Interterm Non-Credit Courses for 2017

Adventures in Photography


Amherst College Winter Creative Writing Residency 2017


An Introduction to the Principles, Practices, and Procedures of Turbine Flight


Celestial Navigation


Collecting 101: Acquiring Art for the Mead


Communicating With Confidence; a Speaking Intensive for Women


Cultural Humility and Competence: An Essential Component of Medical and Health Care


Design/Build Competition -- Book & Plow Farm Edition


Emily's House and Other Rebels: Amherst's 19th Century Architectural Revolt


Guiding conversations about health behavior change: An introduction to Motivational Interviewing


Intro To Machine Shop


Mindfulness-Based Meditation & Relaxation for Students 


Personalizing the Process: One-to-One Writing Instruction


Senior Job Search Boot Camp


Training for Intervention Procedures (TIPS Training For Alcohol Service)


Mapping Knowledge with Geographic Information Science and Technology


Evolution of the Portrayal of Mental Illness in the Media


Web Programming


The Just World of Harry Potter: An Introduction to Social Justice Theory 


 The Art of Writing for Children: A Mead Publication Project 


Talking Heads: Object Narratives at the Mead


Thesis Writers' Retreat Week 1 and/or 2


 Thesis Space


 Introduction to Book Binding


Flesh on Bones: Language, Sight, & Understanding Fossils

 


 

Adventures in Photography

Date and Time: Mon, 1/9/17 - Thu, 1/12/17 1-4pm; Tues, 1/17/17 1-4pm

Location: Seeley Mudd 115

Facilitator: Joshua Baum

Description: This course will develop fundamental concepts of photography through creative hands-on activities and local photo field trips. Students will learn to control the manual functions of a DSLR camera to improve their skills and shoot compelling photographs. We’ll cover exposure, lighting, lenses, composition, color, stylization, experimental techniques, and the basics of retouching images using Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop.

Prerequisites: An interest in digital photography and being outdoors (it will be winter after all). Prior experience is helpful but not required.

Sponsored by: IT - Multimedia Services

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

Amherst College Winter Creative Writing Residency 2017

Date and Time:

Tues Jan 10, 1:00-3:00 PM, Initial Workshop (Converse 207)
Wed-Fri (Jan 10-Jan 13) and Tues-Fri (Jan 17-Jan 20), 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM, Writing Sessions (7) in Frost Library
Fri Jan 20, 3:30-5:30, Final Community Reading, location T.B.D.
Optional mentoring sessions by appointment

Location: Frost Cafe

Facilitator: Roy Andrews, Emily Merriman

Description:

Interterm is writing time! Join us for a two-week independent residency in creative writing. Modeled on writers and artists colonies like MacDowell, Yaddo, and the Provincetown Fine Arts Workshop, this program offers you the opportunity to devote sustained, undistracted attention to your fiction, poetry, dramatic writing, or creative nonfiction in a supportive environment. We'll begin with a meeting in which we'll explore the writing process for insights on starting, developing, and realizing a creative project. We will then convene every morning -- the heart of the program -- for three hours of writing (eight sessions total). Each session will start with a brief meeting at Frost Cafe to warm up our writing muscles, set goals, and/or review progress, then we'll write independently (together or alone, as suits each writer) until noon. Participants are welcome to work either on new or existing projects. For participants seeking guidance, instruction, or simply feedback on their work, we'll also offer up to four one-on-one mentoring sessions with program leaders. At the end of the program, we'll come together for a community reading, during which we'll share work produced during the residency.

Prerequisites: None

Sponsored by: Writing Center

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 
An Introduction to the Principles, Practices, and Procedures of Turbine Flight

Date and Time: We will meet from Wednesday 11 January thru and including Friday January 20. There will be no class on Sunday 15 January or Monday 16 January (Martin Luther King Day).
Classes will meet at 1200 hrs and conclude at 1430 hrs. Additionally each of you will spend a total of four hours in the Virtual Reality Lab with the Oculus Rift CV1 in Smudd (two hours as first officer and two hours as captain aboard the Seven Three Seven). There will also be one daylong field trip to Bradley International Airport sometime during the above dates.

Location: Merrill 4, Merrill Science Center

Facilitator: Henry Parker Hirschel / Instructor
Kwadwo Eck / Virtual Reality Instructor

Description: For a complete description go to the Department and Physics and Astronomy and click on
"Interterm Courses 2017"

Prerequisites: All Majors Encouraged

Sponsored by: Department of Physics and Astronomy & Internet Technology Department

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

Celestial Navigation

Date and Time: 1230 hrs to 1430 hrs; Tuesday, January 3rd thru and including Tuesday, January 10th  (no class on Sunday, January 8th) one daylong field trip sometime during above dates

Location: Merrill 4

Facilitator: Henry Parker Hirschel

Description: This is an introduction to the art and science of celestial navigation. For a detailed course description see the department of Physics and Astronomy homepage.

Sponsored by: Department of Physics and Astronomy

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

 

Collecting 101: Acquiring Art for the Mead

Date and Time: Monday, Jan. 9 – Friday, Jan. 13, 2017
Monday 1-4 PM
Tuesday 10-4 PM
Wednesday and Thursday: Overnight fieldtrip (TBC)
Friday 10-4 PM

Location: Mead Art Museum

Facilitator: Miloslava Waldman

Description: Are you curious to find out how museums add to their collections? Are you keen on meeting the rising stars of the graphic arts scene, visiting their studios and the galleries that represent them (as far away as Boston and New York City)?  What’s involved beyond an interest in art and passion for collecting?

This course will help answer these questions and give participants a chance to play an active role in the art acquisition process at the Mead. Get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the museum’s facilities, discuss collecting strategies with the curatorial staff, and join exciting field trips to meet artists and see their work. Be a part of the process that will culminate in the purchase of an original work for the Mead’s permanent collection!

Participants’ presentations of the pre-selected prints and an announcement of the winning artwork will be held at a public function on Tuesday, February 21 (TBC) at 7 PM at the Mead Art Museum.

The artwork purchase is underwritten by H. Nichols B. Clark through a fund established in the memory of his late wife Trinkett Clark, the former curator of American Art, who “loved working with students and shopping”.

Prerequisites: None

Sponsored by: Mead Art Museum

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

Communicating with Confidence; a Speaking Intensive for Women

Date and Time: Tuesday, January 17 – Friday, January 20.   2pm – 5:30pm

Location: Converse Hall/Porter Lounge

Facilitator: Susan Daniels, Associate in Public Speaking

Description: Communicating with Confidence, a Speaking Intensive for Women: This four day intensive speaking course helps students who identify as women focus on what and how they want to communicate in all aspects of their lives. Drawing on a variety of theatre techniques used by experienced actors to relax, focus their message and connect with an audience, this course will coach students in the art of confident and powerful communication. Students will be guided to uncover their unique strengths, develop an authentic and personalized speaking style, and overcome obstacles to delivering their message.   Working closely together in a positive, supportive environment, students will finish the week with the presentation of an inspiring speech.  Limited to 12 Amherst College students.

Prerequisites: This course is designed for women. Must be a student at Amherst College.

Sponsored by: The Writing Center

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

 

Cultural Humility and Competence: An Essential Component of Medical and Health Care

Date and Time: January 17, 18, 19, 20, 2017  10:30am - 12:30pm

Location: Chapin 201

Facilitator: Dean Richard Aronson and Prof. Patricia O’Hara

Special guest speaker: Dr. Rhea Boyd, MD,  MPH

Description: Cultural competence and humility are central to creating effective medical care, and to addressing health inequality and injustice. It’s the way that patients and doctors - and public health - can come together and talk about health concerns without cultural differences hindering the conversation, but enhancing it.  Cultural competence in health care doesn’t mean being an authority on the values and beliefs of every culture. This course addresses the core components of cultural competence as it applies to health care. This means learning about the groundbreaking Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, research on resilience, the biology of stress, and how toxic stress has an impact on physical and mental health across the lifespan. It means learning to be culturally humble, personally and organizationally; holding and practicing a respect for cultural and language differences;  developing an awareness of the specific cultural and linguistic lenses through which we, as individuals and groups, view the world, including the universal human tendency for bias and stereotype; being aware of how every aspect of public health and medical care is cross-cultural in nature; learning how the biopsychosocial model of health is truly interdisciplinary, and how life at the molecular level is expressed at the macro level of human health; and how these biopsychosocial  factors play a major role in health disparities. We’ll explore the diabetes epidemic among Pima Indians in Arizona; the “cultural competence continuum” that covers the spectrum between cultural destruction and cultural proficiency: and grow to internalize the concept that an individual’s uniqueness transcends cultural traits and that our shared humanity and inter-connectedness ultimately form the foundation for humane and effective medical care and public health strategies.

Prerequisites:

Sponsored by: Health Professions Advisor/Careers in Health/Loeb Centers

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

Design/Build Competition -- Book & Plow Farm Edition

Date and Time: January 9th, 12th, 16th, 19th; 9am to Noon.

Location: Frost Library

Facilitator: Pete McLean

Description:

The Opportunity:  Book & Plow Farm does not have any on campus office space.

The Objective:  Deliver a custom set of plans, budget, and timeline of completion to the client (B&P's Pete McLean)

The Process:  Pete McLean explains the functions that the office needs to perform.  Answers questions.  Explains restrictions and boundaries.  Answers more questions.  Teams of 3 are formed and begin creating and developing models, ideas, drafts, etc to meet the unique and specific needs of the client (B&P).  Teams meet with McLean during class time to show progress, check that they are on the right path, and ask any questions. 

Prerequisites: Be a team player.  Think creatively.  Problem Solve.  Be willing to jump in.

Sponsored by: Book and Plow Farm

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

 

Emily's House and Other Rebels: Amherst's 19th Century Architectural Revolt

Date and Time: Monday, January 16, 10 a.m.-noon; 1 p.m.-3 p.m.
Tuesday, January 17, 10 a.m.-noon; 1 p.m.-3 p.m.
Wednesday, January 18, 10 a.m.-noon; 1 p.m.-3 p.m.
Thursday, January 19 , 10 a.m.-noon; 1 p.m.-3 p.m.
Friday, January 20, 10 a.m.-noon; 1 p.m.-3 p.m.

Location: Frost Library archives (Tuesday through Friday); Monday location to be determined.

Facilitator: Blair Kamin

Description: This class is designed to give you a richer understanding of Amherst’s architecture, a taste of architectural journalism and a chance to contribute to an architecture guide to the College that will be published by Princeton Architectural Press. Previous versions of the class, taught by Pulitzer Prize-winning Chicago Tribune architecture critic Blair Kamin ’79, focused on the College’s former fraternity houses and athletic buildings. This year, the class will train its lens on the College’s remaining mid-19th Century structures, including the Octagon, Morgan Hall, and Stearns Steeple as well as the poet Emily Dickinson's house on Main Street. Whether these designs followed the precedent of Italian villas or Gothic cathedrals, they had something in common: A picturesque rejection of the austere Federal and Greek Revival styles of the early 19th Century. Today, they are important outliers on a campus that can be accused of being harmonious to a fault.  In this class, each student will be responsible for researching and writing an essay about one building. We’ll visit the buildings and do archival research on them at Frost. If enough students sign up, we’ll extend the selection of buildings to the demolished Walker Hall, the medieval-styled “Temple of Science” which occupied the site where Frost now stands. Come ready to explore and learn the basics of journalism, including the great Chicago epigram: "If your mother says she loves you, check it out."

Prerequisites: None

Sponsored by: Art & the History of Art

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

Guiding conversations about health behavior change: An introduction to Motivational Interviewing

Date and Time: Tuesday January 17 - Friday January 20; 2PM-4:30PM Each Day

Location: Cooper 101

Facilitator: Chaya Tikva

Description: Guiding conversations about health behavior change:
An introduction to Motivational Interviewing

Motivational Interviewing is a collaborative counselling style for strengthening a person's own motivation and commitment to change.1  It is widely researched and applied in many settings including health care and medical schools.2 3     Motivational Interviewing (MI) is especially relevant to addressing health behavior change in the context of chronic health conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Two brief videos below illustrate the concerns this model is addressing and the solutions it offers. 4

This participatory workshop will allow students to practice the skills and strategies used in Motivational Interviewing and to experience its foundational values. Activities will include small and large group discussions, role-plays, videos, and supportive feedback. If there is interest, it is possible to have several follow-up sessions during spring semester. This workshop is targeted to students interested in health professions, public health and health education.

Chaya is an Amherst alum and a member or the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT). She was trained in MI through UMASS Medical School’s Center for Integrated Primary Care. This fall, Chaya attended an international MINT conference and is looking forward to teaching what she learned. Please email chayatikva18@gmail.com with any questions.

 1. Miller and Rollnick. Motivational Interviewing: Helping People Change, Third Edition, Guilford Press. 2012.

 2. Harvard Medical School, Motivational Interviewing: An Introductory Workshop. http://cmeregistration.hms.harvard.edu/events/principles-of-motivational-interviewing-an-introductory-workshop/custom-18-e92e2d80363845f287ee3784b0ef82bb.aspx (retrieved 11/12/16)
 
3. Miller, Rollnick, and Butler. Motivational Interviewing in Healthcare: Helping patients change behavior. Guildford Press. 2012.

 4. The Ineffective Physician: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DsEZTWTkM7w
The Effective Physician: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDeXwF8Ff3E  (retrieved 11/12/16)

Prerequisites: This course is targeted to students interested in health professions, health education and public health. It could also be useful to students interested in psychology and education.

Sponsored by:

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

Intro to Machine Shop
 

Date and Time: 1-3-17 thru 1-6-17, 1-9-17 thru 1-13-17, 1-17-17 thru 1-20-17.; 9a-Noon each day

Please note that this course requires attendance for each date listed for safety considerations.

Location: Student Machine Shop, Merrill 126

Facilitator: Jim Kubasek

Description: Students will be introduced to a variety of metal working machinery and their operations. This class is an intensive hands on class where the student work on different projects to learn the basics of lathes, milling machines, saws, layout and measuring equipment as well as a host of hand tools.

Prerequisites: This workshop is a continually rapid progression of techniques and skills and attendance to all dates is of the utmost importance. Students who cannot make all dates and times are encouraged to apply at a later date. Contact Jim Kubasek at jkubasek@amherst.edu for more information

Sponsored by: Physics and Astronomy

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

 

Mindfulness-Based Meditation & Relaxation for Students

Date and Time: January 9-13, 2017; 9:15-11:45am

Location: Conway Classroom

Facilitator: Adi Bemak

Description: The intention of a this course is to offer a week-long introductory program in the practice of mindfulness for the support of students' personal health and wellness. It will also help students cope with the stress that is common to being in a demanding academic environment. The emphasis of the program will be on developing a personal daily mindfulness practice that can be sustained over time, and through which students will be able to discover practical applications as they meet the challenges of daily life.

Prerequisites: None

Sponsored by: Athletics

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

 

Personalizing the Process: One-to-One Writing Instruction

Date and Time: Introductory workshop: Tuesday, January 10, 10:00-11:30am

Location: The Writing Center

Facilitator: Cassie Sanchez

Description: Part of developing as a writer is paying close attention to how you move through the process of writing. In this program, we will focus on process both in group and one-to-one settings. In the introductory workshop we, as a group of students and writing associates, will investigate the writing process to (a) establish a common vocabulary and (b) serve as a jumping-off point to explore your own process. You then will partner with a writing associate to discuss, in 4-6 one-to-one sessions, how and what you write (please bring a few recent papers), identifying strengths, opportunities for development, and ideas and methods to help you strengthen your papers and enhance the overall experience of writing. In the concluding workshop, we will reflect on the process of learning about process, focusing on memorable moments and ways to incorporate what you learned in your course assignments. Introductory workshop: Monday, January 9, 10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Individual sessions: Self-scheduled, two-three times per week during Interterm.

Prerequisites: NA

Sponsored by: The Writing Center

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

Senior Job Search Boot Camp

Date and Time: 

Jan. 18 10:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Jan. 19 10:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Jan. 20 10:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Location: Alumni Room, Pratt Fieldhouse

Facilitator: Kali Odell

Description: Are you a senior looking for concrete skills to improve your job search process? If so, join alumni, guest speakers, and Career Center staff in an interactive three day boot camp designed to develop and enhance your job search skills. Whether you are just beginning your job search or looking to refine your approach, this boot camp is for you!

Day 1: Identify your strengths as a job candidate, learn about tools for finding job opportunities, and develop skills for effectively tailoring your resumes and cover letters to specific positions. 

 Day 2: Learn and practice how to approach a variety of networking situations, including informational interviews, LinkedIn, and networking events. 

 Day 3: Practice your interview skills, learn how to appropriately negotiate and accept a job offer, and receive advice about navigating the job search process. End the program by creating a personalized job search plan. 

Because we want you to reap the full benefits of this boot camp, you are required to attend all sessions in order to participate. Free lunch will be provided each day!

Prerequisites: 

Must be a first or second semester senior. Available for Amherst College students only.

Must commit to attending the complete Boot Camp program. 

Must submit a resume to Kali Odell (kodell@amherst.edu) by January 6, 2017.

Sponsored by: The Loeb Center for Career Planning and Exploration

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

 

Training for Intervention Procedures (TIPS Training For Alcohol Service)

Date and Time: Wednesday, January 18; 12pm - 4pm

Location: Paino Lecture Hall, Beneski

Facilitator: Emily Lombardo

Description: The TIPS Training program is designed for servers of alcohol to learn strategies that ensure responsible alcohol service, promote professionalism, and enhance customer service skills. TIPS Training is highly recommended for students who may be interested in working during Commencement/Reunion and is required to work as a server for any College event in which alcohol is served. Non-seniors will be given priority for registration.

Prerequisites: None

Sponsored by: Office of Student Activities

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

Mapping Knowledge with Geographic Information Science and Technology

 

Date and Time: Tuesday - Friday, January 3 - 6, 1pm - 4pm

Location: Seeley Mudd 104

Facilitator: Andy Anderson

Description: Geographic Information Science and Technology (GIST) is focused on discovering spatial relationships using a powerful set of tools that make it easy to work with geographic data.

Visualize your research with intuitive maps

Spatially correlate census, economic, and other data

Illustrate historic sites and extract features from old maps

Track human, animal, and plant populations

Map locations from a GPS receiver

Display geologic formations and delineate watersheds

Create interactive online maps

This short course will cover the following content:

Constructing and Sharing Maps (including with Google Earth and ArcGIS Online)

Mapping Named Data (including census data and street addresses)

Mapping Coordinate Data (including using a GPS receiver

Mapping Image Data (including scanned maps and satellite data)

Extracting Features from Scanned Maps

Analyzing Geographic Data (including landscapes and demographics)

Please think about a project to which you'd like to apply your new understanding!

This course is non-credit and no charge. Enrollment is limited; priority is given to the Amherst College community and then the Five College community through December 27, after which it is first-come, first-served.

Prerequisites: None

Sponsored by: Academic Technology Services

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

Evolution of the Portrayal of Mental Illness in the Media

Date and Time: January 9-13, 2017, 9am-10am

Location: Converse 302

Facilitator: Kunali Gurditta

Description: This course will examine how mental illness is portrayed in the media, specifically in TV shows and movies with and without a medical theme. It will focus on how the portrayal of mental illness, particularly in regards to the misconceptions surrounding mental illnesses, has evolved from the early 2000s to present day. Activities will include analysis of scenes from older and newer TV shows and movies, as well as discussions of how media can be used to accurately (but captivatingly) portray mental illness to the general public. For more information, contact Kunali Gurditta (kunaligurditta@gmail.com).

Prerequisites: None

Sponsored by: Reader to Reader

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

Web Programming

Date and Time: Monday – Friday, January 9 – 13, 9:00 AM – 12:00 Noon

Location: Webster 102

Facilitator: Andy Anderson

Description: The World-Wide Web is a set of computer technologies that publish and display information over the Internet in a highly interactive manner. At the heart of the Web are several content and programming languages that will be covered in this example-based course:

• The Web content languages (HTML and CSS) that are the foundation of web pages;
• The Web programming language (JavaScript) that makes web pages dynamic and interactive;
• A document object library (jQuery) that makes it easier to manipulate your pages;
• User-interface frameworks (Bootstrap and React) that provide pre-built components for your pages;
• A Web server (Node.js + Express) that lets you store and search for your data;
• A server-side database (MongoDB) to provide efficient access to your data.

Please think about a project to which you’d like to apply your new understanding!

This course is non-credit and no charge. Enrollment is limited; priority is given to the Amherst College community and then the Five College community through December 27, after which it is first-come, first-served.

Prerequisites: None

Sponsored by: Academic Technology Services

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

The Just World of Harry Potter: An Introduction to Social Justic Theory

Date and Time: 

January 9 – 13th
Monday
10:00 to Noon: Class
Noon to 1:00pm: Community Lunch
1:00 to 9pm: Film Screenings (Films 1-3) 

Tuesday
10:00 am to Noon: Class
1:00pm to 3pm: Class
3:30 to 6/7: Film Screening (Film 4 & 5)

Wednesday 
10:00 am to Noon: Class
1:00pm to 3pm: Class
3:30 to 6/7: Film Screening (Film 6)

Thursday
10:00 am to Noon: Class
1:00 to 6: Film Screening (Film 7 & 8)

Friday
10:00am to Noon: Class
Noon to 1: Community Lunch
1 to 2: Class (Wrap-up)

Location: WGC and Keefe Movie Theater

Facilitator: Jesse Beal

Description: During this one week highly interactive course, students will learn the fundamentals of social justice theory through exploring the world of Harry Potter. The course will begin with foundational conversations on identity, power, privilege, oppression, and intersectionality, by critically engaging the films and excerpts from the books, as well as seminal social justice texts. The imagined world of Harry Potter will allow the participants to explore the material conditions of our world and lived experiences. We will also examine the phenomenon of the franchise, the impact of the books on readers, and the ways in which JK Rowling uses her books to deploy social justice pedagogy. 

Prerequisites: None

Sponsored by: WGC & Office of Diversity and Inclusion

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

 

The Art of Writing for Children: A Mead Publication Project 

Date and Time: 

Tuesday, January 17; Wednesday, January 18; Thursday, January 19; and Friday, January 20; all 1-4 PM

Location: Mead Art Museum

Facilitators: Keely Sarr, Pamela Russell, Keffie Feldman

Description: Are you a writer/artist/kid-at-heart? Join this lively workshop to explore the art of writing for young readers and complete an original work that will be published by the Mead in spring 2017. Read and discuss classic picture books and get a behind-the-scenes look at the Mead’s collection as you work together to tell a story inspired by art and history. Open to Five College students.

Prerequisites: Participants should have an interest or experience in at least one of the following: visual art (photography, drawing, digital art), creative writing, and/or graphic design

Sponsored by: Mead Art Museum

REGISTER FOR COURSE HERE

 

Talking Heads: Object Narratives at the Mead

Date and Time: 1/17-1/20, 1-4p

Location: Mead Art Museum

Facilitators: Pam Russell, Keffie Feldman, Keely Sarr

Description: Join with Mead Educators in creating engaging object labels for an eclectic installation focusing on the human head. With objects in a variety of media, dating from antiquity to the present, and spanning the globe, there are many different narratives to tell. You will be guided through the research and writing process, and the final product -- your label -- will be displayed in the Mead's galleries. Choose an object and help it "speak" its unique story!

Prerequisites: None

Sponsored by: Mead Art Museum

REGISTER FOR COURSE HERE

 

Thesis Writers' Retreat Week 1 and/or 2

Date and Time: 

Register for one or both sessions: 

Week 1: Monday, January 9 - Friday, January 13, 9am-1pm

Week 2: Tuesday, January 17 - Friday, January 20, 9am-1pm

Location: Charles Pratt Common Room (Writing Center)

Facilitators: Jessica Kem, associate director of the Writing Center

Description: Perhaps you plan to write intensely over Interterm, but staying motivated to write without the structure of a regular schedule can be challenging. You are invited to join fellow writers at the Writing Center’s Thesis Writers' Retreat, to commit to write together for a consistent, extended period of time. At the start of each week, the group will establish its rules for participation, and then writers will develop their goals and strategies for success for the week. Every day, writers will set (and discuss) individual goals at 9am, and then review and discuss progress before the session ends at 1pm. In between is writing time; Writing Center staff will be available for consultation, and coffee and snacks will be plentiful. 
Registration is required, and space is limited. 
Participants must agree to:
*attend, and be on time for, the first session of the week, where we will discuss the retreat model and establish the group's rules.
*commit to attend all or most days in the session
*observe the retreat rules, as set by the group at the opening session
*set and assess daily goals in a writer's log
If you are unable to meet the requirements of the retreat, you are welcome to attend the drop-in Thesis Space, which is a less-structured thesis writing environment.

Prerequisites: All Amherst College students with large writing/academic projects are welcome, but priority will be given to those enrolled for a senior thesis. 

Sponsored by: Writing Center

REGISTER FOR COURSE HERE

 

Thesis Space

Date and Time: 

January 4, 5, 6 (Wednesday - Friday): 9am-4pm

January 9 - January 12 (Monday - Thursday): 1-5pm 
 
January 17-Thurs January 19 (Tuesday - Thursday): 1-5pm

Location: Charles Pratt Common Room (Writing Center)

Facilitators: Jessica Kem, associate director of the Writing Center

Description: Thesis Space is just that: space dedicated to thesis work, with coffee and simple snacks provided. Writing Center staff will be available nearby for consultation; students may drop by for any length of time. Thesis Space is also available to Amherst College students preparing for comprehensives or writing large projects.

 Prerequisites: None

Sponsored by: Writing Center

REGISTER FOR COURSE HERE

Introduction to Book Binding

Open to Five College Students

Date and Time: Wednesday, January 11, 1:30-5pm

Location: Babbott Room

Facilitators: Michele Barale, Professor of Sexuality, Women's and Gender Studies; Jessica Kem, Associate Director of the Writing Center

Description: Make your own books and never run out of places to write! In this hands-on workshop, participants will learn basic terminology and techniques for book making, see examples of a variety of book binding styles, and learn how to make 2-3 kinds of books. Beginners are welcome, as are those with some experience with book binding. Materials will be provided, but participants may bring in papers or other materials they would like to use.

 Prerequisites: Open to Amherst College students, faculty, and staff. Open to all levels of book binding experience (beginners are especially welcome!).

Sponsored by: Writing Center

REGISTER FOR COURSE HERE

 

Flesh on Bones: Language, Sight, & Understanding Fossils  

Date and Time: 

January 9th - 12th, 11 AM - 12:30 PM
Jan 9th (Mon) + 12th (Thurs): meet at the Beneski Museum of Natural History
Jan 10th (Tue): meet at the Cadigan Center
Jan 11th (Wed): meet in the lobby of the Mead Art Museum

Location: Beneski Museum of Natural History/Cadigan Center/Mead Art Museum 

Facilitators: Sylvia Ngo

Description: Long before paleontology existed as a discipline that formalized the study of fossils, people were stumbling across and seeking to understand fossils. In so doing, they incorporated an unknown into the known. From dragon bones to saints' bones, ancient battlefield carnage to ancestral remains of today's creatures, fossils have been variously perceived and have played diverse roles in medicine, science, and more.

Using the collections and displays from our very own campus museums, the Beneski and the Mead, this mini course will focus on different ways of seeing fossils and bones and the interplay between language and sight in "fleshing" them out. We will also examine the importance of contextualization in shaping how we perceive and understand fossils. No background knowledge is necessary and all are welcome!

 Prerequisites: None.

Sponsored by: Reader to Reader

REGISTER FOR COURSE HERE