2017 Reunion Schedule

Programs will continue to be posted and updated. All programs are 60 minutes unless otherwise noted.

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Wednesday, May 24, 2017
10:00 AM
Tsar Fedorsky ’82 Photography Exhibit: The Light Under the Door

This work contemplates the fear of the unknown. It is about finding the courage to break through and follow the light. Tsar Fedorsky ’82 is a fine arts photographer whose work has been exhibited nationally and published worldwide. She holds an MFA in photography from Hartford Art School. Fedorsky was awarded a 2015 Artist Fellowship Grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and was a Critical Mass Finalist. Her work from the series The Light Under the Door was included in SHOTS Magazine’s Annual Portfolio issue, Winter 2016. She is currently working with Peperoni Books in Berlin to publish a small-edition photo book, and the expected publication date is summer 2017. She resides in Gloucester, Mass. Gallery will be open until 4 p.m. Presented by the Class of 1982.

Eli Marsh Gallery, Fayerweather Hall
2:00 PM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at 9 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
2:30 PM
Reunion Garden Tour of the Emily Dickinson Museum
Meet Jane Wald, Executive Director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, to hear about new projects, including the reconstruction of the Dickinson family conservatory. Enjoy the museum’s garden tour audio wands free of charge, or take the tour on your cell phone.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
5:30 PM
Reunion Welcome Reception at the Beneski Museum of Natural History
Mingle beneath the mammoth, delight in the dryosaurus, enjoy libations and hors d’oeuvres in the shadow of ancient footprints, and renew old friendships amidst Amherst’s extraordinary collection of vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and around the world since 1825. The Bluestockings will perform at 5:45 p.m. Informal tours will be available. Reception ends at 7:15 p.m. 
Beneski Museum of Natural History
7:30 PM
Trump and Putin in Historical Perspective: How We Got into the New Cold War
Talk by William Taubman, the Bertrand Snell Professor of Political Science, Emeritus 
Stirn Auditorium
Thursday, May 25, 2017
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at 10 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
10:00 AM
Tsar Fedorsky ’82 Photography Exhibit: The Light Under the Door

This work contemplates the fear of the unknown. It is about finding the courage to break through and follow the light. Tsar Fedorsky ’82 is a fine arts photographer whose work has been exhibited nationally and published worldwide. She holds an MFA in photography from Hartford Art School. Fedorsky was awarded a 2015 Artist Fellowship Grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and was a Critical Mass Finalist. Her work from the series The Light Under the Door was included in SHOTS Magazine’s Annual Portfolio issue, Winter 2016. She is currently working with Peperoni Books in Berlin to publish a small-edition photo book, and the expected publication date is summer 2017. She resides in Gloucester, Mass. Gallery will be open until 4 p.m. Presented by the Class of 1982.

Eli Marsh Gallery, Fayerweather Hall
10:30 AM
Reunion Garden Tour of the Emily Dickinson Museum
Meet Jane Wald, Executive Director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, to hear about new projects, including the reconstruction of the Dickinson family conservatory. Enjoy the museum’s garden tour audio wands free of charge, or take the tour on your cell phone.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
10:30 AM
The Value of Herman Melville
Talk by Geoffrey D. Sanborn, Professor of English
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
10:30 AM
Mead Behind-the-Scenes Tour
with David E. Little, Director and Chief Curator
Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Quilt-Making with the Women’s and Gender Center
Stop by the Women’s and Gender Center to create a square for our community quilt. Supplies will be provided, and your square will be included in the WGC’s quilt commemorating women of Amherst College. Open until 3 p.m.
Women’s and Gender Center
1:00 PM
Amherst College Financial Update
Join Kevin Weinman, Chief Financial Officer, to learn more about Amherst’s financial model and outlook. Our thoughtful approach to investment, combined with the uniquely generous spirit of philanthropy Amherst inspires, has created one of the strongest financial portfolios in higher education.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1:30 PM
Beneski Museum "Bones and Stones" Tour
Join Alfred Venne, Museum Educator, for a walk through the Beneski Museum of Natural History, which houses outstanding collections and exhibits that include vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and from around the world since 1825. Particularly noteworthy is the world-famous dinosaur track collection. Bring your cameras!
Beneski Museum of Natural History
2:30 PM
Rhetoric at Amherst College: 19th Century and Today
Susan Daniels, Associate in Public Speaking, will share the history of rhetoric at Amherst College. We will begin in the 19th century, exploring the role in academic life of traditions like “The Grove Oration,” once presented by Calvin Coolidge, Class of 1895, and a wide range of annual prizes, including the Kellogg Prize for excellence in declamation and the Hardy Prize for improvement in extemporaneous speaking. Susan will also share the work she is currently doing to help students, faculty and staff deepen their rhetorical skills and be better able to share their research and knowledge with others. The lecture will culminate in a brief interactive workshop, with participants learning how to appear relaxed and confident when speaking in public.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:30 PM
Mead Highlights Tour
with Vanja Malloy, Curator of American Art
Mead Art Museum
2:30 PM
Buzzy Schwartz ’67 with Pilates Instructor Katrina Hawley
Buzzy Schwartz ’67 will present Pilates instructor Katrina Hawley for an explanation and demonstration of Pilates as a fitness regimen that can improve quality of life for aging ex-jocks and others. Buzzy testifies to aching knees and a sore back during and after tennis or golf, which led him to try everything from cortisone shots to plastic sleeves. Finally, following the advice of his wife, he tried Pilates. In his words, “I found my knees stopped hurting and my stomach muscles got stronger and my overall problems diminished considerably.” In order to share this experience with classmates and others, Buzzy has arranged for Katrina Hawley, a Pilates instructor from Hadley, to join us for a discussion and demonstration about how Pilates can help all of us maintain better fitness. Presented by the Class of 1967.
Conway Classroom, Alumni Gymnasium
4:00 PM
The Jewish Experience at Amherst College
Join Wendy Bergoffen, Lecturer in American Studies, and students from her Mellon Research Tutorial, “Jews at Amherst,” in a conversation about Jewish life at the College. Students will present their research findings and invite alumni to share their stories, recollections and insights. A reception will follow.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
5:00 PM
Reception
Join Jewish Advisor Rabbi Bruce Bromberg Seltzer to learn more about current Jewish life at Amherst. Reconnect with previous Jewish Advisors Rabbis Yechiael Lander and Ed Feld.
Lobby, Converse Hall
5:00 PM
Opening Reception for Special Exhibitions at the Mead
Exhibits include: Perspectives on Michael Mazur; From Father to Son: Master Prints from the Collection of Dr. K. Frank Austen; and Collector’s Journey: Highlights from the Print Collection of Dr. William A. Weary ’64.
Mead Art Museum
8:00 PM
Screening of Ted Braun ’82’s Documentary Betting on Zero

A full showing of Ted Braun's '82 award winning docu-thriller. Controversial hedge fund titan Bill Ackman joins forces with Latina activist Julie Contreras in a crusade to expose global nutritional giant Herbalife as a massive pyramid scheme, while Herbalife execs claim Ackman’s a market manipulator out to bankrupt them and make a killing off his billion dollar short.   Allegations of corporate criminality, covert government influence and coopted public servants swirl in this emotional exploration of money, fraud and the American Dream. Ted will introduce the documentary and answer questions after the screening.  He’ll also lead a separate discussion panel, with excerpts of the film, on Friday at 1 pm. Presented by the Class of 1982.

Stirn Auditorium
8:00 PM
Concert with the Omer Quartet
The concert, performed by the Omer Quartet, in residence at the New England Conservatory of Music, will feature music by Ludwig van Beethoven and the world premiere of Quartet No. 4, by contemporary Dutch composer Rocco Havelaar, commissioned by Dr. William Weary '64. The concert is in conjunction with the Mead exhibition Collector’s Journey: Highlights from the Print Collection of Dr. William A. Weary ’64.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at midnight.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Those Who Teach and Those Who Learn: A Conversation with the Dean of the Faculty
Join Catherine Epstein, Dean of the Faculty and Winkley Professor of History, for a wide-ranging conversation about Amherst’s academic landscape. Dean Epstein will discuss the ways in which the College is shaping the next generation of faculty and the ongoing comprehensive review of the curriculum. She will also address pedagogical innovation and other academic initiatives at Amherst.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
9:00 AM
Planworld: The Amherst Social Network

A presentation by Johnnie Odom ’00 with guests. For over 20 years, Amherst students and alumni have had access to their own unique online social network—Planworld! We will explore the unique features of Planworld, briefly discuss its history and present, and show a sneak peak at its future. There is something for everyone, whether you are interested in conversations amongst alumni and students, social networking in general, or the technical nitty-gritty.

Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
9:00 AM
Open House at Book & Plow Farm
Come up to Book & Plow Farm for a tour of the greenhouse and core site! Book & Plow Farm is in our fifth season of production here at Amherst College. Our greenhouse is filling up with plant starts that students will plant, cultivate and harvest for Valentine Dining Hall and a Fall Community-Supported Agriculture Share. Maps to the farm are available at the Alumni House Reception Center. Open house ends at 11 a.m.
Book & Plow Farm, 425 South East Street, Amherst
10:00 AM
Tsar Fedorsky ’82 Photography Exhibit: The Light Under the Door

This work contemplates the fear of the unknown. It is about finding the courage to break through and follow the light. Tsar Fedorsky ’82 is a fine arts photographer whose work has been exhibited nationally and published worldwide. She holds an MFA in photography from Hartford Art School. Fedorsky was awarded a 2015 Artist Fellowship Grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and was a Critical Mass Finalist. Her work from the series The Light Under the Door was included in SHOTS Magazine’s Annual Portfolio issue, Winter 2016. She is currently working with Peperoni Books in Berlin to publish a small-edition photo book, and the expected publication date is summer 2017. She resides in Gloucester, Mass. Gallery will be open until 4 p.m. Presented by the Class of 1982.

Eli Marsh Gallery, Fayerweather Hall
10:30 AM
Meet Emily Griffen, Director of the Loeb Center for Career Exploration and Planning
Get an insider’s look at the new directions and areas of focus for the Loeb Center.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:30 AM
Two Italys and Four Germanys: Remembering Donald Pitkin
During his scholarly career, Donald Pitkin, Professor of Anthropology, studied two families from the two principal fascist countries of the 20th century—Italy and Germany. Based on the posthumous publication of his study Four Germanys: A Chronicle of the Schorcht Family, his former student John Torpey ’81, Professor of Sociology and History and Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center in New York, will lead a discussion of Pitkin’s scholarship and his role in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at Amherst.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
10:30 AM
Looking Under the Hood of a String Quartet
Join the Omer Quartet for a chance to learn about how string quartets work. Ask questions about the musicians’ experience or about the concert from the night before. If you have your instrument with you, you are welcome to sit in at the end of the session for a bit of Hayden and fun!
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
10:30 AM
Mathematics of Voting Systems
Tanya L. Leise, Associate Professor of Mathematics, will examine voting systems from a mathematical perspective, including plurality (“first past the post”), Borda count, instant-runoff voting and approval voting. Arrow’s Theorem suggests that all voting systems have serious potential disadvantages, so what voting system should we use?
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
10:30 AM
Tour of Etched Journey: Patterns, Mysteries and Discoveries from the Print Collection of Dr. William Weary

with Mila Waldman, European Prints Specialist and Study Room Manager

Mead Art Museum
10:30 AM
Why Do We Die? But Don’t Worry About Old Age, It Won’t Last Long
Michael Boxer ’67 will moderate and discuss the genomic consequences of aging, George McNeil ’67 will discuss the psychological and psychiatric effects of aging, and Paul Bunn ’67 will discuss rewiring the immune system. Presented by the Class of 1967.
Stirn Auditorium
1:00 PM
The Amherst College Greenway
By 2018, the eastern portion of campus will be transformed by the addition of a 250,000-square-foot Science Center, four new residence halls and an expansive Greenway for recreation and relaxation running the full length of that landscape. The Greenway Projects are an expression of what Amherst believes about teaching, learning, living and interacting as a community. Join Tom Davies, Director of Design and Construction, and John Middleton ’77, Amherst College Board of Trustees, to hear an overview of the project and its sustainability features, including new dorms completed in 2016; the Science Center construction under way, scheduled for completion in 2018; and the outdoor spaces that will connect these projects with the main campus. 
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1:00 PM
Betting on Zero

Ted Braun '82,  filmmaker and professor at USC's School of Cinematic Arts, will present excerpts of his new feature documentary, "Betting On Zero," an expose of the battle between hedge fund titan Bill Ackman and global nutritional giant Herbalife. Allegations of corporate criminality, covert government influence, and coopted public servants run throughout this exploration of the place of money, fact and justice in the American dream. Ted will be joined by Karin Immergut '82, former US Attorney and now Federal Judge in the Oregon circuit and Denise Pellegrini '87, business journalist for Bloomberg News. Presented by the Classes of 1982 and 1987.

Stirn Auditorium
1:00 PM
Planetarium Program: We Are Part of This Universe
For over 55 years, the Bassett Planetarium has served the College well. This tool has helped countless individuals better understand their place in the universe. Join Alfred Venne, Planetarium Director, as he uses the vintage Spitz A3P Starball to help re-create the night sky over Amherst. In addition, using a classic Orrery, participants will examine the plane of the solar system, the tilt of the Earth, day/night and seasons. The one takeaway from the planetarium visit may best be summed up by Neil deGrasse Tyson, who said, “We are part of this universe, we are in this universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the universe is in us.”
Bassett Planetarium, Morgan Hall
1:00 PM
The QUESTion Project: Expanding Education with Purpose
Students from a public school in the Bronx will share their experience of participating in an innovative semester-long class, the “QUESTion Class,” where they explore some of the most important questions that shape their values and construct their futures. This session will also examine the contribution the QUESTion Class can make in expanding the role of education. Alumni panelists include Nazir Ahmad ’82; Gabriel Gonzalez ’15; Gerard Senehi ’82, founder of the QUESTion Project; and Mohammed Ramy ’18. Presented by the Class of 1982.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
1:00 PM
Resistance and Opposition During World War II: Germany, France and the United States
Catherine Epstein, Dean of the Faculty, Winkley Professor of History, specialist in modern German history and author of Nazi Germany: Confronting the Myths, will discuss resistance movements inside the Third Reich before and during the war. Ronald Rosbottom, Winifred L. Arms Professor in the Arts and Humanities and Professor of French and European Studies, former Dean of the Faculty, specialist in World War II literature and film and author of When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation, will speak about his research on French adolescents involved in resisting the German occupation, the subject of his next book. And David Roll ’62, Washington lawyer and nonfiction author, most recently, of The Hopkins Touch, will address the reactions of George Marshall, Harry Hopkins and John J. McCloy (Class of 1916) to efforts of Jewish leaders and others to rescue European Jews. Roll is presently working on a new treatment of the military and political life of George Marshall. A book signing will follow the talk. Presented by the Class of 1962.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1:00 PM
Performance: Wild and Precious

In his acclaimed one-man show Wild and Precious, Steve Cadwell ’72 gives his personal answer to the question we all ask at our Reunions: “What have you been doing with your life?” Yet Steve’s individual story is also a story about the broader social transformation initiated and lived by our generation. His coming-of-age story spans from when love dared not speak its name, to gay pride, to the AIDS crisis, to civil rights: freedom to marry and raise children. Wild and Precious has been featured at theaters, campuses, conferences and Pride Festivals coast to coast. In addition to his psychotherapy practice, Steve has written and taught on issues of gender, sexuality, shame and group therapy at Boston University’s Graduate School of Social Work and with Harvard Medical School psychiatry residents. Performance is 70 minutes. If you would like to continue discussion after the play, please join us in the lobby for conversation and refreshments. Presented by the Class of 1972.

Kirby Theater
2:30 PM
Development of the Bandon Dunes Golf Resort and Other Exciting Golf Developments Around the World
Mike Keiser ’67 rivals Donald Trump in terms of the number of golf courses developed and the level of challenge taken on in those developments. Like Trump, he believes in the developer’s motto of “Location, location, location.” But, unlike Trump, to Keiser that means taking on the most challenging settings in remote areas, such as Bandon, Ore., where no one ever imagined putting a golf course of any kind, let alone a world-class golf resort like Bandon Dunes. Gary Gold ’67 will lead an interview-like discussion with Keiser, asking how and why he decided to take on the environmental and other challenges associated with the Bandon Dunes project and others like it in places like Nova Scotia and Tasmania. Presented by the Class of 1967.
Stirn Auditorium
2:30 PM
Diversity: The Challenges, Responsibilities and Opportunities
Panelists include: George Carmany ’62 (moderator); Peter Teachout ’62, Professor of Law, University of Vermont; Tony Jack ’07, Junior Fellow, Harvard Society of Fellows, Assistant Professor, Harvard Graduate School of Education and Wade Fellow at Amherst College; Biddy Martin, President. Presented by the Classes of 1962 and 2007.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:30 PM
She's In, You're Out: Children's Use of Relational Aggression
When most of us think about aggression, we imagine physical behaviors like hitting, kicking or fistfights. However, psychologists are confirming what many of us remember from middle school: words and other behaviors can be just as hurtful. “Relational aggression” includes behaviors such as excluding a peer from a group of friends or spreading malicious rumors to damage social reputations. Julia McQuade, Assistant Professor of Psychology, will present research from her lab at Amherst College that examines why children become so tempted to use relational aggression, especially during adolescence. She will discuss the individual characteristics that make certain children more prone to use relational aggression (e.g., self-esteem, cognitive skills) and the way that social factors (e.g., bullying, popularity) can encourage these behaviors. Michael Horne ’02, Superintendent of KIPP Dallas-Forth Worth Public Schools, will moderate and share his perspective as an educator. Presented by the Class of 2002.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:30 PM
From Big Food to Big Disease
How do Big Corn, Big Oil and Big Sugar make for big medical bills?  Follow the money from venture capital and government appropriations through agribusiness, industrial production, special-interest legislation, public works spending, social support programs and consumer spending to the end result of chronic illnesses and their public and private costs. How can we fix it? Panelists include: Gerry Brown '77, Michele Heisler '82, Warren Tolman '82, Dr. Deborah Vogel '82 and Dr. Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge '87. Presented by the Classes of 1977, 1982 and 1987.
Johnson Chapel
2:30 PM
The Future of Medicine: Rehumanization
While there is much talk of the impact of technology and artificial intelligence on the future of health care, a re-emergence of the human and humanistic aspects is likely to have even greater impact. Panelists include: Dr. Annah Abrams '87, Chief of Pediatric Psycho-Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital; Dr. Rafael Campo '87, poet, internist, Harvard Medical School; Dr. Joe Ferriter '87 (moderator) family practitioner and alternative medicine specialist, Park City, Utah; Dr. Clay Johnston '87, Dean, Dell Medical School, University of Texas at Austin. Presented by the Class of 1987.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
2:30 PM
Perspectives on Michael Mazur '57
Remarks from Vanja Malloy, Curator of American Art; Betsey Garand, Senior Resident Artist in the Department of Art and the History of Art and colleague of Michael Mazur '57; Gail Mazur, Michael’s wife.
Mead Art Museum
2:30 PM
Taking Action: Training to Run for Elected Office with Emerge America
When Regina Vidaver ’92 realized she had half of her working life left, she decided to set out on a different path: running for elective office. To prepare, she joined the Emerge America program, which trains Democratic women to run. They boast an impressive 70 percent success rate! Regina is currently in a six-month training process, learning about win numbers, messaging, keeping her cool in intense situations, and the diversity of people—and their needs—in her community and state. She expects to run for local office, such as school board or community supervisor, within the next several years. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
3:00 PM
Celebrating Daniel Velleman
Please join the Mathematics and Statistics Department in celebrating the career of Daniel Velleman, the Julian H. Gibbs '46 Professor of Mathematics, who is retiring after 34 years of teaching mathematics at Amherst College. Reception ends at 5 p.m.
Room 206, Seeley Mudd Building
4:00 PM
“And Now for Something Completely Different”
Four classmates will describe how they transformed their initial careers into something that was almost completely unrelated to their previous training and jobs. They will describe what caused them to make this change, the obstacles they had to overcome and the rewards of doing something new. Presentations will be brief enough (10 to 12 minutes) to allow audience members to quiz them and perhaps offer their own experiences. Panelists include George Fleming ’67 (financial services executive, now a career consultant); Chris Nugent ’67 (insurance executive, now an actor); John McBride ’67 (educator turned spice company entrepreneur); and Warren Muir ’67 (environmental science leader turned international peace NGO leader). Bill Fischel ’67 and Ron Hoge ’67 will moderate. Presented by the Class of 1967.
Stirn Auditorium
4:00 PM
A Conversation with Members of the Board of Trustees
with Patrick Fitzgerald ’82, Kimberlyn R. Leary ’82, John S. Middleton ’77, Dr. Paula K. Rauch ’77, P’00, P’08, Dr. Rafael Campo ’87, and Dwight Poler '87
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
4:00 PM
Donald Trump and American Authoritarianism
Matthew MacWilliams will discuss his new book, The Rise of Trump: America's Authoritarian Spring. MacWilliams’s work has been cited by The New York Times, Der Spiegel, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, and NPR. This book is the first in the new "Public Works" series published by the Amherst College Press. The talk is sponsored by the Amherst College Library thanks to the support of patrons and donors. Reception to follow.
Friendly Periodicals Reading Room, Frost Library
4:00 PM
Preparing for our 80th Reunion: How to Live Happily to 102
The members of the Class of ’77 want not only to survive but to thrive for the next 40 years, for the sole purpose of attending our 80th Reunion and having as much fun as we’re having at this one. Our panel will discuss financial, health-related and personal fulfillment strategies for a healthy and happy next chapter of our lives. Panelists include Dave Babbott ’77, Rev. Geoffrey Piper ’77 and Mike Mendelsohn ’77. Presented by the Class of 1977.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
From Science Fiction to Reality: 20 Years of Exoplanet Astronomy
Purely the stuff of science fiction as recently as 1995, today there are thousands of known exoplanets. What tools and technological advancements enable astronomers to find planets around stars other than our sun? What are the characteristics of the planets that we’re finding today, and how are they different from the planets in our own solar system? What will the next generation of ground- and spaced-based telescopes allow us to learn about exoplanets and their formation processes? Join Kate Follette, Assistant Professor of Astronomy, in an exploration of recent advances in the field of exoplanet astronomy, including work being conducted on campus at Amherst College.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
Resource Center Reception
Join the Multicultural Resource Center, Queer Resource Center, and Women’s and Gender Center for a joint reception for alumnae, queer and trans alumni, and alumni of color. Meet the center directors and mingle with the growing community of Amherst alumni. Stop by for a drink, snack and to hear about the variety of programs and trainings open to the Amherst community and to learn more about diversity and inclusion initiatives on campus.
Multicultural Resource Center, Keefe Campus Center
4:00 PM
Climate Change: Facts, Fictions, Prognostications and Policies
Few issues generate more public debate than climate change; for fewer issues still is the debate conducted with as much misinformation and “irrational exuberance.” In this panel, classmates Brad Hager ’72, Professor of Earth Sciences at MIT; David Helfand ’72, Professor of Astronomy at Columbia University; and Dr. Peter Canaday ’72, a physics undergraduate practicing radiology in New Zealand, will give brief presentations of a few “facts” and a few “fictions” relevant to the topic of climate change. They will then engage the audience in a discussion of how scientific matters might be better communicated, and how public policy discussions might be held on a topic for which projections are uncertain and impacts of such policies may not be seen for decades. Presented by the Class of 1972.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
5:00 PM
Reception with President Biddy Martin
Join President Biddy Martin and others from the College for conversation and celebration. All are welcome. The Amherst College DQ will perform a cappella music at 5:30 p.m. The reception will end at 6:30 p.m.
The Powerhouse
5:00 PM
Geology Department Reception
Hosted by the Geology faculty
Room 100, Beneski Museum of Natural History
8:00 PM
"Complicit" Documentary: Excerpts and Q&A
From Director Heather White ’80 and her husband, Musical Director Freddie Bryant ’87, Complicit had its world premiere in March at the London Human Rights Watch Film Festival and is on this season’s film festival circuit. It is an investigative exposé on Chinese electronics factories and the struggles and dangers faced by the industry’s young workers. The film gives an intimate portrait of these individuals and an activist with leukemia who confronts corporate and government interests while empowering and inspiring those around him. Powerful forces are unleashed as he investigates local factories, putting his own safety at risk. Presented by the Class of 1987.
Stirn Auditorium
8:00 PM
Works in Progress
A very informal salon / show-and-tell / Moth Radio / open conversation where classmates each spend 10 or 15 minutes in an intimate setting talking about a significant, transformational experience or just something very cool. Without naming names, we will hear from poets, world travelers, Alaskan frontierswomen, parents who adopted a child from halfway across the world, people who changed their direction in midlife and more. Presented by the Class of 1982.
Hitchcock House
9:00 PM
Concert: Sawdust Folk Trio
Concert with open jam session to follow. Presented by the Class of 1972.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
Saturday, May 27, 2017
7:30 AM
Fun Run
Come one and all, young and old! Run, jog or leisurely walk around the campus. We’ll assemble at the front steps of Converse Hall (look for the table) at 7:15 a.m. and depart every 15 minutes beginning at 7:30 until 8 a.m. Our route will start at Converse, go down College to East Drive, then down to the southeast corner of the playing fields, then along to Orr Rink, then back up the sidewalks to the Octagon and back to Converse (total of 1.5 miles). This Fun Run will be led by John Kiely ’62, Jeanine Friedman ’82 and Hanna Campbell ’07. Please sign up so we know how many people to expect. Presented by the Classes of 1962, 1982 and 2007.
Meet at the steps to Converse Hall
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at 9:30 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
8:30 AM
Amherst Christian Fellowship Reunion
Come visit old friends and hear about what is going on in ACF. Drop by anytime between 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. Light breakfast foods will be provided. Hosted by Paul Sorrentino, Director of Religious and Spiritual Life, and Chris Gow '16.
Chapin Lounge, Chapin Hall
9:00 AM
Amherst Alums Addressing African Growth
Ron Hoge ’67 and Dianne Hoge will moderate. Boris Bulayev ’07 and Bill Ryerson ’67 will describe their organizations and the work those organizations are doing to encourage and support educational and economic growth in Africa. Africa is projected to be home to 40 percent of the world’s population by 2100, with growth from 1.2 billion to nearly 4 billion people. This session will explore how two nonprofit organizations founded by Amherst alums—Educate! and Population Media Center—are successfully addressing key issues surrounding this projection. Educate! works to transform secondary education in East Africa by giving students the skills to start businesses, get jobs and improve their livelihoods. They have seen a doubling of student income through their work; will impact 26,000 students intensively this year across 20 percent of Uganda’s high schools and 15 percent of Rwanda’s; have had core model components adopted nationally in both countries; were recently the subject of an Al Jazeera documentary; and have been highlighted by Bill Gates, Forbes’ 30 Under 30 and The Brookings Institution as a successful global scaling education initiative. Population Media Center takes a different tack by directly addressing the African population growth challenge itself. PMC creates long-running prime-time serialized dramas on radio and TV in which key characters evolve into positive role models for such goals as ending child marriage, daughter education, child spacing and use of effective methods of family planning. Their programs have been shown to be effective at attracting huge audiences and in changing national norms on the issues addressed. Presented by the Classes of 1967 and 2007.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
9:00 AM
The Bionic Bicycle
There it rests, upright and silent in the morning twilight. It’s a state-of-the-art Specialized Turbo e-bike (pedal-assist electric bicycle) awaiting its commander. Once you activate the potent lithium-ion battery, initialize the onboard computer, and energize the powerful, high-tech, brushless rare-earth motor, this bicycle will possess the strength of three healthy humans. It will be capable of greater velocity than a cantering horse, and have enough endurance to complete a marathon with range to spare. The battery recharges in 3.5 hours at a cost of $0.15, and can be deep-cycled 700 times. During our presentation we will clarify the above engineering details. This machine is silent, swift and maneuverable both on- and off-road. It generates no emissions, carries no flammable liquids, and can be lawfully transported in an elevator and safely stored in an office building or apartment. Recall the joy and wonder of the day you first (successfully) balanced and navigated a “two-wheeler.” This modern high-quality electric bicycle will replicate those feelings exponentially. Join Henry Parker Hirschel, instructor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, to kick the tires of a Specialized Turbo, and consider if there just might be an e-bike in your future. Sponsored by the Department of Physics and Astronomy.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
9:00 AM
(Up-to-)5K Fun Run
If you’re feeling like you’ve eaten and drunk too much at Reunion (who does that?) join enthusiastic runner Toby Snedecor ’02 on a fun run on paths around the College. If you’re lucky, he might even show up in costume. The pace will be gentle to moderate, befitting a fun run. Toby will be going the full 5K, but you can drop out whenever you want (or need) to. Presented by the Class of 2002.
Meet at the front steps of Alumni Gym
9:00 AM
Discovering Your Purpose for Your Second Half of Life
Have you entertained shifting your focus, energy and resources towards a cause, project or business that is radically different from how you spent your first half of life? Do you sense an urgency to reinvent yourself in your second half of life in a way that truly leverages your gifts and makes a bigger impact on the world? If so, join us for a panel discussion to hear from Luisa (Kaye) Hagemeier ’87, Jeff Spadafora ’87 and John Tucci ’87 as they share the stories of their midlife transitions. Spadafora will moderate the session and provide useful ideas and strategies based on his decade of experience helping people through this renewal season of life. Presented by the Class of 1987.
Kirby Theater
9:00 AM
The Future of the American Idea
What inspires people to become—and remain—Americans? Will the individual and social possibilities we call The American Dream survive our recent trends toward balkanization and solipsism? What forces drive us toward narrower lives? After a short presentation of demographic, economic and social trends, the audience will dive into these questions themselves. Presentations from Nazir Ahmad, ’82, President of GivingWorks Inc. - Strategists for Social Impact, and Laurie Maffly-Kipp ’82, Archer Alexander Distinguished Professor in the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis. Presented by the Class of 1982.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
9:00 AM
Dr. Strangelaw or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love States' Rights
The changes in Washington have led to a sea change in the near-term future of climate change rules, financial regulation, immigration, voting rights and other issues. As a result, there is an increased interest by states opposed to this trend to institute their own laws, enforcement and litigation. Some of the most egregious abuses of liberty in American history were carried out under the banner of “states’ rights.” A dream panel: Harlan Levy ’77, former Chief Deputy Attorney General of New York and partner at Boies Schiller Flexner; Austin Sarat, the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science; and Paul Smith ’76, Supreme Court litigator and “one of the greatest legal minds in the country.” Presented by the Class of 1977.
Johnson Chapel
9:00 AM
Tinkergarten Outdoor Adventure
At this event designed for kids and adults, the whole family can enjoy the chance to play and learn in nature. We’ll discover the most confounding mystery and work together to create a solution using our imaginations and all of the tools nature provides. The Tinkergarten program is designed for kids ages 1.5 to 8, but explorers just older or younger are also most welcome. Tinkergarten was founded by Meghan (Nolan) Fitzgerald ’97 and her husband and offers play-based nature classes around the country. Presented by the Class of 1997.
Meet at the steps to Frost Library
9:00 AM
Accountable Care Organizations: An ACA Feature That Will Survive
The Affordable Care Act’s accomplishments and shortcomings will be briefly summarized, followed by a discussion of the ACA’s promotion of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) as a medical care model with the potential to improve quality and to favorably impact medical cost trends— a precondition for the desired extension of coverage to all U.S. citizens. Most of the national ACA debate has focused on insurance mechanisms, but our widely reported quality defects and unsustainable out-of-pocket costs must also be addressed with fundamental reform of the care delivery system. The performance data for ACO models will be reviewed for both Medicare and commercial populations, with discussion of the significant obstacles to be addressed for those medical provider groups who aspire to create and maintain a successful ACO. Panelists include Dr. Michael Kelleher ’72, Dr. Jeffrey Craven ’72 and Dr. David Ray ’72, P’08. Presented by the Class of 1972.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
9:00 AM
Open House at Book & Plow Farm
Come up to Book & Plow Farm for a tour of the greenhouse and core site! Book & Plow Farm is in our fifth season of production here at Amherst College. Our greenhouse is filling up with plant starts that students will plant, cultivate and harvest for Valentine Dining Hall and a Fall Community-Supported Agriculture Share. Maps to the farm are available at the Alumni House Reception Center. Open house ends at 11 a.m.
Book & Plow Farm, 425 South East Street, Amherst
10:00 AM
Reunion Tour of The Evergreens at the Emily Dickinson Museum
Go behind the scenes at The Evergreens, home of the poet’s brother Austin Dickinson and his family. Currently closed to the public for the installation of a fire-suppression system, this unrestored Victorian presents unique preservation opportunities and challenges. Executive director, Jane Wald facilitates. Space is limited, first-come, first-served. 
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
10:10 AM
Current Possibilities for Healthier Aging of Body and Mind
Normal aging results in diminished capabilities of all human systems, but such alterations in cells of the brain and immune system are most hindering to function and contribute most to frailty of old age. Most especially, losses of cognitive functions, balance and mobility with aging are prevalent, feared and very resistant to countermeasures. At the levels of American business and government, it is particularly concerning that senile dementias now are the most expensive disease cluster to diagnose and manage. Dr. Ed Goetzl ’62, P’92, ’89 will present a medical overview of the normal human aging processes and describe how neurological deficits are usually evaluated for assessment of prognosis. Dr. Bob Mignone ’62 will describe common psychiatric manifestations of many of the senile dementias and discuss selected ethical issues in medical approaches to this area. Dr. Larry Beck ’62, P’07, ’92 will elucidate aspects of the worldwide increases in aging populations and their increased susceptibility to dementias and other diseases, and optimistically present current and future therapeutic possibilities for dementias. Dr. Ed Hughes ’62, P’01, ’95 will lead a question-and-answer panel discussion. Possible topics: “Are we all progressing toward (Alzheimer’s) dementia?” “Does it run in families?” “My mother had it by age 68!” “Are there any reliable tests to diagnose it early?” “What are its psychological manifestations, and how can they be managed?” “What, if any, activities, supplements or diets can prevent onset or progression?” “If I have a high risk, should I enroll in a clinical drug trial?” Presented by the Class of 1962.
Stirn Auditorium
10:10 AM
Walk on the Wild Side: Animal Adventures for Kids
Join us under the Class of ’97 tent for a true animal adventure. Meet exotic animals such as armadillo, porcupine and kinkajou! Hear interesting stories and learn all about these unique animals from knowledgeable experts. You can even touch a few animals if you dare! Enjoy a fun and unique hands-on learning experience for kids of all ages. Animal Adventures is New England’s largest privately owned animal rescue center that is fully licensed to keep all of their animals. Educational programs like this one help fund the care for their animals. Presented by the Class of 1997.
Morris Pratt Circle
10:10 AM
Midlife Fitness: Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and CrossFit
Looking to spice up your fitness routine? Or to find something new to master? Join David Wolpaw ’92, a longtime practitioner of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and Nate Gordon ’92, a multiyear devotee of CrossFit, to learn about their sports, how they chose them and the role those sports play in their lives. David and Nate will also discuss the challenges and benefits of remaining committed to fitness in their late 40s and why these activities are ones that many people can take up at different stages in their lives. There may be demonstrations! Presented by the Class of 1992.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
10:10 AM
The Amherst College DQ in Concert
See Amherst's oldest a cappella group perform!
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:10 AM
Mead Highlights Tour
with Keely Sarr, Assistant Museum Educator and Cecelia Feldman, Kress Interpretive Fellow 
Mead Art Museum
10:10 AM
Amherst in Tech: A Panel Discussion
This will feature Amherst College ‘07 alumni who have achieved success in the tech / venture capital / startup landscape. We will have a deep discussion about trends, career paths and ways technology will be shaping our future. Presented by the Class of 2007.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
10:10 AM
When the State Kills: The Death Penalty
Should there be a “no doubt” standard in death penalty cases? Should the validity of capital punishment be decided by each state or by the federal legislature or judiciary? Is killing overseas without due process acceptable as part of the war on terror? Why was Johnson Chapel the appropriate venue to mark the repeal of the death penalty in one state? A judge, a prosecutor, a professor and a legislator will discuss. Panelists include Joseph Hartzler ’72, former Assistant U.S. Attorney; Judge Karin Immergut ’82; Delegate Sandy Rosenberg ’72; and Austin Sarat, the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science. Presented by the Classes of 1972 and 1982.
Johnson Chapel
10:10 AM
Equity and Opportunity: Women in Finance
A discussion of the opportunities and challenges for women navigating careers in finance. Real talk about the highs and lows of the work and the politics from women who have seen Wall Street from the inside. Panelists include Molly Auth Manning ’97, Director of Client Services at Income Research + Management; Susanne Santola Mulligan ’97, Managing Director, Equity Capital Markets, Guggenheim Securities; Ashley McCormick Delahunty ’97, Equity Trader, Fidelity Investments; and Angela Scott ’82, Vice President, Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity, Chief Administrative Office, Wells Fargo. Moderator: Amy Fox ’97, screenwriter of the 2017 film Equity. Presented by the Class of 1997.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
10:10 AM
Careers in International Diplomacy
This panel will discuss diplomatic work in the U.S. Department of State, the United Nations and foreign ministries in today’s world. Participants will share experiences from their own careers, including postings in Afghanistan, Burma, Kyrgyzstan, Poland, South Sudan and Washington, D.C. The panelists will also describe the hiring process to become a diplomat. This event is off the record. Moderator: Michael Rosenthal ’02, Foreign Service Officer, U.S. Department of State. Panelists: Cecily Brewer ’02, Foreign Affairs Officer, U.S. Department of State; Megan Carroll ’02, Team Leader, Department of Peacekeeping Operations, United Nations Secretariat; Michal Safianik, Counselor, Delegation of the European Union to the United States. Presented by the Class of 2002.
Kirby Theater
11:00 AM
Bounce House
Bring your kids to the Bounce House for bouncing fun and to burn off some energy! All children must be accompanied by an adult. Available until 5 p.m. Presented by the Class of 2002.
Main Quadrangle
11:15 AM
A Conversation with President Biddy Martin and the Annual Meeting of the Society of the Alumni and the Alumni Council
Johnson Chapel
11:15 AM
Ed Popielarczyk: Comedy and Magic
Join us for an entertaining and fun magic show with the amazing Ed Popielarczyk. Ed will keep kids enthralled and parents smiling during this comedy magic show with lots of audience participation.  All ages welcome. Presented by the Class of 2002.
Class of 2002 Tent, Main Quadrangle
12:00 PM
Tsar Fedorsky ’82 Photography Exhibit: The Light Under the Door

This work contemplates the fear of the unknown. It is about finding the courage to break through and follow the light. Tsar Fedorsky ’82 is a fine arts photographer whose work has been exhibited nationally and published worldwide. She holds an MFA in photography from Hartford Art School. Fedorsky was awarded a 2015 Artist Fellowship Grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and was a Critical Mass Finalist. Her work from the series The Light Under the Door was included in SHOTS Magazine’s Annual Portfolio issue, Winter 2016. She is currently working with Peperoni Books in Berlin to publish a small-edition photo book, and the expected publication date is summer 2017. She resides in Gloucester, Mass. Gallery will be open until 4 p.m. Presented by the Class of 1982.

Eli Marsh Gallery, Fayerweather Hall
12:00 PM
Men's Soccer Reunion Game
The Men's Soccer Alumni Group and Amherst Men's Soccer will sponsor a game between odd-and even-class soccer alumni. Bring your black shorts, cleats and shin guards; we'll supply shirts and socks. RSVP to Assistant Coach Matt Travis  (mtravis@amherst.edu) so we have a head count, and spread the word to your classmates and teammates. Plan to come to the men's locker room at 11:15 a.m. to pick up your uniform. 
Gooding Turf Field
12:00 PM
Reunion Luncheon
Join us for a complimentary luncheon on the Quad. Look for your classmates under the decade signs!
Valentine Quad
12:15 PM
Amherst College Veterans Meet-up
Alumni and student veterans, and their families, are invited to meet at the tables in the northeast corner of the Valentine tent (near Valentine Hall) for conversation and connection during the all community lunch.
Valentine Quad
1:00 PM
Alumni Baseball Game
Bring your glove, and we’ll supply the rest! Questions? Contact Brian Hamm, head coach, at bhamm@amherst.edu.
Memorial Field
1:00 PM
Carnival Fun and Games
All are welcome to the carnival for face painting, balloon twisting, lawn games, cotton candy, spin art and bubbles. Flayvors ice cream will be served at 3 p.m. The carnival will close at 5 p.m. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Main Quadrangle
1:30 PM
Putting the Arts Back in Liberal Arts
What is it like to devote your life to storytelling via visual media? Three members of the Class of 2002 discuss their work in film, playwriting and other dramatic and narrative art forms. Akwetey John Orraca-Tetteh ’02 creates visual and performance art within various media, and has exhibited his work at venues including the Museum of Modern Art and the Tate Modern. Jes Therkelsen ’02 is a documentary filmmaker whose works have played at film festivals around the world, and who teaches media production and storytelling at California State University, Fresno. Katherine Vondy ’02 is a writer and director for stage and screen who’s won awards for her plays and short films and has published stories and poems in a variety of literary magazines. Moderator Josh Bell ’02 is a film and TV critic for Las Vegas Weekly. Presented by the Class of 2002.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1:30 PM
Jeffrey Wright '87 Film Projects Preview
A preview of two film projects: the first, O.G., a drama shot entirely in Indiana’s Pendleton Maximum-Security Correctional Facility with a cast largely made up of incarcerated men; the second, We’re Not Done Yet, a documentary following current U.S. service members and veterans, who, through participation in U.S.O.-sponsored arts therapy workshops at Fort Belvoir and Walter Reed National Medical Center, attempt to address PTSD and to begin to heal themselves and each other through poetry. Jeffrey Wright ’87 produced and appears in both films. A post-screening discussion/Q&A with Jeffrey will focus on the process of creating each and on the overlaps between inmates and military personnel and their experiences with trauma. Presented by the Class of 1987.
Kirby Theater
1:30 PM
Anti-Money-Laundering, Counterterrorism Financing and Financial Crime: The Critical Role of Financial Institutions and How It Affects You
Talk by Hue Dang ’92, Head of Asia for the Association of Certified Anti-Money-Laundering Specialists. Media coverage in the last several years of financial penalties against global banks such as BNP Paribas ($8.9 billion) or HSBC ($1.92 billion) for money-laundering and sanctions violations—to name just a few examples—highlights the increasing risks to banks as they conduct their normal business. We now live in an era of international money-laundering controls. The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, revolutionized the anti-money-laundering (AML) field and brought into stark relief the threat of the movement and disguising of funds destined for the support of terrorism throughout the world, introducing a whole new effort to combat the financing of terrorism (CFT). As a result of the governmental reaction in virtually all countries, banks, non-bank financial institutions and nonfinancial businesses face tougher national and international legal requirements and harsher penalties than ever before. By the same token, the regulators of those businesses, law-enforcement agents and prosecutors also face greater challenges and responsibilities in their work. The discussion of what this means to you will include the economic and social consequences of money laundering; the latest regulatory developments in the U.S., Asia and Europe; challenges in effective AML/CFT implementation; and key lessons learned from recent cases. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
1:30 PM
The Trump Administration at 100 Days: Part I
Stephen Cohen ’67 and Michael Kramer ’67 will lead a double-session panel discussion. Five experts will assess actions taken by the Trump administration during its first 100 days. The panelists include Michael Kramer ’67, magazine editor and columnist (foreign policy); Stephen Cohen ’67, law professor (tax policy); Jack MacKenzie ’52, journalist and author (justice); Bill Buzbee ’82, law professor (environmental policy); and Richard LeFrak ’67, developer (infrastructure). A two-part session is planned to allow time for questions and discussion following the presentations by the experts. Presented by the Classes of 1952, 1967 and 1982.
Johnson Chapel
1:30 PM
We Should Get a Full House: Lessons from a World Class Poker Player
Ashley Adams ’79 is a highly talented poker player, and author of two books on the subject and hundreds of articles. He runs poker tournaments around the country, and will provide a tutorial and a tournament will follow at 2:45 p.m. From novices to sharks, all are welcome. Presented by the Class of 1977.
O'Connor Commons, beneath Charles Pratt Dormitory (separate entrance)
1:30 PM
The Making of America, From Deep Time to Our Time
Kirk Johnson ’82, Director of the National Museum of Natural History and host of the NOVA series Making North America, will talk about Deep Time, the formation of the North American continent and what they teach us about American life now. Presented by the Class of 1982.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
Amherst's Three Prize-Winning Poets
A detailed discussion of three Amherst grads who have won Pulitzers or National Book Awards in poetry: James Merrill '47, Richard Wilbur '42, P'73, G'14 and David Ferry '46. Panelists include Robert '57, P'82 and Mary Bagg P'82; David Sofield, Samuel Williston Professor of English; and Langdon Hammer, the Niel Gray, Jr. Professor of English at Yale University. Presented by the Class of 1957.
Stirn Auditorium
1:30 PM
Reflections on the 2017 Women's March and the Resistance: What Happens Next?
The Class of 2012 invites everyone who has enjoyed their First Amendment right to assemble, starting with the 2017 Women’s March, to join us for a moderated discussion to hopefully answer the question, “What happens next?” The Women’s March may have been the largest protest in United States history, but since then there have been actions at airports following the travel ban affecting people from Muslim-majority countries, “a Day Without Immigrants” in cities across the country, and a Women’s Strike. Come listen to participants, organizers and advocates who can add context to these organic but highly strategic events, and provide a guide to what kind of actions to take after a protest to ensure long-lasting policy changes. Presented by the Class of 2012.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
Improv at the Office: An Interactive Comedy Workshop for Achieving High-Performing Teams
Who wouldn't want to foster a more collaborative, idea-driven environment at work? The world of improv comedy can help! Join successful comedy artists John Timothy '07 (Upright Citizens Brigade) and Honora Talbott '07 (Master of None) for a high-energy, interactive comedy workshop to learn how to equip your team with improv instincts that reward new ideas with engagement and support. Presented by the Class of 2007.
The Powerhouse
2:00 PM
Amherst Crew Reunion Row
If you peered between the trees along the riverbank, and were startled to see a rowing shell gliding across the face of the water, the urge to jump into the boat would be difficult to extinguish. How satisfying would it be to lean on the rudder again, and holler at individuals who are not your children, or press your weight against the foot-stretcher to leverage the shell forward? The experience would fill the hollowness that has ensued since the last time you sat in a boat. Please join us for an afternoon on the river for our annual Reunion gathering at the boathouse. Coach Bill Stekl will also give an update on the progress and success of the young men and women of the Amherst College rowing team, who move boats faster than any of us.
Amherst College Boathouse (Sportsman’s Marina, Route 9 at Coolidge Bridge)
2:45 PM
Why I Became a Localist—and How to Deal with These Strange Times
Most of our big systems—education, healthcare, government, business—are failing our communities. What if we stopped trying to fix them? In her book, Walk Out Walk On: A Learning Journey Into Communities Daring to Live the Future Now, Deborah Frieze ’92 says it’s not possible to change big systems—we can only abandon them and start over or offer hospice to what’s dying. In this interactive session, we’ll explore the underlying beliefs in our culture that continue to prop up the global mindset and consider a radical theory of change that reveals how localism may be the hope of the future—and you have a critical role to play. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:45 PM
Diversity, Inclusiveness and the Amherst Experience: Where It Was, Is and Will (Should) Be
The Class of 1972 matriculated in the fall of 1968, nearly half a century ago, during the civil rights movement and within months of the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy. No prior class had included as many African-American students. Was the College prepared for their needs? Did it have any curricular offerings to address issues important to them? The African-American members of the class would play an important role in giving birth to the College’s Black Studies program. But if their numbers were enough to provide the impetus for Black Studies, the class included few students of other racial minorities. Two Asian students. One Hispanic student. No classes in Chinese language or Asian art history. Amherst did not anticipate Asia’s importance in the contemporary world. It obviously has tried to catch up. With the completion of the Obama presidency and its succession by the Trump presidency, it is a particularly appropriate time to discuss what diversity has meant for America and for Amherst. What has been its impact on the students who have become its alumni? What should diversity and inclusiveness mean now and in the future? Are the critical issues of diversity still racial, or are they now more about socioeconomic status? Ultimately, what meaning is to be given to Terras Irradient? Panelists include Anthony S. Chan ’72, Mark J. Kuperberg ’72 and Horace A. Porter ’72. Presented by the Class of 1972.
Stirn Auditorium
2:45 PM
Incarceration Nation
The U.S. has the highest per capita rate of incarceration in the world, as we know, widely varying by wealth and the legacy of race. What is the cost of irrationally exuberant imprisonment, not only to prisoners and their families, but to those of us who will not likely go to prison? Are prisons standing in for other institutions in American life? Does mass incarceration produce chasms within American society that cannot be bridged? Panelists include David Cohen ’82, Michele Deitch ’82, Taraneh Kayhani Ferdman ’82 and Malcolm Young ’68. Presented by the Class of 1982.
Kirby Theater
2:45 PM
The Trump Administration at 100 Days: Part II
Stephen Cohen ’67 and Michael Kramer ’67 will lead a double-session panel discussion. Five experts will assess actions taken by the Trump administration during its first 100 days. The panelists include Michael Kramer ’67, magazine editor and columnist (foreign policy); Stephen Cohen ’67, law professor (tax policy); Jack MacKenzie ’52, journalist and author (justice); Bill Buzbee ’82, law professor (environmental policy); and Richard LeFrak ’67, developer (infrastructure). A two-part session is planned to allow time for questions and discussion following the presentations by the experts. Presented by the Classes of 1952, 1967 and 1982.
Johnson Chapel
2:45 PM
Charismatic Mega-Flora: Recent Work by Artist Sarah Bird '87
Sarah Bird '87 is a multimedia artist who will show a selection of film works, photographs and sculpture, highlighting her most recent work: life-size portraits of California coastal redwood trees from her show the fullest measure of you, is you at Chandra Cerrito Contemporary in Oakland, Calif., during February and March 2017. This work springs from Sarah’s long-standing investigations into invisible phenomena, cartography, ecology and the ways in which our human systems interact with natural systems. These portraits acknowledge the trees’ magnificent equal footing, and their essential role in the web of nature. After Amherst, Sarah earned an MFA at California College of the Arts. In addition to gallery shows, Sarah directed a film exhibited at the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2016, co-wrote and produced the feature Hairbrained (2014) and co-wrote The Oh in Ohio (2006). She has received an American Academy of Rome Visiting Artist award and the National Endowment for the Arts’ Arts Corps Grant. She lives in Brooklyn, N.Y. Presented by the Class of 1987.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
2:45 PM
We Should Get a Full House: Poker Tournament
A tutorial and talk with Ashley Adams ’79 precedes this program. From novices to sharks, all are welcome. Presented by the Class of 1977.
O'Connor Commons, beneath Charles Pratt Dormitory (separate entrance)
2:45 PM
NYJFL* Legends Game
Come watch the backyard sports legends of the Class of ’92 rekindle their former gridiron greatness in a flag football faceoff and battle for (at least) five more years of bragging rights. *NYJFL stands for "New York Jewish Football League," even though the group originated on campus and there's at least one Catholic from Missouri on the team. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Pratt Field
2:45 PM
Students These Days: Teaching Undergraduates 40 Years Later
In case you have been living a completely solipsistic existence: there is some consternation Across the Land regarding the resilience and intellectual curiosity of those darn students these days. Let’s talk to people we trust, who teach at a range of institutions across the aforementioned land and get a first hand report. We’ll move on to a broader discussion of the future of higher education. Panelists include: Chris Appy ’77, Peter Bellis ’77, John Foran ’77 and Barry O’Connell, Emeritus Professor of English. Presented by the Class of 1977.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:45 PM
Naturalist-Led Hike in the Wildlife Sanctuary
The Amherst College Wildlife Sanctuary is an underexplored (or unexplored!) place for many of us. This 500-acre area includes open fields, wetlands, flood plain woods, river, upland woods, plantation pines and ponds. Join interpretive naturalist Tory Thompson ’02 as she leads a leisurely hike around the area. We’ll stop to listen and look for birds and other wildlife, learn about the plants and fungi we see along the way, and maybe even turn over some logs to see the amazing world of tiny critters working away in the soil. Take this chance to open your eyes to things around us all the time that few of us take the time to notice. Hike will begin promptly. Family-friendly event. Presented by the Class of 2002.
Meet outside the Powerhouse
2:45 PM
A Call to Action from Educators: Notes from the Field
The Class of 2012 has a dynamic and talented group of people who have entered the educational field. They teach at public, charter and private schools and offer a grounded perspective on the future of K–12 education, and they also work in education policy and conduct research in international education. If you're currently pursuing a career in education or you're interested in learning more about the field, join us to discuss philosophies of education and to talk about the future of education in the US and abroad. We'll also hear from the current Dean of Careers in Education, Robert Siudzinski, who will explain what Amherst is doing to engage current students. Presented by the Class of 2012.
2012 Class Tent, Hitchcock Soccer Field
2:45 PM
True Facts About “The Cyber”: Digital Privacy & Security Today
From election hacking to data breaches, government surveillance to Internet of Everything, our now-digital lives mean digital threats to privacy, free speech and security. Join Richard Borden ’87, cybersecurity lawyer, and Nicole Ozer ’97, Technology & Civil Liberties Director for the ACLU of California, to talk all about the cyber. Get the facts on emerging issues, the current state and federal legal and policy landscape, and what you should know about digital privacy and security for you, your family and your company or organization. Presented by the Classes of 1987 and 1997.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:45 PM
Trivia Challenge
Join Mike Silverman ’07 for a fun bar trivia challenge. Form a team with your family and friends and compete against other teams for trivia bragging rights. Do you have what it takes to be the Reunion-wide trivia champion? Presented by the Class of 2007.
The Powerhouse
2:45 PM
Family Swim
Have children with lots of energy? Come to Pratt Pool and have an afternoon swim! Each child must have a parent or guardian with them.
Pratt Pool, Alumni Gymnasium
3:30 PM
Physics and Astronomy Reception
Hosted by Professors Kannan Jagannathan and William Loinaz. All are welcome. Ends at 5 p.m.
First floor courtyard of Merrill Science
3:30 PM
Christine Gloster: The Happy Face Painter
Stop by for some fun face paint! Christine is passionate about art and working with children, and she only uses FDA-compliant, non-toxic and hypo-allergenic products. All ages welcome. Ends at 5:30 p.m. Presented by the Class of 2002.
Class of 2002 Tent, Main Quadrangle
4:00 PM
Challenges to Delivering Quality Public Education in the New Climate
The education landscape is changing. In a charged political climate that seems to devalue education and expertise, how can those working with students every day meet the diverse needs of America’s elementary- and secondary-school learners? Join Emily Hanford ’92, Senior Education Correspondent for American Public Media and recent recipient of the Excellence in Media Reporting on Education Research Award from the American Educational Research Association; Kyleen Carpenter ’92, Co-Founder and Head of School, Blackstone Academy Charter School; Liliana Vargas ’92, Senior Director of Programs, Internationals Network for Public Schools; and Caitlin Moriarty ’92, Teacher Leader at Churchill High School, for a discussion about current education policy, systemic challenges and what they have learned about what works. Presented by the Class of 1992.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
What Just Happened? Making Sense of Election 2016
The outcome of the Presidential election was a surprise to many on both sides of the aisle. To quote Earl Latham during his Watergate talks, "If you ask me what's going to happen in two weeks, I haven't a clue. But come to me two weeks from now and I'll tell you why it was inevitable." Let's hear why the outcome was inevitable. All points of view welcome. Panelists include: David Friend '77, Joel Paul ’77, Joseph Ellis, UMass Honors College lecturer and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian, and Martha Umphrey, the Bertrand H. Snell 1894 Professor in American Government in the Department of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought and Director of the Center for Humanistic Inquiry. Presented by the Class of 1977.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
Mead Behind-the-Scenes Tour
with David E. Little, Director and Chief Curator
Mead Art Museum
4:00 PM
Amherst in Film
Join award-winning filmmakers Katina (Hubbard) Mercadante ’07 and Joey Ally ’07 for a screening of their recent work and a Q&A about working in today’s film industry. Mercadante is a Directors Guild of America Award-nominated director whose commercials have won Cannes Gold Lions and a Grand Clio and have been featured at the ’12 and ’16 TED Conferences. Ally is a fellow of the American Film Institute Directing Workshop for Women and the Fox Director’s Lab whose films have screened internationally at over 50 festivals, including Sundance 2016 and Tribeca 2017. Presented by the Class of 2007.
Stirn Auditorium
4:00 PM
My Facts Can Beat Up Your Facts: Dispatches from the Truth Wars
Truth and allegation in public and private life. Fake versus real news. Who decides what is factual, and how? How do societies fairly resolve fundamental disagreements without gladiatorial rhetoric or dictatorship? Is it possible for America to exist as a single, diverse, free society, its citizens and aspiring citizens accepting a common body of assertions about human relations and the physical world? How do we heal dissension and accommodate difference in the name of something greater than the causes of dissension? Panelists include Bill Buzbee ’82, Saul Cornell ’82, Russell Haitch ’82, Madeline Janis ’82 and Peter Rogoff ’82. Presented by the Class of 1982.
Kirby Theater
4:00 PM
Opioid Addiction: Medical, Legal and Personal Perspectives on a Use Disorder
What is addiction? How do use disorders arise from and further reconfigure our neural chemistry and circuitry? When and how did the current “epidemic” begin? What factors have affected its evolution? How do we move on from here? A multidisciplinary and multi-class panel tackles these questions and more. Panelists include Dr. Jeffrey Craven ’72, Mark Miliotis ’72, attorney, Dr. Dave Werner ’74, Tom Harrison ’82 and Dr. Adriane dela Cruz ’02. Presented by the Classes of 1972, 1982 and 2002.
Johnson Chapel
4:00 PM
Freddie Bryant '87 and Friends Play Buckley Recital Hall
Freddie Bryant '87, professional musician and teacher will perform New Orleans-inspired jazz and other music, playing guitar both unaccompanied and with his musician friends. Presented by the Class of 1987.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
5:00 PM
Alumni in the Arts Cocktail Party and Networking Reception
All alumni with a passion for or profession in the arts are welcome to attend. Arts faculty will be in attendance.
Mead Art Museum
7:00 PM
Uprising: The 19th Apocalypse Party
Apocalypse is a party for people who don't like parties, hosted by Planworld. Come on by, play intellectual games, have conversations and enjoy a heart-stopping Black Sheep cake and other tasty refreshments. All who enjoy fine company are invited. We will continue until people stop talking. And this year we have some additional surprises up our sleeves....
Second Floor Lounge, Building D, Greenway Dorms
9:00 PM
The Zumbyes' Reunion Show
The Zumbyes welcome all Zum-alums, Amherst alums, friends, fans and anyone else to Buckley Recital Hall to celebrate the 67th year of the group with a free concert of new songs, classic songs and, of course, our beloved College songs.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
9:00 PM
Night at the Observatory
The Astronomy Association, in collaboration with Amherst College Science Outreach, invite you to come observe the night sky through telescopes and binoculars while they guide you and teach you some astronomy as well. Tom Whitney of the Astronomy Association will be present to operate Amherst College’s own 19-inch Clark refractor telescope. This event is open to all, but it will be canceled if the weather is uncooperative (cloudy).
Wilder Observatory, Snell Street
Sunday, May 28, 2017
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
We'll be open for you to drop off your keys or ask last-minute questions before you head home. Telephone: (413) 542–2065. Alumni House will close at noon.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Service of Remembrance and Community
Please join us for an ecumenical service to remember the lives of those alumni we have lost this year with the Rev. S. Mark Heim ’72, the Samuel Abbot Professor of Christian Theology at Andover Newton Theological School and visiting professor at Yale Divinity School.
War Memorial, Memorial Hill (Rain site: Chapin Chapel)
9:30 AM
Yoga at the Mead
Come to the Mead for a relaxing yoga session and the chance to see art from a different perspective. We’ll have a few mats available, so please bring your own if you have one! All experience levels welcome. Presented by the Class of 2002.
Mead Art Museum