We Have Met the Enemy and He Is Us: The Opiate Education of a Vermont Doctor cover
We Have Met the Enemy and He Is Us: The Opiate Education of a Vermont Doctor
by S. Beach Conger III, M.D. (Beach) '63
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2020
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: Health/medicine
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After forty-two years as a jack-of-all trades in the town of Dumster, Vermont, Doc Conger finds himself increasingly out of step with the practice and teaching of medicine. He is reluctantly considering retirement, when an experience in the emergency room makes him realize that he still has something to contribute. As he dedicates himself to the treatment of those whose illness has in large part been contracted by the ministrations of his own profession, he finds new purpose, serving the underserved in the same environment that he started his career more than four decades ago.

Goodbye, Apostrophe cover
Goodbye, Apostrophe
by Mr. Peter V. H. Schmitt '60
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2020
Genre: Poetry
Category: Poetry
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From the publisher: In Goodbye, Apostrophe, his first new collection in more than a decade, nationally recognized and prize-winning poet Peter Schmitt has assembled nearly fifty poems notable for their range and emotional power. From the hard lessons of childhood to the loss of parents, these poems confront the challenging issues of our time, including race, religion, abuse of varying kinds, and reflexive political correctness.

Gestures of Concern cover
Gestures of Concern
by Mr. Christopher D. Ingraham (Chris) '99
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Duke University Press; 2020
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: Media studies
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From the publisher:

What the Farmer Told the Bard cover
What the Farmer Told the Bard
by Mr. Paul V. Cornell du Houx '73
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Polar Bear & Company; 2020
Genre: Fiction
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From the publisher: Plot is hardly the concern of this rich, dense, playful novel of philosophical, historical, and metaphysical inquiry. In Paul Cornell du Houx's book, scientists, lovers, actors, and Pagan gods face the consequences of a new invention that reveals the polarity of sex uniting all the universe's particles and upends all post-Pagan theology. The material is fascinating, but the novel offers a series of erotic setpieces, extended monologues, comic colloquies, and even extended comic erotic colloquies, all set in existence itself's jumbled slipstream of connections, rather than conventional narrative.

The novel's chief attraction is Cornell du Houx's witty, daring, allusive prose. The accounts of action, chiefly sex, are lyric and inventive . . . The dialogue scenes can take chapters to unfold, as characters explain the Slipstream or the metaphysics of sexual connection, or discuss the figure of 'the Running Christ.' Imaginative vigor pulses through descriptive scenes in which characters encounter gods and Shakespeare's fairies . . .

Something I Keep Upstairs cover
Something I Keep Upstairs
by Mr. Philip K. Crawford '89
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2020
Genre: Fiction
Category: Mystery/thriller
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Coleman Cooper is a troubled young man who can never get anything right—not even his own suicide.

When he is sent to an open-door mental health facility in a small New England village to get his life back on track, his journey darkens even further: someone starts killing the psychiatrists, one by one.

After taking a job tending bar at a local country inn—the social heart of the quirky little town where everyone knows everyone and grudges can last for decades—Coleman unwittingly finds himself at the center of the investigation, even a suspect.

Yet as villagers dread news of more victims and the police come up empty-handed, it is Coleman, and he alone, who discovers the twisted path to the killer’s identity—and the door to a new life for himself.

This Is Major: Notes on Diana Ross, Dark Girls, and Being Dope cover
This Is Major: Notes on Diana Ross, Dark Girls, and Being Dope
by Shayla I. Lawson
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Harper; 2020
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: American Studies
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From a fierce and humorous new voice comes a relevant, insightful, and riveting collection of personal essays on the richness and resilience of black girl culture—for readers of Samantha Irby, Roxane Gay, Morgan Jerkins, and Lindy West. 

Shayla Lawson is major. You don’t know who she is. Yet. But that’s okay. She is on a mission to move black girls like herself from best supporting actress to a starring role in the major narrative. Whether she’s taking on workplace microaggressions or upending racist stereotypes about her home state of Kentucky, she looks for the side of the story that isn’t always told, the places where the voices of black girls haven’t been heard.

The essays in This is Major ask questions like: Why are black women invisible to AI? What is “black girl magic”? Or: Am I one viral tweet away from becoming Twitter famous? And: How much magic does it take to land a Tinder date?

With a unique mix of personal stories, pop culture observations, and insights into politics and history, Lawson sheds light on these questions, as well as the many ways black women and girls have influenced mainstream culture—from their style, to their language, and even their art—and how “major” they really are.

Timely, enlightening, and wickedly sharp, This Is Major places black women at the center—no longer silenced, no longer the minority.

Principals with Impact: 5 Leadership Roles to Improve Schools cover
Principals with Impact: 5 Leadership Roles to Improve Schools
by Dr. R. Lloyd Jaeger (Lloyd) '73
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2020
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: Education
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Every American family and their children deserve an effectively led results-driven school. Principals with Impact is your replicable guide for how all principals may fulfill that promise. With compelling examples and real-world case studies, Dr. Jaeger illuminates five critical roles effective principals use to elevate both faculty performance and student learning. The roles function interactively, providing principals with essential tools and capacities to become transformational leaders while fulfilling their many ongoing responsibilities. His conversational style simulates staff and student engagement. His guided modeling supports skill development and application. And his multiple graphics and templates support local planning and analysis. With its many integrative resources, Principals with Impact is both practical and aspirational. It is a roadmap with which every school leader can engage staff well and take a shared journey toward bold futures for all students.

Speculative Fictions: Explaining the Economy in the Early United States cover
Speculative Fictions: Explaining the Economy in the Early United States
by Ms. Elizabeth A. Hewitt '88
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Oxford University Press; 2020
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: History
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Speculative Fictions places Alexander Hamilton at the center of American literary history to consider the important intersections between economics and literature. By studying Hamilton as an economic and imaginative writer, it argues that we can recast the conflict with the Jeffersonians as a literary debate about the best way to explain and describe modern capitalism, and explores how various other literary forms allow us to comprehend the complexities of a modern global economy in entirely new ways.

Speculative Fictions identifies two overlooked literary genres of the late eighteenth-century as exemplary of this narrative mode. It asks that we read periodical essays and Black Atlantic captivity narratives with an eye not towards bourgeois subject formation, but as descriptive analyses of economic systems. In doing so, we discover how these two literary genres offer very different portraits of a global economy than that rendered by the novel, the imaginative genre we are most likely to associate with modern capitalism. Developing an aesthetic appreciation for the speculative, digressive, and unsystematic plotlines of these earlier narratives has the capacity to generate new imaginative projects with which to make sense of our increasingly difficult economic world.

Pathways to a Successful Accountable Care Organization cover
Pathways to a Successful Accountable Care Organization
edited by
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Johns Hopkins Univ. Press; 2020
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: Health/medicine
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Health care in America is undergoing great change. Soon, accountable care organizations—health care organizations that tie provider reimbursements to quality metrics and reductions in the cost of care—will be ubiquitous. But how do you set up an ACO? How does an ACO function? And what are the keys to creating a profitable ACO?

Pathways to a Successful Accountable Care Organization will help guide you through the complicated process of establishing and running an ACO. Peter A. Gross, MD, who has firsthand experience as the chairman of a successful ACO, breaks down how he did it and describes the pitfalls he discovered along the way. In-depth essays by a group of expert authors touch on

• the essential ingredients of a successful ACO
• monitoring and submitting Group Practice Reporting Option quality measures
• mastering your patients' responses to the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey
• how bundled payments and CPC+ can meld with your ACO
• how MACRA and MIPS affect your ACO
• the role of an ACO/CIN
• the complexities of post-acute care
• data analytics
• engaging and integrating physician practices


Dr. Gross and his colleagues are in a perfect position to guide other health care leaders through the ACO process while also providing excellent case studies for policy professionals who are interested in how their work influences health care delivery. Readers will come away with the necessary knowledge to thrive and be rewarded with cost savings.

Raising Cyberethical Kids cover
Raising Cyberethical Kids
by Mr. Frederick S. Lane III (Fred) '85
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2020
Category: Technology
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Acceptable Use Policies: Business have them. Universities and schools have them. Hotels have them. Even coffee shops have them. And your family should too.

A Family Acceptable Use Policy will help keep your kids safer, reduce conflict over the use of digital devices, and encourage better behavior. The key to raising good digital citizens is parent-child communication. Drafting a family acceptable use policy with your child(ren) is a great opportunity to discuss household values, online risks, and responsible online activity. No home should be without one!

This is a brief but detailed guide to the major social media and device issues that will arise as your child grows up. The book contains a model Family Acceptable Use Policy for each major phase of development, with relevant suggestions for not only your child but you as well. The core message of this book is that ongoing communication about family values and household expectations is the most effect method for keeping your child safe and secure online.

The Fire This Time cover
The Fire This Time
by Mr. Stuart F. Liss Esq. (Stu) '67
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2020
Genre: Fiction
Category: Mystery/thriller
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To obtain an acquittal for a client charged with a heinous murder, Maddie Devlin, a public defender, must produce the killer.

Boston, MA, April, 1981. Tensions between its religious, racial, and ethnic communities are high because of court-ordered school busing. The mayor’s son is murdered. At the crime scene is the skull cap of a rabbinic student. After his arrest, anti-Semitism explodes.

Devlin thinks the killer is the leader of Boston’s most notorious street gang. She has no evidence. The D.A. and police won’t investigate. To seek evidence, she must enter the gang’s turf without knowing whether she will live to present whatever evidence she finds. Never has defending a client zealously been so dangerous.

Every criminal defense attorney wants justice for his or her client especially if that client did not commit the heinous crime for which he will stand trial. Maddie Devlin, a public defender, is no different. To obtain justice for her client, she must overcome the ‘Perry Mason Curse.’ Poking holes in the prosecution’s case will not result in an acquittal. Only producing the killer will. To do this, she must put her life on the line without knowing if her gambit will succeed. Even if she survives, she may not be able to produce the killer. This is the dilemma Devlin confronts in defending her client.

Hemingway’s Sun Valley: Local Stories behind his Code, Characters and Crisis cover
Hemingway’s Sun Valley: Local Stories behind his Code, Characters and Crisis
by Mr. Philip Huss III '93
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2020
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: History
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It was a cold, "windless, blue sky day" in the fall of 1939 near Silver Creek--a blue-ribbon trout stream south of Sun Valley. Ernest Hemingway flushed three mallards and got each duck with three pulls. He spent the morning working on his novel For Whom the Bell Tolls. Local hunting guide Bud Purdy attested, "You could have given him a million dollars and he wouldn't have been any happier." Educator Phil Huss delves into previously unpublished stories about Hemingway's adventures in Idaho, with each chapter focusing on one principle of the author's "Heroic Code." Huss interweaves how both local stories and passages from the luminary's works embody each principle. Readers will appreciate Hemingway's affinity for Idaho and his passion for principles that all would do well to follow.

Veil and Vow: Marriage Matters in Contemporary African American Culture cover
Veil and Vow: Marriage Matters in Contemporary African American Culture
by Aneeka A. Henderson
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University of North Carolina Press; 2020
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: American Studies, Black Studies
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In Veil and Vow, Aneeka Ayanna Henderson places familiar, often politicized questions about the crisis of African American marriage in conversation with a rich cultural archive that includes fiction by Terry McMillan and Sister Souljah, music by Anita Baker, and films such as The Best Man. Seeking to move beyond simple assessments of marriage as "good" or "bad" for African Americans, Henderson critically examines popular and influential late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century texts alongside legislation such as the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act and the Welfare Reform Act, which masked true sources of inequality with crisis-laden myths about African American family formation. Using an interdisciplinary approach to highlight the influence of law, politics, and culture on marriage representations and practices, Henderson reveals how their kinship veils and unveils the fiction in political policy as well as the complicated political stakes of fictional and cultural texts. Providing a new opportunity to grapple with old questions, including who can be a citizen, a "wife," and "marriageable," Veil and Vow makes clear just how deeply marriage still matters in African American culture.

Falling for the Innkeeper  cover
Falling for the Innkeeper
by Ms. Meghann Wooster '01
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2020; 224 pp.
Genre: Fiction
Category: Religion/spirituality
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Single mom Laura Lessoway won’t accept her mother’s plan of selling her late grandmother’s inn without a fight. But when big-city attorney Jonathan Masters arrives to arrange an offer from his client, she’s drawn to him. And working together as he helps with repairs only brings them closer. With his career and her home on the line, can they ever find common ground?

Hyper Education: Why Good Schools, Good Grades, and Good Behavior Are Not Enough cover
Hyper Education: Why Good Schools, Good Grades, and Good Behavior Are Not Enough
by Pawan H. Dhingra
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NYU Press; 2020
Genre: Non-fiction
Category: Asian Studies, Education
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An up-close look at the education arms race of after-school learning, academic competitions, and the perceived failure of even our best schools to educate children

Beyond soccer leagues, music camps, and drama lessons, today’s youth are in an education arms race that begins in elementary school. In Hyper Education, Pawan Dhingra uncovers the growing world of high-achievement education and the after-school learning centers, spelling bees, and math competitions that it has spawned. It is a world where immigrant families vie with other Americans to be at the head of the class, putting in hours of studying and testing in order to gain a foothold in the supposed meritocracy of American public education. A world where enrichment centers, like Kumon, have seen 194 percent growth since 2002 and target children as young as three. Even families and teachers who avoid after-school academics are getting swept up.

Drawing on over 100 in-depth interviews with teachers, tutors, principals, children, and parents, Dhingra delves into the why people participate in this phenomenon and examines how schools, families, and communities play their part. Moving past "Tiger Mom" stereotypes, he addresses why Asian American and white families practice what he calls "hyper education" and whether or not it makes sense.

By taking a behind-the-scenes look at the Scripps National Spelling Bee, other national competitions, and learning centers, Dhingra shows why good schools, good grades, and good behavior are seen as not enough for high-achieving students and their parents and why the education arms race is likely to continue to expand.