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Alumni

2014 Reunion Schedule

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014
2:00 PM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.Telephone: (413) 542–2065
Alumni House will close at 9 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
5:30 PM
Reunion Welcome Reception at the Amherst Center for Russian Culture
Meet, mingle and renew old friendships amidst Amherst’s extraordinary collection of Russian books, periodicals, manuscripts and art at this wine reception featuring gourmet hors d’oeuvres. Hosted by Stanley Rabinowitz, curator of the collection, Henry Steele Commager Professor and professor of Russian, and featuring a performance by the BluestockingsLearn more about the Center's collection>>
Amherst Center for Russian Culture, Webster Hall
Thursday, May 29, 2014
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments. Telephone: (413) 542-2065
Alumni House will close at 10 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
11:00 AM
Museum Tour: Teaching Old Art New Tricks: How the Mead Engages 21st-Century Students
With Pamela Russell, head of education and Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Academic Programs
Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
An opportunity to tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command’s (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history, led by Aaron Hayden, the college’s capital projects manager and the unofficial authority on the history of the Bunker. The Bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the college in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the Bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
1:30 PM
Guns, Militias and the Second Amendment
Join Kevin M. Sweeney, professor of American studies and history, for a lecture and discussion.  This talk is also being live streamed as part of the Virtual Lecture Series. View a recording of the talk.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:00 PM
Garden Tour of the Emily Dickinson Museum
Join Jane Wald, executive director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, for a walk around the property to hear about new exterior projects, including the conservatory reconstruction and the introduction of an orchard on the Dickinson property. Participants will also be able to use the Museum's garden tour audio wands free of charge.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
3:00 PM
Exhibition Tour: New Arrivals: Modern and Contemporary Additions to the Collection
With Bettina Jungen, senior curator and Thomas P. Whitney, Class of 1937, Curator of Russian Art
Mead Art Museum
3:00 PM
Mass Extinction, Catastrophe and Deep Time
Humans have emerged as powerful geological agents with the potential to alter climate and biodiversity. Are there precedents for the kinds of changes the modern human experiment will bring? The rock record provides abundant evidence for climate catastrophes and mass extinction events prior to human history. Investigating the causes, consequences, rates and magnitudes of these episodes in deep time illuminates our current Earth-historical moment and helps define what is presently at stake. Join David Jones, assistant professor of geology, for a lecture and discussion.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
4:00 PM
Who Are You and What Do You Think?
In the spring of 2013, Amherst College invited all 21,000 alumni to participate in a comprehensive survey about their Amherst experience and their lives since. Forty-two percent did so. The responses, analyzed over six generations, are informing the college’s strategic planning process and the Advancement Office’s efforts to engage alumni with Amherst. What did we find out? What surprised us? Join Jesse Barba and Kate Doria of the Office of Institutional Research for a closer look at… you.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
8:00 PM
Buckley Chamber Players Concert
The Buckley Chamber Players include Joel Pitchon, violin, and Marie-Volcy Pelletier, cello, from Smith College and Alissa Leiser, piano, from Amherst College. Sindbad, composed and narrated by Harold Meltzer ’88 with a story by Donald Barthelme, marries text and musical narrative in novel ways. Two stories are intertwined: that of absurdist voyages of the intrepid sailor, and that of a night school teacher forced to teach in the daytime. Other works on the program include a Liszt transcription of Orpheus and the famous “Ghost” trio by Beethoven, Opus 70, No. 1.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Friday, May 30, 2014
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.Telephone: (413) 542–2065
Alumni House will close at midnight.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Human Rights in the Age of Limits: Lessons from the 1970s
Vanessa Walker, assistant professor of history, highlights the legacy of U.S. interventionism in informing early human rights policy, particularly in Latin America. Through a discussion of U.S. relations with Chile, she explores the competing logics of dissociation and engagement as strategies of U.S. human rights diplomacy. In doing so, Walker argues that the 1970s held a uniquely non-interventionist and self-reflective conception of human rights policy lost in the more recent emphasis on state-building and democratization.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:00 AM
Garden Tour of the Emily Dickinson Museum
Join Jane Wald, executive director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, for a walk around the property to hear about new exterior projects, including the conservatory reconstruction and the introduction of an orchard on the Dickinson property. Participants will also be able to use the Museum's garden tour audio wands free of charge.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
10:00 AM
The World We Inherited; the World We Will Bequeath — and What We Can Still Do About It
Joseph Stiglitz ’64, professor at Columbia Business School, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (in the Department of Economics) and the School of International and Public Affairs, is a renowned scholar. He created a new branch of economics, the “Economics of Information.” Among many awards and honors, Stiglitz was awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Economics for his analyses of markets with asymmetric information, and he was a lead author of the 1995 Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. In 2011, Time named Stiglitz one of the 100 most influential people in the world. He is now serving as president of the International Economic Association. Stiglitz will reflect on societal advances and issues as a kickoff to the programs presented by the 50th Reunion Class of 1964.
Stirn Auditorium
10:00 AM
Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Collaborative Pedagogy for the Digital Age
When Amherst made headlines last year for not joining an elite group of institutions using massive open online courses (MOOCs) to teach, some observers concluded that the faculty had rejected online teaching altogether. In fact, the digital classroom is alive and well at Amherst College. Rhonda Cobham-Sander, professor of Black studies and English, a self-described dud when it comes to technology, and Missy Roser ’94, head of library research and instruction, recently collaborated with professors and librarians at two other institutions on a course that propelled their students into the digital age as they traveled back in time. The class explored the literature produced after West Indian workers migrated to build the Panama Canal and Asian indentured laborers replaced them on Caribbean sugar cane plantations. Working remotely with students and scholars based at other institutions, students learned how to utilize, critique and annotate digitized archives, while analyzing poems, novels and life histories. Their digital collaboration is reframing the stories scholars tell about the literature of interlocking diasporas.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
11:00 AM
The Amherst Campus: Present and Future
Join Cullen Murphy ’74, chair of the Amherst College Board of Trustees, and Jim Brassord, director of facilities and associate treasurer for campus services, for a discussion of the Amherst campus, campus planning, future buildings and current design plans. Presented by the Class of 1974.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
11:00 AM
Beneski Museum of Natural History Tour: Tales from Our Collections
Fred Venne, museum educator, will take guests on a journey that looks at some of the amazing stories behind our wonderful collection of dinosaur bones, tracks and traces, and magnificent mammals. Learn how faculty, students and alumni have made the Beneski Museum possible. The tour will last about 45 minutes. Bring your cameras! This tour will also be offered at 3 p.m. today.
Beneski Museum of Natural History
11:00 AM
Museum Tour: Extraordinary Art for a Great College: Highlights of the Mead Art Museum
With Elizabeth Barker, director of the Mead Art Museum
Mead Art Museum
11:00 AM
Hitler’s Defeat: How Harry Hopkins Forged the War-Winning Coalition of FDR, Churchill and Stalin
In May 1940, when the Germans overran Europe, FDR insisted that Harry Hopkins, a sickly Iowa-born social worker with no foreign policy experience, move into the White House a few doors down from the president’s own bedroom. As envoy for the physically disabled president, Hopkins formed a lifelong friendship with Winston and Clementine Churchill and earned a measure of respect from Joseph Stalin. In his book, The Hopkins Touch: Harry Hopkins and the Forging of the Alliance to Defeat Hitler, published by Oxford, Dave Roll ’62 resurrects the life of this spectral character, arguably the most powerful presidential aide in the history of the American republic. He will be joined by Ronald Rosbottom, the Winifred L. Arms Professor in the Arts and Humanities and professor of French and European Studies, author of the forthcoming When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation, 1940–44. Dave is a partner at law firm Steptoe & Johnson and founder of the Lex Mundi Pro Bono Foundation, a public interest organization that provides pro bono legal services to social entrepreneurs around the world.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
11:00 AM
Professionalizing Education Careers – Starting with Amherst
How can Amherst and other selective liberal arts colleges support and encourage their students to apply their curiosity, critical thinking, energy and personal leadership to careers in teaching? Can we identify why such historically small numbers of Amherst alumni enter and continue in public education? What can be done, beyond but in conjunction with the curriculum, to help professionalize PK–12 teaching and other education-related careers? This session will feature the live and recorded voices of current Amherst students and alumni, sharing stories of educational success and challenge. It will seek to involve the audience in raising and refining the questions we will need to answer in pursuit of the change we are seeking. The panel includes Robert Frank ’64, former teacher, Weston, Mass., and the Center for Collaborative Education; Chuck Lewis ’64, chair of the Lewis-Sebring Family Foundation and Amherst trustee; Gil Schmerler ’64, director, Leadership for Educational Change, Bank Street College of Education; Robert Siudzinski, director, Amherst Careers in Education Professions program; and Dave Stringer ’64, retired teacher, Ann Arbor (Mich.) Public Schools. Presented by the Class of 1964.
Stirn Auditorium
12:00 PM
Stearns Steeple Tour and Chimes Concert
Aaron Hayden will give a short talk on the history of the steeple, its place on campus in the formative years of the college and the Howe Chimes that are in its belfry. The church was donated by the son of President William Augustus Stearns to be an important centerpiece on campus and in campus life. The chimes were donated in honor of the members of the Amherst College community who died in the “Great War” Between the States. Aaron will play tunes on the chimes that might have been played on them when they were new—as well as some tunes that he just likes. Aaron is the college’s capital projects manager, and he also leads tours of the Amherst Bunker.
Neuhoff Sculpture Court, in front of the Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Are Liberal Arts Graduates Ready for Launch?
We invite you to explore ways for Amherst to address the college-to-career challenge that’s being hotly debated across liberal arts campuses today. Co-hosted by Ursula Olender, director of the Amherst College Career Center, and Denny Meadows ’84, this session is relevant to each of us, whether as alumni with a passion for preserving the liberal arts, as employers making new-hire decisions or as parents with a vested interest in ensuring that our children are employable upon graduation. We will explore topics including:

  • The hiring gap in today’s economy: What’s missing from liberal arts?
  • Where Amherst grads go: For which destinations are they most or least prepared?
  • Disruption, innovation and intermediation: To what extent should the college expand its core competencies vs. exploring external collaboration?

Join us for a discussion worthy of your very best liberal arts critical thinking skills! Presented by the Class of 1984.

Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
1:00 PM
Medicine 2014: The Playing Field Has Changed
Bob Abrams ’54 on “Pediatrics, 2014: The Best of Times, The Worst of Times,” Don Lindberg ’54 on “The National Library of Medicine: Providing Patient Information,” Bob Schapiro ’54 on “Gastroenterology: From Sherlock to Surgeon” and Hank Tulgan ’54 on “Cardiology: Beyond Bed Rest” discuss how technology has changed medical practice and patient relationships. Presented by the Class of 1954.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1:00 PM
Exhibition Tour: An Unblemished Mirror of Truth: Kyohei Inukai, Robert Brackman, and Portraits of American Tragedy
With Bradley Bailey, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Postdoctoral Curatorial Teaching Fellow in Japanese Prints
Mead Art Museum
1:00 PM
Open House at the Multicultural Resource Center and the Women's and Gender Center
Two important student resources, the MRC and the WGC, have moved to the first floor of Keefe - and into the center of many students' lives -- this past year after a coalition of student advocates won support for increased visibility and resource allocation. Drop by to learn about the programming, advising and support services they offer, meet staff and learn about their mission. Refreshments will be served.
Keefe Campus Center
1:00 PM
The Summer Evening Sky
This 45-minute program uses the stars as seen in the evening skies over Amherst. Fred Venne, planetarium director, helps participants find stars and constellations that aid us in navigating our world and beyond. The program looks at the plane of the solar system, the Earth’s tilt and the creation of the moon with the stars as the backdrop. Visitors will be given a current star map.
Bassett Planetarium, Morgan Hall
1:00 PM
Latino/a Alumni Reception
Drop by to reconnect with other Latinos and Latinas and see photos from this spring’s Latino/a Alumni Weekend (LAW). A recording of a discussion on “Being Latino/a at Amherst," from LAW, will be available for those interested. Refreshments will be served.
McCaffery Room, Keefe Campus Center
2:00 PM
Variations on a Theme: The Many Drafts of Writers' Lives
From the sensational to the sublime, there are many incarnations of the writer’s life. Please join us for a discussion with Debby Applegate ’89, Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer; Margaret Stohl ’89, bestselling co-author of the Beautiful Creatures novels; and Juli Berwald '89, a science writer based in Austin, TX who is writing Spineless, a book about jellyfish, the most overlooked but iconic creature of our time. The panel will be moderated by Stacey Sklar ’89, who currently teaches English in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is a former member of the California Young Reader Medal Committee (2009–2011) and has been a member of California’s Curriculum Study Commission since 2000. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:00 PM
College Strategic Planning Process Update
Join Provost Peter Uvin, assisted by selected committee chairs, for an update on and discussion of the college strategic planning process.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:00 PM
The Evolution of Computing and Computer Science at Amherst since the Dark Ages (1974)
Doug Weber ’74; John B. Bennison ’74; Scott Kaplan ’95, professor of computer science; and John Manly ’85, director of systems and networking, look at computing and computer science at Amherst since the days of punch cards. Presented by the Class of 1974.
Room 206, Seeley G. Mudd Building
2:00 PM
The Beatles Weren't Really So Great! (...Or Were They?)
From Beatlemania to Sgt. Pepper and beyond, the Beatles bracketed and defined our years at Amherst. As a cultural phenomenon, they influenced everything from lifestyles to hairstyles to politics, to an extent that has no parallel before or since. But what about the music itself? Does it stand the test of time? Was it as good as we remember, or are our memories clouded by a haze of, ahem, nostalgia? Take our magical mystery tour of recorded and live musical examples as David Glass ’68 explores the connections between the compositional techniques intuitively used by Lennon, McCartney and Harrison and those of the great composers we call “classical.” A splendid time is guaranteed for all! Presented by the Class of 1969.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:00 PM
Family Swim
Have children with lots of energy? Come to Pratt Pool and have an afternoon swim! Each child must have a parent or guardian with them at the pool.
Pratt Pool, Alumni Gym
2:00 PM
Campus Grown: Tour Book & Plow Farm with Farmer Tobin
This unique relationship with Book & Plow Farm and Amherst College is flourishing. Come see what the farm is doing for its second year in operation and how more hyper-local, fresh produce is being supplied to Valentine, all while building community, and providing an educational resource for students and faculty. This tour will be held rain or shine. Meet at the greenhouse at Tuttle Hill, located at 425 South East St, or walk past the tennis courts along the road next to the rail track and up the hill.
425 South East St, Amherst
2:00 PM
Balancing Public and Private Power in American Democracy – What Can We Do About It?
Charged by the Class of 1964 with suggesting ways to improve the Washington political environment, the “democracy team” will propose a context for viewing the issues and will discuss reforms that could have a positive effect. They will also present an action plan that might lead our political system out of its seeming gridlock and make it better able to address the nation’s problems. The presentation represents the culmination of conversations and research conducted since January by a Class of 1964 “problem-solving team.” Panelists are Robert R. Benedetti ’64, Center for California Studies, California State University, Sacramento; Neil C. Bicknell ’64, president, The Bicknell Group, LLC; Mitchell R. Meisner, ’64, Partner, Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn, Detroit, Michigan; Mark J. Sandler ’64; Joseph E. Stiglitz ’64, professor, Columbia University; and Charles C. (Smokey) Stover ’64, co-founder and treasurer, Innovative Development Expertise & Advisory Services (IDEAS). Presented by the Class of 1964.
Stirn Auditorium
3:00 PM
Tour of the Amherst Bunker, Holyoke Range
An opportunity to tour the former U.S. Strategic Air Command’s (Northeast Command) nuclear communications bunker and learn of its history, led by Aaron Hayden, the college’s capital projects manager and the unofficial authority on the history of the Bunker. The Bunker has served as the Amherst College Book Depository since its purchase by the college in 1992. Each tour is limited to 30 people. Sign up at the Alumni House Reception Center.
Note: You will need to provide your own transportation to and from the Bunker.
Amherst Bunker, 100 Military Drive, off Route 116 in the Holyoke Range
3:00 PM
Has Technology Changed Art?
Five Class of 1984 alumni in the arts, who every day confront the clash, compatibility, exhilaration or insignificance of technology in their work, will consider the role technological advancement has played in their professional lives. Panelists are Ezra Barnes, actor and director (Breakfast with Mugabe); Harlan Coben, author of mystery novels and thrillers (Tell No One, Six Years); Susannah Grant, screenwriter and director (Ever After, Erin Brokovich); Allan Rosenfeld, clarinetist (Charlotte Symphony Orchestra); and Perrin Stein, curator (Department of Drawings and Prints, The Metropolitan Museum of Art). Brooke Kamin Rapaport, senior curator (Madison Square Park Conservancy), will moderate. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
3:00 PM
Amherst Teams Do Win Today
How does the college field successful teams in a demanding academic and social environment? Some Old Jocks look at Amherst athletics today. Tom Blackburn ’54, Tony Mahar ’54, Ralph Powell ’54, Cliff Storms ’54 and Dick Sturtevant ’54 discuss today’s consistently successful program with Don Faulstick, interim director of athletics. Presented by the Class of 1954.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
3:00 PM
Encore Endeavors
An exploration of how five members of the 50th Reunion class have invested their time and talents as they continue to pursue their passions. What they are doing now and why? The panel includes Steve Downs ’64, executive director, National Coalition to Protect Civil Freedoms; Bank Greene ’64, pastoral counselor; Donald Lombardi ’64, CEO, Institute for Pediatric Innovation; Barry Palmer ’64, visiting instructor, University of Toledo; and Chuck Lewis ’64, chairman, Lewis-Sebring Family Foundation (moderator). Presented by the Class of 1964.
Stirn Auditorium
3:00 PM
Beneski Museum of Natural History Tour: Tales from our Collections
Fred Venne, museum educator, will take guests on a journey that looks at some of the amazing stories behind our wonderful collection of dinosaur bones, tracks and traces, and magnificent mammals. Learn how faculty, students and alumni have made the Beneski Museum possible. The tour will last about 45 minutes. Bring your cameras! This tour will also be offered at 11 a.m. today.
Beneski Museum of Natural History
3:00 PM
Exhibition Tour: New Arrivals: Modern and Contemporary Additions to the Collection
With Elizabeth Barker, director of the Mead Art Museum
Mead Art Museum
3:00 PM
Revolutionary Summer: How American Independence Really Happened
Joseph J. Ellis, Ford Foundation Professor Emeritus at Mount Holyoke College, New York Times best-selling author and Pulitzer Prize winner, will address the following questions:

1. Why is Independence Day celebrated on July 4?
2. Why is the first sentence of the Gettysburg Address historically incorrect?
3. How did Washington almost lose the war in August of ’76?

Presented by the Class of 1949.

Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
3:00 PM
Digital, Mobile, Social Marketing: The Revolution Is Here
The digital revolution has led to a proliferation of data and information—from interactions on social media to the tracking of browsing and mobile app usage—that has broken the marketing mold. The challenge for marketers is to produce and use information that results in a symbiotic relationship between brands and their customers, who crave and expect personalized experiences that aren’t creepy or invasive. In this session, Jason Spero ’94 (Google), David Muhlenfeld ’94 (Martin Agency) and Matt Collins ’94 (Microsoft) will tackle such issues as the value that is exchanged between consumers and the digital services they consume, how advertisers use data to target these consumers and personalize their experience more efficiently, and what the future holds for consumers and advertisers alike. Presented by the Class of 1994.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
4:00 PM
Going Digital at 60: Gordon Wiltsie's Latest Adventure
National Geographic adventure photographer Gordon Wiltsie ’74 describes the profound challenges he has faced adapting to digital imagery, the Internet and social media. His pictures and stories have been a perennial Reunion favorite. Presented by the Class of 1974.
Stirn Auditorium
4:00 PM
Class of 1964 Memorial Service
Johnson Chapel
4:00 PM
Civil Rights in Pornography, Disability and Heath Care
This program will explore the last 50 years of struggle for the rights of the individual. Tom Kelley ’69 will discuss the protection of satire, noting, among other cases, the Hustler Magazine v. Falwell Supreme Court case. Dan Goldstein ’69 will address disability rights with respect to access to technology—”the hidden civil rights battle.” Dr. Tuffy Simpkins ’69 will address patient rights in health care reform and the special role of the physician-patient relationship. The panel will be moderated by Michael Kraemer ’69. Presented by the Class of 1969. View a recording of the talk.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
Will Reading Go the Way of Handwriting?
Is old-school reading a dying pastime? Are words really the best way to convey meaning? In today’s multimedia world, it is easier to generate and distribute sound bites and video clips than ever before. Channels such as YouTube, Facebook and others make it easier to search and consume this content. Meanwhile, print publication subscriptions are declining. Reading will never entirely disappear, but digital innovation has clearly diminished the reliance upon long-form reading. The panel will discuss and debate where and how reading/writing and multimedia clash and coexist to provide meaning in today’s world, and where the future of communication and content consumption will lead us. The panel will be moderated by Lee Maicon ’94, senior vice president of strategy, 360i, with Rob Bernstein ’94, vice president and editorial director of digital and print, World Wrestling Entertainment, and Ed Castillo ’94, chief strategy officer, TBWA\Chiat\Day NY. Presented by the Class of 1994.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
5:00 PM
Reception with President Biddy Martin
Join President Biddy Martin and others from the college for conversation and celebration. All are welcome. The reception will go until 6:30 p.m.
Valentine Quad
5:30 PM
Reception in Honor of the Architectural Studies Major
Join us to celebrate the second year of the architectural studies major with drinks and hors d’oeuvres.
Covered Patio, The Lord Jeffery Inn
5:30 PM
Amherst Christian Fellowship Reception
Come and connect with friends and staff. Light refreshments will be served.
Cadigan Center for Religious Life (38 Woodside Avenue)
9:15 PM
Screening: Fred Won't Move Out
With levity and sadness, two grown children and their aging parents struggle with the decision of whether or not the older generation should stay in the house where they have lived for 50 years. Shot in the house where the director’s parents lived for close to 50 years shortly after they moved out, the film’s semiautobiographical story is memorably acted by a small ensemble cast led by Elliott Gould. Shot in sequence in three weeks with a heady mix of improvisational work by both author Richard Ledes ’79 and his cast, the film’s personal approach to its subject captures a universal story uniquely told. Presented by the Class of 1979.
Stirn Auditorium
Saturday, May 31, 2014
7:45 AM
Yoga
Begin your summer day at Amherst with a relaxing, rejuvenating yoga class with noted yoga teacher and critically acclaimed author Sara DiVello. Sara is the author of Where in the OM Am I? One Woman's Journey from the Corporate World to the Yoga Mat (June 2013) which has been selected by Shape Magazine as a best book for summer and by Working Mother as a must-read for anyone considering a career change. OM was created with a lot of Amherst help. Allan Petersen, '99, worked as Sara's critique partner, Rebeca Gonzalez, '99, was an adviser and editorial consultant, the front cover art was photographed by Jamie Schulke Schulinn, '99 and Allen Nunnally, '99, served as an editor, legal consultant and ever-supportive husband. Please join us to gently awaken, stretch, and strengthen with this special Reunion weekend yoga practice. Class will be accessible to all levels and abilities.
Conway Classroom, Alumni Gymnasium
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
Stop by for registration, schedules of class activities, messages, information on the Amherst area and light refreshments.Telephone: (413) 542–2065
Alumni House will close at 9:30 p.m.
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
8:00 AM
Reunion Bike Ride
Please join us for a 30+ mile scenic bike ride around the Shutesbury-Leverett loop northeast of Amherst. Participants must bring their own bikes and helmets. Depending on the skill levels of participants, we may divide into two groups (faster and slower). If you are interested, please contact Larry Cranch ’69 (larry.cranch@alliancebernstein.com), who will lead the ride, for information about the route (available on MapMyRide). Presented by the Class of 1969.
Meet at the front steps of Alumni Gym
8:30 AM
Donuts and a Dig at the Dickinson Homestead
The Emily Dickinson Museum is conducting an archaeological survey in advance of the restoration of the Homestead conservatory, an important architectural feature of the poet's home. Observe the field crew from University of Massachusetts Archaeological Services in action as they dig test pits and searches for relics from the past. The crew will be on site all day, but donuts will be provided for those who join us between 8:30 and 9:30 a.m.!
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
9:00 AM
Reunion Tour of the Dickinson Homestead
Tour the birthplace and home of Emily Dickinson. Learn more about this fascinating poet and current special projects, including the restoration of Dickinson's bedroom, in a special before-hours tour.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
9:00 AM
Wildlife Sanctuary Campus Run
Please join us for a little exercise and some fresh air on a group run through the Wildlife Sanctuary led by Helen Dole '04. Presented by the Class of 2004.
Meet at the front steps of Alumni Gym
9:00 AM
Teaching Computers to See and What May Happen If We Do
A part of artificial intelligence, computer vision is a research field focused on automatically extracting useful content from images and video. Steady progress has led to the adoption of computer vision in consumer applications such as human face detection embedded in digital cameras, face recognition in photo management software such as Picasa and license plate reading in tollbooths. With recent breakthroughs in vision research plus exponential growth in cameras on cell phones, video surveillance systems and consumer devices, the field is poised to make a broader impact on society as a whole. Anthony Hoogs ’89 will briefly illustrate how common vision software tools actually work. More speculatively, he will discuss near-term and long-term applications of computer vision and their potential impact on society. Hoogs leads a computer vision research and development group at Kitware, Inc., a small software R&D firm near Albany, N.Y. For more than two decades, he has supervised and performed research in various areas of automated image and video analysis, mostly for the defense and intelligence communities. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
9:00 AM
Lessons Learned from Amherst Athletics
John Pistel ’69, Rob Simpson ’69 and Pete Snedecor ’69 will talk about how their experiences in Amherst athletics (being coached, rigorous training, competition, winning, losing and teamwork) taught them invaluable lessons that transformed their personal and work lives. The role of resilience, overcoming failure and loss, developing others and strategic thinking will be addressed with examples from careers in academia and healthcare. David Hixon ’75, Amherst head basketball coach and senior associate athletic director, will discuss how things have changed and how the enduring strengths and lessons of student athletics at Amherst are maintained. Presented by the Class of 1969.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
9:00 AM
Ed Popielaczyk: Comedy and Magic
The main (kids') attraction at Homecoming for years, Ed Popielaczyk is coming to Reunion!  Ed will keep kids enthralled and parents smiling during this comedy magic show with lots of audience participation. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Main Quad, Rain site: O'Connor Commons
9:00 AM
Rugby Reunion Touch Sevens
Gather at the rugby pitch for a casual game of touch sevens. Open to all, especially alumni of the men’s and women’s rugby teams. Organized by Evan Wollen ’94. Presented by the Class of 1994.
Base of Memorial Hill
9:00 AM
Haiti: The Forgotten Country
Dr. Doug Barlow ’84 is a pediatrician with the Palm Beach County Health District. In 2010 he traveled to Haiti with the Dorsainvil Foundation. The private NGO had learned of his work running a MASH unit in Baton Rouge following Hurricane Katrina and invited him to serve as chief pediatrician for their Earthquake Relief Project. The appreciation from the Haitian people was overwhelming, and their dignity inspiring. Doug will narrate a slide presentation of his Haiti photos, with a Q&A to follow. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
9:00 AM
The Amherst Conspirators
Burt Griffin ’54 and David Slawson ’53 were counsel to the Warren Commission and investigated President Kennedy’s assassination along with fellow alum John McCloy, Class of 1916, who served on the Commission. Hear from Griffin and Slawson about their work and ask questions about “who?” and “why?” Presented by the Class of 1954.
Stirn Auditorium
9:00 AM
The Science Behind Happiness
Catherine Sanderson, the James E. Ostendarp Professor of Psychology, presents both surprising and not-so-surprising information on the science behind happiness. What role do money, marriage, friends, children, weather and religion play in making us feel happier? Is happiness stable over time? How can happiness be increased? Professor Sanderson describes cutting-edge research from the field of positive psychology on the factors that do (and do not) predict happiness, and provides participants with practical (and relatively easy!) ways to increase their own psychological well-being. Moderated by Jill Wilcox Still ’79, managing consultant for The Savitz Organization in Philadelphia. Presented by the Class of 1979.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
9:00 AM
Screening: Shark Loves the Amazon
Mark London ’74 offers a different, decidedly less romantic and more realistic perspective in Shark Loves the Amazon, a documentary he produced after three decades of traveling extensively and writing two books about the region with journalist Brian Kelly. The film depicts the hard realities of a region attempting to find the path to a sustainable model of development that promotes economic activity while preserving Earth’s last great forest and its unparalleled concentration of biodiversity. Presented by the Class of 1974.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:00 AM
Discussion: Shark Loves the Amazon
Join Mark London ’74 for a discussion following the 9 a.m. screening. Presented by the Class of 1974.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
10:00 AM
Our Experience with Medical School Education: Then and Now, with an Amherst Lens
Many classmates from the Class of 1969 went to medical school and completed residencies in the 1970s with the idealism of the 1960s and a desire to make a difference in people’s lives and effect social change. A new cohort of Amherst medical students share this idealism and a humanism characteristic of Amherst health professionals, although the context for such idealism and humanism has changed in many ways. Those who became physicians 40 years ago have had to adjust to a variety of new developments in health care, such as diagnosis-related groups in the 1980s, managed care in the 1990s and electronic medical records in the 2000s. Most recently, the Affordable Care Act has once again shuffled the deck on medicine. In spite of these changes and technological advances, issues of deep concern about the health status of the U.S. population persist, and medical school education today faces old and new challenges. An Amherst education challenged us to be prepared to live our lives fully, and medical school was preparation for the challenges of a medical career. With the benefit of decades in practice or just a few years out, Dr. Richard Aronson ’69, Dr. Richard Carroll ’69, Jeffrey Sternlieb ’69 and Annah Kuriakose ’09 (a current medical student) will share their perspectives on how medical school prepares physicians for practice in our rapidly changing health care landscape. Presented by the Class of 1969.
Music Room 3, Arms Music Center
10:00 AM
What's It Like to Become a Federal Judge?
An interview with His Honor Michael P. Shea ’89 about his first year as a U.S. district judge, in conversation with his classmate Tim Belevetz ’89. Michael was sworn in as a U.S. district judge in 2012. He was previously in private practice in Washington, D.C.; Brussels, Belgium; and Hartford, Conn., focusing on antitrust matters, commercial litigation, mass torts, First Amendment matters and white-collar criminal defense. Tim recently became a partner at Holland & Knight in the white-collar criminal defense and investigations practice group in Northern Virginia. Prior to that, he was a longtime federal prosecutor at the U.S. Department of Justice as assistant U.S. attorney. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Kirby Theater
10:00 AM
"A Certain Slant of Light": A Talk on Photography
In a discussion of their careers in photography, Amy Giese ’99, artist and assistant professor at the Community College of Rhode Island, and Clay Williams ’99, Brooklyn-based photographer and blogger, will talk about some of their recent projects and present examples of their work. Presented by the Class of 1999.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
10:00 AM
Our "Lives of Consequence": How Did We End Up Where We Are 20 Years Later?
Members of the Class of ’94 will be given five minutes each to tell a story of joy, trial, discovery, struggle, value, transformation, endurance or how things are (or are not) turning out just the way they imagined 20 years ago. For those familiar with National Public Radio, this will be The Moth Radio Hour meets This American Life with strong Amherst overtones. Discussions will be moderated by Rebecca Schlatter Liberty ’94, ordained minister, leadership coach, consultant on organizational development and author of the book The Treasure Hunt of Your Life. Presented by the Class of 1994.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
10:00 AM
Museum Tour: Russian Stories
With Bettina Jungen, senior curator and Thomas P. Whitney, Class of 1937, Curator of Russian Art
Mead Art Museum
10:00 AM
Mister G
Called a “kid-friendly, bilingual rock star” by The Washington Post, Mister G (Ben Gundersheimer ’89) is a leading figure in the children’s music world. His most recent album, ABC Fiesta, is currently on the Latin Grammy nominating ballot for Best Latin Children’s Album of the year, and his 2012 bilingual release, Chocolalala, won a Parents’ Choice Gold Award. Mister G performs at theaters, festivals and museums around the U.S. and Latin America. A former indie rocker, he toured internationally, performing for grownups, before earning a master of education degree and becoming a full-time family musician. Mister G’s albums have been named best of the year by People, Parents, Education.com and The Washington Post. To listen to the music and learn more about Mister G, visit mistergsongs.com. You can watch Mister G’s most recent bilingual video, “Cocodrilo,” here: youtube.com/watch?v=G7Jn0z9orac. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Friedmann Room, Keefe Campus Center
10:00 AM
Reflections on 40 Years of Teaching: A Conversation with Austin Sarat About Continuity and Change at Amherst College
Austin Sarat, the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science and associate dean of the faculty, has taught at Amherst for 40 years. He will reflect on what has remained constant and what has been altered in the way Amherst educates its students since he began teaching here. Are the experiences of Amherst students of today radically different from those of their predecessors? How, if at all, have the aspirations of Amherst’s faculty changed? How has the life of the classroom changed? What inferences can we draw about the situation of American higher education from Amherst’s experience? His latest book, Gruesome Spectacles: Botched Executions and America’s Death Penalty, was co-authored with four Amherst students, a rather unique collaboration in the annals of academic book publishing. What about Amherst made this collaboration possible, and what does it tell us about the kind of education Amherst will provide to future generations of students?
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
10:00 AM
The "Veering" of Our Lives and Culture Since Graduation: Are We Better for It?
Rabbi Peter J. Rubinstein ’64, Central Synagogue, New York City, and David Stringer ’64, retired teacher, Ann Arbor (Mich.) Public Schools, will focus on the evolution of cultural values—the drivers of our significant decisions—over the last 50 years, with an emphasis on five dualistic themes:

  • Faith in large institutions vs. fragmentation
  • Spirituality vs. data
  • Happiness vs. anxiety
  • Religious values vs. rational self-interest
  • Direct personal relationships vs. technology-mediated relationships

What touchstones do we use today to give direction to our lives? Presented by the Class of 1964.

Stirn Auditorium
11:00 AM
Architecture Tour at the Emily Dickinson Museum
Although the Homestead (1813) and The Evergreens (1856) are best known for their association with poet Emily Dickinson and her intriguing family, the two houses also offer a fascinating portrait of more than 100 years of architectural history in New England. Join Museum guides to sharpen your skills at "reading" buildings and find out how (and why) these two historic houses have changed - or not - over time. NOTE: The tour is of the buildings' exteriors only and will be cancelled in case of rain.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
11:00 AM
A Conversation with President Biddy Martin
The president will be joined by Cullen Murphy '74, chair of the Board of Trustees. Their remarks will be preceded by the annual meeting of the Society of the Alumni, presided over by the chair, William H. Woolverton '73, P'17, '12. View a recording of the conversation.
Johnson Chapel
11:00 AM
Get Ready to Be Amazed!
Nationally recognized professional entertainer and “edutainer” Robert Hackenson Jr. from DynamicInfluence.com  will be providing family fun magical entertainment. He will stroll through the crowd, mystifying both children and adults, and will also present a short family magic show! Presented by the Class of 1994.
Webster Circle
12:15 PM
Reunion Luncheon
Join us for a complimentary luncheon on the Quad. Look for your classmates under the decade signs!
Valentine Quad
1:00 PM
Alumni Baseball Game
Bring your glove and we’ll supply the rest! Questions? Contact Head Coach Brian Hamm at bhamm@amherst.edu.
Memorial Field
1:30 PM
Taking on Our Environmental Legacy
Our environmental legacy will include major climate change. The Class of 1964 has challenged itself to address this by forming a “problem-solving team” to discuss options and make recommendations. Team members will frame the issue and report on their discussions. Jim Brassord, Amherst’s director of facilities, will share with us what Amherst has been doing to “green” the campus, including initiatives undertaken through the efforts of two members of the Class of 1964. The panel includes Jesse Brill ’64, chair of NASPP and CompensationStandards.com and publisher at Executive Press; Gordon Richardson ’64, principal, TechRich Consulting; Burt Sonenstein ’64, former chief financial and investment officer at the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Wellesley College and Wesleyan University; and Paul Stern ’64, senior scholar, Board on Environmental Change and Society, National Research Council. Presented by the Class of 1964.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
Family Circus Event
Join in a circus event for kids and families with performers from SHOW Circus Studio in Easthampton, Mass. See juggling and contortion and try out some tricks yourself! All kids must have parents or guardians with them at the program.
LeFrak Gymnasium
1:30 PM
From Keg Parties to Board Meetings: Finding Work/Life Balance as We Advance in Our Careers and Start Families
Panelists will discuss how to thrive in your chosen career field while balancing the demands of young families, increasing responsibilities at work and the desire to maintain the semblance of a social life. Panelists include Irv Rakhlin ’04 (moderator), Brad Coffey ’04, Rachael Viehman ’04 and Jon Edwards ’04. Presented by the Class of 2004.
Kirby Theater
1:30 PM
Stephen Collins '69: For Crying Out Loud (How Do You Cry on Cue)?
Following up on a previous Reunion presentation, “Women I’ve Kissed for Money,” this program may include clips from the films and TV shows of our class actor, Stephen Collins ’69. Steve is probably best known for his role as Eric Camden in the television drama series 7th Heaven. He also portrayed Captain/Commander Willard Decker in Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Jake Cutter in the cult favorite Tales of the Gold Monkey and Nick Tattinger on Tattingers, and made guest appearances on The Waltons, Barnaby Jones, Charlie’s Angels and numerous miniseries and made-for-television movies. He was nominated for an Emmy Award for his work opposite Ann-Margret in the miniseries The Two Mrs. Grenvilles, and he played John F. Kennedy in A Woman Named Jackie, which won the Emmy for Outstanding Miniseries. Collins has co-starred with Diane Keaton in The First Wives Club (1996) and Because I Said So (2007). He has co-starred with Meredith Baxter in All the President’s Men, A Woman Scorned: The Betty Broderick Story and Her Final Fury: Betty Broderick, the Last Chapter, the latter two being made-for-TV movies broadcast on CBS in 1992. In 2013, Collins began appearing on the NBC series Revolution as Dr. Gene Porter, the leader of the town of Willoughby. Presented by the Class of 1969.
Stirn Auditorium
1:30 PM
Liberal Education at Amherst: Then and Now
Since 1954, Amherst has abandoned its core curriculum, admitted women and altered the student body’s economic and ethnic composition. Hadley Arkes, the Edward N. Ney Professor in American Institutions; Rick López ’93, associate professor of history; Jacqueline De La Fuente ’09; and Raj Borsellino ’09 will explore these changes with moderator Matthew Mitchell ’54. Presented by the Class of 1954.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
1:30 PM
Syria's Failed Arab Spring: U.S. Interests and What to Expect
Syria presents the international community with this generation’s perhaps most appalling humanitarian disaster, and a platform for proxy conflict that threatens regional stability. What makes the Syrian conflict so devilishly difficult? How is it different from other Arab Spring contexts? What are U.S. interests, and how are they best protected/advanced? From his perch as director of overseas operations in the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations, Win Dayton ’79 will review (off the record) the conflict’s downward spiral and anticipate factors that may propel its trajectory going forward. Presented by the Class of 1979.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
1:30 PM
The Sweatiest of the Liberal Arts: How the Amherst Men's Basketball Team Has Excelled On and Off the Court
During the last 20 years, the college has witnessed a resurgence in its athletic program. At the head of this resurgence is the men’s basketball program, led by Coach David Hixon ’75. Many point to the February 1994 trouncing of Williams (89–60) and the subsequent run to the Elite Eight in their first year of NCAA postseason eligibility as the turning point of the program. Since then, the team has won the National Championship twice (with six Final Fours) and the NESCAC championships seven times. In this session, Hixon; Barry O’Connell, professor and basketball academic advisor; and players from the past few decades, including Yram Groff ’89, Benjamin Batory ’94, Josh Anish ’99, Adam Harper ’04 and Brian Baskauskas ’09, discuss how the program has been able to produce at such a high level both on and off the court, as well as how their experiences on the team helped propel the players to meaningful careers after graduation. Presented by the Class of 1994.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
1:30 PM
Amherst Entrepreneurs
Since 2009, several members of our class have started their own businesses or otherwise been struck by the entrepreneurial spirit in a variety of disciplines. Eve Turow ’09, community editor at Tidal Labs, will moderate a discussion among Taylor Brown ’09, founder of Fivetran; Umang Dua ’09, founder of Handybook, Inc.; Rory O’Connor ’09, co-founder and head of engineering at Ovuline; Rachel Shapiro ’09, Michigan Law School '14, an advisor to entrepreneurs; Garrett Snedeker ’09, assistant director at the James Wilson Institute; and Alex Widen ’09, founder of Sumeria Group, about how Amherst influenced their paths and what they have learned since Amherst that has shaped their work. Presented by the Class of 2009.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:00 PM
Men's Soccer Reunion Game
The Men’s Soccer Alumni Group and Coach Justin Serpone will sponsor a game between odd-and even-class soccer alumni. Bring your black shorts, cleats and shin guards; we’ll supply shirts and socks. RSVP to Assistant Coach Killian Riley (kriley@amherst.edu) so we have a head count, and spread the word to your classmates and teammates. Plan to come to the men’s locker room at 1:15 p.m. to pick up your uniform.
Gooding Turf Field
2:00 PM
Amherst Crew Reunion Row
Bill Stekl, head rowing coach, will give an update on the current rowing program. We urge all former coxswains and rowers—men and women, lightweight and heavyweight, young and old, fit and not-so-fit—to attend. Assemble at the boathouse, ready to row (preferably in Amherst rowing attire from your era). Refreshments (and oxygen) will be available at the conclusion of our workout.
Amherst College Boathouse (Sportsman’s Marina, Route 9 at Coolidge Bridge)
2:30 PM
Architectural Tour of Amherst
The living, learning and athletic spaces on campus have changed dramatically in recent years. As the Residential Master Plan and other campus projects proceed, new and renovated buildings are reshaping the Amherst experience. Discuss changes since 2009 and how the space of the campus shaped our college experience. Tour the newest additions to campus and hear about upcoming changes to the Amherst landscape with Scott Smith ’09. Presented by the Class of 2009.
Meet at Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
2:30 PM
Myths and Misperceptions in the World of Foreign Policy
A workforce strategist in the CIA, a foreign aid executive from the U.N. and a security studies professor from Georgetown walk into a bar—a panel, that is—and have a lively discussion about myths and misperceptions in the world of foreign policy. Come see where the discussion goes. Panelists are Abbey Marks Gardner ’89, who currently serves as senior adviser on aid delivery for Dr. Paul Farmer’s Aid Delivery Support Initiative; Kristin Bertelli ’89, the deputy chief of workforce strategy and planning in the Central Intelligence Agency; and Daniel Byman ’89, professor of security studies at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and the research director of the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
2:30 PM
Family Swim
Have children with lots of energy? Come to Pratt Pool and have an afternoon swim! Each child must have a parent or guardian with them at the pool.
Pratt Pool, Alumni Gym
2:30 PM
Equity in Education: A Conversation of Ways and Means
One of the most firmly held tenets of the American way of life is the idea that our society is a meritocracy, that all who work hard enough will have their labors rewarded in proportion to the expenditure of their efforts. Breathing life into this idea is the premise that the American educational system is “The Great Equalizer” in society. However, for the rural and urban poor, as well as African-American and Hispanic students (who made up more than 39 percent of the public school population in 2009), access to an education does not delineate a clear path to an equitable one. To address issues of inequity in our educational systems—including funding resources, teacher quality and the undefined role of social entrepreneurship in the educational space—a panel of alumni educators, administrators and social entrepreneurs will address key issues in the field of education. Panelists include Dale Henry ’00, Mabel Lajes-Guiteras ’99 and Hayin Kim ’99. Presented by the Class of 1999.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
2:30 PM
Circle Games
All children are welcome for some relay races, a penny toss and other old-fashioned fun. Presented by the Class of 1994.
Webster Circle
2:30 PM
NASA's Balloon Program: Cost-Effective Observations from the Edge of Space
NASA’s High-Altitude Balloon Program provides game-changing access to near space. Balloons as large as a cubic football field can carry heavy payloads to altitudes of 125,000 feet, above 99.5 percent of the Earth’s atmosphere, for less than 5 percent of the cost of a traditional rocket launch. One recent balloon mission was BRRISON (Balloon Rapid Response for Comet ISON), a $12 million mission to study the composition of the sungrazing comet ISON. Dr. Eliot Young ’84 was the principal investigator of the ultraviolet and visible instruments on the BRRISON payload. He will talk about what went right and what went wrong with the BRRISON mission, and some possibilities for what might come next. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
Managing the Return on College Investment: How to Find Value in an Era of $60,000-Per-Year Education
Three experts from the Class of 1994 gather to discuss the emphasis on maximizing the value of a college education, including at an elite institution like Amherst. This talk will touch on the causes of the rapid increases in college costs; the merits, risks and potential outcomes of President Obama’s push to make college more affordable; and ways that those paying for college can maximize their return on this investment. With points of view from Jessica Wolpaw Reyes ’94, associate professor of economics; Seth Reynolds ’94, a partner in The Parthenon Group’s Education Practice; Tom Parker, dean of admissions and financial aid; and moderator Jay Moore ’94, managing director, Romherst Capital, expect lively debate and opportunities for audience participation on a topic near and dear to anyone with kids who would love to go to Amherst someday. Presented by the Class of 1994.
Stirn Auditorium
2:30 PM
Health Care in the 21st Century: Part 1
During Part 1 of this double session, the speakers will review key changes in medical care over 50 years to stimulate questions about what lies ahead for us in the 21st century. Our panel includes Dr. Cyril M. (Kim) Hetsko ’64, clinical professor of medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, moderator; Dr. Thomas P. Jacobs ’64, professor of medicine, Columbia University; Dr. Douglas Lowy ’64, deputy director, National Cancer Institute; Dr. Appleton (Tony) Mason ’64, associate professor, Albany Medical College, family medicine, geriatrics, hospice and palliative care; and Dr. David L. Pearle ’64, professor of medicine (cardiology), MedStar Georgetown University Hospital. Topics will include the wide-reaching impact of evidence-based medicine; David Pearle on the 75 percent reduction in cardiovascular mortality in the United States and the reasons for that success; and Doug Lowy on the potential of precision (personalized) medicine to improve outcomes using treatment focused on molecular abnormalities identified in a growing number of diseases. Tom Jacobs, Tony Mason and the audience will be invited to comment on the respective topics. Presented by the Class of 1964.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
2:30 PM
Public Conversation: Lord Jeff’s Legacy in Art
Join collector Lindsey Echelbarger ’74, P’04 and Elizabeth Barker, director of the Mead, for this richly illustrated exploration of Jeffery Amherst’s place in the history of art, featuring a rare bronze equestrian sculpture by Bela Lyon Pratt. Following the slide presentation, attendees will have the opportunity to see in person many of the original artworks discussed.
Mead Art Museum, William Green Study Room
2:30 PM
Entrepreneurship in a Connected World
Speakers, including Craig McBeth ’04, Daniel Cohen ’04 and Lauren Sozio ’04, will draw on their experiences in starting businesses to address both opportunities and challenges that arise as a result of recent developments in the world of technology: social media, mobile Web, software as a service and cloud computing. Presented by the Class of 2004.
Kirby Theater
3:30 PM
A Run Through the Wildlife Sanctuary
Join Liz Dalton ’09, former Amherst track and cross-country team member, on a run through the Wildlife Sanctuary. Liz has run four marathons and countless other races since graduation, but she will be taking it easy as she leads this group run! Enjoy beautiful scenery and catch up with friends while you work out! Presented by the Class of 2009.
Meet at the front steps of Alumni Gym
3:30 PM
Life and Work in Show Business
Rani Arbo ’89 grew up a cellist and chorister in New York City, where she sang everything from Hildegarde to Poulenc. At Amherst, she took up fiddle and fell for the rootsy sounds of old-time, Cajun, honky-tonk and bluegrass music. She co-founded the bluegrass-folk band Salamander Crossing in 1991 and the quartet Rani Arbo & daisy mayhem in 2000. She has released nine CDs, with a new one in the works this spring. Ben Gundersheimer ’89 spent 20 years as an indie rocker before getting a master’s degree in education (at Smith) and transitioning to writing and performing for families. These days, he tours throughout the USA and Latin America as “Mister G.” His most recent bilingual CD, ABC Fiesta, is on the Latin Grammy ballot as the Best Latin Children’s Album of 2014. John Paluska ’89 discovered the musical giants Phish when he was still a student at Amherst and before Phish was known beyond a small circle of fans. He became their manager and, for 17 years, directed all aspects of Phish’s operations. Greer Shephard ’89 is a TV producer and the co-founder of The Shephard/Robin Company based at Warner Bros. Television. She has been the executive producer of the Golden Globe-winning series Nip/Tuck and the Emmy-winning series The Closer. Presently, she serves as the showrunner of the A&E Western series Longmire. Eric Zicklin ’89 is a sitcom writer/producer whose fanciest credits are Dharma & Greg, Frasier and Hot in Cleveland. In 1995, in one of his first television jobs as a writer, he won a Primetime Emmy Award for the Michael Moore series TV Nation, as a part of the writing team. In 2001, he was nominated for another Emmy for his work on Frasier. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
3:30 PM
The Good News About Old Age
Specialists in orthopedics, cardiology and neurology discuss advances in their fields that have made growing old a little easier than it used to be—and they look ahead to developments already on the horizon. Speakers include Dr. William L. Healy ’74, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Newton-Wellesley Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital; Dr. Robert P. Reichsten ’74, assistant clinical professor, cardiology, Mount Sinai Hospital; and Dr. David F. Long ’74, Brain Injury Program, Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital. Presented by the Class of 1974.
Pruyne Lecture Hall, Fayerweather Hall
3:30 PM
Class of 1959 Memorial Service
Chapin Chapel
3:30 PM
Garden Tour of the Emily Dickinson Museum
Join Jane Wald, executive director of the Emily Dickinson Museum, for a walk around the property to hear about new exterior projects, including the conservatory reconstruction and the introduction of an orchard on the Dickinson property. Participants will also be able to use the Museum's garden tour audio wands free of charge.
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
3:30 PM
Behind the Curtain - An Insider's Look at the Entertainment Industry
Ever wonder how your favorite show ends up on television? Or how a script gets sold? Are you curious about how an independent filmmaker gets their story made or how a working actor navigates the industry? Do you want to know how a Broadway theater company selects its next project? Join moderator Matthew Murumba ’04 for a panel including Ignatius Lin ’04, director, The System Is Broken; Annie MacRae ’04, literary manager, Manhattan Theatre Club (Broadway); Pete Calloway ’04, film and television writer/producer, Under the Dome (CBS); and Bess Kargman ’04, director/producer, First Position. Presented by the Class of 2004.
Kirby Theater
3:30 PM
Supervised Kids' Pickup Games
Come to the King and Wieland end of the field to cheer your children (ages 4 and up) on while they play soccer, Wiffle ball or ultimate Frisbee. Presented by the Class of 1989.
Memorial Field
3:30 PM
Will I Be Able to Nap While My Car Drives Me to Ogunquit? What Self-Driving Technology Might Mean for Our Future
As a knowledge expert at McKinsey & Co., Jeff Thompson ’84 has been part of McKinsey’s effort to understand the societal and business implications of self-driving car technology. Max Hall ’84 is an engineer and high school science teacher. Join them to find out more about self-driving car technology, the roll-out period (it’s already started), the projected year of the first fully autonomous vehicle and how self-driving cars might affect us all. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
3:30 PM
Health Care in the 21st Century: Part 2
During Part 2 of this double session, Cyril M.(Kim) Hetsko ’64, M.D., clinical professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, will discuss 50 years of health care reform, from Medicare’s adoption in 1965 to the Affordable Care Act. Following his presentation, the panel will offer additional perspectives on health care reform and will engage the audience in a discussion of other changes in medical care over 50 years. Panelists include Dr. Thomas P. Jacobs ’64, professor of medicine, Columbia University; Dr. Appleton (Tony) Mason ’64, associate professor, Albany Medical College, family medicine, geriatrics, hospice and palliative care; Robert M. Krughoff ’64, president, Consumers’ CHECKBOOK; and Charles (Smokey) Stover ’64, former commissioner, Massachusetts Rate Setting Commission. Topics will include Tom Jacobs on other significant changes in medicine; Tony Mason on anticipating end-of-life care with living wills, health care proxies and explicit goals; and Smokey Stover on health care reform from the Massachusetts perspective. Presented by the Class of 1964.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
3:30 PM
Crowdsourcing in Scientific Research: Disruptive Technology Harnessing the Power of the Internet
From discussion forums to user reviews, the internet has long been a source of knowledge tapped from a wide population base. Crowdsourcing is a natural evolution of this process, whereby needed ideas and content are solicited from a large group of people (e.g., the online community). Recently, scientists have begun to utilize crowdsourcing to gather large pools of data or knowledge. This phenomenon is disrupting traditional means of conducting and funding scientific research. Allen Hurlbert ’94, academic ecologist, Jaro Wex (Wechowski) ’94, pharmaceutical consultant and Paris Wallace ’04, CEO of Ovuline, will discuss how crowdsourcing (or so-called “citizen science”) has advanced scientific knowledge, including our understanding of biodiversity and climate change, as well as human fertility and how it might impact traditional academic research approaches. They will also discuss how crowdsourcing has changed the business of research and what the future holds for monetizing such methods of data collection. Presented by the Classes of 1994 and 2004.
Stirn Auditorium
3:30 PM
The State of Independent Cinema and Democracies Around the World
Ranging from the film Gravity to the Toronto Film Festival, from Margaret Thatcher to Plato, Richard Ledes ’79, award-winning American filmmaker and writer, will look at the present state of independent cinema and democracies around the globe and propose ways we can think of them as connected. Founding his argument on Plato’s allied critiques of poetry and democracy, he argues that oligarchies of wealth are suppressing experiments in the reinvention of democracy and, likewise, the democratic role of the arts, cinema in particular. He looks at film as a form of production that is being decimated as a means of making a living at the same time that video cameras have become ubiquitous. By supporting a viable cultural life for cinema, Ledes argues, we can assist in the liberation of our democracy from the stagnant hold of a self-defeating oligarchy of finance capital. Amelie Hastie, professor of English and film and media studies and chair of film and media studies, will serve as moderator. Presented by the Class of 1979.
Cole Assembly Room, Converse Hall
4:00 PM
Archaeological Discoveries at the Dickinson Homestead
Head over to the Emily Dickinson Museum to discover what University of Massachusetts Archaeological Services unearthed in test pits at the site of Emily Dickinson's conservatory. (See 8:30 a.m. listing for "Donuts and a Dig at the Dickinson Homestead" for more details.)
Emily Dickinson Museum, 280 Main Street
4:00 PM
Class of 1954 Memorial Service
War Memorial, Memorial Hill (Rain site: Johnson Chapel)
4:30 PM
Kegs and Kickball
Come enjoy a friendly game of kickball between the Class of 2004 and the Class of 2009. Whether you’re playing or cheering, libations will be provided. 
Memorial Field
4:30 PM
"Drawing Patients Closer" - The Integration of Opera and Story in Medicine
The sketches of his patients and the poetry he creates based on their histories have made Dr. Alan Blum '69 a popular speaker at previous reunions. Composer Emory Waters '69 has created a quasi-operatic piece using stories and sketches from Dr. Blum's books Ladies in Waiting, Gentle Men and Seeing Patients. Come see and hear the piece performed live with musicians, narration and video images. Presented by the Class of 1969. View a recording of the talk.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
4:30 PM
New Voices, New Visions: The Power of Narrative in a Digitally Connected World
Pam Allyn ’84, founding director of LitWorld, and Kate Seelye ’84, senior vice president of the Middle East Institute, will draw upon their experiences working with and reporting on youth in countries from the Philippines to Saudi Arabia to examine how new media and digital storytelling have empowered long-marginalized communities and allowed them to shape alternative narratives. Amherst College Professor Marisa Parham, who is also director of Five College Digital Humanities, will moderate this discussion. In the Arab world, new tools like Twitter and Facebook have allowed young people to organize and stand up to authoritarian regimes. In countries like Kenya, Haiti and Pakistan, access to the Internet and online learning are helping to eradicate illiteracy and to raise the power of young people’s voices to campaign for gender equity and children’s rights. Allyn and Seelye will examine how young voices for change are contributing to reform in developing countries, while at the same time continuing to struggle against long-standing challenges like authoritarianism, corruption and injustice. The speakers will examine the power and limitations of narrative in the digital age, as well as the role that the West plays in validating certain voices and communities. Presented by the Class of 1984.
Lecture Hall 2, Merrill Science Center
4:30 PM
Poetry at Amherst: A New Crop
Perhaps it’s the close attention to reading, the classic New England landscape or reverberations in the air left by Dickinson and Frost. Whatever the reason, Amherst has long been a wellspring for poetry—and generations of Amherst alums have achieved remarkable success in the literary world. In this reading and discussion, moderated by Jennifer Acker ’00, founder and editor-in-chief of The Common, five emerging and established poets, critics and essayists read from their work and talk about the ways their literary lives thread through Johnson Chapel and beyond. Featuring Rafael Campo ’87, Rachel Nelson ’99, Brian Simoneau ’99, and Tess Taylor ’99. A book signing will follow. Presented by the Class of 1999.
Lecture Hall 1, Merrill Science Center
5:00 PM
Catholic Mass
All are welcome to join in the Roman Catholic Mass. Liturgical guides are provided. 
Chapin Chapel
5:30 PM
GALA Reception
All alumni and guests are welcome. Refreshments will be served. Sponsored by the Gay and Lesbian Alumni Association and Alumni and Parent Programs.
Queer Resource Center, basement of Morrow Residence Hall
5:30 PM
Reception in Honor of European Studies Majors
Join us in celebrating alumni associated with the European Studies Program. Drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be provided.
Covered Patio, The Lord Jeffery Inn
5:30 PM
Bluestockings 25th Reunion Reception
Green Room, Arms Music Center
7:00 PM
Ethereal: The 16th Apocalypse Party
Apocalypse is a party for people who don’t like parties, hosted by Planworld. Come on by, play intellectual games, have conversations and enjoy a heart-stopping Black Sheep cake and other tasty refreshments. All who enjoy fine company are invited. We will continue until people stop talking.
Third Floor, Moore Dormitory
9:00 PM
The Zumbyes' Reunion Show
The Zumbyes welcome all Zum-alums, Amherst alums, friends, fans and anyone else to Buckley Recital Hall to celebrate the 64th year of the group with a free concert of new songs, classic songs and, of course, our beloved college songs.
Buckley Recital Hall, Arms Music Center
Sunday, June 01, 2014
8:00 AM
Alumni House Reception Center Open
We’ll be open for you to drop off your keys or ask last-minute questions before you head home.
Telephone: (413) 542–2065
Alumni House will close at Noon
Alumni House, 75 Churchill Street
9:00 AM
Service of Remembrance and Community
Please join us for an ecumenical service to remember the lives of those alumni we have lost this year.  Officiants: Rabbi Lisa Gelber '89 and the Rev. Roger Hull '59.
War Memorial, Memorial Hill (Rain site: Chapin Chapel)
9:00 AM
Class of 1969 Memorial Service
Johnson Chapel
11:30 AM
Memorial Service for Gerald P. Brophy
Gerald P. Brophy, the Samuel A. Hitchcock Professor of Mineralogy and Geology, Emeritus, passed away on April 2, 2014. He was appointed to the Amherst faculty in 1954 and retired in 1998. All are welcome to this celebration of his life.
Johnson Chapel, reception to follow in O’Connor Commons
 

Upcoming Events

Admission Dean's Day for sons and daughters of alumni
July 11, 2014

Minnesota - NESCAC Happy Hour
July 11, 2014 | 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Hawaii - Summer Send-Off Reception
July 12, 2014 | 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Washington, D.C. - Nationals Game and Pre-Game Presentation
July 19, 2014 | 5:30 p.m.

Chicago - Summer Send-Off Reception
July 20, 2014 | 3:00 - 5:00 p.m.

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Contact Us

alumni@amherst.edu
Main Phone: 413.542.2313

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