The Transformative Power of Ten Minutes  cover
The Transformative Power of Ten Minutes
by Dr. Beth S. Kurland '88
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2017
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: Self-help
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What if 10 minutes a day mattered for your overall health, well-being, and ability to experience greater ease and joy through your life? Would you make this time for yourself?

In this practical, hands-on book, clinical psychologist Beth Kurland shares her knowledge and expertise gained from over 20 years of experience, and shows you how 10 minutes a day can transform your life. Integrating key findings from multiple fields of psychology and neuroscience, Dr. Kurland uses concise explanations and clear examples to guide you through daily practices that teach you how to implement the many tools she offers.

This book, with its accompanying worksheets and audios, is not just meant to be read, it is meant to be put to use in your life to bring about lasting change.

Designed for the lay person who may not have the time to read many of the other longer and more in-depth self-help books on the market, or who may be looking for a concrete way to implement the ideas from other self-help books, this book is designed to have the biggest impact in the shortest amount of time by offering daily mind-body exercises, based on the latest psychological research and neuroscience, to help readers rewire their minds toward greater well-being.

The practical exercises are designed to be helpful in the work place, at home, in relationships, and in one's personal life.

Each week's chapter begins with a goal and intention highlighting the stress management skill that is being taught, followed by insights as to why this goal is important or relevant. Following this are seven daily mind-body exercises using multiple modalities, designed to get new neural pathways to fire, to help wire-in that particular skill. After each exercise is a specific example, showing how that exercise can be applied and how it is relevant in one's life. There is an accompanying worksheet for each day's practice, (also available online) making it easy for readers to track what they have noticed each day and to help them become more accountable for following through with each exercise. At the end of each chapter there is a meditation/visualization exercise to help integrate the material from that chapter. A writing exercise encompassing a short affirmation that readers can reflect on daily, and a summary of key take-away points concludes each chapter.

This book helps people make significant positive changes in their lives, one day at a time, through short, daily exercises utilizing principles from Mindfulness, Positive Psychology, Cognitive-Behavioral Psychology, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.

Jewish Conscience of the Church  cover
Jewish Conscience of the Church
by Norman C. Tobias Ph.D. '75
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Palgrave Macmillan; 2017; 307 pp.
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: History
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This book presents the backstory of how the Catholic Church came to clarify and embrace the role of Israel in salvation history, at the behest of an unlikely personality: Jules Isaac. This embrace put to an end the tradition, more than fifteen centuries old, of anti-Jewish rhetoric that had served as taproot to racial varieties of anti-Semitism.  Prior to Isaac’s thought and activism, this contemptuous tradition had never been denounced in so compelling a manner that the Church was forced to address it. It is a story of loss and triumph, and ultimately, unlikely partnership.

 Isaac devoted his years after World War II to a crusade for scriptural truth and rectification of Christian teaching regarding Jews and Judaism. Isaac’s crusade culminated in an unpublicized audience with Pope John XXIII—a meeting that moved the pope to make a last-minute addition to the Second Vatican Council agenda and set in motion the events leading to a revolution in Catholic teaching about Jews.

Sold People: Traffickers and Family Life in North China cover
Sold People: Traffickers and Family Life in North China
by Ms. Johanna S. Ransmeier '97
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Harvard University Press; 2017; 408 pp.
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: Asian Studies
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A robust trade in human lives thrived throughout North China during the late Qing and Republican periods. Whether to acquire servants, slaves, concubines, or children―or dispose of unwanted household members―families at all levels of society addressed various domestic needs by participating in this market. Sold People brings into focus the complicit dynamic of human trafficking, including the social and legal networks that sustained it. Johanna Ransmeier reveals the extent to which the structure of the Chinese family not only influenced but encouraged the buying and selling of men, women, and children.

For centuries, human trafficking had an ambiguous status in Chinese society. Prohibited in principle during the Qing period, it was nevertheless widely accepted as part of family life, despite the frequent involvement of criminals. In 1910, Qing reformers, hoping to usher China into the community of modern nations, officially abolished the trade. But police and other judicial officials found the new law extremely difficult to enforce. Industrialization, urbanization, and the development of modern transportation systems created a breeding ground for continued commerce in people. The Republican government that came to power after the 1911 revolution similarly struggled to root out the entrenched practice.

Ransmeier draws from untapped archival sources to recreate the lived experience of human trafficking in turn-of-the-century North China. Not always a measure of last resort reserved for times of extreme hardship, the sale of people was a commonplace transaction that built and restructured families as often as it broke them apart.

Which Sin To Bear?: Authenticity and Compromise in Langston Hughes cover
Which Sin To Bear?: Authenticity and Compromise in Langston Hughes
by Dr. David E. Chinitz '84
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Oxford University Press; 2016; 288 pp.
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: American Studies, Black Studies, Literature, Poetry
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Which Sin To Bear? mines Langston Hughes's creative work, newspaper columns, letters, and unpublished papers to reveal a writer who faced a daunting array of dicey questions and intimidating obstacles, and whose triumphs and occasional missteps are a fascinating and telling part of his legacy. David E. Chinitz explores Hughes's efforts to negotiate the problems of identity and ethics he faced as an African American professional writer and intellectual, tracing his early efforts to fashion himself as an "authentic" black poet of the Harlem Renaissance and his later imagining of a new and more inclusive understanding of authentic blackness. He also examines Hughes's lasting yet self-critical commitment to progressive politics in the mid-century years and shows how, in spite of ambivalence-and, at times, anguish-Hughes was forced to engage in ethical compromises to achieve his personal and social goals.

A Companion to Modernist Poetry  cover
A Companion to Modernist Poetry
edited by Dr. David E. Chinitz '84
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Gail McDonald
Wiley Publishers; 2014; 620 pp.
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: Literature, Poetry
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Offering a comprehensive and up-to-date survey of the field, A Companion to Modernist Poetry provides readers with detailed discussions of individual poets, ‘schools’ and ‘movements’ within modernist poetry, and the cultural and historical context of the modernist period.

  • Provides an in-depth and accessible summary of the latest trends in the study of modernist poetry
  • Balances discussion of individual poets, ‘schools’, and ‘movements’ with in-depth literary and historical context
  • Brings recent scholarship to bear on the subject of modernist poetry while also providing guidance on poets who are historically important
  • Edited by highly respected and notable critics in the field who have a broad knowledge of current debates and of rising and senior scholars in the field
A Companion to T. S. Eliot cover
A Companion to T. S. Eliot
edited by Dr. David E. Chinitz '84
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Wiley-Blackwell Publishers; 2014; 504 pp.
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: Literature, Poetry
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Reflecting the surge of critical interest in Eliot renewed in recent years, A Companion to T.S. Eliot introduces the 'new' Eliot to readers and educators by examining the full body of his works and career. Leading scholars in the field provide a fresh and fully comprehensive collection of contextual and critical essays on his life and achievement.

  • It compiles the most comprehensive and up-to-date treatment available of Eliot's work and career
  • It explores the powerful forces that shaped Eliot as a writer and thinker, analyzing his body of work and assessing his oeuvre in a variety of contexts: historical, cultural, social, and philosophical
  • It charts the surge in critical interest in T.S. Eliot since the early 1990s
  • It provides an illuminating insight into a poet, writer, and critic who continues to define the literary landscape of the last century
Nine Dragon Island  cover
Nine Dragon Island
by Ms. Eleanor Goodman '01
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Zephyr Press; 2016; 114 pp.
Genre: Poetry
Category: Poetry
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Eleanor Goodman navigates between worlds, from a parent's cancer in Ohio to Hong Kong's Tolo Harbor to migrant workers in China. These poems are snapshots of daily life as lived and considered, moments of elegy and rejoicing. Goodman won the 2015 Lucien Stryk Prize and was shortlisted for the Griffin Poetry Prize for her translations of Chinese poetry.

Iron Moon: An Anthology of Chinese Worker Poetry  cover
Iron Moon: An Anthology of Chinese Worker Poetry
by Ms. Eleanor Goodman '01
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2017; 200 pp.
Genre: Poetry
Category: Poetry
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“Iron Moon is a monumental achievement. It redraws the boundaries of working-class poetry for the new millennium by incorporating at its center issues like migration, globalization, and rank-and-file resistance. We hear in these poems what Zheng Xiaoqiong calls “a language of callouses.” This isn’t a book about the lost industrial past; it’s a fervent testimony to the horrific, hidden histories of the 21st century’s working-class and a clarion call for a more cooperative and humane future.”—Mark Nowak

The Geopolitics of Global Energy: The New Cost of Plenty cover
The Geopolitics of Global Energy: The New Cost of Plenty
edited by Mr. Timothy C. Lehmann (Ted) '90
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2017; 283 pp.
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: Business, Economics, Environment, Finance, History, Politics
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In the all-encompassing energy realm, powerful state and private actors determine which of the world’s many energy resources are developed ... and how societies are molded to accommodate those decisions. The authors of The Geopolitics of Global Energy Resources delve into the energy realm, identifying the infrastructure investments of today that are shaping the use patterns and political dependencies of tomorrow. They explore as well, the prospects for change to more sustainable and democratically accountable forms of energy.

Snow Farmer  cover
Snow Farmer
by Mr. Benjamin A. Gantcher (Ben) '91
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2017; 102 pp.
Genre: Poetry
Category: Poetry
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SNOW FARMER is a free-wheeling, finely-tuned collection of reveries, valedictions and declarations of yes.