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Soffer Ornithology Collection Notes (alphabetical by author)

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T

Tachibana, Morikuni (1679-1748). Ehon Tsuuhoushi

Taczanowski, L(adislas) (1819-1899). Mémoires de L’Académie ..de St. Pétersbourg....Sibérie Orientale

Taito, Katsushika) (fl. ca. 1850). Kacho Gaden.

Taka-Tsukasa, Prince (Nobusuke) (1889-1959) Kaidori shusei (Colored plates of Japanese cage birds)

Taka-Tsukasa, Prince (Nobusuke) (1889-1959). The birds of Nippon.

Taka-Tsukase, Prince Nobusuke (1889-1959), et al. Report of the first scientific expedition to Manchoukuo under the leadership of Shigeyasu Tokunaga June-October 1933.

Takatukasa (sic), Prince N. Japanese birds

Takizawa, Kyoshi. Sen Ryu doh gafu: kacho no bu.

Tanner, James T.(aylor)(1914-1991) The ivory-billed woodpecker

Tate, Peter (1926-). A century of bird books.

Tate, Peter (1926-). Birds men and books a literary history of ornithology.

Taverner, P(ercy) A(lgernon) (1875-1947). Birds of Canada.

Taylor, John W(illiam) (1931-). Birds of the Chesapeake Bay.

Tegetmeier, W(illiam) B(ernhard) (1816-1912). Pheasants  their natural history and practical management.

Temminck, C-(oenraad) J(acob)(1770-1858). Manuel d'ornithologie....

Tennent, Sir J(ames) Emerson (1804-1869). Sketches of the natural history of Ceylon.

Tennyson, A., Martinson, P. Extinct birds of New Zealand

Terashima, Ryouan  Wakan Sansaizue 

Thayer, E., and V. Keyes. Catalogue of a collection of books on ornithology in the library of John E. Thayer.

Thijsse, Jac.(obinus Pieter) (1865-1945). Het vogeljaar.

Thorburn, A.(rchibald)(1860-1935)  British birds  1918 edition

Thorburn, Archibald (1860-1935) (Grahame, Major Iain). Thorburn's birds of prey....

Thorburn, Archibald (1860-1935). British birds.  1925 edition

Thorburn, A(rchibald) (1860-1936). Game birds and wild-fowl of Great Britain and Ireland.

Ticehurst, Claud B.(uchanan)(1881-1941) A systematic review of the  genus Phylloscopus  (willow-warblers or leaf-warblers) 

The Kakao-Compagnie Theodor Reichartd of Hamburg-Wandsbek (publisher). Tiere der Urwelt.

Todd, Albert May (1850-1931). Ornithological books.

Todd, W(alter) E(dmond) Clyde (1874-1969). Birds of western Pennsylvania.

Todd, W(alter) E(dmond) Clyde (1874-1969), and M(elbourne) A(rmstrong) Carriker (1879-1965). The birds of the Santa Marta region of Colombia.

Todd, W(alter) E(dmond) Clyde (1874-1969). Birds of the Labrador / peninsula.

Todd, W(alter) E(dmond) Clyde (1874-1969). The Birds of the Isle of Pines.

Traviès, Edouard (1809-) (introduction by Jean Jacques Brochier (1937-), textes de Buffon).   Les oiseaux les plus remarquables par leurs formes et leurs coleurs / scènes variées / de leurs moeurs et de leurs habitudes. Duculot edition

Traviès, Édouard (1807-?1867). Les Oiseaux / Les plus remarquables par leurs formes et leurs Couleurs / Scènes Varieés / de leurs moeurs & leurs habitudes / Etudes à l’aquarelle. Original edition (1857)

Traviès, Édouard (1807-1867[?]). [Les oiseaux les plus remarquables par leurs formes et leurs coleurs.  Scènes variées de leurs moeurs et de leurs habitudes].  Five prints

Traviès, Edouard (1809-1865). L’hirondelle de mer.

Traviès, Edouard (1807-1867[?]).Nouvelles etudes de  nature No. 2 Oiseaux d'Asie

Traviès, Edouard (1809-) (introduction by Brochier, Jean-Jacques, text by Toussenel, Alphonse[1803-1885]).  Oiseaux de chasse.

Trinity College (prepared by Breit, Viola; Clarke, Karen B.; Putnam, Ann; Wondriska, Alison). Ornithology books in the library of Trinity College . Hartford including the library of Ostrom Enders.

Tristram, H.(enry)B.(aker)(1822-1906)  The survey  of  Western Palestine.  The fauna and flora of Palestine. 

Trusler, Peter, (paintings) (text by Kloot, Tess; McCulloch, Ellen M.). Birds of Australian gardens.

Tuck, G(erald) S.  (illustrated by Hermann Heinzel). A field guide to the seabirds of southern Africa and the world.

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles] F[rederick][1901-1979])  Williamson, Henry, (1895-1977)  The peregrine’s saga and other wild tales 1934

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles] F[rederick][1901-1979]) Priestley, Mary  A book of birds English edition, 1937

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles] F[rederick][1901-1979]) Priestley, Mary  A book of birds  American edition, 1938

Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979). My country book.  1942

Tunnicliffe, C(harles) F(rederick) (1901-1979). Bird portraiture. 1945

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles] F[rederick][1901-1979]), Bayne, Charles S. The call of the birds, 1945

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles] F[rederick][1901-1979]) Lockley, R.(onald) M.(athias)(1903-) Letters from Skokholm 

 (Tunnicliffe, Charles (Frederick [1901-1979]) Rogerson, Sydney(1894-1968) Our  bird book

Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979). Mereside chronicle with a short interlude of lochs and lochans. 1948

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles] F[rederick][1901-1979]) Dimdale, C. D.  Come out of doors a guide for nature lovers 1951

Tunnicliffe, C(harles) F(rederick) (1901-1971). Birds of the estuary. 1952

Tunnicliffe, C(harles) F(rederick)(1901-1979). Shorelands summer diary.  1952

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles] F[rederick][1901-1979]), Watson, E(lliot) L(ovegood) Grant (1885-). What to look for in winter, (1959),  early printing

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles] F[rederick][1901-1979]), Watson, E(lliot) L(ovegood) Grant (1885-). What to look for in winter.  (1959), later printing

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles]F[rederick]) (1901-1979), Watson, E(lliot) L(ovegood) Grant (1885-). What to look for in summer. (1960), early printing

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles]F[rederick][1901-1979])Watson, E(lliot)L(ovegood)Grant (1885-). What to look for in autumn. (1960), early printing.

Tunnicliffe, C(harles) F(rederick) (1901-1979). African wild life. 1960

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles]F[rederick] (1901-1979), Watson, E(lliot) L(ovegood) Grant (1885-). What to look for in spring, (1961), early printing.

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles]F[rederick] (1901-1979), and E(lliot) L(ovegood) Grant Watson (1885-). What to look for in spring. (1961), later printing.

Tunnicliffe, C(harles) F(rederick)(1901-1979). Tropical birds(1961)

(Tunnicliffe, C[harles]F[rederick][1901-1979]), Day, J(ames) Wentworth (1899-). British birds of the wild places. (1961)

Tunnicliffe, Charles Frederick (1901-1979). Bird drawings by C. F. Tunnicliffe RA.  1974

Tunnicliffe, C(harles) F(rederick)(1901-1979). Hawks and falcons.  1975

(Tunnicliffe, Charles Frederick[1901-1979]), Bennett, Linda. RSPB Book of garden birds. (1978)

Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979). A sketchbook of birds 1979

(Tunnicliffe, Charles [1901-1979]), and Ian Niall. Portrait of a country artist Charles Tunnicliffe R. A. 1901-1979.1980.

Tunnicliffe, Charles (1901-1979)(Auction catalog) Measured drawings, watercolours, sketchbooks, manuscripts...

Tunnicliffe, C(harles) F(rederick) (1901-1979) (introduction and commentary by Robert Gillmor). Sketches of bird life. London, 1981

Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979) (introduction and commentary by Robert Gillmor). Sketches of bird life New York, 1982

 (Tunnicliffe, Charles F[rederick]), Niall, Ian. Tunnicliffe's countryside 1983

Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979)(introduction, commentary, memoir by Noel Cusa). Tunnicliffe's birds measured drawings by C. R. Tunnicliffe RA.  1984

Tunnicliffe, Charles Frederick (1901-1979)(text by Noel Cusa). Tunnicliffe's birdlife 1985

Tunnicliffe, Charles F(rederick)(1901-1979) (text by Gillmor, Robert). The composition drawings. 1986

Tunnicliffe, C(harles)F(rederick)(1901-1979). Shorelands winter diary 1992

Tunnicliffe, C. F. (Sotheby’s auction catalogue). C. F. Tunnicliffe  from the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. 1995

Tunnicliffe, C(harles)F(rederick)(1901-1979), (Gillmor, Robert, introduction), (Ratcliffe, Derek, "The Anglesey Peregrines, chapter). The peregrine sketchbook.

Turnbull, William P(atterson) (1830-1871).  The birds of east Pennsylvania and New Jersey, Large Paper copy

Turnbull, William P(atterson) (1830-1871).  The birds of east Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Regular ("8vo") paper copy

Turnbull, William P(atterson) (1830-1871). The birds of east Pennsylvania and New Jersey Unrecorded variant

Turner, Angela and Rose, Chris  Swallows & martins  An identification guide and handbook

Turner, William (d. 1568). Turner on birds: a short and succinct history of the principal birds noticed by Pliny and Aristotle 

Turner, L.(ucien)M.(cShan)(1849-1909). Contributions to the natural history of Alaska…

Tweedale, Marquis of (Lord Walden, Arthur Hay)(1824-1878)  Contributions to the ornithology of the Philippines

Twigden, Blake L. (1946-). The fifty rarest birds of the world 

Tyzenhauza, Count K.(onstantin) (1786-1853) Zasady ornitologii albo nauki o ptakach.  Obejmumace: rys postepu jej literatury,taxonomia, glossologia i terminologia 


Tachibana, Morikuni (1679-1748)

Ehon Tsuuhoushi (volume 6)  22.7 x 15.7 cm.  23 leaves as described below.  Contemporary (?) blue-boards, bound Japanese-style with red stitching, white labeling piece with Japanese characters on upper (right) cover.  Prints and text contained within black-ruled frames, 18.5 x 13.7 cm.  All pages with marginal Japanese characters. Leaves externally conjugate in Japanese style.  Kyouhou14 (1729).

Contains three-page text followed by 13 single and 15 double-page uncolored woodblock prints depicting birds (in one case butterflies) and flowers. 

This is a remarkable survival, especially considering its inherent frailty.  There are some wormholes.  The volume is part of a series, probably some sort of illustrated encyclopedia. The drawings are very well done and almost all of the birds are recognizable.  Amongst the best are mallard, baikal teal, tragopan, peafowl, golden pheasant, wagtail, shrike and waxwing.

According to the Japanese dealer, Mr. Ueda, the year of publication and the name of the artist are reported in Iwanami (publisher), " Kokusho so mokuroru" "The Japanese classical books catalogue of the maximum scale", work [14584]. 

Harvard lists "Tachibana, Morikuni" (1679-1748) as the author/artist for Fuso gafu / Tachibana Morikuni ga, Osaka, 1735.


Taczanowski, L(adislas) (1819-1899)

Mémoires / de / L’Académie Impériale des Sciences de St. Pétersbourg, VIIe Série. / Tome XXXIX. /  Faune Ornithologique / de la / Sibérie Orientale  32.6 x 25.0 cm.  π314χ21-8548622X 87-16041612(-1612)[$1, 2 signed]; 649 ll.  Pp. (6)[I]II-VIII(4)[1]2-684(2)685-1278.  Contemporary green half-morocco, gilt-lettered spine with five raised ridges, marbled boards and endpapers.  TEG.  St. Petersburg, Imperial Academy of Sciences, 1891-1893. 

π1r, Journal title page; π1v, publication data; π2r, contents; π2v, blank; π3r, subject title page; π3v, publication data; I, biography of Taczanowski including publication list by Jean Stolzmann; X1r, subject title, part 1, 1891; X1v, publication data; X2r, avant-propos; X2v, blank; 1, preface; 6, species accounts; 2Xr, part 2 subject title, 1893; 2Xv, publication data; 685, species accounts, continued; 1269, index.  Contains photogravure frontispiece portrait of Taczanowski.

Taczanowski was a Polish ornithologist held in high international regard who is best known for the present work as well as one on the birds of Peru (1884-1886), another on the birds of Poland, and several papers on the birds of Algeria.  He also collaborated with Count Tyzenhauza on a very rare two-volume treatise concerning the oology of Polish birds (1862). He was basically a museum ornithologist and his works on exotic birds were based on specimens collected by other ornithologists, for Peru and Siberia mainly by Jelske and Dybowski, respectively.  Most of the skins for the present work were in the Warsaw, St. Petersburg and Moscow Museums. 

Taczanowski’s books are characterized by a high level of scholarship with meticulous attention to detail.  In the present work, he covers 508 species, providing synonymy, exhaustive measurements and descriptions of plumages and eggs, and extensive notes on distribution. 

Taczanowski’s works are all rare.

Bradley Martin, #1908; BM(NH), p. 2069.  Absent from Ayer, McGill, Trinity and Yale catalogs.


Taito, Katsushika) (fl. ca. 1850)

Kacho Gaden (Sketchbook of Flowers and Birds)  21.0 x 15.2 cm.  30 Leaves of which 29 comprise 27 double-page and four single-page colored (sumi-e) wood-block plates and the other includes and initial and final leaf of text.  Orange Japanese wrapper with title label on upper (right-hand) cover and typical Japanese string binding.  The obverse of the upper cover is the title page. 19th century.  Japan.

This book is not quite of the kachô genre because a few of the pictures do not include plants.  The birds are depicted with an eye to artistry as opposed to accuracy and many of them are not recognizable and thus more like those of Kyoshi Takizawa and Seitei Watanabe as opposed to Bairei Kôno or Keinen Imao.  The colors are mainly dilutions of black and red i. e. various shades of gray and pink.  There are also a few blue background washes and one picture with intense green grass.

I identified this book as one of a two-volume set comprising lot #563 of sale 908 at Swann Galleries on 11 October, 2001.  The work was described as follows:  Taito, Katsushika.  Kacho Gaden (Sketchbook of Flowers and Birds), Np, Kaei 1-2 (1848-49).  The volume corresponding to my own was identical even including the patterned orange wrappers.  Hokusai also had the name Katsushika and was the artist for a two-volume kacho work printed in 1848-49 so I am quite certain that this is that work.  The Boston Book Company is offering what is described as a reprint of that work  issued in Tokyo, 1891.  However, I have seen several prints allegedly dating to the late 1880s from the same work on ebay ascribed to Taito who is described as a Meiji artist who had been a pupil of and whose work was much influenced by Hokusai.

Subsequently, I came across a single volume absolutely identical to my own on ebay being offered on 6/19/03 by "ethelthesheep" as ebay #3527954246.  Here is the description on ebay: "This is Kacho Gaden nihen 'Pictures of Flowers and Birds-second part".  One volume complete with designs by Genryusai Taito (Taito II).  Original covers and title slip.  Inside front-cover title page (printed in blue) giving artist Katsushika Taito; 3 pp. preface signed and dated Kaei 2 (1849); 31 sheets of illustrations in sumi, grey and pink; last page advertisements and the names of the publishers Kawachiya Mohei and Kawachiya Tobei of Osaka and Suharaya Shinbei of Edo"  The consignor continues and quotes Hillier, in The Art of the Japanese Book, p. 804 "…some of Taito's designs seem to have been lifted from earlier designs of Hokusai.."

 

 

Taka-Tsukasa, Prince Nobusuke (1889-1959)

 Kaidori shusei (Colored plates of Japanese cage birds)  22.0 x 14.8 cm.  Formatted western-style, i. e. left to right with upper cover on left.  In Japanese.  Pp. (2, recto, title, verso, blank)[1]2[(1)](2)-(10)(1)2-(320)(2, registration leaf).  167 Ll. Publisher’s brown cloth with black block decoration on upper cover, gilt lettering on spine.  Original printed tan dust wrapper. TEG.  Tokyo, Yokendo, 1930.

 (2, Title and blank)(1), introduction; (1)-(10), contents; (1)2- (272), ornithological text; 273, plant text; 298, Lepidoptera; 307, Coleoptera; 313, index of Japanese name.  Contains color gravure plates 1-18, 19A, 19B, 20-61(i. e. 62 plates), each with many figures, printed on one side only and not included in pagination.  Also, uncolored text figures (line sketches, uncolored half-tone photographs) 1-70.

 Taka-Tsukasa, a member of the Japanese nobility, was the author of the unfinished “The birds of Nippon” (eight parts, 1932-1943), the senior author of “Birds of Jehol” (1935) and also wrote a popular tourist pamphlet about Japanese birds.  He had an aviary and was highly regarded and well connected internationally.  His obituary, written by his friend Jean Delacour, appeared in the January 1960 issue of “The Auk”.

 The present work is concerned primarily with almost 500 species of cage birds that were kept in Japan prior to World War II.  The birds are arranged systematically and the name of each is given in Latin, Japanese, English, French and German. A brief text accompanies each. Details of cages and aviaries are also provided and these are the subjects of the text illustrations.  Unlike the other works cited above, which were either written in English or contained an English translation, this one is entirely in Japanese save for the multilingual nomenclature Of the 62 colored plates, 61 are of birds and one depicts flowers. The figures are well drawn and colored and the book is attractive.

 This work is extremely rare, at least in western libraries. This is the only example I have encountered in 30 years.  OCLC locates just four copies: at Harvard, Yale, the University of Michigan and the Smithsonian.  The latter is listed as “1939”

 


Taka-Tsukase, Nobusuke, Prince (1889-1959), Hachisuka, Marquis M.(asauji)(1905-1953), Kuroda, N.(agamichi)(1889-1978), Yamashina, Marquis Y.(oshimaro)(1900-1989), Uchida, Seinosuke (1884-).

Report of the first scientific expedition / to / Manchoukuo / under the leadership of Shigeyasu Tokunaga / June-October 1933. / Section V  Division II  Part III / Birds of Jehol  26.0 x 18.8 cm.  Bound and paginated western-style.  Pp.  One preliminary leaf; 1-91(1)(2, list of sections I-VI of report; required publication information, framed).  Errata slip laid in loosely.  Later quarter red buckram-backed marbled boards by Starr Bookworks.  Two gilt black paper lettering pieces on spine.  Tokyo, Waseda University Faculty of Science and Engineering, April1935. 

Preliminary leaf: recto, title; verso, members of the expedition and contributors to the report; 1-62, introduction and systematic accounts of 70 species in Japanese; 63, English translation of introduction and systematic accounts.  Contains color half-tone plates I-XXVIII signed S. Kobayashi, printed on recto only, not included in pagination, and each with protective tissue guard.  Plate X has correction slip pasted over the original label.

After the Japanese invaded Manchuria, they sent in a scientific investigative team with specific sections concentrating on geology, geography, botany, zoology and anthropology.  The ornithological report was under the aegis of the zoology section.  A collection of birds was made by expedition members Kyukichi Kishida and Tamezo Mori and sent to the Ornithological Society  of Japan for examination.  It was studied under the general supervision of Uchida who also solicited and oversaw the artwork,  with Taka-Tsukasa and Hachisuka responsible for the non-passerine species, and Kuroda and Yamashina the Passeres.  The collection was found to comprise 70 species including one new subspecies.  Every specimen is listed with sex, date, and locality.  The colored plates are excellent, however plate X was intended to illustrate a kestrel but instead depicts a peregrine and has a correction slip denoting a red-footed falcon.

Anker, #498.  Also listed by AMNH, Harvard, Yale. Not listed by Cornell, Trinity.


Taka-Tsukasa, Prince (Nobusuke) (1889-1959)

The birds of Nippon   Volume I, eight parts (all published) in original printed brown wrappers.  Loose with original prospectus in later clamshell box of quarter blue buckram and marbled boards with gilt black paper lettering piece on spine by Starr Bookworks.  London and Tokyo, H. F., & G. Witherby and Yokendo (parts 1-7) and (Tokyo, by the author), part 8.

Part 1 / introduction / order Galli ///// 15th August, 1932 ( all from wrapper)  Pp. [I]II-IV[1]2-70.  I, Introduction; 1, order Galli, keys and distribution; 8, systematic accounts, Megapodius laperouse-Syrmaticus scintillans, forms 1-4.  Contains: tipped in errata slip at front; plates I, III-VII including two partially color printed maps and four plates of birds printed in color half-tone, two after H. Grönvold, two after N. Higashi; each with accompanying tissue sheet of letter-press, the plates and letter-press not included in pagination; four unnumbered sepia photogravure plates not included in pagination; text figures 1-3, one full-page.

Part 2 / physiography / order Galli ///// 20th April, 1933  Pp.  V-XXVI,71-128.  V, physiography; 71, systematic accounts, Syrmaticus soemmerringi soemmerringi-Phasianus versicolor kiusiuensis, forms 5-8.  Contains: tipped in note to binder and errata slip at front; plates II, VIII-X including one color printed map and three colored plates of birds after Higashi; five photogravure plates.

Part 3 / history of / Japanese / ornithology / order Galli ///// 11th April, 1934. Pp.  XXVII-LVI, 129-168.  XXVII, history of Japanese ornithology; 129, systematic accounts, Phasianus colchicus karpowi-Gennaeus swinhoii, forms 9-12.  Contains: tipped in errata slip at front; colored plates XI, XII and XIIb one signed, the other two also probably by Higashi; three photogravure plates.

Part 4 / history of / Japanes / ornithology / order Galli ///// 1st February, 1935.  Pp.  LVII-LX, 169-238.  LVII, bibliography, abbreviations used, A-C; 169, systematic accounts, Bambusicola sonorivox-Coturnix coturnix japonica, forms 13-17.  Contains tipped in errata slip at front; colored plate XIII after Higashi; and seven photogravure plates, one with an accompanying tissue sheet of letter-press.  One text figure, unnumbered here but later called figure 4 in list of illustrations.

Part 5 / the / bibliography / order Galli /////15th November, 1935.  Pp.  LXI-LXXVI, 239-290.  LXI-LXXII, bibliography, abbreviations, C-Z; LXXIII, bibliography, general; LXXIV, bibliography, systematic; 239, systematic accounts, Tetrastes bonasia vicinitas-Lyrurus tetrix ussuriensis, forms 18-22.  Contains tipped in errata slip at front; colored plates XIV-XV after Higashi; five photogravure plates.

Part 6 / the / bibliography / order Galli /////  5th March, 1937.  LXXVII-CVIII, 291-326.  LXXVII-LXXX, bibliography, systematic; LXXX-CVIII, bibliography, faunistic; 291, systematic accounts, Lagopus muticus japonicus-Lagopus mutus kurilensis, forms 23-24.  Contains: tipped in errata slip at front; unpaginated uncolored map with accompanying sheet of letter-press (later called figure 5 in list of illustrations); colored plates XVI-XVII after Higashi; four photogravure plates.

Part 7 / the / bibliography / (continued) / order Galli / (continued) / addenda  1st March, 1939.  CIX-CXLVIII, 327-358 (ends in mid-sentence).  CIX, bibliography, faunistic; 327, systematic account, Lagopus lagopus lagopus, form 25; 335, addenda.  Contains: tipped in errata slip at front; colored plates XVIII-XIX of eggs and chicks, unsigned but probably by Kobayashi; one photogravure.

Part 8 / addenda, corrigenda, / index, & C.  28th February, 1943.  Pp.  [(I)-(V)](VI)-(X)CXLIX-CLXXXIV[(XI)](XII)-(XIII)[(XIV)]358-456.  (I), Half-title; (2), blank; (3), title printed in red; (IV), blank; (V), preface; (VIII), blank; (IX), contents; CXLIX-CLI, bibliography, faunistic; CLI-CLXXIII, bibliography, ethnology; CLXXIII-CLXXV, hereditary; CLXXV-CLXXVIII, bibliography, zoogeography; CLXXVIII-CLXXXIV, bibliography, miscellaneous; (XI), list of plates and figures; (XIV), dates and pagination of all eight parts; 359, addenda, continued; 432, corrigenda; 447, index, mainly Latin but some several other languages.  Contains: errata slip printed in Japanese and in red at front; two unpaginated folding tables on thin paper inserted at p. 366 and 396; colored plate XX signed by Kobayashi; Fine hand-painted woodblock frontispiece of flying  green pheasant by Koyo Ishizaky.

This book was entirely printed and produced in Japan but there was, until the war, an arrangement with Witherby involving promotion.  The prospectus prepared in 1932 by Witherby tells us that  coverage of approximately 800 species and subspecies in five volumes was envisioned by the author.  The price was 15 shillings per part and the edition was limited to 200 copies.  In this first volume which required 11 years of preparation, Taka-Tsukasa got through only 25 species and subspecies.  When one examines his invaluable bibliography of more than 125 pages, one realizes why the going was as slow as it was.  Of special interest to me is the extensive section on the history of Japanese ornithology which contains the only allusions I have ever read to oriental antiquarian ornithological books.  The work is completely exhaustive with virtually every account of species and higher orders a monograph in itself.

The eighth part of this work was published privately by the author during the second world war and is exceedingly rare.   Indeed, many ornithological bibliophiles did not know of its existence until the auction of Bradley Martin's library.

A second, slightly expanded posthumous edition with fewer colored plates was published in 1967.

Listed by AMNH(unspecified number of parts), Ucal (seven parts), Cornell (eight parts), Harvard (eight parts), Trinity (seven parts), Yale (seven parts).

 

 

Takatukasa, Prince Nobusuke ( 1889-1959) (illustrated by Z. Kobayasi [sic])

 

 Japanese birds  18.3 x 12.8 cm.  In English. Pp.  [1-8]9-132(2, blank and Japanese publication and promotion information in Japanese).  Publisher’s printed stiff  card with colored illustration of Little Egrets on upper wrapper  and original glassine sleeve.  Tourist Library: 35.  Board of Tourist Industry, Japanese Government Railways, (Tokyo, 1941).

 

 1, Half-title; 2, list of published volumes (35) in Tourist Library; 3, title; 4, copyright, 1941; 5, editorial note for the Tourist Library series; 6, note on spelling for Romanized Japanese syllable sounds; 7, contents; 8, blank; 9, introduction; 11, birds seen in ports; 18, birds of urban regions; 53, birds of rural regions; 98, shore birds; 106, bird protection; 111, nests and eggs; 121, index of English names; 128, index of Japanese names; 132, short  (6 ) bibliography.  Contains five unnumbered double- page plates printed in fine color gravure with blank obverses and not included in pagination.  Also contains 61 unnumbered, uncolored gravure photographic text illustrations.

 

 There is certainly irony in the fact that this elegant and attractive book, intended for English speaking tourists, should be published during a militaristic phase of Japanese history when Japan entered war against the very countries that supplied the desired tourists.  The well educated author, Takatukasa, was a member of the royal family and belonged to the ornithological elite.  This beautifully written work covers about 130 species in an easy going style intended for the novice.  The special significance of various species in Japanese culture is elaborated.  The colored illustrations and text photographs are very nicely printed. 

 

 The author wrote several other books, the most important of which was “The birds of Nippon”, 1932-1943.

 

 This is common publication.  OCLC locates  more than  280 copies.  The author’s name is frequently given as Taka-Tsukasa and the artist’s as S. Kobayashi.

 

 

 


Takizawa, Kyoshi

Sen Ryu doh gafu: kacho no bu (flowers and birds)  22.4 x 15.0 cm.  24 folded leaves.  Blue card covers sewn in traditional Japanese style with vertical title label.  Tokyo, Matsuzaki, 1877.  An alternate of title: Takizawa Kiyoshi ga: Senryudo Gafu, Kacho-no-Bu

This is an uncolored kacho (i. e. a collection of pictures each of which shows bird[s] and flowers).  The 24 leaves comprise one of text as well as ten double and 26 single-page wood block pictures.  The insides of the covers contain printed Japanese characters which, in the case of the upper cover, are brown.  As often seems to be the case for this genre, the illustrations are artistically expressive rather than graphically accurate.  I haven’t heard of this artist and I have the impression that he is not of the caliber of Bairei, Keinen or Seitei but perhaps this reflects on the quality of reproduction by the publisher.  These pictures have much narrower lines than other wood blocks that I have seen. 

Wood, p. 418: Kyoshi, Senriodo Takizawa  1879.  Sketches of Birds and Flowers

 

 

Tanner, James T.(aylor)(1914-1991)

 

The / ivory-billed woodpecker / research report no. 1 / of the / National Audubon Society  26.2 x 19.7 cm.  Pp.  (4)I-XII1-111(1).  Binder’s blue-green buckram with gilt lettering to spine.  TEG.  Original gray printed wrappers bound at rear.  New York, National Audubon Society, October, 1942.

 

 

 

First preliminary leaf: recto, half-title; verso, blank; second preliminary leaf: recto, title with price of $2.50 included; verso, copyright 1947; printed in U. S. A. by Mack Printing Company, Easton, Pa; I, foreword by John H. Baker; II, blank; III, preface by Arthur A. Allen; V, acknowledgments; VI, blank; VII, contents; IX, list of illustrations; XI, introduction; 1, part I, the ivory-billed woodpecker; 3, part II, distribution and habitat; 31, part III, ecology; 65, part IV, reproductive and nesting habits; 87, part V, conservation; 99, part VI, summary; 101, appendix including nomenclature, taxonomy, plumages and anatomy, measurements, scientific names of birds, mammals, reptiles and trees;105, references (about 150); 109, index.  Contains color half-tone plate after George M. Sutton, uncolored half-tone photographic plates 1-20 printed on both sides of eight glossy leaves that are not included in pagination and text figures 1-22, many of which are maps, some full-page.

 

This is the first and best known of four “Research Reports” of the National Audubon Society that contain exhaustive and scholarly accounts of individual species. The photographs of this possibly extinct woodpecker are striking and evocative and the text is all encompassing.

 

This monograph, unlike the others in the series, is hard to obtain in the original printing.  It was reprinted by Dover in 1964.

 

Listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity and Yale.

 

 

 


Tate, Peter (1926-)

A / century of / bird books  22.3 x 15.5 cm.  Pp.  [1-4]5-256. Original publisher's gray cloth with gilt blue labeling piece on spine.  Blue endpapers.  London, H. F. & G. Witherby, 1979. 

1, Half-title; 2, illustration; 3 title; 4, "first published 1979"; copyright; ISBN 0 85493 127 9; printer designation: Ebenezer Baylis and Son Ltd., London and Worcester; 5, foreword by Eric Hoskings; 6, illustration; 7, contents; 8, illustration; 9, acknowledgements; 13, introduction; 19, part one, fine bird books; 33, books on British birds; 57, books on foreign birds; 75, county and regional studies; 105, monographs; 125, travel and biography; 141, aspects of behavior; 161, birds and birdwatching; 179, field guides; 193, part two, a listing of bird books published in Britain since 1875(misprinted 1895 in contents).  Contains about 98 unnumbered, uncolored half-tone photographic illustrations (31 full-page) all with both sides of leaf printed and included in pagination.

This work lists virtually every book pertaining to ornithology that was published in England from 1875-1974.  It provides almost no bibliographic information but is most entertaining to read.  The pictures are especially interesting.  The dust jacket is a photograph of several shelves full of ornithological books, many of which can be identified with a magnifying glass. There are pictures of book title pages,  dust jackets and plates, and of British ornithological personages.  I particularly like the one of Harry F. Witherby, publisher, author and birder, in suit and tie with a cane and binoculars in the Corsican countryside.

The author discusses many of the books and places them in informed historical perspective. The list of around 2000 books provides for each the author, title, publisher and year of publication.

This book is listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity and Yale.


Tate, Peter (1926-)

Birds men / and books / a literary history of ornithology   22.8 x 15.1 cm.  Five preliminary leaves, pp. 1-193(1).  Original publisher's green cloth with gilt lettering to spine.  Red dust jacket with white printing on upper cover and spine.  London, Henry Sotheran Ltd, 1986. 

First preliminary leaf: recto, half-title; verso, list of books by author; second: recto, title, signed by author; verso, copyright; ISBN 0 9508219 1 8; printer designation: Remploy Ltd., Leicester; third: recto: contents; verso, acknowledgements; fourth: recto-fifth recto, list and explanation of illustrations; fifth verso, blank; 1, the primitives; 2, first scientific approaches; 36, birth of the modern bird book; 47, Audubon and Gould; 61, other early professionals; 73, establishing U. S. ornithology;  83, the collectors' contribution; 106, emphasis on bird behavior; 122, the first popularizers; 135, the academics; 162, the post war period; 179, bibliography; 181, index; Contains uncolored half-tone photographic plates 1-20 printed on both sides of four leaves not included in pagination.

This is a history of English and American ornithology and ornithological books similar in scope and style to Joseph Kastner's A world of watchers, published the same year.  It provides a historical, if provincial, perspective, but suffers from a surfeit of errors, most grammatical and typographical, some factual.  The pictures are of personages and books.  Tate had previously written A century of bird books (1979).

The book is listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard and Trinity.  Not listed by Yale.


Taverner, P(ercy) A(lgernon) (1875-1947)

Birds of Canada  25.1 x 16.5 cm.  1-278288(+289)[$1, 2 signed]; 225 ll.  Pp.  (4)[1]2-445(1).  Original blue cloth with peripheral blind-ruled frame, gilt lettering on upper cover and spine.  Colored maps on endpapers. Canada / Department of Mines / National Museum of Canada / Bulletin No. 72 / Bilogical Series, No. 19  Ottawa, J. O. Patenaude, 1934.

11r, Title with original price of $2.00; 11v, blank; 12r, contents and illustrations; 12v, blank; 1, introduction; 18, ornithological literature (about 70 entries); 23, key to the birds of Canada (contents calls for "Western Canada"); 37, systematic accounts, Gavia immer-Plectrophenax nivalis, comprising about 490 species; 411, glossary; 415, general index including English and scientific bird names; 435, French names; 443, index to check-list (AOU) numbers.  Contains plates I-LXXXVII printed in color half tone, not included in pagination, and displaying 173 images by Allan Brooks (139) and F. C. Hennessey (34).  Also contains text illustrations (line drawings, some anatomical) 1-488, 1-71 by Claude Johnson, the remainder by Taverner, himself.

This is a synthesis of Taverner's previous works on the Birds of Eastern Canada (1919) and the Birds of Western Canada (1926).  These books were the standard Canadian ornithological texts until W. Earl Godfrey's Birds of Canada (1966).  The National Museum of Canada was fortunate to have Allan Brooks as its in-house "bird artist" and the colored figures are quite pleasing, although with two images per plate, they are rather small.  The text provides the following information for each species: length; brief description; distinctions; field marks; nesting (not eggs); distribution; suspecies.

The annotated section on ornithological literature contains one of the first (unintended) reviews of Peterson's Field Guide which was published the same year.  Taverner remarks of it(p. 18) "Exceptionally well illustrated…very excellent for the amateur…"

This book was issued over other imprints (Musson Book Company, David McKay) in 1938 and 1940 and a second edition was published by Musson in 1947 and reprinted in 1953.

This original printing listed by AMNH, Cornell, Yale.  Harvard and Trinity list only later printings.


Taylor, John W(illiam) (1931-)

Birds of the Chesapeake Bay / paintings by John Taylor / with natural histories and journal notes by the artist  29.8 x 25.6 cm.  Ivory-coated paper.  Pp.  [I-ix]x[1]2-83[84-86]  Original publisher's brown cloth with gilt lettering on flat spine.  Russet endpapers.  Pictorial dust jacket with original retail price of $39.95 printed on upper flap.  Baltimore and London, The Johns Hopkins University Press, (1992).

i, Half-title; ii, frontispiece; iii, title; iv, dedication; a Robert G. Merrick edition; copyright 1992; printed in Japan on acid-free paper; ISBN 0-8018-4380-4; v, contents; vi, blank; vii, foreword by Torrey C. Brown, M. D., Secretary, Maryland Department of Natural Resources; viii, blank; ix, preface; 1, half-title; 2-78, text on versos with corresponding facing plate on recto of next leaf; 80, blank; 81, list of plates 1-39 and frontispiece; 84, blank; 85, acknowledgments; 86, credits: composed by Brushwick Graphics, Inc., printed and bound by Toppan Printing Company ( America ), Inc.  Contains frontispiece and plates 1-39, so numbered only in list of plates, printed in various sizes in color half-tone with white borders that contrast pleasingly with ivory-tinted paper.

Taylor has spent most of his life painting wildlife, particularly birds, of the Chesapeake Bay area.  The images in this book were originally painted in oil on board.  Early in his career, Taylor tells us that he visited various bird artists in England and Germany and many of these fine pictures have clearly been influenced by the art of Philip Rickman.  The text contains extracts from diaries relevant to the image portrayed as well as a brief essay for each species depicted.  Taylor has made a career of selling his paintings rather than as an illustrator of books of which this is his first example.

Listed by Cornell, Harvard, Trinity.  Not listed by AMNH, Yale.


Tegetmeier, W(illiam) B(ernhard) (1816-1912)

Pheasants / their / natural history and practical management  21.4 x 14.5 cm.  [a]4b2B-R8S2[$1, 2 signed]; 136 ll.  Pp. [i-iii]iv-xii[1]2-255(1)(4, advertisements Tegetmeier's books).  Publisher's double blind-paneled black pebbled cloth with gilt lettering on upper covers and spine.  Frond-patterned endpapers.  Fourth edition, enlarged.  London, Horace Cox, 1904. 

i, Title; ii, printer designation: Horace Cox,"The Field" office; iii, prdface; vi, dedication; vii, contents; x, blank; xi, list of plates1, half-title: Pheasants / for coverts and aviaries; natural history of pheasants; 43, management in preserves; 77, management in confinement; 131, diseases of pheasants; 150, pheasants adapted to the covert; 204, pheasants adapted to the aviary; 243, transport of pheasants; 247, fertility of hybrids; 249, general index including common and scientific names.  Contains: six unnumbered color half-tone plates after F. W. Frohawk (1861-1946); 16 unnumbered, uncolored plates including 13 reproduced from wood-engravings by T. W. Wood, one each from engravings by J. G. Millais and P. Smit, and one half-tone photograph; 11 tail pieces, most apparently wood engravings, one a half-tone; 12 unnumbered text line drawings, some containing several figures; decorative chapter-opening initials.  The plates are all printed on one side only and not included in pagination.

The title on page one, "Pheasants for coverts and aviaries", was that used for the title page of the original edition of this work in 1873 and describes the subject matter perfectly.  This is a book about keeping pheasants and does not touch upon their existence in the wild.  Evidently, this was (and still is) a popular pastime since editions of the work with various titles appeared in 1873, 1881, 1897, 1904, 1911, 1922 and 1931.  Tegetmeier also wrote extensively on the maintenance of pigeons and of poultry.

Wood, p. 593.  This edition also listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard.  Trinity, Yale and Zimmer list other editions.


Temminck, C-(oenraad) J(acob)(1770-1858)

Manuel / D'Ornithologie / ou / Tableau Systématique / des Oiseaux Qui se Trouvent en Europe; / Précedé / D'une Analyse du Système Générale D'Ornithologie, / et Suivi / D'Une Table Alpabétique des Espèces   Four volumes. 19.9x 12.5 cm.  Laid paper. 8o.  Later gray buckram-backed gray boards.  Gilt green morocco labeling piece on spine. Marbled endpapers.

Première Partie  Paris, Cez Gabriel Dufour, Octobre, 1820.π2b8c8(-c8)d-g8h4(-h4)1-278284[$1 signed, e signature omitted by printer]; 280 ll.  Pp.  (4)[I]ii-cxv[cxvi][1]2-439[440].  π1r, Half-title; π1v, printer designation: Imprimerie De Fain; π2r, title; π2v, blank; i, introduction de la seconde édition; xxiv, avant-propos de la première édition; xliv, auteurs cités;xlvii, analyse du système générale d'ornithologie; 1-439, systematic text of "genres"1(vultur)-40 (caprimulgus).

Seconde Partie   Paris, Chez Gabriel Dufour, Octobre, 1820.  [28]229-598608(-608)[$1 signed]; 257 ll.  Pp.  (4)441-950.  281r, Half-title; 281v, printer designation; 282r, title; 282v, blank; 441-940,  systematic text, genres 41 (columba)-87(alca); 940, addition; 941, table alphabétique, des espèces.

Troisième Partie   Paris, Chez Edmond D'Ocagne, éditeur-libraire, Avril, 1935.  π2a-e8f21-198202(-202)[$1 signed]; 197 ll.  Pp.  (4)[i]ii-lxxxiv[1]2-306.  π1r, Half-title; π1v, avis de l'éditeur, printer designation: Imprimerie de Casimir; π2r, title; π2v, blank; i, introduction de la troisième partie; 1-305, systematic text, genres 1(vultur)-43 (caprimulgus).

Quatriéme Partie   Paris, H. Cousin, Amsterdam, VeLegras, Imbert et Cie, 1840.  [20]221-448452[$1 signed]; 196 ll.  Pp.  (4)[307]308-691[692-694].  201r, Half-title; 201v, "Edmond d'Ocagne, éditeur", printer designation: Paris, Imprimerie de Cosson; 202r, title; 202v, blank; [307]308-582, genres 44 (columba)-97 (alca); 583, appendice

à la troisième partie; 655, auteurs cités; 661, tables corrélative des matières contenus dans les quatre parties; 693, errata.

Temminck had good ornithological genes.  His father, a patron of Levaillant, was treasurer of the Dutch East India Company and had a large collection of birds as well as sufficient money to accumulate more.  The younger Temminck became amongst the most influential and prolific ornithologists of his era.  His two best known works were perhaps the monograph on parrots from which Madame Knip tried to pirate his authorship, and his Planches Coloriées…,  a sequel to the Planches Enluminées of Buffon.  His was always a powerful voice in matters of classification and in advancement of younger ornithologists.

The first edition of the present work was published in a single volume in 1815.  Temminck felt that it was outdated almost immediately.  The first two volumes of the second edition were complete unto themselves but Temminck soon felt again that they were outdated.  The third and fourth volumes could be regarded as a third edition.  For nearly half a century, this work stood as the authoritative one with respect to information on European birds.  But it was more than that because the "système générale" represented an attempt to integrate all known birds into a cohesive framework.  According to Zimmer, it contains many new names.

Temminck  (third volume, p. lxix) recruited Johann Carl Werner to prepare an atlas meant originally to accompany this work.  That octvo  Atlas des Oiseaux d'Europe d'àpres C.-J. Temminck, et Dessinés par J.-C. Werner  (1826-1842) contains 530 hand-colored lithographic plates and has usually been regarded as a separate bibliographic entity.

Wood, p. 593; Zimmer, p. 629.  Also listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity and Yale.


Tennent, Sir J.(ames) Emerson (1804-1869)

Sketches / of the / natural history of Ceylon / with  / narratives and anecdotes / illustrative of the habits and instincts of the  / mammalia, birds, reptiles, fishes, insects, &c. / including a monograph of the elephant / and a description of the modes of capturing and training it  18.3 x 12.0 cm.  A8(-1)B-II8KK2[$1-4 signed]; 261 ll.  Pp.  (2)[v]vi-xxiii[xxiv][1-3]4-500.  Later blind roll-ruled quarter red morocco and marbled boards by Starr Bookworks; Spine with five raised bands, gilt lettering in second, fourth and sixth compartments.  Marbled edges.  London, Longman, Green, Longman and Roberts, 1861.

 A1r, title; A1v, blank; v, introduction; xv, contents; xxi, list of illustrations; xxiv, erratum; 1, half-title; 3, mammalia; 75, the elephant; 241, birds; 271, reptiles; 323, fishes; 369, mollusca, radiata, acalephae; 403, insects; 464, arachnidae, myriopoda, crustacea etc.; 489, index; 500, printer designation: Spottiswoode and Co., London.  Contains: errata slip inserted at xxiv/1; 10 full-page wood-engravings printed on one side only and not included in pagination; 73 unnumbered text wood engravings.                                    

This is an early comprehensive natural history of Ceylon that expands upon a portion of Tennent's Ceylon, an account of the island… published in 1859.  Tennent had been Colonial Secretary in Ceylon during the period 1845-1849.  This work was preceded by that of E. F. Kelaart, Prodromus faunae Zeylanicae (1852) and much of the ornithological material here originally appeared in that publication and was due to Kelaart, and particularly to Edgar Layard as acknowledged by Tennent. That includes a list of more than 320 species and an annotated roster of 38 species thought then to be endemic.  Several of these are no longer considered as such.  The ornithological section contains six text engravings, two of which are after Joseph Wolf.  According to A. H.  Palmer, in his The life of Joseph Wolf (1895), p. 315, Wolf was responsible for 15 of the text engravings and two of the full-page plates in this work.

Perhaps the most interesting and original part of the book is the monograph on the elephant which contains several dramatic illustrations by Wolf.  Palmer particularly admired the original  sketches for these and reproduces them on pages 160 and 161.  He writes (p. 160) that "Ths is a work which every lover of natural history should try not only to place upon his shelves but to read carefully".

The collation of this volume suggests that it may be lacking a preliminary leaf preceding the introduction, perhaps a half-title or dedication.  It should also be noted that whereas the "List of Illustrations" calls for 11 plates, one these, the Saw-fish, p. 326 is actually a text figure.

Wood, p. 594.  Also listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity, Yale.

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Tennyson, Alan (James Drummond) and Martinson, Paul[1956]

 Extinct / birds / of New Zealand  28.1 x 23.0 cm.  3 PL, i-v[vi]1-180.  Original green cloth with gilt moa design, printing on upper cover, gilt printing on spine.  Pictorial dust jacket.  Wellington, Te Papa Press, (2006)2007. 

 PL1r, Half-title; PL1v, blank, coated gray; PL2r, title printed in white on gray coated page; PL2v, copyright; ISBNo-13: 978-0-909010-21-8; design by Mission Hall Creative; digital imaging by NZ Micrographics Services Ltd; printed by Everbest Printing Co, China; PL3r-PL3v contents; i, preface by Tennyson; iii,

acknowledgements; i-v, maps; vi, blank; 1, introduction; 17, species accounts (58); 136, specimens exclusive of fossils; 140, glossary; 141, notes and references; 160, bibliography (about 450 citations); 175, index.  Contains 58 unnumbered full-page color half tone plates after Martinson depicting a single species of extinct bird often with an extant species for size comparison.  Plates printed on recto with facing text with all pages included in pagination.  Also contains figures 1-3, colored charts, one full-page, two double-page, and an unnumbered vignette showing comparative shapes and sizes of nine species of moa.

 New Zealand separated from Gondwanaland more than 80 million years ago so it serves as a kind of laboratory for examining the causes of extinction of endemic birds from isolated environments.  This scholarly book describes 58 such species and marshals specimen and fossil evidence that contribute to understanding the appearance of the birds and the causes of their extinction, usually introduced humans, rats and cats.  Reference material is exhaustive. Locations of all extant specimens are identified and citations are provided for all original fossil descriptions.  The well printed color plates are extremely attractive.

 OCLC locates 138 examples.

 


Terashima, Ryouan (author)

Wakan Sansaizue  Three volumes (41, 42, 43).  27.0 x 18.0 cm.  Japanese-style right-to-left binding.  Laid paper.  Folded-leaf pages.  Stitched blue card covers, each with two white printed labels.  Japan (NP) (Shotoku2 [1712]).

First volume contains 25 leaves with 44 uncolored text woodblock.

Second volume contains 19  leaves with 29 text woodblocks.

Third volume contains 28 leaves with 57 text woodblocks.

This work appears to be the ornithological section of a larger encyclopedia.  It contains extensive text interspersed with small framed woodblocks.  Almost all of the woodblocks illustrate birds but volume two includes some pictures of flying mammals (bats, squirrels).

The information given above comes from the Japanese seller.  The printed labels appear more recent than the rest of the work which is in remarkably good condition for such a fragile item after almost 300 years.

 


 

Thayer, E., and V. Keyes.

Catalogue of a Collection of Books on Ornithology in the Library of John E. Thayer

24 x 16 cm.  Pp. (2, title)1-186[187-188, addenda].  Original half green morocco, gilt spine with five raised ridges, marbled boards and endpapers.  TEG.  Privately published, Boston, 1913.

This was one of the great ornithological libraries of the early twentieth century despite the fact that Casey Wood (p. 594) refers to it as “.... a small collection of books...” .  It was dispensed privately.  It is obvious that Thayer was keenly interested in birds and books.  The emphasis is on important and scientific nineteenth century works including some great rarities such as Giraud’s A Description of 16 new Species... , Linsley’s Catalogue of the Birds of Connecticut... and two copies (sic) of Townsend’s Ornithology of the United States.  It also contained the Richard Owen copy of the mammalian section that he wrote for Darwin’s "Voyage of the Beagle" with a letter from Darwin laid in that I bought for my client from Christie’s New York in 1993.    

There are about 1,100 entries and there is some bibliographic information (size, number of pages, presence of [colored] illustrations).  Unfortunately, this information is irregularly distributed amongst the various entries and is frequently incorrect. This is definitely a list rather than a descriptive bibliography.  None-the-less, it is extremely interesting for reflecting this scholar’s taste (and wherewithal).  Thayer, who built a museum to house his immense collection of stuffed birds, was only fifty when this bibliography appeared.  It is odd that he was content to have his wife write it without his own participation.

Wood, p. 594; Yale, p. 337.  Absent from Ayer and Trinity collections.


Thijsse, Jac.(obinus Pieter) (1865-1945)

Het Vogeljaar / Handleidung tot het leeren kennen / der meest voorkomende Nederlandsche Vogels  31.6 x 23.0 cm.  [1]826384658646287-889410811412-138141015-168171018-1982010[$1 signed]; 158 ll.  Pp.  [1-3]4-316.  Contemporary quarter blind roll-ruled red morocco and red marbled boards.  Flat spine divided by six double gilt rules.  Gilt lettering in second compartment.  Marbled blue endpapers.  Gray printed wrappers for Afleverung (Part) III included.  Amsterdam, W. Versluys, 1904.  Bradley Martin copy with his Sotheby's book plate on upper paste-down. 

1,Title; 2, blank; 3, introduction; 5, text; 305, contents; 307, index of Dutch names.  Contains 14 unnumbered chromolithographic plates, 12 after J. G. Keulemans, two after J. van Oort, printed by P. W. M. Trap; approximately 120 unnumbered uncolored text illustrations, most drawings of birds by van Oort but some photographs as well.

According to the wrapper, this work was to be issued in 12 parts in 1904.  The book was very popular in Holland and remained in print (although not with chromolithographs) at least through a seventh edition1972.  It devotes chapters to the major families and then describes Dutch bird life for each month of the year.  It is splendidly illustrated and the pictures by Keulemans are unusual for his oeuvre in that they show several birds, often of more than one species, dynamically engaged in an appropriate environment.  A particularly fine example, dominated by Lapwings but  depicting the general bird life of a wet marshy area, was selected by Coldewey and Keulemans for inclusion (uncolored) in their biography (Feathers to Brush [1982]) of the artist.  There are also many text illustrations by van Oort, some full-page and quite pleasing.

This handsome book is rare in North America.

Wood, p. 595.  Listed by Berkeley, BM(NH).  Unlisted by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, LOC, Oxford, Smithsonian, Trinity, Yale and Zimmer.


Thorburn, A.(rchibald)(1860-1935)

British birds  31.5 x 26.2 cm.  Four volumes.  Original publisher’s red buckram with single gilt-ruled panel on upper cover, gilt lettering to spine.  All leaves mounted on guards.  TEG.  London, Longmans, Green and Co. Ltd.  Perforated stamp of Hill Library, St. Paul on title pages.

Vol. I.  Fourth edition.  1918.  π4A-S4[$1 signed]; 76 ll.  Pp.  [i-iv]v-viii[1]2-142[143-144]  i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title(title printed in red in all volumes); iv, bibliographical note concerning print runs of various editions and volumes; v, preface; vi, preface to new edition dated September, 1917; vii, contents of vol. I.;1, text, Turdus viscivorus-Corvus corax; 144, printer designation: Robert Maclehose and Co. Ltd., University Press, Glasgow.  Contains half-tone color plates 1-20(with 20 as frontispiece) printed on one side of thick stock, each with protective tissue guard.  Plates and tissue guards not included in pagination.

Vol. II.  Fourth edition.  1918.  π3A-I4; 39 ll.  Pp.  [i-iv]v-vi[1]2-71[72].  i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, bibliographical note; v, contents of vol. II.; 1, text, Corvus corone-Ardea bubulcus; 72, printer designation.  Contains half-tone color plates 21-40 with 32 as frontispiece.

Vol. III.  Third edition.   1918.  π3A-L4; 47 ll.  Pp.  [i-iv]v-vi[1]2-86[87](1).  i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, bibliographical note; v, contents of vol. III.; 1, text, Ardea ralloides-Otis tarda; 87, printer designation.  Contains half-tone color plates 41-60 with 60 as frontispiece.

Vol. IV.  Third edition.  1918.  π4A-N4O6[signature O $1, 2 signed]; 62 ll.  Pp.  [i-iv]v-vii(1)[1]2-115[116]. i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, bibliographical note; v, contents of vol. IV.; 1, text, Otis tetrax-Totanus flavipes; 105, unfigured forms; 107, index (English and generic); 116, printer designation, Robert Maclehouse (vide supra) and “coloured plates engraved and printed by André Sleigh and Anglo Limited, of Bushey, Herts.” Contains half-tone color plates 61-80, 80A and 80B with 71 as frontispiece.

Archibald Thorburn is amongst the most admired of British artists who specialized in natural history.  His best known ornithological contributions are his chromolithographic plates for Lilford’s Coloured figures or the birds of the British Isles (1885-1897) and the present work. 

The text for this work covers more than 400 species but provides only a status overview and, in the case of breeding species, a brief life history.  The illustrations are the noteworthy part of the work.  They are very attractively printed in color half-tone on thick stock.  It is interesting to compare them with those by Fuertes on equally thick stock for the first edition of Eaton’s Birds of New York (1909-1914).  The artists were each faced with the problem of depicting several species on the same plate.  Fuertes tended to do so by creating one large image comprising several species going about their activities in a generally appropriate habitat.  Thorburn sometimes did the same but often depicted several different vignettes on the same plate, each comprising a single species in a congenial environment.  Both artists were successful in producing an unforgettable series of pictures of their country’s birds.  Thorburn later (1925) produced a second series in smaller format with more (192) plates, each depicting only one or two species.  The later work was not as effective, perhaps because it was not printed on thick stock.

The work was originally issued in four editions of volumes I and II and three editions of volumes III and IV and a supplement of 11 pages and two plates.  The editions were actually reprints save for the preliminaries.  The editions comprised a total of 2550 copies of each volume.  The supplement was issued by itself in a print run of 1000 copies in March, 1918 and as a print run of 500 copies bound into volume four of the third edition (as here) in November, 1918.  Thus, 1500 copies of the complete work were printed.  In addition, 105 copies of the four volumes and the individual supplement were issued in a large-paper format.

Listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity and Yale but Cornell and Trinity copies lack the Supplement and thus contain only 80 colored plates.

 


 

Thorburn, Archibald (1860-1935) (Grahame, Major Iain)

Thorburn's / birds of prey / a facsimile of the 1919 edition / with a new foreword  34.8 x 26.5 cm.  Gilt-ruled half green morocco, green buckram sides, gilt-ruled and lettered round spine.  Marbled endpapers.  TEG, others deckled.  Lamarsh, Bures, Suffolk, Major Iain Grahame, 1985.  Housed in original unprinted green board slipcase.

This beautiful facsimile contains single unprinted initial and terminal leaves, 20 leaves printed on one side only save for title leaf, and 12 leaves containing mounted plates as follows;

Leaf 1: recto, half-title.

Leaf 2: recto, title; verso, copyright and registration of 15 numbered copies of De Luxeedition and 135 copies of Collectors' Edition.

Leaf  3: recto, limitation leaf, this copy #114 of 145 including 10 copies hors de commerce lettered A-J.

Leaf  4: recto, foreword by Grahame.

Leaf  5: recto, facsimile title page.

Leaf  6, recto, preface by Hugh S. Gladstone containing illustrated initial letter and numbered "(1)".

Leaf  7: recto, preface continued containing reproduced old woodcut "The Honey Buzzard and page numbered "(ii)".

Leaf  8: recto, list of plates.

Leaves 9-20; versos, numbered (1)-(12) and containing text for facing plate.

Contains 12 fine color half-tone plates, 24.9 x 16.9 cm, mounted on recto of 12 leaves in impressed frames, 27.3 x 19.0 cm. Thorburn facsimile signature in pencil at lower left outside image but within frame.  At upper right, outside image but within frame "Published by Major Iain Grahame, Bures, Suffolk (copyright sign) 1985"

Some leaves of paper watermarked with a ram's head, others with a symbol below which is printed "LANA".

Thorburn's Birds of Prey was originally published in 1919 as a limited edition of 150 copies.  He was at the height of his popularity and most sets were quickly broken up for framing and the complete original work is rare.  Thorburn died in 1935 so Grahame decided to publish this facsimile of very high quality for the 50th anniversary of his death.  Grahame knows a good deal about books.  After a military career during which he became an advisor to Idi Amin, he settled down on an estate in Suffolk, bred waterfowl, wrote occasional books, and established a good business in Sporting and Natural History books and prints.  The present very handsome volume has some inconsistencies (vide supra) but is just as attractive and well printed as the original which I saw at the sale of Bradley Martin's library.  It seems to have the same limitation of 150 copies as the original (but see above for inconsistent numbers on copyright and limitation leaves) and went out of print very quickly.

This facsimile edition listed for AMNH, Cornell.  Not listed by Harvard, Trinity, Yale, however the last two do list the original edition.


Thorburn, Archibald (1860-1935)

British birds  Four volumes   21.8 x 14.3 cm.  Original publisher's red cloth with impressed (? Originally gilt) lettering on upper cover, gilt lettering to spine.  New Edition.  London, Longmans, Green and Co., 1925-1926

Vol. I  1925  π6A-L8[$1 signed]; 94 ll.  Pp.  [i-iv]v-xii1-176.  i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, "Made in Great Britain"; v, contents; 1, systematic accounts, Turdus viscivorus-Plectrophenax nivalis, comprising about 161 species; 176, printer designation: Robert Maclehose and Co. Ltd, The University Press, Glasgow.  Contains plates 1-48 (25 as frontispiece) displaying abut 108 species, printed by the Sun Engraving Company in color half-tone on one side only, and not included in pagination.

Vol.  II  1925  π5A-H8(+H9); 70 ll.  Pp.  [i-iv]v-ix(1)1-130.  i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, "Made in Great Britain"; v, contents; 1, systematic accounts, Sturnus vulgaris-Botaurus lentiginosus, comprising  about 87 species; 130, printer designation.  Contains colored plates 49-96 (61 as frontispiece) displaying about 71 species.

Vol.  III  1926  π5A-K8L4; 89 ll; Pp.  [i-iv]v-x1-168.  i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, "Made in Great Britain"; v, contents; 1, systematic, Ciconia alba-Phalaropus hyperboreus, comprising about 105 species; 168, printer designation.  Contains colored plates 97-144 (121 as frontispiece) depicting about 89 species.

Vol.  IV  1926  π5A-I8K6; 83 ll.  Pp.  [i-iv]v-x1-154[155](1);  i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, "Made in Great Britain"; v, contents; 1, systematic, Scolopax rusticula-Fulmarus glacialis, comprising about 112 species; 137, index of English and scientific names; 155, printer designation.  Contains colored plates 145-192 (168 as frontispiece) depicting about 90 species.

The complete work describes about 465 species of which some 358 are illustrated on the 192 colored plates.  Thorburn's highly praised "quarto" edition of British birds appeared originally in 1915-16 and went through four "editions" by 1918.  By this time Thorburn's name guaranteed commercial success which he achieved with various illustrated works including A naturalist's sketch book.. (1919) and Game birds and wild-fowl of Great Britain and Ireland (1923), as well as the present series.  Thorburn must have been a very facile artist to have turned out the 192 pictures which justified this new but superfluous edition of  British birds.  He enjoyed the same kind of reputation in Great Britain as Louis Agassiz Fuertes in the United States.  That having been said, this remains an attractive publication.

This work was reprinted in the 1930s.  Wood, p. 597. This original printing also listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity and Yale.


Thorburn, A.(rchibald)(1860-1936)

Game birds and / wild-fowl / of Great Britain and Ireland  37.4 x 27.6 cm.  [a]2b2A-U2[$1 signed]; 44 ll.  Pp.  [i-vi]vii(1)1-78[79](1).  Later fine blind roll design-ruled quarter blue calf and marbled boards.  Spine with six raised bands, gilt printing in second, fourth, seventh compartments, blind lozenge-shaped design in first, third, fifth, sixth and seventh.  TEG.  London, Longmans, Green and Co., 1923.  Perforated stamp of Hill Library, Saint Paul on title page. 

i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title printed in red; iv, "Made In Great Britain"; v, preface; vi, blank; vii, contents; 1, text for plates; 77, index; 79, printer designation: Robert Maclehose and Co. Ltd, at the University Press, Glasgow.  Contains colored plates 1-30 printed in color half-tone on very heavy stock by the Sun Engraving Co., Limited, Herts., all on linen mounts and protected by substantial unprinted leaves of tissue.

This work depicts 58 species on 30 colored plates by the British artist who, amongst his countrymen, was the most popular of all wildlife illustrators.  Archibald Thorburn was the son of a successful miniaturist painter.  He was a keen field observer with a hunterly bent and his pictures often show active birds in countryside settings that are very pleasing and evocative.  They show us a Scotland that looks the way we would like to see it. He was extremely influential on contemporaries like George Lodge and on successors and students like Philip Rickman.  Thorburn much preferred to paint English birds that he knew and illustrated very few works that were concerned with exotic birds.  He was admired for his early illustrations in Walter Swaysland's Familiar Wild Birds (1883) but really burst upon the scene when Keulemans was unable to complete Lilford's Coloured Figures…. (1885-1897). Thorburn took over and was an immediate and overwhelming success.  His own British Birds (1916) solidified his popularity.  Thorburn is one of the few bird illustrators whose original paintings can be relied upon fetch a sizeable sum at auction.

In this work, Thorburn describes and illustrates many of his favorite subjects from the families Anatidae, Phaisianidae, Charadriidae and Scolopacidae.  The book was undoubtedly published as a showcase for the colored plates.  However,the text is deceptively short and simple because he manages to convey most basic information rather painlessly. For each species, he provides a description; a summary of status in the British Isles; a description of nest and eggs if the species is a breeder; and a first-hand account of the habits and behavior.  It is evident that he has seen and studied all these birds in the field.  The pictures themselves are good, but not, in my view, exceptional.  The reproduction seems quite ordinary to me although the presentation on thick stock leaves hinged on guards is impressive.

The book also was issued in a limited print run (155 copies) on larger paper.

Wood, p. 579; Zimmer, p. 635.  Also listed for Cornell, Trinity, Yale but not Harvard.


Ticehurst, Claud B.(uchanan)(1881-1941)

A systematic review / of the / genus Phylloscopus / (willow-warblers or leaf-warblers)  24.7 x 18.8 cm.  π[1]82-128134[$1 signed]; 101 ll.  Pp.  [i-v]vi-viii1-192[193](1).  Contemporary black cloth with peripheral blind frames, gilt lettering to spine.  London, Trustees of the British Museum, 1938. Issued 26th November, 1938.  Price Ten Shillings.

i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, printer designation: Jarrold and Sons, Norwich; v, preface by Martin A. C. Hinton of the British Museum; viii, list of maps and plates; 1, introduction; 2, acknowledgments; 3, notes on various related genera and other considerations; 22, list of species and subspecies; 24, key to species; 27, systematic review of 30 species comprising 67 forms; 189, generic and specific index of Latin names.  Contains text line maps 1-8, plates I and II printed on one side of unpaginated mat leaves in fine color half-tone by John Bale Sons & Curnow Ltd, London, after paintings by Roland Green.

This meticulous monograph covers 30 species comprising 67 forms of this confusing genus of Eurasian warblers.  The emphasis is almost entirely on morphological characteristics.  For each form there is an original citation, a very detailed description of all plumages and moults, extensive measurements including wing formulae, seasonal ranges and field characteristics.  There are references given for information about breeding and eggs and some brief indications of vocalization but little else concerning the life histories of the various species.

Listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity, Yale.

 


 

Tiere der Urwelt

The Kakao-Compagnie Theodor Reichartd of Hamburg-Wandsbek published privately five series, each containing 30  cards with this general title around 1900.  Each card displayed a picture of an extinct creature, usually prehistoric, with a descriptive text on the verso.  These cards may have been used promotionally.  They are well printed and often adapted from antecedent illustrations.  Some of them portray birds or their antecedents.  Each card is 27.0 x 19.1 cm and the printed images are either 20.5 x 13.0 or 13.0 x 20.5. Those that I bought are:

Serie 1.  No3.               Moa

Serie 1.  No15.             Reptilvogel Archäopteryx

Serie 2.  No1.               Dodo oder Dronte (Didus Ineptus)

Serie 2.  No3.               Leguatie (Leguatia Leguatia)

Those in the first series are reproduced by four-color gravure and were drawn by Heinrich Harder.  Their text was written by W. Bölsche.  Those in the second series were reproduced by chromolithography and drawn by F. John.  The writer of their text is not identified.  The picture of Leguatia is copied from the original by Collaert (ca. 1600) and the Dodo resembles closely that originally painted by Savery (1626).


Todd, Albert May (1850-1931)

Ornithological Books / Incunabula, Press Publications / First Editions, Standard Sets / Oriental & Other Manuscripts / Many in Fine Bindings Collected by the late / Albert May Todd  26.5 x 18.2 cm.  Pp.  (4) 1-171[172].  Original gray printed wrappers.  New York, Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc., 1941.

Todd was a businessman and politician from Kalamazoo.  He was a well known book collector and allegedly possessed a fine ornithological library.  Most of it was left to Kalamazoo College and, despite its heading, this catalog contains only a few ornithological titles.  They are standard high profile works and, oddly, in several instances such as Sharpe's Birds of Paradise, two copies were offered for sale.  Presumably, Kalamazoo College got yet another copy! 

The catalog contains a mélange of works of high quality that are unrelated to ornithology.  Perhaps the most interesting are those comprising a subgroup of oriental manuscripts.


Todd, W(alter) E(dmond) Clyde (1874-1969)

Birds / of Western Pennsylvania  27.9 x 21.9 cm.  Pp.  [i-viii]ix-xv(1)[1-2]3-710 (4, blank leaf, initial leaf of plate section containing designation " color plates" on recto and letter-press for plate 1 on verso.); 365 ll.  Original publisher's blue cloth with red outline of barn swallow on upper cover, red and black lettering on spine.  Blue endpapers.  Pittsburgh, the University of Pittsburgh Press (for the Carnegie Museum), 1940. 

i-ii, blank; iii, half-title; iv, blank; v, title; vi, copyright and printer's designation: Edward Stern & Company; vii, acknowledgment of financial support from Buhl Foundation; viii, blank; ix, foreword; xiii, contents; 1, part one, introduction; 27, part two, annotated systematic list; 661, gazetteer; 677, bibliography; 703, index of English and Latin bird names.  Contains folded topographical map, colored plates 1-22 after G. M. Sutton depicting 118 species on 117 pictures, uncolored plate 23 by Roger Tory Peterson depicting silhouettes of diurnal raptors.  All plates not included in pagination and with apposite letter-press printed on the verso of the antecedent plate.  Also contains 60 unnumbered text line drawings of individual species and the topography of a bird by Sutton as well as numerous unnumbered local distribution maps.

Todd, a native of western Pennsylvania, won two Brewster Awards for contributions to the ornithology of the Santa Marta mountains of Colombia and the Labrador peninsula, respectively.  He could as easily have won a third for the present work, one that occupied him intermittently for almost all his life.  Sutton also had a special interest in these birds since his own first complete book was on the Birds of Pennsylvania published in 1928.  All of the colored pictures and line drawings in this work were prepared specifically for it by Sutton and they are very attractive, the more so for the colored pictures because they are printed on mat paper.

Todd provides a scientific introduction that covers climate, geography, physiography and ecology.  He then covers all species that have been recorded in the area, virtually every species of eastern North America.  Each species receives a meticulous and articulate essay that includes description, overall general and local distribution, habits including nests and eggs, and a specific bibliography of the species in the area, as distinct from the copious more general bibliography at the end of the work.

Trinity, p. 240; Yale, p.  290.  Listed in on-line catalogs for all major libraries.


Todd, W.(alter)E.(dmond)Clyde (1874-1969), Carriker, M.(elbourne)A.(rmstrong)(1879-1965)

The birds of the Santa Marta region of / Colombia: a study in altitudinal / distribution (from page 3 where authors and title first appear).  24.0 x 16.3 cm.  π113-388394408(-408)[$1 signed]; 310 ll.  Pp.  [i-ii]iii-viii1-611(1).  Original publiser's (?) green cloth with blind ruled panel on upper cover, gilt lettering to spine.  Uncut, partly unopened.  Annals of the Carnegie Museum, Volume XIV, 1922.  (Pittsburgh), by order of the Trustees of the Carnegie Institute, October, 1922. 

i, Journal title page; ii, printer designation: The New Era Printing Company, Lancaster, PA; iii, contents; vi, list of plates; vii, list of text figures; viii, errata et corrigenda; 1, foreword by W. J. Holland, editor of the journal; 3, title of publication; authors; introduction; 6, geography and physiography; 11, climate; 13, population and resources; 14, ecology; 21, historical review of Santa Marta ornithology; 40, ornithological explorations by the junior author; 49, species first described from the region and originally considered endemics; 55, North American migrants; 57, life zones; 102, summary and conclusions; 106, list of localities; 131, annotated list of species 1-514, Anhinga anhinga-Catamblyrhynchus diadema diadema; 536, bibliography; 577, supplement describing trip in 1920; 583, index.  Contains: plates I-IX including folded map in color half-tone; six plates by G. M. Sutton in color half-tone; two uncolored half-tone photographic plate, each with two images.  All plates printed on one side only and not included in pagination.  Also contains text figures 1-9, uncolored range maps.

According to Holland, the editor, one of the missions of the Carnegie Museum was "to carry on researches upon the natural history and resources of tropical America".  To this end, Carriker was sent to live and collect in the Santa Marta region during the period 1911-1915.   The area had begun to be recognized as one of special interest in the late 1870s, so Carriker was not the first to examine its avifauna. However, he collected 5355 specimens including 458 species and subspecies of a total of 514 that were on record when he finished.  He added 77 forms to the Santa Marta list of which 36 were entirely new.  Todd worked up the collection and put the book together for which he received the first of his two Brewster awards, the second coming in 1963 for Birds of the Labrador peninsula.  The species accounts contain synonymy if there is a regional form; status; number and locality of collected specimens; and a discussion of taxonomic (Todd) or field (Carriker) aspects.

Two of the plates by Sutton in this work are dated 1918 when he was only 20 years old.  These were not the precocious artist's first published pictures, however, for he had one in the January 1915 issue of Bird Lore, Frank M. Chapman's periodical which eventually became Audubon Magazine.

The work is listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity, Yale but not by Wood, Zimmer.


Todd, W(alter) E(dmond) Clyde (1874-1969)

Birds of / the Labrador / peninsula / and adjacent / areas / a distributional list  27.7 x 21.6 cm.   Pp.  [i-iv](4[two glossy leaves])[v-vii]viii-xii[xiii-xiv][1-3]4-822 (text in double columns).  Buteo Books red cloth binding with gilt lettering to spine.  Blue-gray endpapers.  Vermillion, South Dakota, Buteo Books in association with Carnegie Museum of Natural History, 1980(University of Toronto Press in association with Carnegie Museum, 1963).

  i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, first edition title page; iv, "First published 1963.."; first unpaginated glossy leaf: recto, brief biography of Todd by Kenneth Parkes of Carnegie Museum dated April, 1980; verso, note explaining reissue by Buteo Books with addition of biographical leaf and leaf (pp.  821/822) of addenda and corrigenda; ISBN 0-931130-06-09; copy # 54 (of 450); second unpaginated glossy leaf: recto, dedication with photograph of dedicatees; verso, blank; v, original publisher's acknowledgments; vi, blank; vii, preface; ix, contributors (to expeditions); x, blank; xi, author's acknowledgments; xiii, contents; xiv list of colored plates; 1, introduction section leaf; 3, geography and physiography; 6, geology, climate; 7, population, resources; 8, ecology; 9, ornithological history; 13, Carnegie Museum expeditions; 58, seasonal occurrences of birds; 61, life zones; 65, geographic history of avifauna; 67, conservation; 68 new forms (22) of birds originally described from Labrador peninsula; 71, systematic accounts, Gavia immer-Plectrophenax nivalis, comprising 338 species and subspecies; 727, annotated bibliography (918 titles); 781, gazetteer; 815, index to families and names (Latin and English) of birds; 821, addenda and corrigenda (1980).  Contains: folding map with expedition routes in red; colored frontispiece and plates I-VIII, seven by G. M. Sutton, one by C. L. Ripper, printed in color half-tone on both sides of four unpaginated leaves; 64 unnumbered, uncolored half-tone photographs by various expedition members printed on both sides of 12 unpaginated leaves; approximately 45 unnumbered text distribution maps.

This book was originally published by the University of Toronto Press and the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in 1963.  In 1980, Buteo Books rebound 450 copies to include a new leaf of corrigenda and a biographical note about Todd who died in 1969 and won the second of his two Brewster awards for this book.  This copy is number 54 of the Buteo Books reissue.

This book summarizes the results of 25 expeditions carried out under the auspices of the Carnegie Museum during the period 1901-1958.  Todd was the leader for many but not all of these.  Other participants and leaders for certain of the expeditions included James Baird, Roland Clement, J, Kenneth Doutt, Olaus J. Murie and Arthur C. Twomey amongst others.  During these expeditions, 5375 specimens of birds were collected. 

The work is a paradigm of meticulous scholarship with respect to the status and distribution of birds on the Labrador peninsula.  For each of the 338 species and subspecies, Todd first provides every published reference for its occurrence in the area.  These individual long lists of references are in addition to the bibliography that contains 918 annotated entries.  There follows an annotated list of all observations, collected specimens and localities of the birds recorded during the expeditions, including arrival and departure dates.   Finally, there is a discussion of the records of the expedition as they pertain to the life histories of the various species although (p. 72) "the present memoir is not primarily devoted to life-history studies". 

Cornell lists both the original edition and the present issue.  AMNH, Harvard, Trinity and Yale list the original.


Todd, W.(alter) E.(dmond) Clyde (1874-1969)

The Birds of the Isle of Pines  Incorporating the Substance of Field-notes by Gustav A. Link  23.0 x 15.8 cm: Pp.  146-296.  Extract (not author’s offprint) with later wraps containing stamp of Pierce Brodkorb, an early twentieth century ornithologist.  (Pittsburgh), Annals (of the) Carnegie Museum, Vol. X (1916).

 148, geography and physiography; 154, climate; 155, previous work; 156, the expedition of 1912-1913; 157, seasonal occurrence; 160, faunal affinities; 162, list of localities; 169, list of species; 286, bibliography. Errata slip bound between 276 and 277.  146, introduction;Contains 10 photographs on rectos only of five leaves designated plates XXII-XXVI and a folding map designated plate XXVII.

This work is based mainly on specimens collected by Link who was commissioned by the Carnegie Museum to do the field work.  The island is physically and faunally very close to western Cuba and the only previous reports concerned with its bird life were a 37 page article in the American Naturalist for 1905 by O. Bangs and W. R. Zappey, and scattered references in articles by Gundlach on the Cuban avifauna.  There is little of particular interest in the birds of this small island but the present article is very well done.  The bibliography is particularly noteworthy and provides several references to Gundlach that are hard to find.   The work represents an early scholarly contribution by Todd, who eventually won two Brewster awards for subsequent books on Colombia and Labrador. 

Trinity, p. 240.  Unlisted as a separate by Ripley and Scribner, Wood and Zimmer.


Traviès, Edouard (1809-)(introduction by Jean Jacques Brochier(1937-), textes de Buffon)

Edouard Traviès / Les oiseaux les plus remarquables / par leurs formes et leurs coleurs / scènes variées / de leurs moeurs et de leurs habitudes / textes de Buffon  32.0 x 24.4 cm.  Pp. 96 unpaginated leaves as described below.  Original publisher's green cloth with gilt lettering on upper cover and spine.  Lemon endpapers.  Pictorial cloth and board slipcase with mounted prints.  Paris, Editions Duculot, 1990.

First leaf: blank.

Second: recto, half-title; verso, blank.

Third: recto, title; verso, conceived, designed by Diane de Selliers; thanks to Charles Clarke; copyright 1990; ISBN 2-8011-0911-8; printed in Belgium.

Fourth: recto, colored plate; verso, colored plate.

Fifth: recto-verso, rencontres by Charles St. G. S. Clarke.

Sixth: recto, colored plate; verso, colored plate.

Seventh-twelfth leaves: des oiseaux sur le vif by Jean Jaques brochier.

Thirteenth-ninety fourth leaves: title leaf, plates 1-78, text.

Ninety fifth leaf: recto, plate 79; verso, list of plates.

Ninety sixth leaf: recto, list of plates; verso, credits: photogravure; fotoimprim, Paris; imprimerie de Charleroi, sa; printing terminated August 1990.

Contains title page and (all) plates 1-79 reproduced from the original work in color half-tone (36 double-page) and 12 other colored illustrations after Traviès (10 full-page)

This work arose from a conversation in April 1989 between Charles Clarke, a collector of Traviès, and Diane de Selliers, apparently a publishing executive.  The resulting book was published only 16 months later.  It has been reproduced from Clarke's copy of the original (ca. 1857) edition, one of very few with the complete complement of plates, and perhaps the only one with a colored title page.  Plate 60 depicts butterflies as is true in all other (6) copies which I have examined.  Of the original 79 plates, 36 were in horizontal format and are here presented as two-page reproductions.  Each illustrated species is accompanied by a text with a volume and page number citation from an unspecified edition of Buffon that I happen to own, namely Oervres complètes de Buffon avec des extraits de Daubenton et la classification de Cuvier published "Au Bureaus des Publications Illustreées", Paris, 1841-1844(1837-1839).  The present work also contains six colored plates by Traviès from the second edition of Orbigny's Dictionnaire…(1867-1869), one from an original painting of a toucan, two colored text figures and three plates from colored lithographs in a work that I have never seen, Nouvelles études de nature vivante.  These each illustrate eight species of birds in attractive landscapes and are entitled Oisesaux D'Europe, Oiseaux D'Amerique and Oiseaux D'Afrique, although the latter depicts mostly Australian birds.

The introduction is a vague and poorly informed discussion of Traviès and Buffon and is certainly not the catalogue raisonée of Traviès for which I had hoped.  Most of the information that I give here for the sources of the plates and text is not specified in the book.

This book is not listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity or Yale.


Traviès, Édouard (1807-?1867)

The following is taken from an original wrapper bound into this volume: Les Oiseaux / Les plus remarquables par leurs formes et leurs Couleurs / Scènes Varieés / de leurs moeurs & leurs habitudes / Etudes à l’aquarelle / Par Édouard Traviès / Paris / Publié par Berrieux, 36 Rue de Rivoli près l’Hotel de Ville / London / E. Gambart & Co 25 Berners St. Oxf. St. / Imp lemercier à Paris  590 x 420 mm.  Uncolored lithographed printed wrapper with hummingbird design and and hand-colored lithographic plates 1-75 (of 79).  Contemporary green half-morocco, richly gilt spine containing six raised bands.  Title blocked in gilt on upper cover as follows: Les Oiseaux / les plus / Remarquables / de / La Terre.  Paris, (?1845-)1857.

This beautiful suite of plates, issued serially and without text, is among the rarest of ornithological publications and is unsurpassed as a work of ornithological iconography.  The only publicly catalogued library that contains a copy is McGill and Casey Wood says of it: “Some of the plates are simply wonderful and are among the best portraits of birds ever painted”.  Apparently, the work was never actually seen by Ronsil, Nissen nor Anker and Marcel Jeanson’s copy contained only 58 plates although he was a major collector of Traviès’ original paintings for it.  In 1990, the firm of Duculot in Paris reprinted the entire suite of 79 plates in smaller format with an introduction by Jean-Jacques Brochier.

I already owned 14 prints from this work before obtaining this copy.  In this copy, every plate is designated Lemercier.  The designation on several of my loose prints and on many of the plates in the Duculot edition is Imp Becquet so there were probably at least two issues.  Although Berrieux is listed as publisher on the wrapper of my copy, many of the plates are designated Ledot ainé Edit. and several of my loose prints are designated Jourdan Barbot et Cie, apparently the successor to Ledot.  In addition, many of the plates, either loose or in this volume, are designated London, Victor Delarue instead of Gambart.  In my bound volume and in the Duculot reprint, plates 1 and 4 are dated Avril, 1857.  An extraordinary difference between my copy and the Duculot edition concerns plate 38.  In my copy, this numbered plate depicts “La Peruche à longs brins” and is designated Imp. Lemercier.  The identical plate is numbered 78 in the Duculot edition and is designated Imp Becquet.  Plate 38 in that edition shows “La Pie Grièche”  with Lemercier designated as printer.   This plate is absent from my copy.  Although this plate was not amongst my 14 singles, I remembered that Bob Braun selected it from the same Christie’s lot that I had picked nine of my loose prints.  When I mentioned this to Bob, he was kind enough to make a gift to me of that plate which was numbered 38 but did not contain a designation of the printer.    I now own 76 of the 79 plates in the complete suite. 

Ronsil, in his Bibliographie (#2953), lists this work as “Paris, Gambart, 1845”  Since he fails to list the number of plates, and since he does not discuss this work in his L’Art Français..., it seems very unlikely that he ever actually saw it.  Plate 60 in this copy, as in several others I have seen including the Duculot reprint, depicts butterflies.

I have a personal association with this copy.  It was included in the Sotheby’s “Menagerie” auction of February 1, 1984 in London.  The books in that sale were exhibited beforehand at Sotheby’s New York where I examined them.  I still remember that when I walked into the room, I recognized every great book save this one which was opened to the picture of the spaniel and snipes.  I was stunned by the realization that I had not heard of this work which was the most beautiful in a room that contained even an elephant folio.

Bradley Martin, #222; Wood, p. 601.   Absent from Ayer, BM(NH), Copenhagen, Yale, Trinity,  Harvard, Cornell, AMNH and New York public libraries.


Traviès, Edouard (1809-1865)

L’Hirondelle de Mer  Hand-colored lithographic print.  Print size, 66 x 48 cm.  Image size, 55 x 38 cm.  Paris, François Delarue, ca. 1860.  Plate No. 15 in a series entitled “Musée du Chasseur”.

This print of a dead Common Tern, hanging from a hook, is a broadsheet , 66 x 48 cm, containing an architectural frame, ca. 55 x 38 cm which encloses the image.  On the left, just beneath the frame, is printed “FRANÇOIS DELARUE édit.r 18, rue J. J. Rosseau, Paris”.  In the center, just beneath the frame, is printed “No. 15” and on the right, just beneath the frame, is printed “Imp. FRANÇOIS DELARUE, 8, rue Larrey, Paris”.  About three cm below the bottom of the frame is printed, in the center “L’HIRONDELLE DE MER PIERRE-GARIN”.  At the top of the frame, within its architectural vault, is lithographed “MUSEE DU CHASSEUR”.  The signature of Traviès appears at the lower left within the frame.

According to the book Edouard Traviès  Oiseaux de Chasse (Paris, Duculot, 1991, p. 149), the Musée du Chasseur was the first of several suites of hand-colored lithographs by Traviès depicting dead game and was issued prior to 1852.  It comprised 18 prints, 16 of which illustrated birds.  The book reproduces several of these including the present example.  The book tells us that Traviès was amongst the first of the continental artists to do this type of hanging bird as a "trompe-l'oeil" .  Of course, the depiction of dead game in French art antedated Traviès and was perhaps best exemplified by Oudry in the 18th century.

The only other reference I have been able to find to the series “Musée du Chasseur” is lot #385 of the Bibliotheque Marcel Jeanson, deuxième partie, Ornithologie (16 June, 1988).  This is an original painting of a Snipe designated “Musée du Chasseur” pl. 11.  All of the lithographs by Traviès depicting dead game are notoriously rare.  36 and 29 such lithographs from suites other than this one comprised lots #566 of the first (première partie, 1 March, 1987) Marcel Jeanson auction and #220 of the Bradley Martin auction, respectively.


Traviès, Edouard (1807-1867[?])

Nouvelles etudes /de nature vivant / N0. 2 / Oiseaux d'Asie  66.2 x 57.1 cm.  Modern reproduction, by four-color half-tone, of an unrecorded hand-colored lithograph probably originally issued about 1850.  Anaheim, Haddad's Fine Arts, Inc.1990.

The works of Edouard Traviès, most of which are very rare, have never been completely cataloged.  They have best been covered in two books based largely on the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Clarke and published in Paris by Duculot editions.   The first of these, Edouard Traviès  Les Oiseaux les plus remarquables…(1990) contains, without explanatory text, three reproductions, Nos 1, 3 and 4 from a series called Nouvelles Etudes de Nature Vivantes.  There is a systematic list of publications by Traviès in the second book, Edouard Traviès  Oiseaux de Chasse (1991).  In that list, on page 150 we read the following:  "….Edouard Traviès a peint des planches reprenant plusiers oiseaux charactéristiques de chaque continent, intitulées Oiseaux d'Europe, Oiseaux d'Amérique, Oiseaux d'AfriqueVraisemblablement, il existe également, une planche consacrée aux Oiseaux d'Asie et d' Oceanie, non repertoriée".  The present print is an attractively produced reproduction of the bibliographically unknown predicted original.

Just underneath the image on the right is written "Imp. Bequet à Paris".  Under this is "OISEAUX D'ASIE" then in two columns a list of the birds illustrated; 1.  Le Roller varie (Roller) / 2.  Le Gobe-mouche flamme (minivet) / 3.  Le Paradis manucode (King Bird of Paradise) and 4.  L' Enicure de Leschenault (Forktail) / 5.  Le Martin brame (Myna) / 6.  Le Eurylaine Javanais (broadbill).  All of these are Asian save the bird-of-paradise which is found in New Guinea. 

Underneath the center of the image is written: Paris  DUSACQ & Cie, boulevt Poissonnière 14.  Of the three prints reproduced in the first Duculot book , two have "publié par" replacing the word "Paris" whereas the other contains wording identical to the above.

Underneath the image at the left is signature of Traviès in manuscript and further to the left is printed: NOUVELLES ETUDES / DE NATURE VIVANTES / PAR ED. TRAVIÈS / NO 2.  Save for the plate number, all these details are identical in the Duculot reproductions.


Traviès, Edouard (1809-) (introduction by Brochier, Jean-Jacques, text by Toussenel, Alphonse[1803-1885])

Edouard / Traviès / Oiseaux de Chasse  32.0 x 25.0 cm.  Pp.  [1-12]13-150(2, printer's designation and date); 76 ll.  Original publisher's brown cloth, gilt lettering on spine and upper cover, brown endpapers.  Paris, Duculot, 1991. 

1-2, Blank; 3, half-title; 4-5, plate; 6, plate; 7, title; 8, copyright, publication data; 9, plate; 10, plate; 11, contents; 12, plate; 13, introduction by Brochier (about Traviès); 17, ornithologies passionées by Brochier about Toussenel; 27, la formule du gerfaut (essay by Toussenel); 38, musée du chasseur (suite of lithographs); 54, galerie ornithologique (contributions of Traviès to a book); 66, Buffon illustré (contributons of Traviès to a book); 86, souvenirs du chasseur (suite of lithographs); 90, la vénerie, souvenirs de chasses (suite of lithographs); 116, gibier dans paysage (suite of lithographs); 122, volumes découpés; 126, la chasse (suite of lithographs); 149, liste des oevres d' Edouard Traviès. Contains unnumbered reproductions of engraved and lithographed prints including 10 double-page (nine colored); 72 full-pages  of colored illustrations some containing two separate images; three colored text figures.

This is the second and concluding volume that showcases illustrations by Traviès from rare works in the collection of an Englishman, Charles Clark.  The first, also introduced by Brochier but containing a text from Buffon,  dealt almost exclusively with Les Oiseaux les Plus Rémarquables.  For this volume, Brochier has used the text from the third (1864) edition of L'Esprit des Bêtes.  Le Monde des Oiseaux.  Ornitholgie Passionelle by Alphonse Toussenel, a sportsman and naturalist, to describe the species portrayed by Traviès in the accompanying prints.

The importance of this volume is that it provides some bibliographical information and representative examples of exceedingly rare prints by Traviès.  In particular,  the five suites of lithographs cited above are never found as complete suites and this is the first work that describes how many plates comprise each suite and what each plate depicts.  The compilers of the catalogs at Sotheby's for the auction of the libraries of Marcel Jeanson and Bradley Martin were unable to supply this in describing the incomplete and mixed sets of these suites in those collections.  That having been said, the bibliography of works illustrated by Traviès at the end of this volume is grossly inadequate and the subject requires a much more serious work of scholarship than is presented in this volume.

I compared the illustrations from Gallerie Ornithologique and Buffon with those in my own collection and concluded that either the color reproduction is poor, or the examples in Charles Clarke's collection are inferior to my own.  The former is more likely.

With all its inadequacies, this is an important work of reference and I was surprised to find it lacking in libraries from Harvard, Yale, Trinity, LSU, AMNH, Cornell, Kansas and the Library of Congress.  It is listed for the Oxford Library.


Traviès, Édouard (1807-1867[?])

[Les oiseaux les plus remarquables par leurs formes et leurs coleurs.  Scènes variées de leurs moeurs et de leurs habitudes].  Five loose prints.  Wove paper.  60.0 x 42.5 cm.  Paris Ledot Ainé, no date (before 1857).

Includes:  plate 10, Le Pierre-Garin (common tern), lithography printing firm not specified;  plate 11, Le Roi des Gobe-Mouches (royal flycatcher) and Le Lindo bleu doré (blue-and-yellow tanager), lithography printing firm not specified; plate 20, Le Perroquet à tete jaune (yellow-headed amazon [parrot]), Imp. Becquet, Paris; plate 28, Le petit Toucan à ventre rouge (red-breasted toucan), Imp. Becquet, Paris; plate 62, La Pie rousse (rufous treepie), Imp. Becquet, Paris.

The complete work contained 79 prints of which plate 60 depicted butterflies.  The prints were printed and lithographed by both Becquet (Frères), as here, and by Lemercier, and there were several publishers involved.  Since both lithographic firms produced examples of the same prints, there were different issues, at least of some of the plates.  My copy of a contemporarily bound volume with 75 plates has an upper wrapper with title and with Lemercier designated as the lithographic printing firm which suggests that the work was once published as a large collection of plates, but it is certainly possible that the plates were also sold seriatim in parts or even singly.

This is one of the most beautiful of all ornithological iconographies and sufficiently rare so that even Ronsil seems not to have been well acquainted with it.  In his Bibliographie (No. 2953), he fails to provide a figure for the number of plates and gives a publication date of 1845.  However two of the plates in my copy are dated 1857.  Writing about Traviès in his L'art Français..(p. 68), Ronsil, who considered the art in Gould's work the apotheosis of iconography, states (my translation) "We have personally seen several of Traviès' original sketches (doubtless those in the Marcel Jeanson collection) from which his lithographs are taken (he rarely did his own lithography) and we were filled with admiration for his skill and precision.  This fine artist completed several remarkable lithographic series, sometimes so carefully painted that we are pleased to consider them comparable to the marvelous plates of the Englishman, Gould."

Wood, p. 601.  There are no other examples of the bound work cited for major collections or libraries.


Trinity College (prepared by Breit, Viola; Clarke, Karen B.; Putnam, Ann; Wondriska, Alison)

Ornithology books / in the library of / Trinity College . Hartford / including the library of Ostrom Enders  25.8 x 16.5 cm.  One preliminary leaf, Pp. [1-4]5-270.  Original black cloth with silver lettering on spine.  Printed white dust jacket.  Hartford, Trinity College, (1983). 

Preliminary leaf: recto, half-title; verso, uncolored half-tone photograph of Enders; 1, title; 2, designation of preparers; copy numbered 296 in ink (of 1500 though not explicitly stated); copyright 1983; credits: composed and bound at the Stinehour Press, printed at the Meriden Gravure Company; 3, dedication to Mrs. Enders; 4, blank; 5, foreward by Ralph S. Emerick, Librarian; 9, introduction by Breit; 11-265(1), alphabetical listing by authors of ornithological books; 267, list of bibliographical books.  Contains frontispiece of Enders and additional page with uncolored half-tone photographic portraits of three other benefactors, the leaf containing this page printed on both sides and included in pagination.

Supplement  1991  One preliminary leaf, Pp.  [1-2]3-51(1).  Printed white card wrappers.  Preliminary leaf: recto, half-title; verso, blank; 1, title; 2, blank; 3, introduction by Clarke; 4, blank; 5, listing of additional books  acquired between April, 1982 and January, 1991.

The format of this list of books is clearly based on that of the list in the Yale Library published in 1961.  The main volume lists about 5-6 thousand titles, the supplement around 500.  Entries include author, title, size and a brief indication of pagination and plates.  The main benefactor was Ostrom Enders who supplied most of the books and, with his brother John, the funds necessary for future acquisitions.  John Enders was a Nobel Laureate in Medicine who developed methods for growing in culture viruses such as that causing polio.

The ornithological library listed here is outstanding and one that I have often visited.  I once had occasion to deliver to it a copy of Lear's Parrots for possible purchase.  Amongst its numerous treasures is the nicest and most complete copy of the original Naumann that one can find in North America which was acquired at the auction of Bradley Martin's library in 1989.

Published lists such as this one became superfluous when libraries, including Trinity, listed their catalogs on-line.

According to Karen Clarke, the original Curator of the ornithological collection, 1500 copies of the main volume and 500 of the supplement were issued.

Listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard (lacking supplement), Trinity, Yale.


Tristram, H.(enry)B.(aker)(1822-1906)

The survey / of / Western Palestine. / The fauna and flora of Palestine.  29.0 x 22.5 cm.  [a]4b6(-b6)c41-574[$1, 2 signed]; 241 ll.  Pp.  (8)[v]vi-xxii[1]2-455(1).  Late 20th century brown morocco-backed marbled boards with silver lettering on spine.  Uncut, unopened.  London, Committee of the Palestine Exploration Fund, 1884. 

a1r, Half-title; a1v, blank; a2r, title; a2v, blank; a3r, contents; a3v, blank; a4r, list of plates; a4v, blank; v, preface (misdesignated "i" in contents); 1, Mammalia; 30, Aves; 140, Reptilia; 159, Amphibia; 162, Pisces; 178, Mollusca; 207, flora; 455, printer designation: Billing and Sons, Guildford and London.  Contains: 13 hand-colored lithographs (I-VI, mammals, VII-XII, birds) by and after J. Smit, printed by Hanhart imp; 7 uncolored lithographs (XIV-XX) of reptiles and fish by and after R. Mintern and printed by Mintern Bros imp.

Canon Tristram, one of the original founding members of the British Ornithologist's Union (BOU) and a prolific author, was known amongst fellow ornithologists as the "Sacred Ibis" and the "Great Gun of Durham"  He suffered from pulmonary problems which led to prolonged stays in warm and dry areas of North Africa and the Middle East.  The best known of his other works were The great Sahara (1860) and The natural history of the bible (1867) and he amassed a large collection of bird skins and eggs.

Wood, p. 602 (incorrectly calling for 20 colored plates); Zimmer, p. 638.  Also listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard and Yale but not by Trinity.

 


 

Trusler, Peter, (paintings) (text by Kloot, Tess; McCulloch, Ellen M.)

Birds of / Australian / gardens  35.5 x 27.0 cm.  [1-8]9-191[192].  Publisher's blue cloth with darker blue ornithological vignette in block on upper cover, gilt lettering to spine.  Blue endpapers with ornithological vignette; pictorial dust jacket.  Adelaide, Rigby, 1980. 

1, Half-title; 2, another work by same authors; 3, title; 4, ISBN 0 7270 1353 X; "first published 1980"; credits: printed by Griffin Press Limited, Netley, South Australia; color separation by Lasercolor, Adelaide; 5, contents; 6, blank; 7, dedication; 8, blank; 9, foreword by Graham Pizzey; 10, blank;11, artist's note; 12, blank; 13, acknowledgments; 14, blank; 15, introduction; 23, text and plates; 185, suggested plants; 186, bird clubs; 187, references; 189, general index with common and scientific names; 192, uncolored vignette.  Contains 80 unnumbered plates included in pagination and  printed on recto in color half-tone with facing text, and with text for next plate on verso.  Also contains 24 unnumbered, uncolored vignettes and text illustrations.

These plates represent the first major commission for the artist Peter Trusler and they are nicely printed and very impressive.  Most depict a single species.  The book describes species likely to be found in gardens of any of ten Australian cities that span the continent.  The accompanying text is more comprehensive than usual for a book of this type and includes a length measurement and information about distribution, food, nest and eggs, and voice, as well as other sundry material.  However, it is the fine "photographic style" artwork that makes this a noteworthy book.

The book was reprinted in 1990.

Listed by Cornell.  Unlisted by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity and Yale.


Tuck, G(erald) S.  (illustrated by Hermann Heinzel)

A field guide to the / seabirds / of southern Africa and the world  19.2 x 12.7 cm.  Pp.  [i-viii]ix-xxviii[1-2]3-292.  Original publisher's pictorial printed boards.  Endpapers decorated with colored figures of flying and resting representatives of each family treated in the book.  London and Johannesburg, Collins, 1979.

i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title with line vignette; iv, dedication; quotation from John Masefield; copyright 1979; first published 1979; printed by William Collins Sons & Co., Ltd., Glasgow; ISBN 0 00 219714 6; v, contents; vi, blank; vii, list of plates; viii, blank; ix, preface; x, blank; xi, how to use this book; xiii, introduction; 1, the birds; 3, descriptions, Spheniscidae-Alcidae, comprising almost 300 species; 133-227(1), colour plates with descriptive letter-press; 229, distribution maps including double-page world and species1-287 partly printed in red; 261, seabirds of southern Africa (16 breeding, about 40 visitors); 281, local distribution maps of 16 southern African breeding species; 287, index of English names; 290, index of scientific (generic) names.  Contains: colored plates 1-48, so enumerated on facing letter-press, printed in half-tone on recto with explanatory letter-press for next species on verso, all included in pagination; approximately 61 unnumbered text line illustrations (22 full-page), many comprising several subjects.

The title of this work is confusing as is the somewhat superfluous section on seabirds of southern Africa (pp. 261-286).  The work comprises  descriptions of all the "seabirds" of the world.  Perhaps the book was partially financed by a South African source.  It is a very attractively illustrated work that covers both inshore and pelagic birds.  All are figured in color, the global distribution of each is on a map, and the text for each includes measurements, a description, and points of identification to distinguish it from similar species.  There are numerous artful text illustrations.  The 16 breeding seabirds of southern Africa receive a somewhat more comprehensive text that includes a life history and there is some introductory material in that section about the seas surrounding southern Africa.

Not listed by AMNH.  Cornell, Harvard, Trinity and Yale all list a book published in London by Collins in 1978 with the identical title, author, illustrator and pagination, save that the word "Britain" is present in the place of "southern Africa".


(Tunnicliffe, C[harles]F[rederick][1901-1979]), Day, J(ames) Wentworth (1899-)

British Birds / of / the Wild Places  Pp.  [1-4]5-87[88]; 44 ll.  Original publisher's yellow boards with heron vignette on upper cover, black printing on spine.  Pictorial dust jacket.  London, Blandford Press, (1961).  Printed by the Berkshire Printing Company Limited, Reading, Berkshire. 

1, title; 2, copyright; 3, contents; 4, list of illustrations; 5, text;  Contains minicolored plates 1-49 on 10 pages as well as 19 text black and white line sketches all after Tunnicliffe and all included in pagination.

Tunnicliffe did four sets of illustration for Brooke Bond Tea Ltd. , each containing fifty pictures to be pasted into an album.  There was, I believe, a single picture accompanying each packet of tea but it was also possible to buy pictures individually from the company.  The four series covered: British Birds, Tropical Birds, African Wild Life, and Asian Wild Life.  The present work contains 49 of the 50 pictures from the series on British Birds.  I believe it is the only book in which any of these stamps were reproduced.  Day, a "wildfowler" who wrote books in the gentlemanly hunting genre, did a 10 chapter text for this book which occasionally touches upon birds.  Each of the colored pictures is accompanied by a small amount of information (perhaps from Tunnicliffe's original text for the stamps)  concerning the species.  The line sketches are extremely attractive.  I am not certain whether or not they are enlarged versions of the line sketches that were present with a small text in the original stamp album supplied by Brooke Bond Tea.

This work is unlisted by AMNH, Harvard, Trinity and Yale, probably not because it is rare, but because it is trivial unless one has a special interest in Tunnicliffe.  It is, however, present in Oxford library which lists 58 books by and/or illustrated by Tunnicliffe.


Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979)

Hawks and falcons / ten lithographs  Two prints 59.0 x 40.0 cm.  Eight prints 39.0 x 29.0 cm.   Original ochre card portfolio with black printing on upper cover and its verso.  Guilford, (England), Circle Press Publications, 1975.  #79 of 90 sets signed by the artist.

This work contains 10 uncolored true lithographs, the larger ones signed in pencil “C. F. Tunnicliffe”, the smaller ones initialed in pencil.  All are numbered in pencil 79/90.  The verso of the portfolio explains that there were sets (1-90) so signed and numbered as well as 110 additional sets (91-200) with the signature and initials incorporated into the print (i.e., lithographed rather than signed in pencil).

In his earliest book, the masterpiece My country book(1942), Tunnicliffe devotes a chapter to “Hawks and falcons at Avebury” which describes his initial exposure to falconry and his interest in it.  The magnificent plates in the present work were probably inspired in part by that experience since the raptors are all depicted with jesses and other falconry paraphernalia.  The birds are not identified on the prints and there is no text, however, the pictured species include Gyrfalcon, Peregrine, Sparrowhawk and Goshawk.

The art displayed in this suite of plates has been conspicuously influenced by the two most artistically important mid 19th century works on falconry, Schlegel’s Traité de fauconerie illustrated by Joseph Wolf and Salvin and Brodrick’s Falconry in the British Isles illustrated by Brodrick.

Tunnicliffe is certainly amongst the finest 20th century ornithological artists, yet his artwork appeared almost exclusively in popular works on British natural history.  I believe that the present suite is his only effort that was specifically intended as a limited edition publication.  It is already difficult to find a complete set.

Not listed by  AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Melvyl, Trinity, Yale, nor even by Oxford which has a comprehensive collection of books illustrated by Tunnicliffe.  OCLC lists one copy at the University of Southern California.  That copy turns out to be a publication announcement.


(Tunnicliffe, Charles Frederick[1901-1979]), Bennett, Linda

RSPB Book of / Garden Birds  23.9 x 16.7 cm.  Pp. [1-4][9]10-124; 60 ll.  Original publisher's brown cloth, gilt lettering on spine. Yellow end papers.  Pictorial dust jacket.  Original price of £2.95 printed on upper flap.  London, New York, Sydney, Toronto, Hamlyn, (1978). 

1, Half-title; 2-3, title; 4, copyright, dedication; 9, Contents; 10, what is a garden bird?; 12, gardens and their birds through the ages; 14, gardening for birds; 26, spring and summer in the garden; 32, autumn and winter in the garden; 36, watching more closely; 39, list of plates; 122, further reading, bird conservation societies; 123, index.  Contains 36 unnumbered colored plates signed by Tunnicliffe as well as the following uncolored, unnumbered illustrations by Robert Gillmor: one double-page(title); eight single full-page (five of birds, two separate pictures per plate, and three of leaves) and 14 text figures.  All illustrations included in pagination with printing on both sides.

I believe this is the original printing of an extraordinarily attractive book.  It is possible that two preliminary leaves are missing or that the pagination is incorrect due to a printer's error.  The latter is almost certainly the explanation since both the AMNH and Oxford libraries give the pagination of the original 1978 edition as "5-124".  This book was reprinted many times and I wonder whether the pagination was corrected in later issues.

Although not explicitly stated in the book, the 36 beautiful colored plates by Tunnicliffe appeared originally as Christmas cards for the RSPB or as covers for the magazines Bird and Bird Life.  Many of the originals for them were auctioned by the RSPB at Sotheby's London on 11/22/95 and they made unusually high prices for small pictures.  The catalog for that auction, which is part of my collection, is an important and very well illustrated and written piece of Tunnicliffeiana.

The text of the book deals with attracting birds to the garden.  The species accounts of the birds are popular and not systematic.  I am always amazed by how low the price can be of popular British books that are beautifully illustrated by fine and well known artists.  According to the jacket, this one was £2.95.

This book is present in the libraries of AMNH and Oxford but not listed by Cornell, Harvard, Yale and Trinity.


Tunnicliffe, C(harles) F(rederick) (1901-1979)

African / Wild Life  18.4 x 13.4 cm.  Pp.  (16).  Original pictorial cardboard covers with printed and illustrated endpapers.  London (?), Brooke Bond Tea Company Ltd., ca. 1960.  Contains 50 unnumbered mounted colored pictures and 21 uncolored text vignettes by Tunnicliffe in addition to illustrated covers and end papers.

This is one of the four series of Brooke Bond Picture Cards each containing 50 subjects.  One card was included in each packet of tea but individual cards could be purchased separately.  I don't know when or how one obtained the card album in which to mount the pictures.  The present series depicts 50 African animals in color.  Tunnicliffe provides a brief discussion of the distribution and life habits of each.  Four of the uncolored vignettes are ornithological.  The artistry is first-rate.

The four series comprised British Birds, Tropical Birds, and Asian Wild Life, in addition to the present item.  Of these, only the series on British Birds was expanded and reproduced in book form.  The original sets such as this one are scarce ephemera and seem not to be present in any of the major libraries.


Tunnicliffe, C(harles) F(rederick) (1901-1979).

Bird / portraiture  24.7 x 18.9 cm.  Pp.  1-96. Original publisher's red cloth with gilt lettering on upper cover, black lettering on spine.  Pictorial dust jacket.  "How to do it" Series No. 35.  London and New York, The Studio, 1945.

1, Half-title; 2, "How to do it" Series, list of 35 titles, this one No. 35; 3, title with kestrel vignette; 4, juvenile house sparrow vignette; "First published January, 1945; printed by Balding & Mansell Ltd., Wisbech, Cambridgeshire; 5, contents; colour plates; 6, list of illustrations in monochrome; 7, introduction; 9, making a beginning; 13, drawing from life; 16, equipment for field work; 18, a field day; 29, plumage study; 45, poses and action studies; 56, colour and tone; 60, settings; 66, picture making; 74, a day of days; 94, in conclusionl  Contains 16 unnumbered  plates printed in color half-tone with running text on obverse and included in pagination.  Also contains 87 unnumbered scratch board and half-tone text illustrations and vignettes (16 full-page).

This is the only book that I obtained as a child and kept for my entire life.  I recall vividly  how it seized me when I first examined it at about age 14 and I still react the same way to pictures by this great artist.  There is something about them that anyone, even the most uneducated in art, can recognize as special.  It is extraordinary that a person of such talent would write a simple book for the public on his craft and by all accounts Tunnicliffe was an unusually unpretentious and humble man.  Can one imagine Picasso doing such a thing?

 

Tunnicliffe first achieved acclaim for his pictures in Henry Williamson's Tarka the Otter (1932) and he was certainly highly regarded during his lifetime.  However, much of the appreciation of his oeuvre has been posthumous and due to the efforts of two influential admirers, Ian Nial and Noel Cusa.

This work is listed by AMNH, Cornell, and Trinity.  Not listed by Harvard and Yale.


Tunnicliffe, C(harles) F(rederick) (1901-1971)

Birds of the Estuary  22.0 x 18.2 cm.  Pp. [1]2-31[32]; 16 ll including covers which are included in pagination.  Original illustrated card covers and illustrated endpapers containing text all included in pagination.  Puffin Picture Book 90, Penguin Books, Ltd., Harmondsworth, Middlesex, UK., 1952.  Printed by John Swain and Son, Ltd.  All 32 pages contain illustrations which are colored on 16.

This work was published when Tunnicliffe was at his prime, just completing Shoreland's Summer Diary (1952) and having recently published Our Bird Book (1947) and Mereside Chronicle (1948).  Therefore, it is not surprising that the artistry in this modestly presented work is superb.  About 54, species are illustrated, half in color.  Tunnicliffe has provided a brief popular style text with sundry unsystematic notes for each species.

The work is listed for the libraries of the BM(NH), Oxford and Harvard.


Tunnicliffe, Charles F(rederick) (1901-1979) (text by Gillmor, Robert)

The Composition Drawings  20.0 x 21.2 cm.  Pp.  [1]2-72; 36 ll.  Original stiff pictorial wrappers, illustrated on endpapers.  London, Bunny Bird Fine Art, 1986.  Printed by The Penna Press St Albans, Herts. 

1, Title; 2, copyright; 3, introduction by Gillmor; 6, contents, acknowledgements; 7, catalog; 72, list of exhibitions and bibliography.  Contains 50 colored and 140 uncolored reproductions of art by Tunnicliffe designated with respect to catalog numbers.

This is the catalog for an exhibition of artwork by Tunnicliffe organized by Bunny Bird Fine Art in association with the Tryon and Moorland Galleries and presented in London, 5-25 March, 1986.  The artwork ranged from initial pencil sketches to finished watercolors and the exhibition was intended to show the stages of development that went into Tunnicliffe's paintings.  The subjects are varied though mostly birds.  The purposes of the paintings were also varied and included undesignated work as well as subjects commissioned for books, magazines, covers, advertisements etc.  The introduction and comments concerning the displayed items are by Robert Gillmor, an ornithological artist and long-time admirer of Tunnicliffe.

This catalog listed for the BM(NH).


Tunnicliffe, Charles Frederick (1901-1979)

Bird drawings by C. F. Tunnicliffe RA  24.5 x 18.0 cm.  Pp. [1-4]5-30[31](1).  Pictorial wrappers.  (London), Royal Academy of Arts, 1974. 

1, Half-title; 2, blank; 3, title; 4, copyright; catalogue designed by James Shurmer; printed at the Curwen Press Ltd; 5, preface by Sir Thomas Mornington; 6, general information; 7 biography (chronology) of the artist; 8, C. F. Tunnicliffe by Kyffin Williams RA; 12, notes on catalogue entries by Dr. Bruce Campbell; 13, the catalogue; 31, legends for colored plates.  Contains uncolored photographic half-tone frontispiece portrait of Tunnicliffe and 12 plates (I, IIa-b, III, IVa-b, V, VIa-b, VII, VIIIa-b, printed in half-tone on both sides of four leaves not included in pagination.

This is the catalog for an exhibition held at the Diploma Galleries of the Royal Academy of Arts August 3-September 29, 1974.  Tunnicliffe was prevailed upon by Williams, his Anglesey neighbor and fellow artist, to allow exhibition , for the first time, of his notebooks containing reference "measured drawings".  These apparently created quite a sensation amongst ornithologists as well as artists.  Three books (A sketchbook of birds [1979], Sketches of birdlife[1981], Tunnicliffe's birds [1984]) were subsequently produced from the contents of the notebooks.  These drawings were made from dead birds as reference material.  Tunnicliffe had an unfulfilled ambition to complete them for male, female and immature examples of every specie of bird found in the British Isles.

Listed by Yale.  Unlisted by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity.


(Tunnicliffe, C[harles]F[rederick] (1901-1979), Watson, E(lliot) L(ovegood) Grant (1885-)

What to Look / For in Spring  17.1 x 10.5 cm.  Pp.  [1-3]4-50[51-52]; 26 ll.  Original publisher's tan boards with blue printed landscape-tree design on upper cover (slightly different for each "What to Look for.." book), blue lettering on upper cover and spine.  Pictorial dust jacket designating price of 2'6, a Ladybird Nature Book, and this one as well as 13 others in the Ladybird Nature series 536 and stating that there are more than 100 titles in the series.  Inscription dated "Xmas 1965" on front paste-down.  Loughborough, Willis & Hepworth, Ltd, (1961). 

1, Brief essay on spring, ladybird designation; 2, blank; 3, title; 4, text; 52, index to illustrations and plates (continued on rear paste-down).  Contains uncolored title page vignette and 24 full-page, unnumbered colored plates by Tunnicliffe.

Another in this series that presents an idyllic picture of the English countryside in words and pictures.  The price indicates that this is an early printing but the fact that it lacks the blue flying ladybug design on the end papers,  that there were already more than 100 Ladybird titles available, and that it bears a 1965 inscription indicate that it is not the original printing.


(Tunnicliffe, C[harles]F[rederick]) (1901-1979), Watson, E(lliot) L(ovegood) Grant (1885-)

What to Look / For in Summer  17.1 x 10.5 cm.  Pp.  [1-3]4-50[51-52]; 26 ll.  Original publisher's tan pictorial boards with blue landscape-tree design on upper cover (different for each "What to Look for.. " book), blue lettering on upper cover and spine. End papers with blue flying lady bug motif, the rear one containing printed material.  Pictorial dust jacket listing price of 2'6, designating a Ladybird Nature Book and listing this and seven other titles in the Ladybird Nature Series 536 but not including "What to Look for in Spring (Autumn)" which followed this title in order of publication.  Loughborough, Willis & Hepworth, (1960). 

1, blank; 2, brief essay on summer, ladybird designation; 3, title; 4, text; 52, index to illustrations and text (continued on rear paste-down).  Contains uncolored title page vignette and 24 unnumbered full-page colored plates by Tunnicliffe.

This is another in the series of four books about the seasons containing narrative by Watson (sometimes listed as Grant Watson) that describes the accompanying idyllic depiction by Tunnicliffe of the English countryside.  This is probably the first printing since it contains the flying lady bug motif on the end papers, which was discontinued around 1961, and more importantly, since the list on the lower flap of the dust jacket lists only nine titles of which this is the last one.

Present only at Cornell amongst the usual libraries and collections that I examine.  The work is not rare and is important only because of the fine illustrations by Tunnicliffe.


(Tunnicliffe, C[harles] F[rederick][1901-1979]), Watson, E(lliot) L(ovegood) Grant (1885-)

What to Look / For in Winter  17.1 x 11.5 cm.  Pp.  [1-3]4-50[51-52]; 26 ll.  End papers printed and included in pagination.  Original publisher's tan boards with blue tree design on upper cover, blue lettering on upper cover and spine.  Free end papers and rear paste-down printed.  Pictorial dust jacket with price of 2'6 on fold-in. Loughborough, Wills & Hepworth, (1959). "A Ladybird Nature Book" 

1, Essay, series 536 designation, and ladybird logo (a ladybug); 2, blank; 3, title and copyright date; 4, text; 52, index to illustrations and text (continued onto rear paste-down).  Contains 24 full-page, unnumbered colored plates by Tunnicliffe.

This example must be a reprint since the rear fold-in of the dust jacket lists this one and12 other books in the Ladybird Nature Series 536 including the three other "What to look for in … books, which were all first published in 1960 and 1961 and states that there are over 100 Ladybird titles.  However, the price of 2'6 indicates that the printing was an early one.

The book contains a narrative in words and pictures describing various scenes and activities that might be observed during winter in the English countryside.  The pictures by Tunnicliffe are absolutely wonderful and some, but not all of them include birds.  Each of the blue designs on the upper cover of the "What to look for.." books is somewhat different from the others.

The author is sometimes cataloged under the last name Grant Watson.

The four What to look for in … books are present in the Cornell University library but unlisted for all of the other major museum, university and governmental libraries that I ordinarily use for reference.  They are not even present at Oxford which lists 58 title by, or illustrated by Tunnicliffe.  These books are not uncommon and, though textually insubstantial, contain superb Tunnicliffe art.


(Tunnicliffe, C[harles]F[rederick][1901-1979])Watson, E(lliot)L(ovegood)Grant (1885-)

What to Look / For in Autumn  17.1 x 10.5 cm.  Pp.  [1-3]4-50[51-52; 26 ll.  End papers printed with blue design of flying lady bugs,  and included in pagination.  Printed material on bottom end papers.   Original tan boards with blue design on upper cover and blue lettering on spine.  Pictorial dust jacket designating price of 2'6 and listing 11 titles, including the three other "What to Look for…volumes in the "Ladybird Nature Series 536".  Loughborough, Wills & Hepworth Ltd., (1960).

1, Upper end paper blank; 2, brief essay on autumn and designation of  series 536; 3, title; 4, text; 52, index (continued on rear pastedown).  Contains uncolored title vignette and 24 unnumbered, colored plates after Tunnicliffe.

This is a series of work and graphic essays on autumn in England, one of four companion volumes, each corresponding to a season.  Tunnicliffe's pictures are masterpieces in conveying an ideal image of rural England.

The dust jacket mentions the volume on Spring, the original printing of which appeared in 1961 so the present volume is clearly not the first printing of 1960.  However, it must be a very early one as indicated by the list of only 11 titles on the rear flap of the jacket, and particularly by the pattern of flying lady bugs on the end papers which was discontinued about 1961.

Listed only by Cornell among the important libraries and collections.


(Tunnicliffe, C[harles]F[rederick] (1901-1979), Watson, E(lliot) L(ovegood) Grant (1885-)

What to Look / For in Spring  17.1 x 10.5 cm.  Pp.  [1-3]4-50[51-52]; 26 ll.  Original publisher's tan boards with blue printed landscape-tree design on upper cover (slightly different for each "What to Look for.." book), blue lettering on upper cover and spine.  Pictorial dust jacket, price of 2'6 clipped off, rear flap designating 11 titles for Ladybird Nature Series 536 of which the last four are the "What to look for in.." books.  End papers and paste downs with blue flying lady bug design.  Loughborough, Willis & Hepworth, Ltd, (1961). 

1, Blank upper end paper; 2, brief essay on spring, ladybird designation; 2, blank; 3, title; 4, text; 52, index to illustrations and plates (continued on rear paste-down).  Contains uncolored title page vignette and 24 full-page, unnumbered colored plates by Tunnicliffe.

Another in this series that presents an idyllic picture of the English countryside in words and pictures. This copy is very likely a first printing since it contains the flying lady bug design on the end papers which was discontinued about 1961 and since the last four titles listed on the wrapper are the four "What to look for in…" books of which this volume was the last to appear.

Present only at Cornell amongst the libraries and collections that I usually examine.


(Tunnicliffe, C[harles] F[rederick][1901-1979]), Watson, E(lliot) L(ovegood) Grant (1885-)

What to Look / For in Winter  17.1 x 11.5 cm.  Pp.  [1-3]4-50[51-52]; 26 ll.  End papers printed with blue motif of flying lady bugs.  Rear end paper and paste-down with printed material.  Original publisher's tan boards with blue tree design on upper cover, blue lettering on upper cover and spine. Pictorial dust jacket with price of 2'6 on fold-in. Loughborough, Wills & Hepworth, (1959). "A Ladybird Nature Book" 

1, Upper, unprinted end paper; 2.essay, series 536 designation, and ladybird logo (a ladybug); 3, title and copyright date; 4, text; 52, index to illustrations and text (continued onto rear paste-down).  Contains 24 full-page, unnumbered colored plates by Tunnicliffe.

This example is a very early printing,  as indicated by the blue flying lady bug motif that was discontinued around 1961, and, more importantly, by the list of only seven titles on the rear flap of the dust jacket, the last of which is this title.  Ordinarily, that might guarantee that this is the original printing.  However, I have read that a few copies were printed with  an error on page 16 which was shortly corrected.  This copy may thus be considered the original corrected printing.  The book contains a narrative in words and pictures describing various scenes and activities that might be observed during winter in the English countryside.  The pictures by Tunnicliffe are absolutely wonderful and some, but not all of them include birds.  Each of the blue designs on the upper cover of the "What to look for…" books is somewhat different from the others.

The author is sometimes cataloged under the last name Grant Watson.

The four What to look for in … books are present in the Cornell University library but unlisted for all of the other major museum, university and governmental libraries that I ordinarily use for reference.  They are not even present at Oxford which lists 58 title by, or illustrated by Tunnicliffe.  These books are not uncommon and, though textually insubstantial, contain superb Tunnicliffe art.


Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979)(introduction, commentary, memoir by Noel Cusa).

Tunnicliffe's / birds / Measured drawings by C. R. Tunnicliffe RA  33.3 x 25.2 cm.  Pp.  [1-6]7-160.  Publisher's brown cloth with gilt-ruled vertical panel, gilt lettering on spine.  Chocolate endpapers.  Pictorial dust jacket with original price of $49.95 printed on upper flap.  Boston, Toronto, Little, Brown and Company, (1984). 

1, Half-title; 2, frontispiece; 3, title partly printed in red with colored vignette of shelduck; 4, Copyright 1984; "First American Edition"; first published in Great Britain by Victor Gollancz Ltd; designed by Harold Bartram; printed in Great Britain; 5, contents; 6, blank; 7, introduction; 9, predatory birds; 45, ducks, geese, grebes, ducks, divers, herons, bitterns, ibises, coots; 87, fulmers, gannets, skuas, gulls, auks, terns, waders; 119, miscellaneous birds; 155, C. F. Tunnicliffe, a memoir; 160, picture index.  Contains 79 unnumbered plates including frontispiece reproduced from the artist's notebook in color half-tone, about 32 full-page,  depicting 63 species and title vignette.

Tunnicliffe filled numerous notebooks with sketches that he made of  dead birds and anatomical parts, recording various measurements to assist him in full-scale paintings.  Ian Niall recognized the excellence and beauty of these sketches and convinced the firm of Gollancz to publish them after securing Tunnicliffe's approval.  The first collection, A Sketchbook of birds, was published in 1979, the year of the artist's death.  The second, Sketches of birdlife, appeared in 1981.   Those two were printed in Italy and have quite a different appearance from this book which was printed in England.

This work reproduces the actual pages from various notebooks and includes the dates of the drawings and the actual measurements made by Tunnicliffe with his notes.  Cusa's commentary provides a brief essay about the species in the British Isles and the circumstances under which the various sketches were made.

Tunnicliffe, surely one of the finest ornithological artists of the 20th century, did not promote his work very aggressively, and it is the good fortune of the public that he had two such ardent and active admirers as Niall and Cusa.

This work is listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity.  Not listed by Yale.


Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979)

Mereside chronicle with a short interlude of lochs and lochans  28.3 x 22.2 cm.  [A]4B-N8[$1 signed]; 100 ll.  Pp. [1-6]7-200.  Original red cloth with gilt lettering to upper cover and spine.  London: Country Life Limited  New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1948. 

1, Half-title; 2, frontispiece; 3, title with vignette; 4, "First Published 1948"; made and printed in Great Britain by Lowe & Brydone Printers Ltd., London; 5, preface; 8, plate; 9, text.  Contains approximately 218 unnumbered uncolored half-tone illustrations of which six are full-page area overviews printed on three leaves and two others are full-page plates with running preliminaries on obverse, all included in pagination.

This book, written in diary format, describes a year of looking for birds, almost entirely in central Cheshire save three weeks in Scotland.  The pictures, which were probably done with pencil, have been reproduced by half-tone and have a soft quality quite different from wood engravings or scraperboards, and quite unlike most others by Tunnicliffe.

The work is listed by AMNH, Harvard and Trinity.  Not listed by Cornell and Yale.


Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979)

My / country / book  24.7 x 18.9 cm. [1-7]8-95(1).  Original blue-gray cloth with dark blue lettering to spine.  Pictorial dust jacket with original US price $3.50 printed on upper flap.  London and New York, The Studio, 1942. 

1, Half-title; 2, blank; 3, title with pastoral vignette; 4, "First published in 1942"; printed in England by Balding & Mansell, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire; 5, contents; list of colour plates; 6, list of monochrome illustrations; 7, my country in general; 28, the country of my youth; 33, the shire stallion; 36, a day in the hay; 40, art on the farm; 46, early winter morning; 50, on bulls; 54, Gosworth in spring; 58, hawks and falcons at Avebury; 63, isle of Iona; 67, salmon in Devon; 71 Redes mere; 76, goldsitch moss; 81, bird country; 93, down to earth.  Contains; 16 unnumbered colored half-tone plates with running text on obverse and included in pagination; 81 unnumbered, uncolored text illustrations in scratch board and half-tone.

This is the first book actually written by this outstanding British artist.  It is one of three that represent a kind of autobiography in diary form.  The other two, Mereside chronicle (1948) and Shorelands summer diary (1952), are better known, better produced because they were done after the war, and more or less completely devoted to ornithological experiences. This one is only partially devoted to ornithology but is more personally revealing as we learn about the author's early farming and artistic experiences.  There are some very interesting illustrations from a meet of falconers that was a seminal experience in Tunnicliffe's life and the beginning of his passion for drawing birds.  His talent as an artist first drew attention after his illustrations for Henry Williamson's Tarka the otter (1932).  His first published collection of ornithological illustrations was the series of beautiful wood engravings he did for Mary Priestley's A book of birds (1937).  But the present work is the first to present pictures that he, rather than another author, selected, and is thus of special importance. 

The lower flap of the dust jacket contains the following indication that it was produced during the Battle of Britain in the second world war: " 'London calling!' (wherever you are), London calls you daily on the radio with the news from Britain, truthful…".

Listed by Cornell.  Unlisted by AMNH, Harvard, Trinity and Yale.


(Tunnicliffe, Charles [1901-1979]), Niall, Ian

Portrait of / A Country Artist / Charles Tunnicliffe R. A. / 1901-1979  28.0 x 20.5 cm.  Pp.  [1-6]7-160; 80 ll.  Original publisher's brown cloth, blue and gilt paper labeling piece on spine.  Pictorial dust jacket.  Ochre end papers.  London, Victor Gollancz Ltd, 1980.

1, Half-title; 2, colored frontispiece; 3, title; 4, copyright; 5, dedication; 6, acknowledgments; 7, contents, list of illustrations; 9, a private viewing; 15, the drawing on the wall; 34, London scene; 53, the world of Henry Williamson; 78, changing backgrounds; 102, book illustration; 122, field sketches and post mortem drawings; 146 retrospect; 157, bibliography.  Contains 102 unnumbered, uncolored and 50 unnumbered colored half-tone illustrations, some full-page

This is a lavishly illustrated biography of Tunnicliffe's professional life written by one of his many contemporary admirers and embellished with a fine bibliography of works written and/or illustrated by the artist. 

Cornell (later printing), Yale.  Absent from AMNH, Harvard, Trinity libraries.


Tunnicliffe, C(harles)F(rederick)(1901-1979), (Gillmor, Robert, introduction), (Ratcliffe, Derek, "The Anglesey Peregrines, chapter)

The Peregrine / Sketchbook  30.0 x 26.2 cm.  Pp. [1-6]7-79[80]; 40 ll.  Original entirely unmarked red cloth.  Pictorial dust jacket.  London, Excellent Press, 1996. 

1, Half-title; 2, blank; 3, title; 4, copyright, production information, acknowledgements; 5, contents; 6, map; 7, quotation from Tunnicliffe's Bird Portraiture (1945); 8, blank; 9, introduction by Robert Gillmor; 15, the peregrine sketches; 69, the Anglesey peregrines by Derek Ratcliffe; 79, bibliography.  Contains about 25 full-page colored or partially colored illustrations and a comparable number of text scraperboard pictures.

Gillmor, an admirer of Tunnicliffe and a fine ornithological artist himself, has here assembled those passages from Tunnicliffe's Shorelands Summer Diary (1952) that deal with the Anglesey peregrines and correlated them with the appropriate graphic depictions in notebooks, scraperboard drawings, and more fully finished paintings.  Derek Ratcliffe has written a chapter concerned with the conservation of peregrines, particularly those in the vicinity of Anglesey where Tunnicliffe lived.  The result is this attractive volume in which Tunnicliffe depicts graphically and in words what was probably his favorite subject.

This one of the more common books by Tunnicliffe that was assembled posthumously yet I could find it listed only in the Trinity on-line catalog.  It was absent from those of the New York Public Library, the American Museum, Harvard, Cornell and Yale.


Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979)

Shorelands / summer / diary  30.0 x 23.2 cm.  [A]8B-K8[$1 signed]; 80 ll.  Pp. [1-8]9-160.  Original publisher's red cloth with gilt shorebird design on upper cover, gilt lettering to spine.  Pictorial dust jacket with price of two guineas printed on upper flap.  London, Collins, 1952. 

1, Half-title; 2, uncolored frontispiece; 3, title; 4, printed by the publishers; colour plates printed by Harrison and Sons Ltd., High Wycombe, Bucks.; 5, contents; 6, blank; 7, list of colour illustrations; 8, blank; 9, introduction; 14, april; 37, may; 59, june; 79, july; 100, august; 120, september; 151, list of drawings in text; 155, half-title leaf for index; 157, index including English bird names.  Contains 16 unnumbered colored plates printed by gravure on one side only and not included in pagination.  Also contains uncolored title vignette and about 185 unnumbered, mostly or all scraperboard text illustrations including full-page frontispiece.

Charles Tunnicliffe was one of the great ornithological artists of the 20th century and, although widely recognized as such among other British artists, he deserves to be much better known in the general world of ornithology.  He was originally a farmer and his passion was in the English countryside and its birds.  He apparently had little interest in, and rarely drew, exotic birds.  This present work is usually considered his greatest masterpiece.  It describes, by a kind of ornithological diary, his beloved home county of Anglesey, which juts into the Irish Sea from the west coast of Wales.  Tunnicliffe's eye is very sharp and his prose is good, but it is his art that is really arresting and that makes his books very special.  In general, he did three types of pictures: countryside vignettes filled with ambiance and usually largely devoted to birds, as this work; carefully drafted and very intellectual compositions, usually of birds and painted for commissions or exhibitions; and carefully measured drawing of British birds made from dead specimens for use as reference.  He had many notebooks filled with the latter and hoped to accumulate such a study for every English species.  The best amongst his other books, written or illustrated during his lifetime, are Our bird book with Sydney Rogerson, also published by Collins (1947) and Mereside chronicle (1948).  In addition, his own My country book (1942) and Bird portraiture (1945) published by The Studio, are particularly praiseworthy and he was a prolific illustrator of books by other authors, the most artistically interesting from the point of view of ornithology being Mary Priestley's A book of birds (1937).

The present work was reprinted in 1984.

This original edition listed by AMNH, Cornell, Trinity, Yale.  Not listed by Harvard.

 

Tunnicliffe, Charles (Frederick)(1901-1979)

Measured drawings / watercolours, sketchbooks / and manuscripts / from the studio of / the late / Charles Tunnicliffe, R. A.  24.0 x 18.4 cm.  Pp.  [1-12]13-102[103-108).  Original pictorial wrappers.  Christie’s catalogue “Tunnicliffe”, London, May 8, 10, 11, 1981. 

1, Title; 2, conditions of sale; 5, half-title; 6, uncolored photograph of  Tunnicliffe; 7, introduction by Ian Niall; 10, blank; 11, references; 12, contents;  13-102, description of lots 1-373;103, estimate list; 105, bid form;     106, Robson Lowe International LTD; 107, Officers and locations of Christie’s.  Contains 63 text illustrations (10 colored) including 6 full-page (five colored).

This was an important auction of much of the contents of Tunnicliffe’s estate, particularly measured drawings.  The biographical introduction by Ian Niall is informative.   I had not known that early in his career, Tunnicliffe was known for his fine etchings on copper.

This copy of the attractive catalog does not have laid in a list of the prices realized which would be of considerable interest.


Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979) (introduction and commentary by Robert Gillmor)

Sketches of bird life  Oblong, 24.0 x 26.0 cm.  Unpaginated with 72 leaves as described below.  Original publisher's ochre cloth with Tunnicliffe monogram on lower right corner of upper cover, black lettering to spine.  Gray endpapers.  Pictorial dust jacket.  London, Victor Gollancz Ltd, 1981. 

First leaf: recto, half-title with uncolored sketch; verso, blank.

Second: recto, title with colored sketch; verso, copyright 1981; ISBN 0 575 03036 4; printed by A. Mondadori Editore, Verona.

Third: recto, contents; verso, uncolored sketch.

Fourth-fifth recto: introduction; verso, Charles Frederick Tunnicliffe, chronology.

Sixth: recto, half-title courtship and display; colored sketch; verso, commentary.

Seventh-14th: plates 1-16.

15th: recto, half-title the young bird; colored sketch; verso, commentary.

16th-26th: plates 17-38.

27th: recto, half-title feeding; colored sketch; verso, commentary.

28th-39th: plates 39-62.

40th: recto, half-title flying; uncolored sketch; verso, commentary.

41st-46th: plates 63-74;

47th: recto, half-title other behaviour; uncolored sketch; verso, commentary.

48th-53rd: plates 75-86.

54th: recto, half-title picture making; uncolored sketch; verso, commentary.

55th-71st: plates 87-122.

72nd: recto, acknowledgements; verso, index of English bird names.

Contains plates 1-122 (105 colored) printed in half-tone.

After the critical acclain for the first exhibition of Tunnicliffe's notebook sketches in 1974, Tunnicliffe agreed to their publication and Ian Niall assembled the first group and arranged with the Gollancz firm for their publication in 1979, as A sketchbook of birds.  Additional collections were assembled by the distinguished ornithological artist, Robert Gillmor for this work, identical in format to the previous one, and by Noel Cusa for Tunnicliffe's birds measured drawings published in 1984.  Cusa also selected a group of more finished paintings for Tunnicliffe's birdlife (1985).

Listed by Cornell, Trinity.  Not listed by AMNH, Harvard, Yale.


Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979) (introduction and commentary by Robert Gillmor)

Sketches of bird life  Oblong, 24.0 x 26.0 cm.  Unpaginated with 72 leaves as described below.  Original publisher's ochre cloth with Tunnicliffe monogram on lower right corner of upper cover, black lettering to spine.  Gray endpapers.  Pictorial dust jacket with original price of $24.95 on upper flap.  New York, Watson-Guptill Publications, 1982.

First leaf: recto, half-title with uncolored sketch; verso, blank.

Second: recto, title with colored sketch; verso, copyright 1981; ISBN 0-8230-4856-X; first published in the USA in 1982 by Watson-Guptill publications; printed by A. Mondadori Editore, Verona.

Third: recto, contents; verso, uncolored sketch.

Fourth-fifth recto: introduction; verso, Charles Frederick Tunnicliffe, chronology.

Sixth: recto, half-title courtship and display; colored sketch; verso, commentary.

Seventh-14th: plates 1-16.

15th: recto, half-title the young bird; colored sketch; verso, commentary.

16th-26th: plates 17-38.

27th: recto, half-title feeding; colored sketch; verso, commentary.

28th-39th: plates 39-62.

40th: recto, half-title flying; uncolored sketch; verso, commentary.

41st-46th: plates 63-74;

47th: recto, half-title other behaviour; uncolored sketch; verso, commentary.

48th-53rd: plates 75-86.

54th: recto, half-title picture making; uncolored sketch; verso, commentary.

55th-71st: plates 87-122.

72nd: recto, acknowledgements; verso, index of English bird names.

Contains plates 1-122 (105 colored) printed in half-tone.

After the critical acclain for the first exhibition of Tunnicliffe's notebook sketches in 1974, Tunnicliffe agreed to their publication and Ian Niall assembled the first group and arranged with the Gollancz firm for their publication in 1979, as A sketchbook of birds.  Additional collections were assembled by the distinguished ornithological artist, Robert Gillmor for this work, identical in format to the previous one, and by Noel Cusa for Tunnicliffe's birds measured drawings published in 1984.  Cusa also selected a group of more finished paintings for Tunnicliffe's birdlife (1985).

The original Gollancz imprint, to which this one is identical save for the second leaf, was published the preceding year.

Listed by Cornell(both imprints), Trinity (Gollancz imprint).  Not listed by AMNH, Harvard, Yale.


Tunnicliffe, C. F. (Sotheby’s auction catalogue)

C. F. Tunnicliffe  From the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds  27 x 21 cm.  Pp. [1-10]11-76(8).  Original decorated wrappers.  London, 1995.  Contains 109 reproductions of paintings by Tunnicliffe, 104 of which are colored.  A list of the prices realized is loosely inserted.

This auction, LN5663 “RSPB”, was held in London on November 22, 1995.  All of the pictures were relatively small, comparable to octavo or small quarto format, and were the originals for the Society’s publication, “Bird Notes”, or for its Christmas cards.  It is extraordinary that an auction of such material could occur so soon (in this case 16 years) after the artist’s death.

Listed by Cornell.  Unlisted by AMNH, Harvard, Trinity, Yale.


Tunnicliffe, C(harles) F(rederick)(1901-1979)

Tropical Birds  18 x 23 cm.  Pp.  (16); 8 ll.  Original pictorial card cardboard covers with printed and illustrated endpapers.  (London?) Brooke Bond Tea Ltd., ca 1961.  Printed by the Berkshire Printing Co., Reading, England.  Contains 50 unnumbered mounted colored illustrations and 18 uncolored vignettes in addition to the illustrated covers and end papers.

Brooke Bond Tea Ltd. issued four albums each capable of accommodating 50 mounted colored pictures which were supplied, one per packet, with tea, or could be purchased individually.  This is one of the albums and it includes a picture card order form.  The birds from Africa, South America and Australasia have been selected on the basis of their striking appearance.  In addition to providing a colored illustration, Tunnicliffe has provided a succinct text that includes distribution, length, habits, and description of nests and eggs.  It is interesting that a great artist such as Tunnicliffe required projects such as this to survive.  His talent is evident in this ephemeral production.


Tunnicliffe, Charles Frederick (1901-1979)(text by Noel Cusa)

Tunnicliffe's birdlife  31.0 x 26.0 cm.  Pp.  [1-7]8-150.  Text and preliminaries within black-ruled frame, 25.6 x 22.7 cm.  Publisher's blue cloth with silver lettering to spine.  Blue endpapers.  Pictorial dust jacket.  London, Clive Holloway Books, 1985. 

1, Half-title; 2, colored frontispiece; 3, title; 4, "First published in Great Britain 1985.."; copyright 1985; ISBN 0 907745 040; designed by Nigel Partridge; printed and bound by New Interlitho, Milan; 5, author's acknowledgements; 6, contents; 8, quote from Tunnicliffe; 9, foreword by Peter Scott; 10, introduction; 18, ducks and rails; 36, geese; 48, swans; 58, waders; 72, gulls and terns; 82, auks; 84, birds of prey; 94, fowl and game; 112, pigeons; 114, bee-eaters and magpies; 118, bird painting; 144, further reading on Tunnicliffe; 148, picture index; 149, acknowledgements for pictures.  Contains; about 89 unnumbered colored illustrations of varying sizes within black and white double ruled frames on gray paper with accompanying commentary below the frames; 31 unnumbered colored text illustrations; 10 unnumbered uncolored text illustrations.  All illustrations are printed in half-tone.

Peter Scott remarks in the foreword (p. 9): "The verdict of posterity in time to come is likely, I believe, to rate Charles Tunnicliffe the greatest wildlife artist of the 20th century."

This posthumous anthology differs from others that preceded it in containing many finished, decorative pictures that were painted for individual commissions as opposed to book illustrations or notebook sketches.  These are designated by frames and present two aspects of Tunnicliffe's work that are not widely recognized: first, he did occasionally paint exotic birds such as bee-eaters and pheasants; second, he adopted an oriental style for much of his decorative work that is completely absent from the books that he illustrated.

The dust jacket informs us that "Dr. Noel Cusa, a distinguished wildlife artist in his own right…" was friendly with Tunnicliffe for more than 30 years.  Cusa did some of the illustrations for the Handbook of the  birds of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, edited by Stanley Cramp and C. M. Perrins (1977-1994). In the present book, he writes as an art critic and concludes (p. 17) that Tunnicliffe was "…perhaps the greatest of bird artists."

Listed by Cornell, Trinity.  Not listed by AMNH, Harvard, Yale.


Tunnicliffe, C(harles)F(rederick)(1901-1979), Gillmor, Robert (introduction)

Shorelands / Winter Diary  28.0 x 23.2 cm.  Pp.  [1-7]8-159[160]; 80 ll.  Original red cloth with gilt title on spine.  Diary pages reproduced on endpapers.  Pictorial dust jacket.  London, Robinson Publishing, 1992.

1, Half-title; 2, colored plate; 3, title; 4, copyright, production information; 5, contents; 6, map; 7, introduction; 12, October; 37, November; 60, December; 91, January; 109, February; 133, March; 159, index.  Contains approximately 100 colored, or partially colored illustrations including a few that are double-page, some that are full-page, and others that are interspersed with text.  Also contains a few line illustrations.

Gillmor, a great admirer of Tunnicliffe and a fine artist in his own right (Herons of the World, 1978), was rummaging through Tunnicliffe's original manuscript for Shorelands Summer Diary (1952) when he recognized that it also contained a winter journal.  He selected and assembled extracts of the diary together with their associated pictures and sketches and this volume was the result.  In addition to being amongst the finest ornithological artists of the 20th century, Tunnicliffe was also a gifted writer who provided word pictures of the same high quality as his graphic images.  The present volume is precious and delightful for those who revel in the output of this gifted man.

This is one of the more uncommon of the works by Tunnicliffe that were posthumously culled.  It is listed in the on-line catalog of the New York Public Library but is absent from those of Harvard, Cornell, Yale, Trinity and the American Museum of Natural History.


Tunnicliffe, C.(harles)F.(rederick)(1901-1979)(introduction by Ian Niall)

A sketchbook of birds   Oblong, 24.1 x 26.4 cm.  72 Unpaginated leaves as described below.  Publisher's brown cloth with Tunnicliffe monogram on upper cover, black lettering on spine.  Gray endpapers.  Pictorial dust jacket with original price of $19.95 printed on upper flap.  New York, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1979.

First leaf: recto, half-title; verso, blank.

Second: recto, title with colored vignette; verso, copyright 1979; First published in USA in 1979; ISBN 0-03-052326-5; printed in Italy; first printing.

Third: recto, contents; verso, publisher's note.

Fourth-fifth recto, introduction; fifth verso, location notes to sketches.

Sixth: recto, half-title seabirds; verso, legend for plate 1.

Seventh-21st leaves: plates 1-30 of seabirds.

22nd : recto, half-title waders; verso, legend for plate 31.

23rd-36th: plates 31-58 of waders.

37th: recto, half-title geese, ducks and swans; verso, blank.

38th-53rd: plates 59-90 of geese, ducks and swans.

54th: recto, half-title, birds of prey; verso, blank.

55th -60th: plates 91-102 of birds of prey.

61st: recto, half-title miscellaneous birds; verso, blank.

62nd-71st: plates 103-122 of miscellaneous birds.

72nd: recto, plate 123; verso, books of ornithological interest illustrated by Tunnicliffe.

Contains plates 1-123 printed in color half-tone and title vignette.

This work, published during the year of Tunnicliffe's death, was the first to contain sketches reproduced directly from his notebooks.  These sketches with manuscript annotations were intended as preparatory to more developed pictures.  Often, though rarely in this particular selection, they contained anatomical parts and measurements.  Niall recognized the artistic value of the sketchbooks and convinced the Gollancz firm that they should be published.  The 17 sketchbooks from which this selection comes, were done 1934-1962.

Listed by AMNH, Cornell, Trinity, Yale.  Not listed by Harvard.

 


(Tunnicliffe, Charles F[rederick]), Niall, Ian

Tunnicliffe's Countryside  29.2 x 23.0 cm.  Pp.  [1-8]9-216; 108 ll.  Original publisher's off-white cloth, gilt lettering to spine.  Red end papers.  Pictorial dust jacket.  London, Clive Holloway Books, (1983). 

1, Half-title; 2, uncolored frontispiece; 3, title; 4, copyright; 5, contents; 7, dedication; 9, introduction; 15, text; 211, acknowledgements; 212, bibliography of books written and/or illustrated by Tunnicliffe; 213, list of illustrations.  Contains approximately 27 full-page colored plates; 14 full-page uncolored plates; 21 colored text illustrations; and 173 uncolored text illustrations all included in pagination and printed on both sides of leaves.

This is a very attractive book that reproduces text and illustrations from 42 publications written and/or illustrated by Tunnicliffe, considered by many to be the finest ornithological artist of the 20th century.   My Country Book (1942), Mereside Chronicle (1948), Both Sides of the Road (1949) and Shoreland's Summer Diary (1952) were the major sources.  Some editorial comment about Tunnicliffe and his life is provided by Niall.  Tunnicliffe was fortunate in having devoted admirers including Niall, Noel Cusa and Robert Gillmor who encouraged popularization of his work late in his life and posthumously.

This work is listed by Yale and Trinity but not by the libraries of the AMNH and Harvard.

 


 

  ( C.[harles]F.[rederick] Tunnicliffe[1901-1979]) Bayne, Charles S.

The / call of the birds  18.4 x 12.9 cm.[A]8B-Z8[$1 signed]; 184 ll.  Pp.  [1-4]5-368.  Original publisher's green cloth with turquoise labeling area containing green lettering on spine.  Pictorial dust jacket with original price of 6s printed on upper flap.  London and Glasgow, Collins, 1945(1929). 

1, Half-title; 2"Uniform with this book: Exploring England"; 3, title; 4, "First published , 1929 / Revised, 1945"; dedication; printed in Great Britain by Wm. Collins Sons & Co., London and Glasgow; 5, contents; 6, blank; 7, list of illustrations; 8, blank; 9, text; 363, index with English bird names.  Contains; uncolored half-tone photographic frontispiece not included in pagination; ten unnumbered uncolored scratch board (scraperboard) plates with running text on obverse and included in pagination; 18 scratchboard chapter head and eight tailpieces.

This is a popular work on the natural history of birds, the 18 chapters of which deal with various aspects including song, migration, nests, protection etc.  This revised edition differs from the original in the very significant addition of Tunnicliffe's marvelous pictures.  This was the second book exclusively devoted to birds that Tunnicliffe illustrated for another author.  The first was Mary Priestley's A book of birds (1937) which is one of the few bird books to which the artist contributed wood engravings as opposed to the less demanding scratch boards.

Listed by Trinity.  Not listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Yale.

 


 

(Tunnicliffe, C.[harles] F.[rederic], illustrator)(1901-1979); Dimsdale, C. D. (author)

Come out of doors / a guide for nature lovers 
21.2 x 13.9 cm.  [A]8B-M8[$1 signed]; 96 ll.  Pp.  [1-4]5-192.  Original publisher’s green cloth with gilt lettering on upper cover and spine.  Color pictorial dust jacket.  London, Hutchinson & Co., 1951.

1, Half-title; 2, blank; 3, title; 4, printer designation: The Anchor Press, Ltd., Tiptree, Essex; 5, contents; 12, acknowledgements; 13, list of illustrations; 16, the author explains; 17-192, text, chapters January-December.  Contains four unnumbered color half-tone plates after Tunnicliffe including frontispiece printed on one side only and not included in pagination.  Also 30 unnumbered text scratchboard illustrations by him and 11 unnumbered glossy half-tone leaves with 22 photographic  plates (some containing more than one photograph) not included in pagination.

The author had written a weekly newspaper column with the same title and presents a journal dealing month by month with various seasonal aspects of nature as experienced in Great Britain.  The illustrations by Tunnicliffe make the book special and the photographs are also very good.

Although this is a common book in England, OCLC lists only one copy in an American library.  This is often the case with books containing illustrations by Tunnicliffe which were written at a popular level and inexpensively produced in England.  Many have considerable charm and the artwork is always superb. However,  they usually deal with the English countryside and are not well known or appreciated in North America.

 


 

(Tnnicliffe, C. F.) Lockley, R.(onald) M.(athias)(1903-) (illustrated by Charles Tunnicliffe [1901-1971])

Letters from Skokholm  21.3 x 14.0 cm.  [A]16B-H16[$1, 5 signed]; 128 ll.  Pp.  [i-vi]vii-ix[x]1-243[244-246].  Original publisher's blue cloth, gilt bird design on upper cover, gilt lettering to spine.  Map with five of the text drawings printed in blue on endpapers.  Upper edge dyed blue.  Pictorial dust jacket.  London, J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd, 1947.

i, Half-title; ii, other works by Lockley; iii, blank; iv, frontispiece with vignette of meadow pipit; v, title; vi, First published 1947; Made (printed) by the Temple Press, Letchworth, Herts.; vii, introduction; viii, contents; x, map; 1, text; 225, appendices; 226, appendix I, census of breeding birds; 228, appendix II, list of birds (149) recorded; 232, appendix III, list of flora; 237, index including English names of birds; 245, printer's logo, Temple Press.  Contains frontispiece and 50 unnumbered, uncolored scraperboard text illustrations one of which is repeated on title leaf and five of which are repeated on endpapers.  Also contains several diagrams.

Lockley lived for 13 years on Skokholm, a tiny Welsh island off the west coast of Britain,.  He shared an interest in its natural history with his brother-in-law, John Buxton, who was taken prisoner in Norway by the Germans during the second world war.  He was responsible for numerous works concerned with birds, the last of which, Flight of the storm petrel, was published in 1983.  The present book is a collection of essays on the natural history of Skokholm which Lockley wrote as a series of letters to his brother-in-law during 1939-1940.  Although the work is wide-ranging, it is primarily concerned with birds.  Lockley was much influenced by Gätke's studies in Heligoland.

Most of Charles Tunnicliffe's published pictures were done on scraperboard.  Ian Niall,in his Portrait of a country artist (1980), reproduces two of the original scraperboards, each with multiple vignettes, that were used for the present work.  He remarks (p. 107) that they represent "some of his finest scraperboard work". 

Listed by AMNH, Trinity, Yale.  Not listed by Cornell, Harvard.

 


 

(Tunnicliffe, Charles Frederick[1901-1979])Priestley, Mary

A book of birds   With 82 wood engravings by / C. F. Tunnicliffe  18.5 x 13.0 cm.  [AB]8BB-AAB8[$1 signed];192 ll.  Pp.  [1-17]18-384.  Original publisher's green cloth with gilt black paper lettering piece on spine.  London, Victor Gollancz Ltd, 1937.

1, Half-title; 2, blank; 3, title; 4, printed in Great Britain by Purnell and Sons Ltd., Paulton and London; 5, dedication; 6, blank; 7, preface; 9, publisher's note; 10, blank; 11, list of illustrations; 15, quotation from Chaucer; 17, text; 368, acknowledgments; 373, index of authors; 377, index of birds.  Contains 81 unnumbered, uncolored text wood engravings (including nine full-page) one of which is repeated as title page vignette.

This book contains numerous quotations of passages by ornithologists, zoologists, novelists and poets concerning various birds.  However, it is best known for its graphical content  which is widely considered a masterpiece.  Although Charles Tunnicliffe gained renown for his abilities as a wood engraver, most of his ornithological contributions were made by scraperboard.  This work is the exception, the only one of birds for which he executed wood engravings.  No one has ever better technically projected texture and pattern of birds.  The combination of this craftsmanship with his tremendous knowledge of posture, shape and special attitudes made Tunnicliffe amongst the very best of ornithological artists.

An American edition of this book was published by Macmillan in 1938.  Although retaining the peculiar lettering of the signatures, it was printed in the U. S. A., and the graphic images are considerably inferior to the Gollancz edition.  Areas that appear finely engraved in the original are sometimes rendered as completely dark or chaotically streaked in the American edition so that texture and pattern are lost.  Particularly striking examples are the Bittern on page 140 and the Cuckoo on page 260.  The American edition clearly contains photographically reproduced versions of the wood engravings.  The English edition probably contains the bona fide engravings although it is conceivable that they were finely reproduced as three of them were in Christine Jackson's Wood engravings of birds (1978).

AMNH and Yale list the English edition.  Cornell and Trinity list the American edition.  Harvard does not list either.

 


 

(Tunnicliffe, C.[harles]F.[rederick][1901-1979], illustrator) Priestley, Mary

A book of birds  18.6 x 12.7 cm.  [Ab]8Bb-AAb8[$1 signed]; 192 ll.  Pp.  [1-17]18-364.  Publisher's turquoise cloth with gilt-ruled green frame, gilt lettering on spine.  Pictorial dust jacket with original price of $2.50 printed on upper flap.  New York The Macmillan Company, 1938. 

1-2, blank; 3, half-title; 4, Macmillan monogram; 5, title with vignette; 6, copyright 1938 by the Macmillan Company; printed in the USA; 5, dedication; 6, blank; 7, preface; 9, list of illustrations; 15, Chaucer quotation; 16, blank; 17, text; 369, acknowledgments; 373, index of authors; 377, index of English bird names.  Contains 82 unnumbered uncolored illustrations (eight full-page) reproduced from wood engravings by Tunnicliffe.

This book was first published the preceding year, 1937, by Gollancz in England.  Christine Jackson reproduced three wood engravings from that edition for her Wood engravings of birds (1978) and when I compared those three with their counterparts in this American edition, I was shocked at the difference.  The pictures in Jackson's book prove that the wood engravings can be well reproduced,  but they are certainly not in this American issue.  Which is unfortunate because amongst the originals are some real masterpieces.  Indeed, most of the wood engravings by Tunnicliffe that have subsequently been reproduced many times, such as the swan, snipe, gannet, tawny owl, stork, peregrine and woodcock, come originally from this title.

The work was published with the notion that the pictures would embellish the text, a series of interesting quotations from scholars (Gilbert White, W. H. Hudson, Alfred Russell Wallace, Baron Cuvier etc) about various aspects of bird life.  In retrospect, the text has served as a vehicle for showcasing the very fine artwork.

Listed by Cornell, Trinity (Macmillan printing); AMNH, Yale (Gollancz printing).  Not listed by Harvard

 


 

 (Tunnicliffe, Charles (Frederick [1901-1979]) Rogerson, Sydney(1894-1968)

Our / bird book  27.3 x 20.4 cm.  [A-B]8C-Q8 [$1 signed]; 64 ll.  Pp.  [1-5]6-128.  Original publisher's red cloth with gilt lettering to spine.  Pictorial dust jacket with original price of 21s printed on upper flap.  London, Collins, (1947).  Original printing. 

1, half-title; 2, blank; 3, title; 4, copyright 1947; printed by the publishers; colour plates printed by Bemrose and Sons Ltd., Derby; 5, contents; 6, legend for facing plate; 7, list of illustration in colour; 11, dedication; 12, blank; 13, birds in general; 26, familiar friends; 37, acquaintances of the field; 55, acquaintances of trees and woods; 72, acquaintances of river, marsh and shore; 94, visitors; 117, birdnesting; 125, index of English bird names.  Contains;  32 unnumbered plates printed in color gravure on one side only and not included in pagination; 84 uncolored, unnumbered mostly scraperboard text illustrations, a few perhaps reproduced from wood engravings.

When I first scrutinized this inexpensive book at a book fair, it took my breath away.  It is a chef d'oeuvre of ornithological iconography.   Every  knowledgeable ornithological bibliophile recognizes that Tunnicliffe's Shoreland's summer diary (1952) is very special.  However, Mary Priestley's Book of birds (1937), the present work, and the RSPB book of garden birds (1978) containing pictures done previously for the RSPB, are Tunnicliffe's largely unrecognized masterpieces.  In his introduction to Tunnicliffe's Sketches of bird life (1981), the distinguished British ornithological artist Robert Gillmor remarks on the great impact made by the beautiful plates in Our Bird Book when, as a child, he examined this work.  I didn't see this book as a child, but I did experience a similar reaction when I chanced upon a copy of Tunnicliffe's Bird portraiture (1945).

This book was written by Tunnicliffe's friend Sydney Rogerson and is directed at children.  It describes the appearance and habits of England's commoner species and is organized along habitat lines.

The reproductions in gravure by Bemrose and Sons Ltd of Derby is the best color printing of Tunnicliffe's birds that I have seen.  This book was reprinted several times.

 


 

(Tunnicliffe, Charles Frederick [1901-1979]) Williamson, Henry, (1895-1977)

The peregrine’s saga and other wild tales 
18.3 x 12.5 cm.  [A]6B-R8S6[$1 signed]140 ll. Pp. [i-x]xi(1)[1]2-265[266](2, blank). Original publisher’s green cloth with framed gilt owl vignette on upper cover.  Uncolored pictorial dust jacket with price of 3s  6d. net on upper flap.  London, New York, Putnam & Company(1934).

i-ii, blank; iii, half-title; iv, list of Williamson’s other publications; v, blank; vi, frontispiece; vii, title; viii, “First published in November, 1923.  First Illustrated Edition published February, 1934”.  Printed in Great Britain by the Shenval Press; ix, dedication; x,blank; xi, contents; xii, blank; 1-266, text.  Contains 24 unnumbered full-page wood engravings included in pagination and 12 wood-cut tail pieces.

Williamson and Tunnicliffe collaborated on six books, the first and most celebrated of which was Tarka the otter, published in 1932.  Williamson first wrote most of these in the early 1920s.  Four of the books, including Tarka..  and this  one were published in identical formats by Putnam.  These works marked Tunnicliffe’s debut as an artist and book illustrator.

This work is not listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard and Trinity.  Yale lists only the unillustrated 1923 edition.  OCLC locates 21 American libraries that contain it, so apparently it is not usually considered an ornithological book despite Tunnicliffe’s superb artwork.


Turnbull, William P(atterson) (1830-1871)

The / Birds of east Pennsylvania / and New Jersey  24.5 x 15.5  [A]4B-G4[$1 signed]; 28 ll.  Pp. [i-v]vi-vii[viii][5]6-50(2, blank).  Contemporary half-green calf with marbled boards, endpapers and edges.  Philadelphia, Henry Grambo & Co., 1869.  

I, Title; iii, dedication to Alex. Wilson; v, preface; viii, number of species; 5, species accounts; 48, birds which have disappeared.  On page 50 “Glasgow: printed by Arch. K. Murray and Co.” Contains a total of 20 uncolored unnumbered lithographed vignettes, each in the center of its own unprinted leaf and two, a church and the head of an egret signed by Wilson, serving as frontispieces.  The remaining 18 vignettes are unsigned and of birds and are bound after the text from which they are separated by a blank leaf.

AN UNDESCRIBED VARIANT OF AN UNCOMMON AND IMPORTANT BOOK.  The general bibliographic wisdom holds that there were two imprints of this work, one American, as here, the other Scottish, although both were printed in Scotland.  The usual version of the American imprint has no illustrations whereas the Scottish imprint has single lithographed vignettes on the title and dedication pages, a tail-piece vignette for the preface, and an additional 17 vignettes distributed throughout the text.  The Scottish imprint is, thus, paginated to a higher number than the American imprint even though the text of the two is substantially identical.  The Scottish imprint was limited to 150 octavo and 50 quarto copies.

This copy is the American imprint bound with what appear to be proof copies of all the vignettes that are associated with the Scottish imprint.

This work describes 342 species and, according to Witmer Stone, in his Birds of New Jersey (1909, p. 322), “..is our first reliable list of the birds of Pennsylvania and New Jersey”.  Coues (I, pp. 681-682) remarks “This is a sumptuous and elegant book-the best printed treatise on American birds extant”.  According to Zimmer, the original artists responsible for the very attractive vignettes were: Alexander Wilson; William Sinclair; Edwin Sheppard; John Faulkner; M. Julliard; William Bartram; and Frank Bott.  Coues mentions only Wilson and Bott.

Trinity, p. 243; Wood, p. 604; Yale, p. 293; Zimmer, p. 642-643.

 

 


 

Turnbull, William P.(atterson)(1830-1871)

The birds of east Pennsylvania and New Jersey  32.0 x 25.0 cm.  π6 (π4 signed “A2”)B-H4[$1 signed]; 34 ll.  Pp.  [i-vii]viii-x[xi-xii][9]10-62(2, blank).  Near contemporary patterned green boards with later carmine linen tape backing and carmine linen tape labeling piece with short title on upper cover.  Chocolate endpapers with bookplate of Yale University Library on upper pastedown.  TEG. Glasgow: printed for private circulation, 1869.  Printed by Arch. K. Murray and Co., Glasgow.

i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title page with vignette of Meadowlark; iv, “This impression has been limited to one hundred and fifty copies 8vo, and fifty 4to –two of the former being on vellum”; v, dedication to Alexander Wilson with vignette of church and graveyard; vi, blank; vii, preface dated Philadelphia, January, 1869 and with tail-piece of Great Egret from original sketch by Wilson in 1805; xii, number of species; 9, systematic text, Turkey Buzzard-Thick-billed Guillemot; 51, stragglers or irreglar visitants; 60, birds which have disappeared; 62, printer designation. Contains a total of 20 unnumbered, uncolored vignettes, lithographed finely by Frank Bott from original sketches by William Sinclair, Edwin Sheppard and John Faulkner, with at least two copied from Alexander Wilson and one from William Bartram.

This is one of 50 Large-Paper examples of a work which has always been highly praised by bibliographers.  It covers very briefly 342 species, for each of which it provides English and Latin names, seasonal appearance and an estimate of abundance.  Most striking on the main list is the Great-crested Grebe, considered “not uncommon in winter”; also on the main list are: Red-cockaded Woodpecker, “Rare”; Wild Pigeon, “plentiful…”; Pinnated Grouse, “Now very  rare….”; Long-billed Curlew, “frequent…”; Esquimaux Curlew, “rather rare…”; and Labrador Duck, “Rare. A few are seen every season”.

This 4to edition is very rare as only 50 copies were printed.

 

Turnbull, William P.(atterson)(1830-1871)

 The / birds of east Pennsylvania / and New Jersey  25.1 x 16.3 cm. π6(π4 signed “A2”)B-H4[$1 signed]; 34 ll.  Pp.  [i-vii]viii-x[xi-xii][9]10-62(2, blank).  Contemporary quarter red calf with mottled green boards.  Chocolate endpapers.  TEG.  Glasgow, printed for private circulation, 1869. Printed by Arch. K. Murray and Co., Glasgow.

 i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title page with vignette of Meadowlark; iv, “This impression has been limited to one hundred and fifty copies 8vo, and fifty 4to –two of the former being on vellum”; v, dedication to Alexander Wilson with vignette of church and graveyard; vi, blank; vii, preface dated Philadelphia, January, 1869 and with tail-piece of Great Egret from original sketch by Wilson in 1805; xi, illustrations; xii, number of species; 9, systematic text, Turkey Buzzard-Thick-billed Guillemot; 51, stragglers or irregular visitants; 60, birds which have disappeared; 62, printer designation. Contains a total of 20 unnumbered, uncolored vignettes, lithographed finely by Frank Bott from original sketches by William Sinclair, Edwin Sheppard and John Faulkner, with at least two copied from Alexander Wilson and one from William Bartram.

 This is one of 150 "8vo" examples of a work which has always been highly praised by bibliographers.  It covers very briefly 342 species, for each of which it provides English and Latin names, seasonal appearance and an estimate of abundance.  Most striking on the main list is the Great-crested Grebe, considered “not uncommon in winter”; also on the main list are: Red-cockaded Woodpecker, “Rare”; Wild Pigeon, “plentiful…”; Pinnated Grouse, “Now very  rare….”; Long-billed Curlew, “frequent…”; Esquimaux Curlew, “rather rare…”; and Labrador Duck, “Rare. A few are seen every season”.

 There were also 50 “4to” (32.0 x 25.0 cm)  copies, otherwise identical to this one and likewise published in Glasgow In addition, there was an edition published in Philadelphia (H. Grambo & Co., 1869) that possessed the same text but lacked the illustrations.

 

Turner, Angela (text), Rose, Chris (illustrations)

 Swallows / & martins / an identification guide / and handbook  23.2 x 15.2 cm.  Pp.  [i-iv]v-viii[ix](1)1-258.  Original plain blue cloth with gilt lettering to spine.  Pictorial dust jacket with original price of $35.  Gray endpapers.  Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1989.  Original printing.

 i, Half-title; ii, blank; iii, title; iv, copyright; ISBN 0-395-51174-7; LOC card number 89-080262; printed in the Netherlands; v, contents; vii, acknowledgements; viii, introduction; ix, second half-title; 1, morphology and plumage; 5, classification; 12, distribution and migration; 16, food, foraging and competition; 20, behaviour; 26, breeding biology; 30, population sizes and conservation; 33, colored plates 1-24, each plate on recto with facing identification points and distribution maps on verso of previous leaf; all included in pagination; 83, systematic section, Pseudochelidon eurystomina-Delichon nipalensis, species 1-74; 234, bibliography (about 700 references); 255, index of English, generic and specific names.  Contains color half-tone plates 1-24 as indicated above.

 A complete and very well illustrated handbook.  The systematic part contains, for each of the 74 species, sections entitled: Field Characters, Habitat; Distribution and Population; Migration; Food and Behaviour; Breeding; Voice; Description and Races.  The plates, in addition to being well drawn, are well colored and printed.

 


Turner, William (d. 1568)(edited with introduction, translation, note and appendix by A.[rthur]H.[umble] Evans[1855-1943])

Turner on birds: / a short and succinct history / of the / principal birds noticed by Pliny and Aristotle  22.2 x 14.6 cm.  a8[b]21-148[$1, 2 signed]; 122 ll.  Pp.  [i-vii]viii-xviii(2)[1-3]4-223(1).  Publisher's green cloth with blind ruled panel on covers, gilt lettering to spine. Cambridge (England), The University Press, 1903. 

i, Half-title; ii, list of distributors; iii, title; iv, printer designation: J. and F. Clay at The University Press; v, preface; vi, note concerning pagination of the original work; vii-xviii, introduction; unpaginated leaf: recto, facsimile title page; verso, blank; 1, half-title; 3, epistle dedicatory; 15, species accounts; 181, common places referring to birds from Aristotle; 185, peroration to the reader; 193, extracts from the works of John Caius " De rariorum animalium atque stirpium historia" (1570); 213, index of English, Latin, Greek and German names.

The original work, the first printed book entirely devoted to birds, was written in Latin and published by Joannes Gymnicus at Cologne in 1544.  It was reprinted in London by George Thackery in 1823.  Both of these editions are very rare.

William Turner was an English physician who spent much of his life in Germany as an exiled heretic.  He was an acquaintance of Gessner and not only did he write the first printed bird book, he was also the first Englishman to write an herbal.

The present work provides Turner's original Latin text on the verso with the translation by Evans facing it as the recto of the next leaf. Turner quotes extensively from Aristotle and Pliny usually correctly inferring the species being described, and adds information of his own, making his book considerably more than a synopsis of antecedent treatises  In some instances i. e. Oncocrotalus, the species being described (by Pliny) seems fairly obvious (pelican), yet Turner misconstrues it as a bittern (p. 127) and Evans remarks (p. x) on the error.  In general, however Aristotle seems to have been remarkably observant and Turner provides correct contemporary English and German names as well as supplying Latin names which in some instances may be the original such designations.  I am not certain as to whether these are really the first because, although Evans assures us (p. x) that Turner " was acquainted with Aristotle's works in the original Greek….he preferred quoting that author from the Latin translation of Theodorus Gaza (d. ca. 1484) of Thessalonica…".

Wood, p. 605; Zimmer, p. 644.  This edition also listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity, Yale.


Turner, L.(ucien)M.(cShan)(1849-1909)

Contributions / to the / natural history of Alaska. / Results of investigations made chiefly in the Yukon / district and the Aleutian islands; conducted / under the auspices of the Signal Service, / United States Army, extending from / May, 1874 to August, 1881  ///// No. II. / Arctic series of publications issued in connection with the Signal Service, U. S. Army  29.4 x 22.3 cm.  [S.Mis.155-1]4S.Mis.155-2-S.Mis.155-284S.Mis.155-294(-S.Mis.155-294)[$1 signed]; 113 ll.  Pp. [1-2]3-226.  Later half dark green cloth with light green buckram sides, gilt lettering on spine.  Washington, Government Printing Office, 1886. 

1,title; 2, blank; 3, list of Arctic series of publications of which this is No. III; 4, blank; 5, letter of transmittal by Turner; 10, blank; 11, contents; 12, blank; 13, part I, general description; 17, part II, meteorology; 61, part III, plants; 87, part IV, fishes; 115, part V, birds, systematic accounts, Holboell's Grebe-Varied Thrush, covering about 169 species referenced to AOU numbers; 184, list of the birds of Alaska, about 268 species and subspecies referenced to AOU numbers; 197, part VI, mammals; 209, index.  Contains chromolithographed plates I-XI of birds after R. Ridgway (4) and R. and J. L. Ridgway (7) by the Giles Litho. & Liberty Printing Co, NY.  Also contains uncolored engraved plates 1-15 of fish that are undesignated.

This work represents a major contribution to Alaskan ornithology because of the superb field notes that the author has supplied with the list of around 170 species that he actually encountered or collected.  Moreover, the attempted complete list of Alaskan birds that forms the last part of the ornithological section is certainly the most exhaustive that had been compiled up to the date of publication.  It is interesting that Edward W. Nelson was simultaneously carrying out a very similar investigation in Alaska, the results of which would be published as No. III of the same Arctic series of publications, the following year.

The pictures by the Ridgway brothers and the chromatography by Giles Litho & Liberty Printing Company are good.

The peculiar S.Mis.155 signature probably denotes that the publication was the 155th of the Smithsonian Miscellaneous publications.  Nelson's was the 156th.

Wood, p. 605; Zimmer, p. 605.  Also listed by AMNH, Cornell, Harvard, Trinity, Yale.


Twigden, Blake L. (1946-)(Cocker, Mark, author of text in consultation with Nigel Collar)

The Fifty / Rarest Birds / Of / The World  41.0 x 31.3 cm.  Pp.  [1-6]7-215[216]; 108 ll.  Original green half morocco and suede covered boards.  Gilt lettered spine.  AEG.  Gray endpapers.  Auckland, Osborne Editions International, 1991. 

1, Signed (by Twigden), numbered limitation statement (92/2000); 2, blank; 3, title; 4, credits, copyright; 5, contents; 6, dedication "..to the memory of Audrey Mars.."; 7, artist's note; 8, blank; 9, subscribers (71); 10, blank; 11, foreword by Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands; 12, blank; 13, introduction by Chrstoph Imboden; 14, blank; 15, species accounts; 215, artist's biography; 216, blank.  Contains 50 colored plates of birds printed on one side only but included in pagination, 50 framed sections of those colored plates, a colored photograph of the artist, and, laid in, a signed limited print (92) of a Whooping Crane by Twigden.

This work was carried out in close association with the International Council for Bird Preservation (ICBP) of which Prince Bernhard and Christoph Imboden are officers.  The species included for presentation were selected by Nigel Collar of the Council and the text was written by another member, Mark Cocker, in consultation with Collar.  The original retail price of the book was GB£975 (ca. US$1,700) and a considerable fraction of the proceeds was targeted to the ICBP.  The book apparently failed to sell at such a price and is now available for much less.

Four pages are devoted to each species: the first is a framed section of the subsequent colored plate; the second is text concerned with the locality and number of individuals and what must be done to prevent its extinction; the third is the full colored plate; and the fourth is blank.

The selection of species must have been difficult.  It would have been easy to find 50 very rare species amongst endemics  of small islands but only 22 of the species are island endemics and most of these are from major islands including Madagascar, New Zealand, the Philippines and Hawaii (but not New Guinea).  Selection seems to have been based partially on representational geography and was also probably somewhat predicated on the artist's preference.  In general, the selected species are of interest and the text is authoritative. 

The artist paints with oils and these do not reproduce as well as watercolors.  He has a predilection for light birds painted against dark backgrounds that lack much detail.  This arrangement makes the bird a striking focus.  I first saw this approach used effectively in some of the watercolors by George Sutton for Bailey's Birds of Florida (1925).  This is the first published bird book with paintings by Twigden.  He previously did on one fish.  The color reproduction in the present work is satisfactory but not outstanding and clearly did not involve any special method.

 


 

Tweedale, Marquis of (Lord Walden, Arthur Hay)(1824-1878)

 Contributions to the ornithology of the Philippines (Sammelband,Collection of 12 numbered articles under this overall title from the Proceedings of the Zoological Society as well as two unnumbered articles on the same subject by the author) 22.0 x.15.8 cm.  Binder’s ochre cloth with double lined blind frame on covers, gilt letteredd “Ornithology of Philippines” on spine.  London, 1877-1879.  In total, contains 19 lithographs by Hanhart after J. Smit of which 12 are colored.


I.  On the collection made by Mr. A. H. Everett in the Island of Luzon  Pp.  686-703.  Read  Nov. 6, 1877.  Contains plates LXXII. and LXXIII., hand-colored lithographs.

II.  On the collection made by Mr. A. H. Everett in the Island of Zebu  Pp.  755-769.  Nov. 20, 1877.  Colored plates LXXVI.-LXXVIII.

III.  On the collection made by Mr. A. H. Everett in the Island of Mindanao  Pp.  816-834.  Dec. 4, 1877.  Colored plates LXXXII.-LXXXV.  Uncolored ext figures 1-2.

IV.  On the collection made by Mr. A. H. Everett in the Islands of Dinagat, Bazol, Nipah, and Sakuyok.  106-114.  Jan. 15, 1878.  Uncolored plates VI-VIII.

On a new Philippine genus and species of bird  114-115.  Jan. 15, 1878.  Uncolored plate IX.

On a new species of the genus Buceros  277-280.  Feb. 19, 1878. Text figures 1-4.

V. On the collection made by Mr. A. H. Everett in the Island of Negros  280-288.  Feb. 19, 1878.

VI.  On the collection made by Mr. A. H. Everett in the island of Leyte 339-346.  Mar. 19, 1878.

VII.  On the collection made by Mr. A. H. Everett in the Island of Panaon  379-381.  April 2, 1878.

VIII.  On some Luzon birds in the museum at Darmstadt  429-430.  April 16, 1878.  Uncolored plate XXVI. (Koch’s pitta).

IX.  On the collection made by Mr. A. H. Everett in the Island of Palawan 611-624.  May 21, 1878 Uncolored plates XXXVII., XXXVIII.

X.  On the collection made by M. A. H. Everett in the Island of Bohol  708-712.  June 18, 1878.

XI.  On the collection made by Mr. A. H. Everett at Zamboanga,in the island of Mindanao 936-954.  Nov. 19, 1878.  Colored plates LVII.-LIX.  Text figure 3.

XII.  On the collection made by Mr. A. H. Everett in the Island of Basilan  68-73.  Jan. 14, 1879.  This article is in Xerox copy and page 70 is mistakenly bound  after 73.


These articles continued Tweedale’s early characterization of Philippine ornithology and ended with his premature death.  They also must have established Everett’s reputation as a courageous collector.


Tyzenhauza, Count K.(onstantin)(1786-1853)

Zasady Ornitologii albo Nauki o Ptakach.  Obejmumace: Rys Postepu Jej Literatury,Taxonomia, Glossologia i Terminologia  21 x 13 cm.  Blank, (1)8 2-108114  blank. ($1,2 signed; $2 as *).  84 ll excluding blanks at beginning and end.  Pp. Blank, (1-7)8-165(166-168), blank.  Contemporary calf-backed maroon cloth.  Wilno, J. Zawadzkiego, 1841.

  1, half-title; 3, title; 5, dedication; 7-165, text; 167, errata.  Contains two fold-out tables, five uncolored fold-out lithographed plates of anatomical parts and one fold-out sheet with 70 hand-painted swaths of standard designated colors for descriptive purposes, all not included in pagination.

THIS POLISH WORK IS EXTREMELY RARE AND IS ABSENT FROM ALL MAJOR COLLECTIONS AND BIBLIOGRAPHIES SAVE ENGELMANN.  Tyzenhauza was the first Polish ornithologist of international stature and the mentor of the other great 19th century Polish ornithologist, Taczanowski.  This work, the earliest on ornithology to be written entirely in Polish, is concerned with the discipline itself rather than with the species of the homeland.  It covers taxonomy, literature, anatomy and terminology.  The two fold-out tables depict, respectively, the classification schemes of Illiger (1811) and Cuvier (1817).  The citations in the literature section seem to me relatively complete and important, indicating that this work is authoritative, although, of course, I can’t read Polish.  The set of standard colors is remarkably precocious as an aid to descriptive ornithology.  It precedes Ridgway’s classic work by about 60 years.  In 1842, a year after this book appeared, Tyzenhauza published the first Polish national ornithology.  That work is also exceedingly rare. 

Engelmann, p. 399.  OCLC locates only one or two copies.

 

Creative Commons License
The Richard L. Soffer Ornithology Collection by Richard L. Soffer is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.
Based on a work at www.amherst.edu.

 

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