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Type of Event

Event Calendar

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Tue, Nov 12, 2019

Eduardo H Da Silva Neto

Despite three decades studying superconductivity in cuprate-based materials, we are still left with an incomplete understanding of how their superconducting state at unexpectedly high temperatures emerges from a “soup” of multiple broken-symmetry phases (i.e. ordered states). Although states of broken translational symmetry (i.e. charge order) were known to exist in some cuprates, only recently have we realized [1,2] that charge order could be the missing piece of the high-Tc puzzle. To understand how charge order fits in the puzzle, we require a suite of new measurements to specifically address: What does the charge order ‘look’ like? Is the charge order, like superconductivity, ubiquitous to all cuprates or just a material-specific accident? Is it helpful or harmful to superconductivity? Which electronic orbitals form the ordered patterns? Is it related to the mysterious pseudogap phase? Do the electron spins participate in the charge order phenomenon?
In this talk, I will discuss how we pushed the limits of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/S) and resonant (inelastic) x-ray scattering (R(I)XS) to address some of these questions [2-5]. In particular, I will focus on how STS can be used to ‘take pictures’ of charge order patterns with atomic resolution in solids and how soft RXS has emerged as an extremely sensitive technique to detect charge order in quantum materials.
[1] G. Ghiringhelli, et al. Science 337, 821 (2012).
[2] E. H. da Silva Neto, et al. Science 343, 393 (2014).
[3] E. H. da Silva Neto, et al. Science 347, 282 (2015).
[4] E. H. da Silva Neto, et al. Science Advances 2 (8), e1600782 (2016).
[5] E. H. da Silva Neto, et al. PRB, Rapid Comm. 98, 161114(R) (2018).

Event poster featuring a photo of a crowd of people standing on the Berlin Wall, and four small photos of Amherst faculty panelists

Commemorating the 30th Anniversary of the Fall of the Berlin Wall

4:30 pm - 6:00 pm Fayerweather Hall, Pruyne Lecture Hall (Room 115)

The Departments of Political Science and German at Amherst College will host a panel discussion commemorating the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. This event is free and open to the public.

The panel members are as follows:
William Taubman, Bertrand Snell Professor of Political Science, Emeritus
Catherine Epstein, provost and dean of the faculty and Winkley Professor of History
Christian Rogowski, G. Armour Craig Professor in Language and Literature in the Department of German
Gustavo Salcedo, Karl Loewenstein Fellow and visiting assistant professor of political science

This panel will be moderated by Javier Corrales, Dwight W. Morrow 1895 Professor of Political Science.

Ill Erotics: The Politics of Care and Self-Making Among HIV-Positive Black Caribbean Women

Ill Erotics: The Politics of Care and Self-Making Among HIV-Positive Black Caribbean Women

Carney, Sandoe & Associates Information Session and Resume Review

Want to use your degree to make a difference for the next generation? Join Carney, Sandoe & Associates for an info session about working in K-12 private, independent schools across the country. CS&A is an educational recruitment firm that can help recent college graduates get started as a teacher or coach in the rewarding word of independent schools—no education degree or teaching certification required.

A CS&A representative will explain the process and benefits of the organization's free educational placement service, discuss what it’s like working at independent schools, and share resume and job search advice.

Whether you become a master teacher or pursue a different career down the road, CS&A believes that independent schools are a great place to work, coach, and even live. Students of all majors who are looking for a first teaching job, an opportunity to work with kids, or a way to translate a love of one or more areas of study into a rewarding job are encouraged to attend this session and learn more!