Event Calendar

Tue, Feb 12, 2019

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

Wed, Feb 13, 2019

Russian Table

The Russian Table is an opportunity for all interested in conversing in Russian to meet regularly with Russian faculty and students. We'll meet from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays on the Mezzanine level in Valentine Dining Hall. Russian speakers at all levels are very welcome!

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Fri, Feb 15, 2019

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

Music Department Tea Time

Music Department Tea Time

Come take a break from your busy week and enjoy tea, coffee, snacks and good company in the Arms Green Room. The music department's tea times are casual get-togethers where you hang out and chat with other musical folks from around campus. Everyone is welcome — students, faculty, staff and visitors. No affiliation with the department is required!

This event follows the "Workshop for Non-Majors and Majors: Research in Music" hosted by Faculty in Music.

Mon, Feb 18, 2019

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

Yoda at Amherst

Yoda's Table: A Weekly Lunch Conversation with Religious and Spiritual Life

Does everything happen for a reason? Are there invisible forces at work? What does spirituality look like in our fast-paced, tech-driven lives? Come ponder these and other questions at this casual, drop-in time to share lunch and conversation on a topic of spirituality, belief or values. Every Monday beginning December 3. Look for Yoda to find us, and please reach out if you'd like to co-host a conversation!

Tue, Feb 19, 2019

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

Wed, Feb 20, 2019

Russian Table

The Russian Table is an opportunity for all interested in conversing in Russian to meet regularly with Russian faculty and students. We'll meet from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays on the Mezzanine level in Valentine Dining Hall. Russian speakers at all levels are very welcome!

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Thu, Feb 21, 2019

A picture of Nate Chinen

Change of the Guard, a talk by jazz critic Nate Chinen

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

The story of jazz has often been upheld in terms of cultural triumph, as a transcendent response to African-American struggle. Jazz is also presented as a story of succession, a chain of creative genius passing from one ‘Great Man’ to the next. These are persuasive frameworks that define the art form by a canon and a fixed set of values, inscribing a kind of perimeter. In this multimedia presentation, which draws from the first chapter of Playing Changes: Jazz For the New Century (Pantheon, 2018), Chinen will address the rise of a conservation agenda in the jazz culture of the 1970s and ‘80s, and the stubbornly powerful trope of a jazz messiah, which now exists in a different form.

Nate Chinen was born in Honolulu, to a musical family: he grew up around the local Musicians Union, as his parents were popular nightclub entertainers. He began writing about Jazz in 1996 for the Philadelphia City Paper, and has now authored content for several national music publications including DownBeat, Blender and Vibe. Chinen spent about twelve years working as a jazz and pop critic for the New York Times, and wrote monthly columns for JazzTimes. He is a ten-time winner of the Helen Dance-Robert Palmer Award for Excellence in Writing, presented by the Jazz Journalists Association. The same organization presented him with its award for Best Book About Jazz, for his work on Myself Among Others, the autobiography of impresario George Wein. Chinen is currently working as Director of Editorial content at WBGO, while still closely engaging with programs like Jazz Night in America, The Checkout, and a range of jazz programming on NPR.

This event is co-sponsored by the Music Department, the Corliss Lamont Lectureship for a Peaceful World, and the Georges Lurcy Lecture Series at Amherst. This event is free and open to the public. For more Music Department events, see our department calendar at https://www.amherst.edu/academiclife/departments/music/events

Contact information: Prof. Jason Robinson.
Photo by Michael Lionstar.

Fri, Feb 22, 2019

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

Nicole Mitchell

M@A Parallels Series presents: Nicole Mitchell, “Mandorla Awakening II”

With her Black Earth Ensemble, Mitchell uses science fiction to address the question, “What would a world look like that is truly egalitarian, with advanced technology that is in tune with nature?”

Tickets required, available at amherst.universitytickets.com or please call the Concert Office at 413-542-2195.

Single ticket prices: General Public: $18, Senior Citizens (65+) and Amherst College Employees: $12, Students, with valid ID: $10, FREE AC student rush one hour before each concert.

Recorded in May 2015 at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, Mandorla features Mitchell's Black Earth Ensemble with new collaborators Tatsu Aoki (bass, shamisen, taiko) and Kojiro Umezaki (shakuhachi). Also in the mix is Chicago artist, scholar and poet Avery R. Young, who brings the composers’ lyrics to life with visceral humanity; and longtime collaborators Tomeka Reid (cello, banjo), Alex Wing (electric guitar, out, theremin), Renee Baker (violin), and Jovia Armstrong (percussion).

Mandorla Awakening II explores what Mitchell describes as a “collision of duality,” urban vs. country, hegemonic vs. vulnerable, acoustic vs. electric, with the dialogue of contrasting musical languages: Japanese, African American gospel, R&B, jazz. The work chronicles the journey of a couple as they find themselves navigating between two civilizations: the World Union, a crumbling society rampant with disease and inequality, and Mandorla, a utopia where spirituality, technology, and nature coexist harmoniously. Mandorla Awakening was included among the top ten jazz albums for 2017 by The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, NPR and Wire (UK).

Nicole M. Mitchell is an award-winning creative flutist, composer, bandleader and educator. She is perhaps best known for her work as a flutist, having developed a unique improvisational language and having repeated been named “Top Flutist of the Year” by Downbeat magazine critics poll and the Jazz Journalists Association (2010–17). Mitchell initially emerged from Chicago’s innovative music scene in the late ’90s, and her music celebrates contemporary African-American culture.

“One of the most exciting jazz soloists and composers in the world” –Peter Margasak, Chicago Reader

Tickets Required

Mon, Feb 25, 2019

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

Derron Wallace, Assistant Professor of Education and Sociology, Brandeis University

Education Studies Initiative Speaker Series Presents Derron Wallace: “Safe Routes to School? Black Caribbean Youth Negotiating Police Surveillance in London and New York City”

This talk examines how Black Caribbean youth perceive and experience the state-endorsed ‘Stop and Search’ program in London and then-ongoing ‘Stop and Frisk’ practices in New York City while on route to and from public schools between 2007 and 2014. Despite a growing body of scholarship on the relationship between policing and schooling in the U.S. and U.K., comparative research on how school students experience stop and frisk/search practices remains sparse. Drawing on the BlackCrit tradition of Critical Race Theory and in-depth interviews with 60 black Caribbean secondary school students, this article explores how adolescents experience adult-like policing to and from schools. The findings indicate that participants develop a strained sense of belonging in British and American societies due to a security paradox—a policing formula that promises safety for all in principle, but does so at the expense of some black youth in practice. Participants learned that irrespective of ethnicity, black youth are regularly rendered suspicious subjects worthy of scrutiny, even during the school commute. This paper concludes with recommendations that can assist in improving students’ safety while en route to and from school.

Derron Wallace is an assistant professor of education and sociology at Brandeis University with joint affiliations in African and Afro-American Studies and Social Justice & Social Policy. He is a sociologist of race, ethnicity and education who specializes in cross-national studies of inequalities and identities in urban schools and neighborhoods, focusing specifically on the experiences of young people of African descent. His work has appeared in journals such as Sociology: The Journal of the British Sociological Association, The British Journal of Sociology of Education and Harvard Educational Review. His research has been supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Gates Cambridge Trust, the Marion & Jasper Whiting Foundation and the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research. Prior to joining the Brandeis faculty, he served as a professional community organizer in London, working on youth safety, living wages, fair housing and immigrant rights campaigns.

Tue, Feb 26, 2019

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

Wed, Feb 27, 2019

Russian Table

The Russian Table is an opportunity for all interested in conversing in Russian to meet regularly with Russian faculty and students. We'll meet from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays on the Mezzanine level in Valentine Dining Hall. Russian speakers at all levels are very welcome!

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Fri, Mar 1, 2019

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

Sat, Mar 2, 2019

Amherst College Symphony Orchestra: ¡Viva Argentina!

The Amherst Symphony Orchestra closes its survey of music of Spain and Latin America with three works from Argentina on Saturday, March 2 at 8 p.m. in Buckley Recital Hall, Amherst College. Tickets are available on the day of the concert beginning at 7 p.m. in the lobby of Arms Music Center. For more information, please call 413-542-2195, email concerts@amherst.edu or visit www.amherstsymphonyorchestra.com.

Argentina is home to one of the world's great opera houses, the Teatró Colon in Buenos Aires. Musical narratives of gauchos and the pampas emerged early in the 20th century, and indigenous Indian, mestizo, creole and dance music associated with Carnival found expression in Argentine concert music.  

Estanciones Porteña (Four Seasons) of Buenos Aires (1965-1970) by Astor Piazzolla (1921-1992), a set of four seductive and beguiling tangos, opens the program. Conceived in response to Vivaldi's Le quattro stagioni (Four Seasons), they were composed for a wide variety of instruments, including bandéon, but are most commonly performed today in a virtuosic arrangement for strings and violin soloist by the Russian composer Leonid Desnyatnikov (1955- ). 

After intermission, the ASO performs another contemporary masterpiece, Three Songs for Soprano & Orchestra (2001) by the Argentine-born Osvaldo Golijov (1960- ). Inspired by poems of Sally Potter, Rosalia di Castro and Emily Dickinson, Three Songs demonstrate Golijov's expert and deeply moving mastery of text setting. The concert closes with a brief suite from the ballet Estancia (1941) by Alberto Ginastera (1916-1983), which evokes the life of Argentine ranchers in four short segments: Land Workers, Wheat Dance, Cattlemen, & Malambo.

For information on ticketing and directions to the concert, see https://www.amherstsymphonyorchestra.com/musicians

Tickets may be purchased only at the door. Prices are $10 for the general public; $5 for senior citizens, students with ID and children under 12, and are free to Amherst and all Five College students with ID.

Tickets Required

Mon, Mar 4, 2019

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

Yoda at Amherst

Yoda's Table: A Weekly Lunch Conversation with Religious and Spiritual Life

Does everything happen for a reason? Are there invisible forces at work? What does spirituality look like in our fast-paced, tech-driven lives? Come ponder these and other questions at this casual, drop-in time to share lunch and conversation on a topic of spirituality, belief or values. Every Monday beginning December 3. Look for Yoda to find us, and please reach out if you'd like to co-host a conversation!

Tue, Mar 5, 2019

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

Wed, Mar 6, 2019

Russian Table

The Russian Table is an opportunity for all interested in conversing in Russian to meet regularly with Russian faculty and students. We'll meet from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays on the Mezzanine level in Valentine Dining Hall. Russian speakers at all levels are very welcome!

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!