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4. Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing Texts

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Read the following passage excerpted from an online edition of a foreign policy magazine. Determine whether any of the sample sentences that follow are improperly cited or plagiarized.

The illegal trade in drugs, arms, intellectual property, people, and money is booming. Like the war on terrorism, the fight to control these illicit markets pits governments against agile, stateless, and resourceful networks empowered by globalization. Governments will continue to lose these wars until they adopt new strategies to deal with a larger, unprecedented struggle that now shapes the world as much as confrontations between nation-states once did.

—from: Naím, Moisés. "The Five Wars of Globalization." Foreign Policy Jan.-Feb. 2003: Online Edition. <http://www.foreignpolicy.com>. January 13, 2003.

Which of the following passages are cited correctly, and which are plagiarized, improperly paraphrased, or otherwise cited inadequately?

  1. In his essay on "The Five Wars of Globalization," Naím Moisés argues that governments need to adopt new strategies for handling the kinds of borderless illegal activity increasing under globalization.
  2. In describing the "illegal trade in drugs, arms, intellectual property, people, and money" as "booming," Naím, Moisés asserts that governments need to adopt new strategies to deal with this unprecedented struggle that now shapes the world (http://www.foreignpolicy.com).
  3. Like the war on terror, the struggle to control illegal trade in drugs, arms, money, etc., pits governments against cunning, stateless, and enterprising networks empowered by globalization (Moisés 2003).
  4. Many experts believe that globalization is changing the face of foreign policy.

The following passage is from a book on romance novels and soap operas. Below are citations from it. Determine whether the citations are plagiarized.

The complexity of women's responses to romances has not been sufficiently acknowledged. Instead of exploring the possibility that romances, while serving to keep women in their place, may at the same time be concerned with real female problems, analysts of women's romances have generally seen the fantasy embodied in romantic fiction either as evidence of female "masochism" or as a simple reflection of the dominant masculine ideology. For instance Germaine Greer, referring to the idealized males of women's popular novels, says, "This is the hero that women have chosen for themselves. The traits invented for him have been invented by women cherishing the chains of their bondage." 9 But this places too much blame on women, and assumes a freedom of choice which is not often in evidence—not in their lives and therefore certainly not in their popular arts.

[Tania Modleski. Loving with a Vengeance: Mass-Produced Fantasies for Women. New York and London: Methuen, 1982. 37-38]

Citations:

  1. Tania Modleski claims that Germaine Greer over-simplifies why women read romance novels (38).
  2. Modleski states that although romance novels may keep women in their place, they also address real female problems (37).
  3. Feminist critics see the fantasy embodied in romance novels either as evidence of female "masochism" or as a simple reflection of male chauvinism (Modleski 37-38).
  4. One feminist writer, Germaine Greer, says that the idealized male featured in women's popular romance novels "is the hero that women have chosen for themselves. The traits invented for him have been invented by women cherishing the chains of their bondage. 9"" (38).
  5. Tania Modleski rejects the idea that the fantasies expressed in romance novels are merely a reflection of some innate masochism in women who, in the words of Germaine Greer, "cherish[...] the chains of their bondage" (37; Greer qtd. in Modleski, 38).

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