, will present ExxonMobil's current energy outlook and engage in conversation on energy issues. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
10:00 AM
Documentary Film on Niijima Jo
This documentary examines the life of Niijima Jo (Class of 1870), the founder of Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan. A Q&A session with Wako Tawa, professor of Asian languages and civilizations, will follow. The film will also be shown on Friday at 10 a.m.
Room 220, Webster Hall
10:00 AM
How to Talk to Your Doctor (About You and About Your Kids)
Four physicians, parents all—Eric Baum ’93, pediatric otolaryngologist and instructor at Yale School of Medicine; Shersten Killip ’93, family medicine physician at Valley Medical Group in Florence, Mass.; Mark Mallory ’93, gastroenterologist at the Digestive Health Clinic in Boise, Idaho; and Nadine Schwartz ’93, child psychiatrist and assistant professor at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia—will share war stories and offer practical advice for moms and dads struggling to find the right way to interact with their children’s physicians. They’ll also offer up advice for anyone navigating the medical system themselves more frequently as they age. Presented by the Class of 1993.
Kirby Theater
11:00 AM
A Conversation with President Biddy Martin and the Annual Meeting of the Society of the Alumni and the Alumni Council
Kirsten Poler ’88, president of the Society of the Alumni, will preside; William A. Woolverton ’73, chair of the Executive Committee of the Alumni Council, will present the motion on annotations to the bylaws, to be followed by remarks from President Martin.
Johnson Chapel
12:15 PM
Reunion Luncheon on the Valentine Quad
Join us for a complimentary luncheon on the Quad. Look for your classmates under the decade signs!
Valentine Quad (Rain site: Valentine Dining Hall)
1:00 PM
Alumni Reunion Baseball Game
Memorial Field
1:30 PM
It's in the Doing: 50 Years of Art in a Closet
Artist Norman Gorbaty '53 will present a digital slideshow and explanation of the fine art he has been making over the past 50 years. Having majored in fine art at Amherst and earned an M.F.A. from Yale University, Norman became a graphic designer and art director in New York, winning numerous awards for his work for major American corporations and magazines, Hollywood films and children's books. He also served as adjunct professor of advanced graphic design at Cooper Union and has been a visiting lecturer at many other institutions. Secretly, while living in the hectic, time-consuming world of advertising, Norman never stopped creating fine art, amassing a body of work not shown until 2009. Now he is holding successful exhibitions of his paintings, drawings and sculptures in museums and earning critical acclaim from Charles D. Noyes, director of The Tremaine Gallery, for "riotous pastel drawings," "voluptuous figure work in both luminous color and carved walnut,” “energetically painted canvases" and "a remarkable breadth of subject matter, media and technique, all guided by a masterful, sensitive hand and brilliant eye." Presented by the Class of 1953.
Stirn Auditorium
1:30 PM
Henry Clay Folger and Amherst
Stephen Grant '63, senior fellow with the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training, will present highlights and a slideshow from his soon-to-be published biography of Henry and Emily Folger, who founded the Folger Shakespeare Library in 1932. Henry Folger, Class of 1879, climbed to the top of two fields: the petroleum industry and assembling a collection of what he called “Shakespeareana.” He served as CEO of Standard Oil Company of New York, which later became Mobil Oil Corp. He endowed a library two blocks from the Capitol and named the Trustees of Amherst College to administer it. Amherst never got the memo and read of the gift in The New York Times after Folger died. Moderated by Johannes Bergmann '63. Presented by the Class of 1963.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
1:30 PM
Experiences as an Ambassador Down Under
Jeffrey Bleich '83, U.S. Ambassador to Australia, will speak about his experiences as Ambassador Down Under. The discussion will focus on the role of an ambassador, life inside the Administration, the U.S. perspective on the Asia-Pacific's future, and Australia's role as our key ally there. Presented by the Class of 1983.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
1:30 PM
The Beatles Weren't Really So Great! (Or Were They...?)
From Beatlemania to Sgt. Pepper and beyond, the Beatles bracketed and defined our years at Amherst. As a cultural phenomenon, they influenced everything from lifestyles to hairstyles to politics, to an extent that has no parallel before or since. But what about the music itself? Does it stand the test of time? Was it as good as we remember, or are our memories clouded by a haze of, ahem, nostalgia? Take our magical mystery tour of recorded and live musical examples as David L. Glass '68 explores the connections between the compositional techniques intuitively used by Lennon, McCartney and Harrison and those of the great composers we call “classical.” "Having been some days in preparation, a splendid time is guaranteed for all!" Presented by the Class of 1968.
Music Room 7, Arms Music Center
1:30 PM
Private Investment in National Security: Economic Stabilization in Afghanistan
Heather Werner, special assistant for the DOD Task Force for Business and Stability Operations, has spent the last four years working on economic stabilization initiatives in Afghanistan. She will discuss the importance of private-sector development in stability operations, new approaches to economic development through engagement with the global market, the challenges facing pre- and post-conflict regions in enabling foreign investment and the importance of the global market connections to the future of Afghanistan. Presented by the Class of 2003.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
From Amherst to Entrepreneur
Small-business entrepreneurship is regularly and deservedly called the engine of growth for our economy. Come meet Darren Malhame '98, managing partner at Northstar Café; Alex McMullin '08 from ePantry.com; Mbambu Miller '98, founder of Project Aurora Games; Nelson Gonzalez '93, co-founder of Declara; Andrew Slutsky '08, director of Loeb Enterprises, LLC; and Jeffrey Sullivan '86, COO of United Bank, who will share their experiences and insights. From Main Street to high-tech, from food and apparel to games and digital services, what tools did Amherst provide, and what more did each of these classmates have to learn to create a path as an entrepreneur? Presented by the Classes of 1988, 1993, 1998 and 2008.
Johnson Chapel
1:30 PM
Politics Then and Now
When the Class of ’73 was at Amherst, there were protests in the streets and political divisions ran deep. Today we can all choose our news sources, and politicians choose their voters. If there was once a shared culture, it no longer exists, or at least it is not the same. The Internet has allowed for an explosion of information, much of it unfiltered, which is difficult for governments and editors to control, contributing to social upheaval across the world. Class of 1973 members George Johnson Jr., dean of Elon University School of Law in Greensboro, N.C.;, and  Peter Scheer, executive director of the First Amendment Coalition; will attempt to make some sense of these trends. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:00 PM
Amherst Crew Reunion Row
Bill Stekl, head crew coach, will give an update on the current rowing program. We urge all former coxswains and rowers—men and women, lightweight and heavyweight, young and old, fit and not-so-fit—to attend. Assemble at the boathouse, ready to row (preferably in Amherst rowing attire from your era). Refreshments (and oxygen) will be available at the conclusion of our workout.
Amherst College Boathouse (Sportsman’s Marina, Route 9 at Coolidge Bridge)
2:00 PM
Tour: Book & Plow Farm
Come tour Book & Plow Farm, Amherst College's most recent push towards a more sustainable future, and hear all about the inception of the idea; the current state of the project; its trajectory; its unique relationship with Valentine Dining Hall; and student, staff and faculty collaborations. Bring your walking shoes. Arrangements can be made at Alumni House for those with special accessibility needs. You will need to provide your own transportation to the farm. Another tour will be offered on Friday at 2 p.m.
415 South East Street, Amherst
2:30 PM
Express Yourself: Writing, from Published Memoirs to Poetry, from Non-Fiction to Speech Writing
Do you have an article, short story, poem, memoir, speech or book that you've always been itching to write? Have you ever thought about self-publishing? Come hear David Applefield '78, author, editor, publisher; Caroline Patterson Haefele '78, fiction writer, children's book author, editor; Fred Levine '78, editor, book designer, private publisher; and David Whitman '78, speechwriter, nonfiction author, and journalist, talk about the excitement and the challenges of writing and publishing. Presented by the Class of 1978.
Stirn Auditorium
2:30 PM
Health Care in America: First, the Good News
Changes in the science of medicine and the delivery of care have been dizzying. In our professional lifetimes we’ve seen new, major diseases arise and spread and then yield to new treatments. Health care has become a dominant force in the economy and a heavy burden on individual and corporate budgets. The panelists, Dr. Steven Coulter ’73, president of The Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee Health Institute; Dr. David Margulies ’73, assistant professor of medicine in the Faculties of Genetics, Bioinformatics and Developmental Medicine at Harvard Medical School; Dr. Steven Scheinman ’73, president and dean of The Commonwealth Medical College; and Dr. Paul Yock ’73, the Martha Meier Weiland Professor of Bioengineering and Medicine and director of the biodesign program at Stanford University, will share their perspectives on the direction of change and speculate on what health care will look like in the coming generation. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:30 PM
Personal Wartime Experiences
This panel will present contrasting personal experiences during two different wartimes. For World War II, Herb H. Uhl '53 will describe growing up in Florence, Italy, and Hela Finberg W'53 will explain how she and her family were affected by the war in Hamburg and Wurzburg, Germany. For the Korean War, Edward M. Bassett '53, activated with his U.S. Marine Reserve unit in 1950, will relate how he managed his hectic tour of duty. After his Amherst graduation, Laurence F. DeCarolis '53 became an ensign in the U.S. Navy. He will describe his three-year duty on land in Philadelphia and at sea with the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean. Presented by the Class of 1953.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
2:30 PM
The Folgers' Priceless Gift to Amherst, Part II: Highlights from the Masquers' Performance of the First Two Shakespeare Productions at the Folger Theater from 1949 and 1965
Brett P. Prentiss '63, professor emeritus in the theatre department at Stephens College, will show highlights from a 1949 production of Julius Caesar and also discuss the 1965 Masquers' spoof of Twelfth Night entitled The Gulling of Malvolio and starring Prentiss. The former was the first televised Shakespeare play anywhere in the world. The latter was the highlight of a comic evening of assembled Washington "brass" and Amherst trustees. Also included will be comments by then President Charles Woolsey Cole about Amherst. After the showing, Brett will lead a Q&A. Moderated by Johannes Bergmann '63. Presented by the Class of 1963.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:30 PM
Open House at the Emily Dickinson Museum
The Emily Dickinson Museum invites alumni and families for self-guided tours of the Homestead, home of the poet Emily Dickinson, and The Evergreens, home of her brother Austin. The open house is free. The museum is open for regular guided tours throughout Reunion. Please see daily museum listings for admission information.
280 Main Street, Amherst
2:30 PM
Searching for the Best in Education
Tired of hearing what's wrong with our education system? Come hear what's right. The Odyssey Initiative is the story of three teachers' (and one videographer's) yearlong journey to learn from the best schools in America before opening a new, progressive public school in Brooklyn, N.Y. Todd Sutler ’98, executive director of The Odyssey Initiative, will discuss their journey, share highlights from their research and present plans for the new Compass Charter School that will incorporate this learning. Presented by the Class of 1998.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
Jennifer Cody-Epstein '88 Reads from The Gods of Heavenly Punishment
Called “epic” by Kirkus Reviews and “exquisite” by Publishers Weekly, Jennifer Cody-Epstein’s second novel (following international bestseller The Painter from Shanghai) is a “big, visceral, achingly humane portrait” (Jennifer Egan, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of A Visit from the Goon Squad) of one of the most brutal wartime acts in history. On March 9, 1945, American bombers swarm Japan’s capital, unleashing a storm of napalm and fire that will leave 100,000 dead and a quarter of the city incinerated. Fifteen-year-old Yoshi Kobayashi is among those who lose everything. Yet in the days that follow, safety and redemption will come in the unexpected shape of three Americans whose stories intertwine with her own: a downed bomber pilot, a tortured American architect and an Occupation soldier with a burning secret of his own. Books will be available for sale. Presented by the Class of 1988.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
2:30 PM
An Entrepreneur's Dilemma
Entrepreneurs Brett Nicol '03, CEO of Empower the Athlete and Forgetful Gentlemen; Andrew Unger '03, founder/CMO of Lifebooker; Ryan Moriarty '03, owner of lolspots.com; and Daniel Murillo '03, CEO/founder of Little Black Bag, discuss the trials and tribulations of successful technology start-ups. You will hear interesting stories of bootstrapping business, dealing with unforeseen challenges and how to ultimately make a living working as a tech entrepreneur. Presented by the Class of 2003.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
Family Circus Event
Join in a circus event for kids and families. See juggling and contortion and try out some tricks yourself! All kids must have parents or guardians with them at the program.
Alumni Gymnasium
3:30 PM
Successful Aging/Aging Successfully
We will discuss "aging successfully" from a biological point of view (so if you are looking for early retirement planning, that's a different session!). We are interested in how the health habits, behaviors, nutritional patterns, etc. that we adopt throughout the course of our lives have set us on the paths we now travel. What are the medical, psychological and economic obstacles and facilitators that hinder and help us in changing our health habits? Our panelists, Angelo J. Devita '78, vice president of Healthcare at Connolly, Inc.; Lloyd Fisher '78, fitness maven; Dr. Michael Rosenbaum '78, professor of pediatrics and medicine at Columbia University; and Dr. Arthur M. Southam ’78, executive vice president, Health Plan Operations at Kaiser Permanente, bring a wide variety of experience and insight, ranging from the biology of body weight regulation to population health management and a view that we are only just beginning our journey. Presented by the Class of 1978.
Stirn Auditorium
3:30 PM
Confronting Challenges in Public School Education
What does education in America look like today? Join Kathleen Berchelmann '98, a homeschool teacher in Des Peres, Mo.; Noah Lippe-Klein '98, a teacher at Susan Miller Dorsey High School and community organizer with the Coalition for Educational Justice in Los Angeles; Todd Sutler '98, executive director of The Odyssey Initiative, Brooklyn, N.Y. and Alison McCormick '98, a teacher at Wellesley High School in Wellesley, Mass. This panel of Amherst teachers and administrators from all aspects of public education—urban, suburban, charter and homeschool—to discuss changes, trends, policy and outcomes in K-12 schools today. Presented by the Class of 1998.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
3:30 PM
Elliott Arkin '83: Sculpture
Artist Elliott Arkin '83 will present a slideshow of his most recent work related to his upcoming solo exhibition at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Nice, France, and Elizabeth Barker, director of the Mead Art Museum, will lead a discussion of the work. Arkin’s sculptures have been seen in galleries and museums around the world, and they are currently in several permanent collections, including the Louvre Museum’s Musée des Arts Décoratifs and the New York Public Library. Presented by the Class of 1983.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
3:30 PM
In Concert with David Lahm '63 and Ms. Blu
Jazz composer and pianist David Lahm '63 will offer a soulful set with his partner, the dynamic singer Ms. Blu. Both are big hits in their hometown and will bring some of Manhattan to Amherst. Sit back and enjoy! Presented by the Class of 1963.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
3:30 PM
Let's Talk about Sex: Talking to Teenagers in the Digital Age
Talking to teenagers about sex has never been easy, but the advent of Facebook, Snapchat and other technology has changed the contours of the conversation. Join Kelly King ’08, former student health educator and current public health researcher with a focus on sexually transmitted infections and Denise McGoldrick, director of health education at Amherst College, for a frank discussion of how best to convey the important health and social aspects of sex. Presented by the Class of 2008.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
3:30 PM
Family Swim
Have children with lots of energy? Come to Pratt Pool and have an afternoon swim! All kids must have parents or guardians with them at the pool.
Pratt Pool, Alumni Gym
4:00 PM
Retirement Reception for Steve George
Steve George, the Manwell Family Professor of Life Sciences (Biology and Neuroscience) and chair of neuroscience, is retiring on June 30, 2013. You are cordially invited and warmly encouraged to attend this cocktail party in his honor.
Third-Floor Lobby of the McGuire Life Sciences Building
4:30 PM
John Stringer’s Amherst: Drugs and Rebellion, Sickness and Joy
John Stringer ’73, an anthropology major at Amherst and captain of the crew team, fought drug abuse and mental illness for decades. His brother, David ’64, will reflect on John’s years at Amherst and the climate of drugs and rebellion that he embodied. He will read from his book, What’s My Zip Code?: The Promise of My Brother’s Life, His Descent into Mental Illness, and His Brutal Murder. The session will include an open discussion of the Amherst that John experienced, the role of the family in dealing with young men and women like John and the difficult relationship between mental illness and substance abuse. In exploring the question “Who was John Stringer?” the session will address issues of freedom and identity. Presented by the Class of 1973.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:30 PM
Athletics at Amherst Today: A Real Live Discussion (in Place of a 140 Character Tweet)
This panel will review the 2012-13 athletic scorecard for Amherst, bring to light the achievements and backstories of several of our teams and student-athletes during the past year, discuss today's student-athlete experiences on and off Amherst's fields and courts, share a “view from the outside" from alumni and preview some of the opportunities and challenges ahead for Amherst and its student-athletes (beyond just besting that other fine college and worthy competitor from the Berkshires as often as possible). Suzanne Coffey, director of athletics and Rick Murphy '73, president of the Friends of Amherst Athletics (FAA) will "captain" a panelist team of knowledgeable and accomplished leaders including Jack Arena '83, head men's hockey coach; Sean Clancy ’78, member of the executive committee of the FAA; Jen Hughes, head women's soccer coach; and Matthew Schulkind, associate professor of psychology and faculty liaison to the men's lacrosse team. Presented by the FAA and the Class of 1978.
Stirn Auditorium
4:30 PM
But Will Anyone Read What You Write? Creating Tribes of Readers When (or Because) Publishers Can't
These days, most book publishers won’t touch new nonfiction authors unless they already have a ready-made following lining up to buy their books. But how do you build such a tribe? This panel, featuring Christine Bader ’93, visiting scholar at Columbia University and author of the forthcoming Girl Meets Oil: The Evolution of a Corporate Idealist; Kevin Patrick Leech ’93, author of License to Fail: The Business Mistakes of Bond Villains; Jeff Posternak ’93, literary agent with The Wylie Agency; Jenny Rosenstrach ’93, author of Dinner: A Love Story; and moderator Ron Lieber ’93, author of the forthcoming The Opposite of Spoiled, will share their stories. Presented by the Class of 1993.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:30 PM
Tim Eriksen '88 and the Trio de Pumpkintown
Tim Eriksen '88 (Cold Mountain) is acclaimed for transforming American tradition with his startling interpretations of old ballads, love songs, shape-note gospel and dance tunes from the Eastern Seaboard. Tim is joined by Peter Irvine ’87 on percussion and Zoë Darrow (MHC ’12) on fiddle. Much of the Trio’s music comes from the imaginary Pumpkintown’s diverse early inhabitants: Yankees, Africans, Native Americans, Irish, Scottish and Germans. Also influential are the sounds of the cotton trade, which brought many of the town’s youth to Southern India via Zanzibar and back. “Among the world's finest folk practitioners” - Toronto Star. Presented by the Class of 1988.
Kirby Theater
5:00 PM
Catholic Mass
All alumni and their families are welcome!
Chapin Chapel, Chapin Hall
5:30 PM
GALA Reception
All alumni and guests are welcome. Refreshments will be served. Sponsored by the Gay and Lesbian Alumni Association.
McCaffrey Room, Keefe Campus Center
8:00 PM
Cicatrix: The 15th Apocalypse Party
Apocalypse is a party for people who don't like parties, hosted by Planworld. Come on by, play intellectual games, have conversations and enjoy a heart-stopping Black Sheep cake and other tasty refreshments. All who enjoy fine company are invited. We will continue until people stop talking.
Moore Dormitory, Third Floor
9:00 PM
The Zumbyes' Reunion Show
The Zumbyes welcome all Zum-alums, Amherst alums, friends, fans and anyone else to Buckley Recital Hall to celebrate the 63rd year of the group with a free concert of new songs, classic songs and, of course, our beloved college songs.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Sunday, June 02, 2013
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
We’ll be open for you to drop off your keys or ask last-minute questions before you head home. Telephone: (413) 542–2065
Alumni House will close at Noon
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
8:00 AM
Sunday Morning Bike Ride
Shake off those Saturday night shenanigans with some Sunday morning exercise! Join us for a "B" level road bike ride to the spectacular views from atop Mount Sugarloaf, or for a more casual bike ride along the Norwottuck Rail Trail. Regardless of the route you prefer, we'll all meet up in the Orr Rink parking lot on Sunday morning and try to head out by 8 a.m. Please RSVP or send any questions about the ride (including where to rent a bike) to JShefftz@alumni.Amherst.edu or jblum155@optonline.net
Meet at the Orr Rink Parking Lot
9:00 AM
Service of Remembrance and Community
Please join us for an ecumenical service to remember the lives of those alumni we have lost this year.  Officiants: Rabbi Brenner Glickman '93 and the Rev. Frank Poole '63
War Memorial, Memorial Hill (Rain site: Chapin Chapel)
 

Upcoming Events

Virtual Lecture - Prof. Austin Sarat
April 24, 2014 | 4:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Southern Connecticut - Reception with President Biddy Martin
April 24, 2014 | 6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

New York - NESCAC Alumni Happy Hour
April 24, 2014 | 7:00 - 10:00 p.m.

Philadelphia - RESCHEDULED Evening of music by the Chamber Music Society
April 24, 2014 | 8:00 p.m.

Amherst Today
April 24 - 25, 2014

Reunion
May 28 - June 1, 2014

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alumni@amherst.edu
Main Phone: 413.542.2313

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