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Alumni

2015 Reunion - Preliminary Schedule

This schedule is subject to change. Class programs are still being posted. Check back regularly for updates.

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Wednesday, May 27, 2015
2:00 PM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065.
Alumni House will close at 9 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
5:30 PM
Reunion Welcome Reception at the Robert Frost Library
Meet, mingle and renew old friendships at the Robert Frost Library with a glass of wine and hors d'oeuvres. Check out the new Humanities Center, a renovated main floor with a new cafe, study area and gathering spaces, and displays from Archives and Special Collections. Performance by the Bluestockings. Reception ends at 7 p.m.
Thursday, May 28, 2015
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542-2065.
Alumni House will close at 10 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
11:00 AM
Archaeology at the Emily Dickinson Museum
The Emily Dickinson Museum is hosting the summer field school operated by the University of Massachusetts Archaeological Services. Observe the field crew in action as they dig test pits and search for relics of the past.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
11:00 AM
Museum Tour: Art for Amherst: Collecting at the Mead from 1855 to 2015
With Pamela J. Russell, interim director and head of education
Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Alone with Tess
Alicia Christoff, assistant professor of English, specializes in Victorian literature and in literary & critical theory. Her current book project, Novel Feelings, focuses on the novels of George Eliot and Thomas Hardy. She will discuss the relationship between Thomas Hardy's novel Tess of the D'Urbervilles (1891) and the work of the twentieth-century psychoanalytic thinker D. W. Winnicott, and in particular his essay "The Capacity to Be Alone" (1958).
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
1:00 PM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
An opportunity to tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command’s (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history, led by Aaron Hayden, the college’s capital projects manager and the unofficial authority on the history of the Bunker. The Bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the college in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the Bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
1:00 PM
Planetarium Program: We Are Part of This Universe
For over 55 years the Bassett Planetarium has served the college well. This tool has helped countless individuals better understand their place in the universe. Join Fred Venne, planetarium director, as he uses the vintage Spitz A3P Starball to help re-create the night sky over Amherst. In addition, using a classic Orrery, participants will examine the plane of the solar system, the tilt of the Earth, day/night and seasons. The one takeaway from the planetarium visit may be best said by Neil deGrasse Tyson, “We are part of this universe; we are in this universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts, is that the universe is in us.”
Bassett Planetarium, Morgan Hall
2:30 PM
Garden Tour of the Emily Dickinson Museum
Meet Jane Wald, executive director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, to hear about new Museum projects, including the introduction of an orchard to the Dickinson property. Enjoy the Museum’s garden tour audio wands free of charge.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
2:30 PM
Amherst Campus Update
Join Jim Brassord, chief of campus operations, for a discussion of ongoing and upcoming campus building projects including new dormitories, the science center and the exciting campus greenway project.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
2:30 PM
Exhibition Tour: The Dynamic Spirit of the Russian Avant-Garde
A joint project of the Amherst Center for Russian Culture and the Mead Art Museum. Tour led by Bettina Jungen, acting chief curator and Thomas P. Whitney ’37 Curator of Russian Art.
Amherst Center for Russian Culture Gallery, Webster Hall, Second Floor
4:00 PM
Native American Literature at Amherst College
In August 2013, Amherst College acquired one of the most comprehensive collections of books by Native American authors ever assembled by a private collector. Pablo Eisenberg devoted years of his life to collecting nearly 1,500 books written by Native American authors ranging in date from 1772 (Samson Occom) to living writers still publishing today (Louise Erdrich). Learn about the Younghee Kim-Wait ’82, Pablo Eisenberg Native American Literature Collection with Lisa Brooks, associate professor of English and American Studies at Amherst College, and co-chair of the Five Colleges Native American Indian Studies program; Kiara Vigil, assistant professor of American Studies; and Michael Kelly, director of Archives and Special Collections.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
Friday, May 29, 2015
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065.
Alumni House will close at midnight.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Launching the Amherst College Press
Join Mark Edington, director of the Amherst College Press, to explore the goals and opportunities in this ambitious new project.  How will the Press impact the college and the world of scholarship?  What can we look forward to in the next five years?
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
9:00 AM
Living in the Milky Way
Learn about the super-massive black hole and extrasolar planets in our galactic neighborhood with Nicolas Cowan and Daryl Haggard, assistant professors of astronomy.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
9:00 AM
Service Project at Book and Plow Farm
Start your Reunion weekend off right by lending your Friday morning to Amherst's own Book & Plow Farm. The end of May is a big transplanting time on the farm. They could use help transplanting tomatoes, peppers, watermelons, cantaloupes and eggplants. Volunteers will meet at Florida Field, less than a mile from campus, at 9 a.m. and be done before lunch. Limited transportation available, meet at the Alumni House at 8:40 a.m. Directions to field also available at Alumni House. Presented by the Class of 2000.
Florida Field, 173 Mill Lane, Amherst
9:00 AM
The Beatles Weren't Really So Great! (...Or Were They?)
As a cultural phenomenon, the Beatles influenced everything from lifestyles to hairstyles to politics, to an extent that has no parallel before or since. But what about the music itself? Does it stand the test of time? Was it as good as we remember, or are our memories clouded by a haze of, ahem, nostalgia? Take our magical mystery tour of recorded and live musical examples as David Glass ’68 explores the connections between the compositional techniques intuitively used by Lennon, McCartney and Harrison and those of the great composers we call “classical.”
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
10:30 AM
Iguanas, French Fries, Miss Universe, and the Road Not Taken: Travels to Guantanamo
Dem Sherman ’65, counsel at Locke Lord Edwards, describes the legal representation of two Afghan detainees at Guantanamo. They may or may not have been Taliban soldiers. The men were captured and transported to the base in Cuba in the aftermath of 9/11. The challenges faced by lawyers trying to advocate for detainees will be explained, including the vagaries of the legal process regarding habeas corpus. You’ll also hear about other bizarre incidents that occurred at this outpost on the “war on terror.” Presented by the Class of 1965.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
10:30 AM
Campus Grown: Tour Book & Plow Farm with Farmer Pete
The unique relationship between Book & Plow Farm and Amherst College is flourishing. Come see what the farm is doing for its third year in operation and how more hyper-local, fresh produce is being supplied to Valentine, all while building community, and providing an educational resource for students and faculty. This tour will be held rain or shine. Meet at the greenhouse at Tuttle Hill, located at 425 South East St., or walk past the tennis courts along the road next to the rail track and up the hill. Map available at Alumni House.
425 South East St., Amherst
10:30 AM
Garden Tour of the Emily Dickinson Museum
Meet Jane Wald, executive director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, to hear about new Museum projects, including the introduction of an orchard to the Dickinson property. Enjoy the Museum’s garden tour audio wands free of charge.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
10:30 AM
Museum Tour: American Art at Amherst: Highlights of the Mead Art Museum
With Vanja V. Malloy, curator of American art
Mead Art Museum
10:30 AM
Surfing the Digital Media Tsunami: A Dialogue with Jonathan Friendly '60 and Phil Pochoda '60
The internet has forced “traditional” media – radio and television, newspapers, magazines, books, music and the movies to reconsider how they operate. The Web has followed the pattern of earlier new mediums, cannibalizing existing content and reducing the income flow to the older forms. As newspapers shutter, fears are voiced that culturally valuable products will perish while the speedy new information leads to hasty and inadequate reporting and further dumb-sizing of content (think Facebook videos of cats). We believe that the Web will lead to an ultimately better informed society, more knowledgeable (if not necessarily wiser) and hence more fit for advancing democracy and, despite the present flames, civility. The massive growth of interactive media – Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, etc. – offers the opportunity for unprecedented individual and group participation in culture and politics. Jonathan Friendly '60, Phil Pochoda '60 and the audience will talk about ongoing disruptions and the opportunities they create. Presented by the Class of 1960.
Stirn Auditorium
10:30 AM
Beneski Museum “Bones and Stones Tour”
Join Fred Venne, museum educator, for a walk through the Beneski Museum of Natural History, which houses outstanding collections and exhibits that include vertebrate and invertebrate paleontology, minerals and other geologic specimens collected locally and from around the world since 1825. Particularly noteworthy is the world-famous dinosaur track collection. Bring your cameras.
Beneski Museum of Natural History
10:30 AM
Those Who Teach and Those Who Learn: A Conversation with the Dean of the Faculty
Join Catherine Epstein, dean of the faculty and professor of history, for a wide-ranging conversation about Amherst's academic landscape. Dean Epstein will discuss the ways in which the college is shaping the next generation of faculty and the upcoming comprehensive review of the curriculum. The dean will also address pedagogical innovation and other academic initiatives at Amherst.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
11:00 AM
Archaeology at the Emily Dickinson Museum
The Emily Dickinson Museum is hosting the summer field school operated by the University of Massachusetts Archaeological Services. Observe the field crew in action as they dig test pits and search for relics of the past. 
12:00 PM
Stearns Steeple Tour and Chimes Concert
Aaron Hayden will give a short talk on the history of the steeple, its place on campus in the formative years of the college and the Howe Chimes that are in its belfry. The church was donated by the son of President William Augustus Stearns to be an important centerpiece on campus and in campus life. The chimes were donated in honor of the members of the Amherst College community who died in the “Great War” Between the States. Aaron will play tunes on the chimes that might have been played on them when they were new—as well as some tunes that he just likes. Aaron is the college’s capital projects manager, and he also leads tours of the Amherst Bunker.
Neuhoff Sculpture Court, in front of the Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
A Conversation with the Chairman of the Board of Trustees
Cullen Murphy '74, chair of the Amherst College Board of Trustees, offers thoughts on the College and takes questions along with John Williams '75, life trustee. Moderated by Bob McCartney '75. Presented by the Class of 1975.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
1:00 PM
Reunion 1967 - The War Classes
This classic 1967 ABC-TV News Scope documentary on the 1967 Amherst Reunion (29 minutes), considered by producer-writer Dick Hubert ’60 to be lost in the fog of TV News history, was discovered by Jack Hailey ’67 in the archives of the Library of Congress. It will be shown here for the first time since it was telecast in June 1967 with background commentary on why it was produced, how Amherst became the target campus, how the Amherst administration reacted to the entire concept at the time, and how ABC News Correspondent John Scali (host for the program) argued with ABC executives about its content. Dick Hubert will be donating a copy of the program, with the permission of ABC News, to the Amherst Archives and Special Collections. Presented by the Class of 1960.
Stirn Auditorium
1:00 PM
Transforming Your Travel Experience: Visiting Places with New Eyes
Ben Hitchings '90, planning director for the Town of Morrisville, N.C., LeAnn Shelton '80, architect and lawyer for the Rockwell Group (New York, NY), and Burt Woolf '70, principal of the Center for Quality of Life (Amherst, MA), see things a little differently than your typical tourists. When they travel, they view things with the eyes of a city planner, an architect, and cultural tourism professional. Through pictures and stories, they'll share their unique perspectives and show you how to enrich and enliven your future itineraries. Presented by the Classes of 1970, 1980 and 1990.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1:00 PM
Remembrance of Things Past: Marcel Proust and the Night of September 22, 1961
The Class of 1965 gathered for our first intellectual experience on September 22, 1961. Professor George Kateb discussed the book assigned that summer, E. M. Forster's Passage to India. He urged us to think about how language captures experience; about character and our relation to others; about race; the Cold War; Western and non-Western worlds; about what an Amherst education would, could, and should do for us. He concluded with advice to "travel light" the next four years. If Forster's Passage to India was an ideal choice for unbounded youth, Marcel Proust's Remembrance of Things Past is an ideal guide for limited age. Using Proust's masterpiece, Howard Bloch ’65, Sterling Professor of French, Yale, will reflect on the road traveled since our first time together, the goals of liberal education then and now, and what great works of literature might teach us about travelling light in years to come. Presented by the Class of 1965.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
Continuing the Dialogue on Race and Racism
Early in 2015, the college closed for a full day to allow campus-wide participation in a Day of Dialogue on Race and Racism. Fresh on the heels of Ferguson and Staten Island, and with #BlackLivesMatter named as the American Dialect Society’s word of the year, more than 1,300 students, faculty and staff engaged. This panel will keep this critical dialogue alive and bring alumni into the conversation on race in America. Join Junius Williams ’65, author of Unfinished Agenda: Urban Politics in the Era of Black Power, who first joined the civil rights movement as a senior in college; Blair Taylor ’85, chief community officer at Starbucks and past president of the Los Angeles Urban League; and Phil Jackson ’85, vicar of Trinity Wall Street Episcopal Church, for an in-depth examination of what it means to be black in America today and what we as a nation need to do to come to grips with racism. Moderated by Rhonda Cobham-Sander, professor of English and Black Studies. Junius Williams will sign copies of his book after the program. Presented by the Classes of 1965 and 1985.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:30 PM
Why I’ve Meditated Three Hours a Day for 43 Years
Since taking up Transcendental Meditation in his freshman year, Willy Koppel ’75 has been active at the highest levels of the national TM movement. He lives in a rural Iowan town where 3,000 of 10,000 residents are meditators. TM has drawn increased national attention recently, partly thanks to endorsements by Clint Eastwood, Oprah, Jerry Seinfeld and Cameron Diaz, among others. Willy will discuss his personal experience, current research and why interest in meditation continues to grow. Presented by the Class of 1975.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
An opportunity to tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command’s (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history, led by Aaron Hayden, the college’s capital projects manager and the unofficial authority on the history of the Bunker. The Bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the college in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the Bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
2:30 PM
Please Allow Me to Introduce Myself
Each attendee will introduce himself and take a few minutes to tell us what he is doing now - and a reflection or two about how he is different (or not) from the student we knew then. Presented by the Class of 1970.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:30 PM
What We Learned About Americans by Living Abroad
Living abroad creates an opportunity to better understand the U.S. from a cultural, political, economic and societal perspective. Morgan McKenney '95, global head of Citi's cross border payments,  Heather Heaton Wiederholt, principal, ZS Associates and Paul Ingram, head of hedge fund investments at APG, have lived and worked in Great Britain, the Netherlands, Japan, Switzerland and Germany and will offer their perspectives on education, foreign policy, family-related issues, work-life balance and other topics of interest to the audience. The conversation will go beyond common stereotypes (we really are comparatively loud…) to provide a deeper examination of what we can learn about Americans and America by using an outside-in view. Presented by the Class of 1995.
Stirn Auditorium
2:30 PM
Museum Tour: Giving Light to the World: Global Education at the Mead Art Museum
With Keely Sarr, assistant museum educator
Mead Art Museum
2:30 PM
Family Swim
Have children with lots of energy? Come to Pratt Pool and have an afternoon swim! Each child must have a parent or guardian with them at the pool.
Pratt Pool, Alumni Gym
4:00 PM
Impacting Lives and Communities: Why Corporate Social Responsibility Matters
Can what builds a company’s bottom line help build a better world? For-profit corporations across the globe increasingly integrate social responsibility into their business models and promotional strategies—from engaging in environmentally sustainable practices to ethical supply chain sourcing to empowering individuals and communities through job creation, corporate philanthropy, volunteerism and more. Tucker Moodey ’85, president of eCommerce Platform at Expedia, and Blair Taylor ’85, chief community officer and EVP at Starbucks, will discuss how companies can do well by doing good and how CSR initiatives benefit companies and their employees, the communities in which they operate, and the customers they serve. Gerri Walsh ’85, president of the FINRA Investor Education Foundation, will moderate. Presented by the Class of 1985.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
I Won't Back Down
This session will update (and perhaps activate) us all about class initiatives: Tito Craige '70 on opposition to the various statements by Professor Arkes; Sam Caldwell '70 on climate change activities; and Alan Webber '70 on political involvement. Presented by the Class of 1970.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
The Partisan Divide: Congress in Crisis
According to President Bill Clinton, "Martin Frost and Tom Davis are uniquely qualified to examine how constant conflict in Washington keeps too many good things from happening. The Partisan Divide: Congress in Crisis is a smart book that asks the right questions and offers some intriguing solutions." During their 40 years in Congress, Tom Davis ’71 and Martin Frost were the field generals for their respective parties, each serving two terms as chair of the Democratic and Republican House campaign committees. Now they have joined forces — along with columnist Richard Cohen — to write The Partisan Divide. They are joined by Pulitzer Prize finalist David Eisenhower ’70, who wrote the book’s preface that sets the stage for this powerful behind-the-scenes narrative.
Johnson Chapel
4:00 PM
Misconceptions About Mental Illness and Their Consequences: A Fifty Year Perspective
Over the last 60 years a troika consisting of psychiatry and the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries has gained power, prestige and economic wealth by marketing a medical model that claims severe mental “illness” is a disease like diabetes or cancer. The model and the drug treatment that follows from it are generally accepted despite the fact that diagnosis of mental illness is based on social judgments of abnormality rather than distinguishing physical abnormalities, as none have yet been discovered. The harmful effects of this belief from health and humanitarian perspectives are described by Dr. Michael Robbins ’55, and a psychosocial model is suggested that better fits the known facts. Presented by the Class of 1955.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
Spirituality Matters
Richard Keady '60, once a novitiate in the Order of St. Benedict, then professor of religion at San Jose State University; David Purdy '60, ordained United Methodist minister and civil rights activist; and Carlton Russell '60, college music professor and “delayed vocation Episcopal priest” on “faith and belief” will briefly outline their spiritual lives and journeys. They represent quite a wide spectrum of beliefs and experience that will invite much audience participation, maybe even enlightenment. Presented by the Class of 1960.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
4:00 PM
Cancer 360: Perspectives on Living with and Living Through the Cancer Journey
We have all been affected by the emperor of all maladies. Dr. Andrew Balder '75 (moderator), Robert Carver '75, Carol MacKinnon '75, Skip Broadhead '75, Thomas Thaler, Dr. Michael Soojian and Dr. Peter Silberstein '75 come together to share their journeys with the illness that struck fear in our hearts as children. We will share lessons derived from being patients, family members and treating oncologists. The session will also examine "hope" as perceived by the patient and loved ones and augmented by advances in the understanding and treatment of cancer. Presented by the Class of 1975.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
Reading, Writing, Talking (aka Procrastinating Writer Hasn’t Decided What She’s Going to Talk About)
Catherine Newman '90, author of the books Waiting for Birdy and the forthcoming Field Guide to Catastrophic Happiness (2016), reads from her work, answers questions, and talks about the (over) examined life of a writer. Catherine writes the etiquette column at Real Simple, edits the nonprofit kids' cooking magazine ChopChop, and writes regularly for O, FamilyFun, the New York Times Motherlode blog, and other publications. She also writes a food and parenting blog, Ben & Birdy, at www.benandbirdy.blogspot.com. Presented by the Class of 1990.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
5:00 PM
Reception with President Biddy Martin
Join President Biddy Martin and others from the college for conversation and celebration. All are welcome. The reception will go until 6:30 p.m.
The Powerhouse
8:00 PM
Larry Miller: Prime-Time Comedy in Johnson Chapel
Actor and comedian Larry Miller ‘75 brings his stand-up routine to Johnson Chapel, and Calvin Coolidge won’t believe his ears. “House” Miller has appeared in a host of movies (including Pretty Woman and 10 Things I Hate About You), and TV shows (Seinfeld, Law and Order). He is an author, voice artist and podcaster. Presented by the Class of 1975.
Johnson Chapel
8:00 PM
In It for the Long Run
This concert with Jim Rooney '60 covers his more than 60 year journey through the musical world. Joining Jim will be Nashville Songwriter’s Hall of Fame member, Pat Alger and multi-instrumentalist, Chris Brashear. Jim’s recent autobiography In It for the Long Run: A Musical Odyssey will be featured, with Jim, in the program “Still Writing 55 Years After Amherst.” Presented by the Class of 1960.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Saturday, May 30, 2015
7:00 AM
Birds and Breakfast
Come explore Amherst College's beautiful farm land at Book & Plow Farm. In the process, join Pete McLean for a guided walk along the farm fields in search of all things birdy (7 - 8:15 a.m.). Bobolink's, Eastern Meadowlark's, Rose Breasted Grosbeaks and Indigo Buntings have all been spotted on the farm as well as many more. But the bird walk is a mere formality, really. The real treat is in the farm fresh breakfast that is served at the top of Tuttle Hill overlooking the Pelham Hills at the conclusion of the walk (8:15 - 9:30 a.m.). The breakfast is sure to be the highlight of the morning and the view unbeatable. Bring binoculars and a bird book if you have them. If not, we can share. Interested participants need to meet at the east end of the tennis courts closest to the railroad tracks. We'll meet there, explore the bird sanctuary, cross the rail trail, scope out Book & Plow Farm's land for birds, and end up at the top of Tuttle Hill. Be sure to bring your appetites! This program will end at 9:30 a.m. and requires pre-registration and a separate $30 registration fee. Signups are first-come, first-served here. We will walk rain or shine.
East end of the tennis courts closest to the railroad tracks
7:30 AM
Saturday Morning at Mt. Warner (Hadley)
What? A mountain in Hadley that's not part of "The Range"? OK-it may just be a 500 foot bump near the Connecticut River, but it is officially Mt. Warner. Come take a break with a Saturday morning stroll over the Trustees of Reservations' newest public property, guided by an experienced naturalist. The trail length is two miles and we should be back on campus before 9:30 a.m. for the day's offerings. Discover another natural offering of the Pioneer Valley in the spring. Contact Andy Balder '75 for carpool information. Presented by the Class of 1975.
Carpoolers meet at Mayo Smith
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542–2065.
Alumni House will close at 9:30 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
8:30 AM
Corporate Restructuring: Operational, Financial and Legal Perspectives
Although the stock market is scaling new heights, the experiences of the Great Recession are still fresh for many of us. Whether it is General Motors and Chrysler, the City of Detroit, or even Greece, bankruptcy and restructuring are recurring topics in today’s news cycle. Our panelists bring three different perspectives to corporate distress and restructuring. Christopher Mirick ’95 is a partner in the insolvency and restructuring practice of the law firm Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP, and the co-author of Strategies for Creditors in Bankruptcy Proceedings. Christopher Santana ’95 is a co-founder and co-portfolio manager of Monarch Alternative Capital, a private investment firm that primarily focuses on the debt of distressed and bankrupt companies. Barak Tulin ’95 is a restructuring advisor with Winter Harbor LLC, which provides turnaround management and restructuring services to companies in operational and financial distress. Drawing from their diverse experiences, they will share war stories and provide suggestions for dealing with corporate distress. Presented by the Class of 1995.
Stirn Auditorium
8:30 AM
5K Fun Run
Race or just run at your leisure through and around Amherst’s campus.  Orange slices and bananas to follow. Presented by the Class of 2000.
Meet at the Steps to Frost Library
8:30 AM
Reflections
Scott Turow '70, fresh off the Amherst College Board of Trustees, will answer our questions on life, literature and, of course, Amherst. Presented by the Class of 1970.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
9:45 AM
Reunion Tour of the Emily Dickinson Museum
See the birthplace and home of Emily Dickinson. Learn more about this fascinating poet and current special projects, including the restoration of Dickinson’s bedroom, in a special before-hours tour.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
9:45 AM
Is Public Education Dead?
What would it really take to give students a first-rate education? Some critics insist that our schools are irremediably broken and that charter schools offer the only solution. David Kirp '65, professor of Public Policy at UC-Berkeley, begs to differ. Drawing on his prize-winning book, Improbable Scholars: The Rebirth of a Great American School System and a Strategy for America's Schools, and recent articles in the New York Times, David will describe the striking achievement of Union City, N.J., bringing poor, mostly immigrant kids into the educational mainstream, as well as of other school systems that have beaten the demographic odds. He'll counter the nay-sayers, arguing that we need to reinvent, not decimate, the public schools we have. Presented by the Class of 1965.
Stirn Auditorium
9:45 AM
Talking About My Generation
We will discuss the results of the latest reunion survey of the Class of 1970 and compare and contrast with findings from a parallel survey of the Class of 2005. We will present all the conclusions quickly and then – with the Class of ’05 – openly discuss what it all means. Presented by the Classes of 1970 and 2005.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
9:45 AM
Museum Tour: Sacred and Secular: Women in Art at the Mead
With Bettina Jungen, acting chief curator and Thomas P. Whitney ’37 Curator of Russian Art
Mead Art Museum
9:45 AM
The State of Congress
Charles Johnson ’60, former long term parliamentarian to the U.S. House of Representatives, author with Sir. William McKay, clerk of the House of Commons, of Parliament and Congress will be joined by Tom Davis '71, former member of the House of Representatives. They will enlighten us with pungent perspectives on the current state of our representatives on Capitol Hill. Presented by the Class of 1960.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
9:45 AM
Bird Sanctuary Run
Come join us for a leisurely 30-minute run through the bird sanctuary and wooded trails behind campus. The run will be led by alumni from the Cross Country and Track and Field teams from the Class of 2010. This is an open event, and runners of all skill levels are welcome! Meet us down at the tennis courts and we will take off from there. Presented by the Class of 2010.
Tennis Courts
9:45 AM
Jadoo: Reviving the Dying Art of Indian Magic
Dr. Shreeyash Palshikar ’95 presents a fun family-friendly Indian magic show, then discusses why traditional magic is vanishing in contemporary India and his ongoing efforts to preserve and revive this dying ancient art. His show blends the best of East and West and refreshes ancient Indian illusions by presenting them in his signature improvisational style. Presented by the Class of 1995.
Kirby Theater
9:45 AM
Coach Hixon and the Amherst Basketball Phenomenon
With 38 seasons under his belt and more to come, Amherst’s legendary men’s basketball coach, David Hixon ’75, holds court with returning alums from his teams. In a conversation with Jim Kennedy ’75 of the Associated Press, the coach and his players will reflect on the remarkable success and impact of the program and the role of athletics in an Amherst education. Shaped by Coach Hixon, the class of ’75 alum who never left campus after graduation, the Amherst men’s basketball program has produced two national championship teams and is the leader in wins and championships among all institutions that compete in the New England Small College Athletic Conference. Presented by the Class of 1975.
LeFrak Gymnasium
9:45 AM
Protecting Vulnerable Adolescents: Cyber-bullying, Sports-related Concussions and Other Tough Stuff
How do we protect teenagers from such common problems as cyber-bullying, which is a new and potentially devastating phenomenon, and sports-related concussions, which we are learning about now but have been around since time immemorial? Two leading commentators on the problem of protecting teenagers from these and other difficulties will describe the current situation (in terms which may surprise you) and will lay out action plans for parents, school administrators and for teenagers themselves. Frederick Lane ’85  is a leading national expert on cyber-bullying and social media in teens. Kate Silbaugh ‘85 is a law professor (Boston University) who works on innovative ways to think about preventing bullying, sports-related concussions and other tough stuff. Catherine Kerr ’85, assistant professor of medicine and family medicine Brown University School of Medicine, will moderate this panel. Presented by the Class of 1985.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
9:45 AM
Dancing with Death, Meeting Izzy and Other Ways Cancer Saved My Life
In September 2013, Deborah Cohan '90 was diagnosed with breast cancer. She named her cancer Izzy and invited it to teach her about herself and life. Deborah danced the night of her diagnosis and that initiated a profound journey with dance as a core healing modality. Minutes before her double mastectomies, Deborah invited her friends and family to join her in a virtual flash mob at the same time as she danced in the operating room. The anesthesiologist captured the dance on video which got posted to YouTube while Deborah was undergoing surgery. The video went viral over the next few days and set in motion an unexpected journey that continues to unfold. Deborah will speak about fear, death, interconnectedness, archetypes, projection, perspective, mystery and the ancient wisdom embedded in our bodies. And then we will dance. Presented by the Class of 1990.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
11:00 AM
Archaeology at the Emily Dickinson Museum
The Emily Dickinson Museum is hosting the summer field school operated by the University of Massachusetts Archaeological Services. Observe the field crew in action as they dig test pits and search for relics of the past. 
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
11:00 AM
A Conversation with President Biddy Martin
President Martin's remarks will be preceded by the annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni.
Johnson Chapel
12:15 PM
Reunion Luncheon
Join us for a complimentary luncheon on the Quad. Look for your classmates under the decade signs!
Valentine Quad
1:00 PM
Alumni Baseball Game
Bring your glove and we’ll supply the rest! Questions? Contact Head Coach Brian Hamm at bhamm@amherst.edu.
Memorial Field
1:30 PM
Winding Back Up Instead of Down
Just when you think retirement is around the bend, other greener pastures beckon. What prompts someone with a long career to shift course and pursue a big new challenge at a stage when you might otherwise think of slowing down or at least coasting toward the finish line of a working life? Several members of the Class of ’75 will discuss their remarkable stories and the new opportunities they have recently seized – and why, when roads diverged, they chose the one less traveled. The panel features Brad Berk ’75, who is creating an institute to study serious brain injuries; David Kirkpatrick ’75, who has launched the Techonomy media and conference company, Ned Mulligan ’75, now an Episcopal priest and school chaplain in Georgia; and John Williams ’75, who assumes the presidency of Muhlenberg College in July. Presented by the Class of 1975.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
Family Circus Event
Join in a circus event for kids and families with performers from SHOW Circus Studio in Easthampton, Mass. See juggling and contortion and try out some tricks yourself! All kids must have parents or guardians with them at the program.
LeFrak Gymnasium
1:30 PM
How is Digital Technology Transforming Public Media?
What is the impact of the technology revolution on the viewing and listening patterns of public broadcasting audiences? How is San Francisco station KQED, one of the nation’s largest public broadcasting entities, using its core competencies to respond to these changing technologies?  Is a local station’s financial model a strength or weakness in crafting this response? Mark Perry ’65, chair of the Board of KQED, will reflect on the exponential expansion of digital technology on public broadcasting, especially on the use of mobile devices as the preferred access mode for many significant demographic segments of the San Francisco area public media audience. He will describe some of the key technology innovations that are disrupting, challenging and changing public media today. Presented by the Class of 1965.
Stirn Auditorium
1:30 PM
Singing College Sing-Along
Relive those days of singing "Lord Jeffery Amherst" after each touchdown. Whether you know all the college songs or none, whether you were in the choral society or not, join Eric Bone '95 and sing whatever college or choral society songs we can dredge up from our memories. Bring sheet music or just the words to a song if you've got it. Come to listen if you don't want to sing: an appreciative audience is always welcome! Presented by the Class of 1995.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
1:30 PM
Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace
David Foster Wallace ’85 is generally considered to be the greatest writer of his generation. Join Daniel T. Max—the leading authority on Wallace, a staff writer at The New Yorker and graduate of Harvard—for an in-depth discussion of Wallace and his time at Amherst. Max's best-selling biography of Wallace, Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace, includes a particularly illuminating chapter on Wallace’s college years. Max’s talk will not only shed new light on Dave during his time at Amherst, but also bring classmates and alumni back to that era. Max will be introduced by Harlan Coben ’84, New York Times bestselling author. Presented by the Class of 1985.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
Developing Community in the 21st Century
Where do you go to have those “Oh, I’m not the only one who feels this way? Really?!” moments? What makes a community trustworthy, honest, vulnerable and valuable in the 21st century, and how does each participant help set the rules? This panel will likely focus largely on online spaces, but may delve into ‘onsite’ groups, too. Presented by the Class of 2000.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1:30 PM
Forever Young
This session will be interactive with class members who are trying new activities since our last reunion describing what they are doing and why. It could be a volunteer job, a new travel destination or a hobby or book. The idea is for anyone to be able to share something which could be attractive to others. Presented by the Class of 1970.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
1:30 PM
From the Playing Fields to the Front Office: An Intergenerational Conversation About Sports and Business
Front office executives will share their insights and stories about the business behind the sports you see on TV and discuss the evolution of sports management through the years and to come. Alumni panelists include: Pam Lester '80, president of Lester Sports and Entertainment, Inc., a consulting company specializing in sports marketing and management; John D'Angelo '10 of Major League Baseball and others. Moderated by Jack Pannell '80 and Wyatt Moss '10. Presented by the Classes of 1980 and 2010.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
1:30 PM
"Hands Up, Don't Shoot" A Discussion on Race and Policing in America
What role, if any, does race play in the recent spate of shootings of citizens of color by white police officers across the country? Do citizens of color have any responsibility for keeping themselves safe when interacting with the police? Are white police officers mentally and emotionally equipped to patrol minority neighborhoods? Is the policing model in minority communities broken? Chaka Patterson '90, partner at the Jones Day law firm in Chicago, has seen these issues as a prosecutor, as a criminal defense lawyer, and as a lawyer for the City of Chicago, defending police misconduct cases. Arthur Ago '90, chief of the trial division of the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C., addresses these issues every day as trial counsel for people charged with crimes, many of whom are people of color, in a law enforcement regime that is predominated by white police and prosecutors. Presented by the Class of 1990.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
Encore Endeavors
Charles Hosfrod '60 and Jos Zgrodnik '60 will talk of current farming efforts in Vermont and our nearby Connecticut Valley. Dr. Stuart Rose '60, Thomas Paulson '60 and David Mace '60 have intriguing and satisfying pro bono projects and experiences, local and international, to share.  Scott MacConnell '60 re-imagines history through his experiential design of the below decks for The Hector, the ship that brought the first wave of Scottish immigrants to Nova Scotia in 1773. The audience is encouraged to participate. Presented by the Class of 1960.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
2:45 PM
My Spiritual Journey from Amherst to Amma
Brahmachari Shantamrita Chaitanya '90 (the former Brandon Smith) will talk about his journey from the classroom study of Asian Languages and Civilizations at Amherst to becoming a Hindu monk and dedicating his life to advancing the spiritual teachings and charitable works of Sri Mata Amritanandamayi Devi, who is known throughout the world as "Amma" and "the Hugging Saint." Br. Shantamrita became a Brahmachari (monk) in Amma's Indian monastery over 20 years ago and ever since has been engaged in Amma's social, educational and spiritual activities around the world. He was based in Tokyo for 10 years, as director of M.A. (Mata Amritanandamayi) Center Japan, primarily active in East Asia, the Pacific Rim and Africa. Now the director of the recently founded M.A. Center Chicago, he conducts regular spiritual and social service programs there and travels around the Midwest to inspire spiritual seekers with his heartfelt talks. Presented by the Class of 1990.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:45 PM
Negotiating with Emotion
We all negotiate in ways big and small—at work, in our communities, and even with family members. Some people relish negotiation, but for many others, the process stirs discomfort, doubt, and anxiety. Such feelings are self-defeating. Michael Wheeler ’65, professor, Harvard Business School, will explain why negotiation is so emotionally fraught. He and colleague Kim Leary ’82 conducted in-depth interviews with veteran managers and lawyers. Notwithstanding their subjects’ impressive experience, most spoke of the risk of dealing with others who can’t be trusted, uncertainty about what might unfold, and concern about their own competence. You’ll see dream-like collages that these subjects created to express their feelings; you'll also hear them explain their strange pictures in short audio clips. The program will end on a practical note, highlighting recent research showing how to manage and draw upon your emotions successfully, not just in negotiation but in your social lives more broadly. Presented by the Class of 1965.
Stirn Auditorium
2:45 PM
Writing on the Side
Many liberal arts graduates have a novel in them. But how do you simultaneously pursue your day job with your passion for creative writing? Whether you enjoy (or would like to enjoy) writing as a creative outlet, an additional source of revenue, or a possible exit strategy from your current field, this program will be of interest.  Helen Wan '95, who wrote her first novel, The Partner Track, over the course of 12 years while pursuing a legal career, and John Rudolph '95, who has a long career in publishing, will discuss practical strategies for completing a manuscript and publishing it amid the stressful demands of work/family obligations. Helen will sign copies of The Partner Track after the program. Presented by the Class of 1995.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:45 PM
Architecture Tour at the Emily Dickinson Museum
Although the Homestead (1813) and The Evergreens (1856) are best known for their association with poet Emily Dickinson and her intriguing family, the two houses also offer a fascinating portrait of more than 100 years of architectural history in New England. Join Museum guides to sharpen your skills at "reading" buildings and find out how (and why) these two historic houses have changed - or not - over time. NOTE: The tour is of the buildings' exteriors only and will be cancelled in case of rain.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
2:45 PM
Literature in a Digital Age
The Internet and digital technologies have been described as both a boon to literature and its death knell. What can we say in 2015 about how people write, read and listen to literary stories, poetry, experiences and opinions in the digital age? Can technology enhance our experience and appreciation of literature? How may the very definition of "literature" change in an increasingly digital age? What is the future for non-technologized methods of literary transmittal, also known as "books"? Join David Kirkpatrick '75, founder and CEO of Techonomy, and Jennifer Acker '00, founder and editor in chief of The Common. Presented by the Classes of 1975 and 2000.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:45 PM
I've Seen Fire and I've Seen Rain
Douglass Clark ’70 will lead this session, similar in format to those he has hosted in the past. The themes in ‘15 will be the influence of luck (be it the random factor or the ovarian lottery) and engagement of our skills; maintaining and nurturing our closest relationships and forgiveness of self and others. Presented by the Class of 1970.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
2:45 PM
Family Swim
Have children with lots of energy? Come to Pratt Pool and have an afternoon swim! Each child must have a parent or guardian with them at the pool.
Pratt Pool, Alumni Gym
2:45 PM
Tomorrow's Healthcare
What will health care look like tomorrow? Some leading physicians from the Class of 1985 will share their insights: Dr. Anne Armstrong-Coben  (community health services); Dr. Anthony Lembo  (academic medicine); Dr. Paula Muto  (community practice); Dr. Richard Ruh  (accountable care organizations); and Dr. James Tsai  (current change environment). Presented by the Class of 1985.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
2:45 PM
Still Writing 55 Years After Amherst
More than 20 classmates who have published since our 50th Reunion. Charles Collins '60, James Rooney '60, William Rosenberg '60 and Robert Steele '60 will initiate discussion among themselves and the audience about recent writing experiences.  How have decades of experience shaped what they produced and how they create their writings? Did English 1-2 have a positive or negative impact—or any at all? Presented by the Class of 1960.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
4:00 PM
The Ebola Story
Ebola is an example of extreme natural terrorism. John Gallin '65, director of the Clinical Center at the National Institutes of Health, will review how the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) responded to the Ebola epidemic. John will highlight the experience at the NIH Clinical Center caring for patients and conducting the first vaccine studies in humans. John Howe '65, president and CEO of Project HOPE, will describe the project's on-site experience in dealing with the disaster first hand in Sierra Leone. The local, national and international social and political tensions related to patient care, disease prevention, and rapidly evolving treatments and vaccines were extraordinary. The discussion will include the challenges educating the public, politicians, policy makers and care providers about the best way forward in dealing with the fear raised by this emerging infectious disease and frightening epidemic. Presented by the Class of 1965.
Stirn Auditorium
4:00 PM
Healthcare in 2015: Issues We Face in Our Fifties
Dr. Mark Alexander '80, Dr. David Schriger '80 and Dr. Jonathan March '80, from different fields in healthcare, to discuss and debate issues we need to address in our mid-fifties. Topics will include the role of the primary care physician in health maintenance, heart disease and exercise, and the judicious use of expensive technology in healthcare. We hope that audience members will also contribute their own concerns and opinions. Presented by the Class of 1980.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
A Conversation with Senator Chris Coons ‘85
Five years ago, Chris Coons ‘85 accepted what one Democratic strategist called a “suicide mission” to serve as the Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate, from Delaware. Today, after winning a special election in 2010 and a general election in 2014, he is serving his first full term in the Senate. Senator Coons will talk about the national spotlight on his 2010 campaign (against a Tea Party activist who started her first television ad with the statement, “I am not a witch”); serving his Delaware constituents; his work on Africa issues, a passion that began when he spent part of his junior year in Kenya; and the political environment heading to 2016.  Senator Coons earned his law degree from Yale Law School and a master's in ethics from Yale Divinity School. Maura Reynolds ’85, White House and foreign policy editor for Politico, will moderate. Presented by the Class of 1985.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
Faculty Diversity at Independent Schools
Many among us are connected to an independent school—we attended one, worked at one or send our children to one. But while many of those schools have made significant efforts to create a more racially diverse student body, the faculty at most remains predominantly White/European-American. Is there a need for a racially diverse faculty? How can schools that desire a more diverse faculty improve their recruitment and retention practices?  What are the experiences of teachers and administrators of color? Examining these questions are Angela Brown '00, director of admissions, Pike School; Jackson Collins '00, dean of students, Shipley School; and Jessica Keimowitz '95, upper school director, Dana Hall School. Presented by the Classes of 1995 and 2000.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
Wiffle Ball on Tap
Come on down to the athletic fields for a little fun in the sun and a casual game of Wiffle Ball! Refereed by Jennifer Rybak '10. Open to all alumni and guests, beer and soft drinks will be provided by the Class of 2010.
Memorial Field
4:00 PM
Wine Tasting and Discussion with Cushing Donelan
Experience a slice of Sonoma wine country with Cushing Donelan ’05, chief marketing officer of Donelan Family Wines. We’ll spend an hour tasting three wines from the Donelan portfolio; 2013 Nancie Chardonnay, 2012 Two Brothers Pinot Noir and the 2012 Cuvée Christine Syrah. Donelan Wines has been producing award winning (3 Robert Parker 100pt scores) Syrah, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir out of their Santa Rosa, CA winery since 2009. They strive to obtain the most authentic expression of their vineyard sites in every small production wine they produce. Come re-connect with classmates over a couple glasses of wine. Presented by the Class of 2005.
Lecture Hall 4, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
New Solutions for Climate Change
Later this year, diplomats will meet in Paris to hammer out a new international agreement on climate change.  Addressing climate change requires business and government to adapt to a lower-carbon economy. How will we scale solar and wind power and make electric vehicles mainstream? What policy frameworks make the most economic sense-a carbon tax, cap and trade or some other mechanism? What role can universities play? What should we do as individuals? Fortune editor Brian Dumaine '75 leads a panel of experts that includes Gilbert Metcalf '75, professor of economics at Tufts University and former Treasury official focusing on climate issues; James Manwell '70, director of the Wind Energy Center at the University of Massachusetts; Tom Reicher '70, senior counsel of Cooley LLP; and Christopher Lehane '90, NextGen Climate Action's senior political strategist and Amherst College trustee. Presented by the Classes of 1970, 1975 and 1990.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
5:00 PM
Reunion Vigil Mass
Come, participate in the Roman Catholic Mass. We will use prayers and readings for Sunday. Liturgical guides are provided. We welcome everyone. Bring the family!
Chapin Chapel, Chapin Hall
5:30 PM
GALA Reception
All alumni and guests are welcome. Refreshments will be served. Sponsored by the Gay and Lesbian Alumni Association and Alumni and Parent Programs.
Queer Resource Center, basement of Morrow Residence Hall, enter from Valentine Quad
9:00 PM
The Zumbyes' Reunion Show
The Zumbyes welcome all Zum-alums, Amherst alums, friends, fans and anyone else to Buckley Recital Hall to celebrate the 65th year of the group with a free concert of new songs, classic songs and, of course, our beloved college songs.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Sunday, May 31, 2015
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
We’ll be open for you to drop off your keys or ask last-minute questions before you head home. Telephone: (413) 542–2065.
Alumni House will close at noon.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Service of Remembrance and Community
Please join us for an ecumenical service to remember the lives of those alumni we have lost this year. Officiants: Rev. Peter Meek '65 and Rabbi James Morgan '90.
War Memorial, Memorial Hill (Rain site: Chapin Chapel)