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Type of Event

Event Calendar

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Thu, Feb 21, 2019

A picture of Nate Chinen

"Change of the Guard": A Talk by Jazz Critic Nate Chinen

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

The story of jazz has often been upheld in terms of cultural triumph, as a transcendent response to African-American struggle. Jazz is also presented as a story of succession, a chain of creative genius passing from one "Great Man" to the next. These are persuasive frameworks that define the artform by a canon and a fixed set of values, inscribing a kind of perimeter.

In this multimedia presentation, which draws from the first chapter of Playing Changes: Jazz For the New Century (Pantheon, 2018), Chinen will address the rise of a conservation agenda in the jazz culture of the 1970s and '80s, and the stubbornly powerful trope of a jazz messiah, which now exists in a different form.

Nate Chinen was born in Honolulu, to a musical family: he grew up around the local Musicians Union, as his parents were popular nightclub entertainers. He began writing about jazz in 1996 for the Philadelphia City Paper, and has now authored content for several national music publications, including DownBeat, Blender and Vibe. Chinen spent about 12 years working as a jazz and pop critic for The New York Times and wrote monthly columns for JazzTimes. He is a 10-time winner of the Helen Dance-Robert Palmer Award for Excellence in Writing, presented by the Jazz Journalists Association. The same organization presented him with its award for Best Book About Jazz, for his work on Myself Among Others, the autobiography of impresario George Wein. Chinen is currently working as director of editorial content at WBGO, while still closely engaging with programs like Jazz Night in America, The Checkout and a range of jazz programming on NPR.

This event is co-sponsored by the Department of Music, the Corliss Lamont Lectureship for a Peaceful World and the Georges Lurcy Lecture Series at Amherst. This event is free and open to the public.

For more music department events, see our department calendar at https://www.amherst.edu/academiclife/departments/music/events.

Photo by Michael Lionstar

TRUTH: Amherst College's Speaking Competition 2019

TRUTH. Arrive curious. Leave inspired.
On Thursday, Feb. 21, support student speakers by attending TRUTH: Amherst College’s Speaking Competition. Ten students have written persuasive speeches about this year’s theme, “Truth,” and will speak compellingly about what matters to them. Speaking prizes will be awarded at the conclusion of the event.

Depiction of Adam, Eve and Satan in the Garden of Eden, surrounded by plants and animals

"The Bible: Bane and Blessing"

Phyllis Trible earned a Ph.D. in 1963 from Union Seminary, Columbia University, with an emphasis in Old Testament. By the time she earned her Ph.D., there were regularly 300+ women enrolled at Union Seminary—but women were still not correspondingly visible in the faculty. Trible taught at Wake Forest University and Andover-Newton Theological School before being appointed professor of Old Testament at Union, and later became the first woman to hold the post of Baldwin Professor of Sacred Literature. Trible has become a leading authority on what is now known as feminist interpretation of biblical texts, as well as literary and rhetorical methods of biblical criticism. She is an internationally known lecturer, and also has served as President of the Society of Biblical Literature. Professor Trible left Union to pursue a deanship at the new Wake Forest School of Divinity in Winston-Salem, N.C. She is the author of what are considered to be two of the groundbreaking works in feminist biblical scholarship: God and the Rhetoric of Sexuality and Texts of Terror. She also contributed Jonah to the New Interpreters' Bible Commentary Series; appeared on television as part of Bill Moyers' PBS special Genesis; and has written numerous articles, book reviews and columns for various publications.

Event poster showing Wickman's photo and book cover

Book Discussion with Author Dr. Tom Wickman: "Snowshoe Country"

Dr. Tom Wickman, associate professor of history and American studies at Trinity College, will discuss his new book, titled Snowshoe Country: An Environmental and Cultural History of Winter in the Early American Northeast, on Thursday, Feb. 29, at 5 p.m. in Paino Lecture Hall (Beneski 107).

Camille Brown performance

Five College Dance: "SPRING"

Five College Dance, in collaboration with the Amherst College Department of Theater and Dance, presents SPRING, an evening of dance featuring contributions from faculty, guest artists and dancers across all five campuses, including Camille A. Brown’s New Second Line, Five College Dance’s 2018-19 guest artist repertory project, made possible with a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. This dance is a celebration of the spirit and culture of the people of New Orleans.

The concert also features Picture This, a new work by critically acclaimed choreographer David Dorfman. Picture This is a kinetic, visual, musical and textual homage to the next generation of dance citizens-- a brief look at what makes these fine performers both joyous and angry in regard to love and politics.

Dances by Danté Brown (visiting assistant professor, Amherst College), Lailye Weidman (visiting assistant professor, Hampshire College) and Barbie Diewald (visiting artist, Mount Holyoke College), as well as a lobby installation by Rodger Blum (professor, Smith College), complete the program.

Tickets are free, but reservations are recommended: (413) 542-2277 or fcddance.reservations@gmail.com

French Film: "Les Petits Mouchoirs" (2010)

"Every year, Max, a successful restaurant owner, and Véro, his eco-friendly wife, invite a merry group of friends to their beautiful beach house to celebrate Antoine's birthday and kick-start the vacation. But, this year, before they all leave Paris, their buddy Ludo is hurt in a serious accident, which sets off a dramatic chain of reactions and emotional responses. The eagerly anticipated vacation leads each of the protagonists to raise the little veils that for years they have draped over what bothers and upsets them. Pretenses become increasingly hard to keep up. Until the moment when the truth finally catches up with them all..."

Ongoing Events

Studio Art Faculty Exhibition

until Mar 1 Fayerweather Hall, 105 - Eli Marsh Gallery

Gallery hours are 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. on Mondays through Fridays, and noon - 4 p.m. on Sundays. Closed Saturdays. This exhibition will close at noon on Friday, March 1.