Event Calendar

Today - Wed, Apr 25, 2018

Russian Table

The Russian Table is an opportunity for all interested in conversing in Russian to meet regularly with Russian faculty and students. We'll meet from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays on the Mezzanine level in Valentine Dining Hall. Russian speakers at all levels are very welcome!

French Table

If you are interested in speaking French, or learning about French culture, come and join the French language table. We will meet on Wednesdays from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. on the mezzanine in Valentine Hall. The French language table is open to students, faculty, staff and anyone who is interested in having informal conversations in French. All levels are welcome! We look forward to meeting you.

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly, informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon - 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

TALES FROM THE FRONT: ENHANCING THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF LARGE INTRODUCTORY STEM COURSES WITH TEAM-BASED LEARNING

Part of our "Food for Thought" lunch series, join Caroline Goutte of the biology, biochemistry-biophysics and neuroscience departments, as well as Alix Purdy of the biology and biochemistry-biophysics departments for lunch and a discussion about team-based learning in introductory STEM courses.

For several iterations now, we have converted the large-lecture based introductory molecular biology course into a course that blends lectures, online quizzing, team-based learning and laboratory applications. Each year we learn what works and what doesn’t, and the course improves a bit more. We finally feel that we’ve reached an effective blend that achieves a dynamic learning environment in which students tackle challenging material and build life-long skills of collaborative inquiry. Kindly R.S.V.P. at the link below.

Registration Required
Write Place, Write Time

Write Place, Write Time: pop-up writing support in Frost Library

2:00 pm - 5:00 pm Frost Library, Ground Floor (near entrance)

Are you looking for some structure and support for your writing? The Writing Center hosts a pop-up space where students can write in the company of others with staff support nearby. Join us at the tables near the entrance to Frost Library on Monday and Wednesday afternoons throughout April to make progress on long projects, get started on shorter ones or seek on-the-spot support for your writing.

At Write Place Write Time, you can consult with a writing associate about clarifying a prompt or developing your thesis, for checking citation rules or asking a grammatical question ...or any other issues that come up as you are writing. Associates can also talk with you about ways to get started, generate ideas and write productively. To make an appointment for a longer consultation, visit our website.

Students Only

Summer 2018 Funded Experience Pre-departure Workshop

All students who receive or who plan to receive funding from the college to support unpaid or low-paid internship or off-campus research opportunities are required to attend a pre-departure workshop session. During this session, students will learn more about the additional program expectations and tips for completing a successful summer opportunity. Students who are abroad or who are unable to attend a workshop in person should contact Victoria Wilson at vwilson@amherst.edu to discuss alternatives.

Poster is a picture of Daniel Goldstein '69 and contains the headline 'Disability and the Law'. Event details are also duplicated and are visible in other sections of the daily mail.

"Disability and the Law"

Come listen to Dan Goldstein, class of 1969, speak about his work with disability and the law! Dan will discuss how we got to where we are, why progress is so slow and what tools we can use for change. There will be a Q&A following the talk.

Dan has won numerous awards for his service to the community, including the American Bar Association’s Paul G. Hearne Award for Disability Rights and 2018 Baltimore Civil Rights Law Lawyer of the Year.

As counsel for the National Federation of the Blind, Dan initiated a national legal campaign to ensure access to technology. His settlement of a class action against Cardtronics, which provides for tens of thousands of voice-guided ATMs, constituted a major step toward making this ubiquitous convenience accessible to the blind. His suit against Target.com set precedent regarding the application of access laws to websites, and his suit against America Online made AOL accessible to the blind.

A former federal prosecutor, Dan’s criminal practice included successfully avoiding prosecution for a target of an independent counsel, representing an attorney charged with campaign financing violations, a minister charged with mail fraud and various medical practitioners charged with insurance fraud, as well as persons charged federally with violent crimes.

There will be Crazy Noodles, drinks and dessert. The event is sponsored by The Roosevelt Institute and CAB.

Mermaids and Massages: Self-care for Survivors of Trauma and Activists, Part II

Join the WGC and Sexual Respect Education for a self-care event centering survivors and students working to create change. Stop by for a chair massage or to make your very own stress-relieving mermaid goo, friendship bracelets, or essential oil room spray. This event is sure to be a fun community-building event that will help you de-stress and prepare for finals. This program is cosponsored by Student Activities.

Who's in the Pews in 2016?

7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Amherst Common, Grace Episcopal Church

McCloy Visiting Professor in American Studies, Ray Suarez will speak Wednesday, April 25 at Grace Episcopal Church in Amherst. His 7 p.m. talk will highlight the rapid decline in religious affiliation, especially among younger Americans, age 18-35, and the challenges presented to the Episcopal Church and all Mainline Protestant denominations.

Grace Church is located at 14 Boltwood Avenue, next to Town Hall. Professor Suarez’ presentation will be in “The Connector,” next door to the church.

Centerview Partners Information Session

Please join alumnus Jeremy Kesselhaut ’16 and current students Cameron Bahadori ’18 and Nick Ulanoff ’18 to hear more about Centerview Partners and the firm’s investment banking summer analyst program. With offices in New York, London, San Francisco, Palo Alto and Los Angeles, Centerview Partners is a leading independent investment banking and advisory firm. The firm provides advice on mergers and acquisitions, financial restructurings, valuation, and capital structure to companies, institutions and governments. Since the founding of Centerview in 2006, they have advised on over $2 trillion of transactions. Their clients include over 20% of the 50 largest companies in the world by market capitalization, and they have been involved in many of the largest and most complex corporate situations and transactions.

Jazz Combo Concert

Jazz combos Ferrari Folks, Camaro Crew and Mustang Madness perform sets of originals, original arrangements and jazz standards. Refreshments will be served toward the end of the evening's music.
This event is free and open to the public.

WGC Logo

Women's and Gender Center Late Night Study Hours

Join us for study hours every Wednesday from 10 p.m. to midnight in the Women's and Gender Center, Keefe 211! There will be donuts from Glazed!

Tomorrow - Thu, Apr 26, 2018

Ivory Billed Woodpecker

On Today’s Horizon: Mass Extinctions

Student curated temporary exhibit, On Today’s Horizon: Mass Extinctions, is available for public viewing from Thursday, April 19-May 20. Step into the Beneski and discover the history of the five mass extinctions that have ravaged the species living on Earth. We are currently undergoing a sixth mass extinction, this time caused by our human impact. What can we do to mitigate the effects of this mass extinction? Learn more about what you can do in this interpretive exhibition.

Spanning all three floors, the exhibition will take you through all previous mass extinctions and the theories on how they were caused. What kinds of species did they affect? What information can we take from these previous mass extinctions to learn about the sixth one? Come for a guided tour with the student curator, Antonella Dominguez ‘18, on April 26 and May 3 at 2:30 p.m. The small steps we take now to reduce the effects of our human impact can only help now with the trajectory of the six mass extinction we have caused.

Both sides of a postcard about this event

"City Bench Live: An Eco-Urban Assemblage with Sculptor Ted Esselstyn"

Arts at Amherst Presents "City Bench Live: An Eco-Urban Assemblage with Sculptor Ted Esselstyn"

In this daylong workshop, community members will be able to watch Master Carpenter Ted Esselstyn make a new bench for the community by up-cycling "Street Trees," which are trees that have had to be torn down for various reasons. He then uses this recycled wood and turns it into sustainable, eco-artistic and unique pieces of furniture. During this demonstration, community members are invited to both observe and ask Ted questions about his sustainability practices in art and more.

More about City Bench:
"City Bench grew out of our passion for building beautiful objects with meaning and a story. It also grew out of a reverence for the trees that line our streets, fill our public spaces and enliven our campuses. Those trees represent our shared space and generations of common stories—they are also a vital and overlooked resource.

"There are over 70 billion trees in U.S. metropolitan areas. New Haven removes more than 600 trees each year, New York City fells 7,000, and hundreds of thousands more come down across the country. Most of these grand, historic trees are relegated to the landfill, ground into mulch or chopped into firewood each year.

"We extend the life left in those trees by building uniquely handcrafted furniture that tells their stories. Community and connection to place are built into everything we create—whether that community is a big city, a small town, or a much-loved school. Our pieces have a 'birth certificate' describing the tree’s origin, significance and story. Our aim is to build a meaningful and lasting enterprise, which creates positive environmental and social change and contributes to the vitality of the communities in which we operate."

"Poem in Your Pocket" logo: drawing of a blue pocket with a folded piece of paper in it

Poem in Your Pocket Day at the Emily Dickinson Museum

Join the Emily Dickinson Museum and the Academy of American Poets in celebrating Poem in Your Pocket Day! Every April, on Poem in Your Pocket Day, people celebrate by selecting a poem, carrying it with them, and sharing it with others throughout the day and on social media using the hashtag #pocketpoem.

On April 26, the Emily Dickinson Museum will grant free admission all day to any visitors who can recite a Dickinson poem from memory. Bring a budding poet for free activities. Make a "Poem Catcher" craft, decorate a miniature pot and plant seeds from Emily Dickinson's own garden, or take a Story Walk through the Dickinson landscape.

This event is free and open to the public, with no reservations required.

Poster graphic of healing fire.  Image of fire and text listing date and location of fire and opening ceremony.  Black text with red and orange letters.

Opening Ceremony of Healing Fire for Survivors of Sexual Violence

The Healing Fire Initiative for Survivors of Sexual Violence, their friends, families and allies.
Opening Ceremony 1 p.m. on April 26
Fire will burn until 1 p.m. on April 27

People who come to the healing fire are welcome to make offerings to the fire. Wooden shims and sharpies will be provided and you are welcome to bring letters and pictures of your own. Amherst College is honored to partner with Gedakina Inc. in an effort to provide a space of healing for our campus community. In 2002 Gedakina co-founded the Healing Fire Initiative for Survivors of Sexual Violence. The purpose of the Healing Fire Initiative is to offer survivors of sexual violence a welcoming and comforting place to break the isolation they may feel, build community with other survivors and supporters, and begin or continue their healing process. This program is now a regional initiative with organizations and colleges/universities across the United States adopting this award-winning program.

The Healing Fire will begin with an opening ceremony at 1 p.m. on Thursday April 26, on the First Year Quad (directly across from the Frost Library entrance). The fire will be burning until 1 p.m. on April 27 and will staffed by faculty, staff and the Peer Advocates of Sexual Respect throughout the 24 hour period. Please feel free to stay for any amount of time that feels right for you. In respect for attendees we ask that no photography or social media include faces of people unless you have explicit permission.

“When I sit in the light of the Healing Fire, there are no voices that tell me I am to blame, that I am the only one, or that I deserve to be assaulted. When I sit in the light of the Healing Fire, I see the many kind faces before me. I hear their stories and feel the warmth and wisdom that we share. There is a power hear tonight, As this fire symbolizes the strength of survivors, it also symbolizes our passion, our righteous anger, our commitment and hope for a future where our children will be free of abuse and violence.”- A quote from a Survivor who attended a Healing Fire in Burlington, Vermont

Poster of Healing Fire Program.  Black background with fire burning in background.  Orange and white lettering of date and time of event.

Healing Fire for Survivors of Sexual Violence

The Healing Fire Initiative for Survivors of Sexual Violence, their friends, families and allies.
Opening Ceremony 1 p.m. on April 26
Fire will burn until 1 p.m. on April 27

People who come to the healing fire are welcome to make offerings to the fire. Wooden shims and sharpies will be provided and you are welcome to bring letters and pictures of your own. Amherst College is honored to partner with Gedakina Inc. in an effort to provide a space of healing for our campus community. In 2002 Gedakina co-founded the Healing Fire Initiative for Survivors of Sexual Violence. The purpose of the Healing Fire Initiative is to offer survivors of sexual violence a welcoming and comforting place to break the isolation they may feel, build community with other survivors and supporters, and begin or continue their healing process. This program is now a regional initiative with organizations and colleges/universities across the United States adopting this award-winning program.

The Healing Fire will begin with an opening ceremony at 1 p.m. on Thursday April 26, on the First Year Quad (directly across from the Frost Library entrance). The fire will be burning until 1 p.m. on April 27 and will staffed by faculty, staff and the Peer Advocates of Sexual Respect throughout the 24 hour period. Please feel free to stay for any amount of time that feels right for you. In respect for attendees we ask that no photography or social media include faces of people unless you have explicit permission.

“When I sit in the light of the Healing Fire, there are no voices that tell me I am to blame, that I am the only one, or that I deserve to be assaulted. When I sit in the light of the Healing Fire, I see the many kind faces before me. I hear their stories and feel the warmth and wisdom that we share. There is a power hear tonight, As this fire symbolizes the strength of survivors, it also symbolizes our passion, our righteous anger, our commitment and hope for a future where our children will be free of abuse and violence.”- A quote from a Survivor who attended a Healing Fire in Burlington, Vermont

Screenshot of three teenage girls standing in a hallway with their eyes downcast

Russian Film Screening: "Everybody Dies But Me" (ВСЕ УМРУТ, А Я ОСТАНУСЬ)

4:30 pm Keefe Campus Center, Theater (Room 008)

Join us for a screening of Everybody Dies But Me (ВСЕ УМРУТ, А Я ОСТАНУСЬ). The film is from 2008 and directed by Valeria Gai Germanika. The runtime is 80 minutes. This film will be shown in Russian with English subtitles.

The lifelong friendship of three young women is tested in this hard-hitting coming-of-age drama
that broke new ground in post-Soviet cinema with its unflinching, controversial account
of teenage life in a grim urban neighborhood.

The film will be screened at both 4:30 and 7:30 p.m.

Event poster featuring a closeup photo of Jan Dizard

Celebration of Professor Emeritus Jan Dizard

The Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, American Studies and Environmental Studies at Amherst College are pleased to announce a celebration of Professor Emeritus Jan Dizard, a pivotal member of all three departments. The event will include tributes to Jan's scholarship by distinguished colleagues John Organ, Donal Waller, Allen Rutberg and Hannah Holleman. The celebration will take place on Thursday, April 26, at 4:30 p.m. in Paino Lecture Room in the Beneski Museum of Natural History. A reception will follow.

Event poster featuring a stylized image of a raised fist

"Martin Luther King Now"

5:00 pm - 8:00 pm Fayerweather Hall, Pruyne Lecture Hall (Room 115)

Brandon Terry of Harvard University will present the fourth and final lecture in the 2017-2018 Forry & Micken Lecture Series on "Racial Justice and Injustice." His talk is titled "Martin Luther King Now" and will take place on Thursday, April 26, at 5 p.m. in Pruyne Lecture Hall (Fayerweather 115). This event is free and open to the public and wheelchair-accessible. For further information, please contact the Department of Philosophy at (413) 542-5805.

Closeup photo of Adam Grabowski

Mass Poetry's Common Threads Poetry Discussion

Did you know that April is National Poetry Month? Poetry is alive in Massachusetts this spring in this friendly discussion group at the Emily Dickinson Museum! Facilitated by local poet Adam Grabowski in the home of Amherst’s favorite poet, this discussion will revolve around eight poems by Massachusetts poets featured in Common Threads 2018. Common Threads, an annual publication produced by MassPoetry, includes a guide to reading and discussing these poems and inspires hundreds of programs around the state. This year's collection focuses on the shared ideas of connection and disconnection.

Poetry newcomers and enthusiasts alike are welcome to this program. Tea and cookies will be served. The participation fee is $5 per person. Space is limited; please reserve a space by calling 413-542-2034.

Registration Required

French Department Thesis Showcase

5:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

The Department of French is pleased to invite you to its first annual Thesis Showcase.

Lily Fang, Joshua Harmon, Sunna Juhn and Flavia Martinez will talk about female networks in Gustave Flaubert’s novel Madame Bovary and the Bechdel Test, the unparalleled tradition of the French snare drum and its revolutionary political uses, how fragments of foreign languages can make us feel at home, and the tension between mother and other tongues.

Please join us and help us celebrate their work on Thursday, April 26, at 5 p.m., in the Center for Humanistic Inquiry. Refreshments will be served following the presentations!

Ongoing Events

Image of Ivory Billed by Matthew Inabinett

On Today’s Horizon: Mass Extinctions - Beneski Museum of Natural History

Student curated temporary exhibit, On Today’s Horizon: Mass Extinctions, is available for public viewing from Thursday, April 19 until May 20. Step into the Beneski and discover the history of the five mass extinctions that have ravaged the species living on Earth. We are currently undergoing a sixth mass extinction, this time caused by our human impact. What can we do to mitigate the effects of this mass extinction? Learn more about what you can do in this interpretive exhibition.

Spanning all three floors, the exhibition will take you through all previous mass extinctions and the theories on how they were caused. What kinds of species did they affect? What information can we take from these previous mass extinctions to learn about the sixth one? Come for a guided tour with the student curator, Antonella Dominguez ‘18, on April 19 at 2:30 p.m. The small steps we take now to reduce the effects of our human impact can only help now with the trajectory of the six mass extinction we have caused.