Event Calendar

Friday, February 28, 2020

Fri, Feb 28, 2020

Wellness Party

Join us for lunch, raffle prizes, coloring and DIY self-care kits. We will be celebrating the end of the Wellness Challenge, but the event is open to anyone who would like to hear a little bit more about the Challenge or just enjoy a fun break.

Dr. Chris Lim ’12, Biochemistry and Biophysics

The Path to Grad School: Drop-in with Dr. Chris Lim

Amherst alum Dr. Chris Lim, member of the graduating class of 2012, will be available for a drop-in conversation on “The Path to Grad School.” After finishing his studies at Amherst as one of the first two BCBP (biochemistry and biophysics) majors, he attended graduate school in molecular biophysics & biochemistry at Yale. He is currently on his way to UC Berkeley to start his next chapter doing postdoctoral research in structural biology.

Stop in for a friendly conversation with Chris and Carolyn Margolin, Program Director for Careers in Science and Technology of the Loeb Center.

Polyhedra

Playing with Polytopes

Join Amherst student Andrew Tawfeek '21 as he demonstrates the simple mathematical beauty of polytopes. Join the fun and build a 3-D polygon to display in the Science Center! This is an event open to everyone: first-years, faculty, staff, art majors, STEM-minded...all are welcome!

Symposium schedule

Five College German Studies Undergraduate Research Symposium

You are cordially invited to join us for the Five College German Studies Undergraduate Research Symposium. We hope to see you there! Please contact mhowes@amherst.edu with questions.

Headshot of Professor Ronald Raines

Cheminar: "Ghost Proteins"

3:15 pm - 4:30 pm Science Center, Kirkpatrick Lecture Hall - #A011

Professor Ronald T. Raines, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry

ABSTRACT: The lipid bilayer that encases human cells has evolved to keep the outside out, and the inside in. This barrier is not, however, impenetrable. Some small molecules, including many drugs, can burrow through and manifest therapeutic activities. Others can be “cloaked” to endow membrane permeability, and then uncloaked inside cells. We have learned how to beneficially cloak proteins, which are typically 100-fold larger than small-molecule drugs. Specifically, the conversion of protein carboxyl groups into esters enables a protein to traverse the lipid bilayer. The nascent esters are substrates for endogenous esterases that regenerate native proteins within cells. The ability to deliver native proteins directly into cells opens a new frontier for molecular medicine.

Three members of the Parker Quartet, dressed elegantly and standing near a wall

M@A Masterclass: Parker Quartet Feb. 28

Please join us for a public masterclass as M@A Chamber artists the Parker Quartet work with students on their craft.

Crafting a Career in Food Writing

The foodie media universe offers storytellers with a passion for the culinary the opportunity to share in and define new culinary traditions. Explore the possibilities for your own work—across print, digital, and television—with this behind the scenes look at Crafting a Career in Food Writing. This in-depth discussion will feature three distinguished Amherst community members who will share the details of their trajectories into careers as food writer, cookbook authors, recipe developers and personal chefs.
They are:
Lizzy Briskin ’15 is a personal chef, cooking instructor, food writer and recipe developer specializing in healthy, vegetable-forward food.
Dana Cowin P ’22, best known for her two decades as the Editor-in-Chief of Food & Wine, is a tastemaker, talent scout, consultant, author, lecturer and radio show host.
Ted Lee ’93 is co-founder of The Lee Bros. Boiled Peanuts Catalogue, an award winning cookbook author, and host/executive producer of Southern Uncovered with The Lee Bros. on Ovation.

Collage of protests, marches and news programs

"Shusenjo—The Main Battleground of the Comfort Women Issue"

4:30 pm Keefe Campus Center, Keefe Theater Auditorium

Miki Dezaki, a YouTuber who was threatened and harassed by Japan’s notorious netouyo (cyber neo-nationalists) for his video on racism in Japan, is not shying away from controversial topics with his debut feature-length documentary on the comfort women issue. The film dives deep into the most contentious dispute between Japan and Korea and finds answers to hotly debated questions, such as: Were the comfort women “sexual slaves” or prostitutes? Were they coercively recruited? Were there really 200,000 comfort women? And does Japan have a legal responsibility to apologize?

Dezaki masterfully interweaves footage from demonstrations, man-on-the-street interviews, news and archival clips with in-depth interviews with the most prominent scholars and influencers from both sides of the debate, including Yoshiko Sakurai (journalist), Kent Gilbert (lawyer/celebrity), Mina Watanabe (secretary-general of the Women's Active Museum), Koichi Nakano (political science professor) and Yoshiaki Yoshimi (historian).

Shusenjo includes surprising confessions and revelations that uncover the hidden intentions of both supporters and detractors while deconstructing the dominant narratives. That Dezaki has managed to bring nuance to a sensationalized and often oversimplified issue is just one of the many reasons that Shusenjo: The Main Battleground of the Comfort Women Issue is a must-see work.

Co-sponsored by the Departments of Asian Languages & Civilizations; History; Sexuality, Women’s & Gender Studies; and Film & Media Studies

Amherst STEM Network Logo

Amherst STEM Network Launch Party

On Friday join The Amherst STEM Network (a new student-run science magazine) for Lime Red bubble tea and Fresh Side tea rolls and celebrate the launch of their first few articles! Stop by the Science Center living room between 4:30pm and 6pm to meet the group and learn about what they do. This event is open to STEM and nonSTEM students alike!

Students Only
Susan Choi

A Conversation with 2019 National Book Award Winner Susan Choi and Finalist Laila Lalami

Join Professor Judith Frank, in conversation with National Book Award recipient Susan Choi and finalist Laila Lalami. This event free an open to the public, to be followed by audience Q&A and book signing. Hosted in partnership with the National Book Foundation.

Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian American Literary Award for fiction. Her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize and was adapted into a film. Her third novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. In 2010 she was named the inaugural recipient of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award. Her fourth novel, My Education, received a 2014 Lambda Literary Award. Her fifth novel, Trust Exercise, and her first book for children, Camp Tiger, came out in 2019. Trust Exercise won the National Book Award for Fiction in 2019. A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation, Choi teaches fiction writing at Yale and lives in Brooklyn.

Laila Lalami was born in Rabat and educated in Morocco, Great Britain and the United States. She is author of the novels Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits, which was a finalist for the Oregon Book Award; Secret Son, which was on the Orange Prize longlist; and The Moor’s Account, which won the American Book Award, Arab American Book Award and Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, was on the Man Booker Prize longlist and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Her essays and opinion pieces have appeared in Harper’s, The Guardian, The New York Times and elsewhere. A recipient of British Council, Fulbright and Guggenheim Fellowships, she teaches creative writing at the University of California, Riverside. Her most recent novel, The Other Americans, was a Los Angeles Times best-seller, a best-of-2019 selection from NPR and Time and a finalist for the National Book Award in Fiction.

Judith Frank is author of a book of criticism, Common Ground: Eighteenth-Century English Satiric Fiction and the Poor, and two novels, Crybaby Butch, which won a 2004 Lambda Literary Award, and All I Love and Know. In 2008, Frank received a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship. They have been a resident at Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony and have published short fiction in The Massachusetts Review, Other Voices and Best Lesbian Love Stories 2005. They teach English and creative writing at Amherst College and are currently working on a novel about race, reproduction and queerness.

"Gossamer"

The Department of Theater and Dance presents Gossamer, written and directed by Sophina Flores ’20. Gossamer follows three children and their mother through a dissociative fantasy world they have created as a response to trauma, trapped in the liminal space between death and life. Through surrealist movement, Gossamer carries us through a distorted narrative of a broken home—a family grappling with forgiveness, acceptance and hope for recovery, while facing the truth that no one is innocent within the cycle of abuse.

Set design by Laura Carty ’20, costume design by Lorelei Dietz ’20, lighting design by Lauren Thompson, projection design by Brenna Kaplan ’22, and sound design by Christianna Mariano ’21 and Alistair Edwards ’22

Starring Sam Beach, Emily Fedor, Leah Folpe, Nick Govus, Eli Quastler, Andrew Rosevear, Caroline Seitz and Renz Toledo

Tickets are free; reservations are recommended: call (413) 542-2277 or email theater@amherst.edu.