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Type of Event

Event Calendar

November 2020

Mon, Nov 2, 2020

2019-2020 Lazerowitz Lecture with Carrie Palmquist

Lazerowitz Lecture with Carrie Palmquist (Postponed from 2019-2020)

Lazerowitz Lecture with Carrie Palmquist postponed from 2019-2020 due to Covid-19 pandemic.

Registration Required

Tue, Nov 3, 2020

NAIS Mellon Mini-Grants & Residencies

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS
NAIS Mellon Mini-Grants and Residencies

Five Colleges, Incorporated, has been awarded a $2.5 million, four-year grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to help its member campuses transform how they approach Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS), with the goal of enhancing teaching, learning and scholarship in the field. As part of this multi-year initiative, FCI is offering mini-grant and residency opportunities to Five College faculty and staff interested in working collaboratively to integrate NAIS into their curricula.
Five College full-time faculty or staff members responsible for creating curriculum are encouraged to apply for mini-grants to lead team projects to develop one or more course modules, a new course, or a cluster or sequence of courses (such as language study). This funding opportunity is also open to faculty with a more multi-disciplinary background and no prior experience in NAIS who are interested in infusing Indigenous approaches into their courses through collaboration with other faculty experts. Mini-grant projects should include multiple faculty and can also include the engagement of Five College staff, students, and community participants as collaborators.

Faculty can also apply for residencies to host indigenous artists, authors, activists, and community historians. Please note that campus policies during the pandemic will severely restrict residencies but creative and/or remote options will be considered.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis with two more deadlines this academic year: December 1, 2020 and February 9, 2021. Virtual information sessions will be offered prior to each deadline to assist applicants in refining their proposals. The next information session will be held on November 17, from 4 to 5pm. Prior to submitting a proposal, applicants are encouraged to attend an information session and read the Frequently Asked Questions section of the FCI NAIS mini-grants website.

For more information, please visit https://www.fivecolleges.edu/natam/mellon-grant

OHR Office Hours for Staff and Faculty

The Office of Human Resources is pleased to offer Zoom office hours for staff and faculty as an opportunity to ask questions, provide feedback and receive information on a variety of topics. We will engage in a conversation about workplace developments and communication highlights, and will offer group discussion or private consultation in break-out rooms with HR Representatives.

Please see the OHR Newsletter or the Daily Mammoth for the Zoom link. You can also contact hr@amherst.edu for the access information. We look forward to connecting with you!

Assistant Professor Manasa Kandula: UMASS "Understanding fundamental physics through Colloid experiments"

A fundamental challenge in materials physics is to understand the microscopic
underpinnings of various physical phenomena. In this regard, in the first part of my talk,
I will discuss how colloidal suspensions have emerged as an ideal system to probe
generic condensed matter phenomena in real-time and space. In the second half, I will
discuss our research using binary colloidal suspensions, to unravel the mysteries of
glass transition and deformation. I will conclude by discussing our ongoing efforts to
develop experimental active colloidal system to investigate non-equilibrium active
matter physics.

Wed, Nov 4, 2020

CRG: Doing the Work: White People Committing to Anti-Racism (Group A)

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Zoom (link will be shared before meeting)

The current racial justice movement has most likely motivated you to think more about racism and in many ways, question how you participate and perpetuate racism in your own life. Fortunately there are many steps one can take to embark on the journey of anti-racism. Many of us are at different stages of learning and unlearning how racism operates in our lives and often the question is where to start? This new CRG will guide us through a series of self-reflection activities and action steps to begin and dive deeper into the work of anti-racism. We will utilize the book Me and White Supremacy by Layla F. Sadd, to guide our process.

A space for staff to examine what it means to be white, learn how to identify and confront racism in ourselves, the systems and people surrounding us, and to critically reflect on our actions and socialization. We will emphasize building our own capacity as white people doing anti-racism work that centers BIPOC.

For the fall semester we will host two separate groups of 20 people each. Both sessions will be co-facilitated by Angie Tissi-Gassoway and Dr. Sarah Erickson. Please email Angie at atissi@amherst.edu to request your book and learn about next steps.

Registration Required
Red, white, and blue flag-style garland with "vote" written on each flag.

CHI Salon: Post-Election Salon

4:30 pm - 5:30 pm Virtual, Zoom

Join us in a supportive space for an open-forum discussion of the November 3rd U.S. presidential election. Restricted to the Amherst College community. Please log into Zoom with your Amherst email address.

Zoom link and passcode:
https://amherstcollege.zoom.us/j/97743612182?pwd=Y2hIbGZxdDRCajNJSFZ6Wlk...

Meeting ID: 977 4361 2182
Passcode: 342503

Thu, Nov 5, 2020

NAIS Mellon Mini-Grants & Residencies

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS
NAIS Mellon Mini-Grants and Residencies

Five Colleges, Incorporated, has been awarded a $2.5 million, four-year grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to help its member campuses transform how they approach Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS), with the goal of enhancing teaching, learning and scholarship in the field. As part of this multi-year initiative, FCI is offering mini-grant and residency opportunities to Five College faculty and staff interested in working collaboratively to integrate NAIS into their curricula.
Five College full-time faculty or staff members responsible for creating curriculum are encouraged to apply for mini-grants to lead team projects to develop one or more course modules, a new course, or a cluster or sequence of courses (such as language study). This funding opportunity is also open to faculty with a more multi-disciplinary background and no prior experience in NAIS who are interested in infusing Indigenous approaches into their courses through collaboration with other faculty experts. Mini-grant projects should include multiple faculty and can also include the engagement of Five College staff, students, and community participants as collaborators.

Faculty can also apply for residencies to host indigenous artists, authors, activists, and community historians. Please note that campus policies during the pandemic will severely restrict residencies but creative and/or remote options will be considered.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis with two more deadlines this academic year: December 1, 2020 and February 9, 2021. Virtual information sessions will be offered prior to each deadline to assist applicants in refining their proposals. The next information session will be held on November 17, from 4 to 5pm. Prior to submitting a proposal, applicants are encouraged to attend an information session and read the Frequently Asked Questions section of the FCI NAIS mini-grants website.

For more information, please visit https://www.fivecolleges.edu/natam/mellon-grant

Truman Scholarship Information Session

Join Christine Overstreet, Director of Fellowships, and Truman finalists Jeremy Thomas '21 and Margot Lurie '21 to learn about the Truman Scholarship. We'll talk about what makes a strong candidate, how to produce a compelling application, and what the application process entails. The Truman is open to juniors who are U.S. citizens planning a career in public service. All class years are welcome in the session.
Zoom link: https://amherstcollege.zoom.us/j/99871620008

OHR Office Hours for Supervisors/Department Chairs

The Office of Human Resources is pleased to offer Zoom office hours for staff and faculty as an opportunity to ask questions, provide feedback and receive information on a variety of topics. We will review recent communications and important developments in the workplace as the semester progresses, and provide a resource takeaway to support effective communication within departments. You will also have opportunities to hear specific tips and best practice examples from other supervisors/department chairs.

Please see the OHR Newsletter or the Daily Mammoth for the Zoom link. You can also contact hr@amherst.edu for the access information.

We look forward to connecting with you!

Event poster featuring headshots of Bradley, Ashe and Thomas

Black Student Activism and the Struggle for Institutional Change in Higher Ed

Dr. Stefan Bradley, author of Upending the Ivory Tower: Civil Rights, Black Power and the Ivy League, will speak about the history and impact of Black student activism at elite colleges with Amherst student activists Jeremy Thomas '21 and Kyndall Ashe '18. This discussion will kick off several events commemorating the fifth anniversary of the Amherst Uprising.

Register in advance at:

https://amherstcollege.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_fS2RnnPcTbinLoK1Jwdj7g

Registration Required

Fri, Nov 6, 2020

What’s Happening / What Happened? Reflections on the Election and Its Aftermath

This reflection on the post-election picture will feature Lawrence Douglas, the James J. Grosfeld Professor of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought; Jakina Debnam Guzman, assistant professor of economics; and Eleonora Mattiacci, assistant professor of political science. Attendees will have the opportunity to share their reflections and ask questions.

Lawrence Douglas, chair of the Department of Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought, is the author of seven books, including The Memory of Judgment: Making Law and History in the Trials of the Holocaust and The Right Wrong Man: John Demjanjuk and the Last Great Nazi War Crimes Trial, a New York Times “Editor’s Choice.” His most recent book is Will He Go? Trump and the Looming Electoral Meltdown in 2020. Douglas’ two novels are The Catastrophist, one of Kirkus' “Best Books of the Year,” and The Vices, a finalist for the National Jewish Book Prize. His commentary and essays have appeared in Harper’s, The New York Times, The Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times; and he is a regular contributor to the Times Literary Supplement and The Guardian (U.S.). Douglas is also a recipient of major fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Institute for International Education and American Academy in Berlin, and the Carnegie Foundation.

Jakina Debnam Guzman, assistant professor of economics at Amherst, uses econometric, experimental and network methods to explore questions in behavioral economics and public policy. Guzman works to understand the impact of economic policies and events on human thriving, where human thriving is broadly defined. To do this, Guzman introduces social and psychological features into existing economic frameworks and quantify the extent to which these features matter for economic outcomes and well-being. Their current projects address three themes: 1) consumer responses to anti-soda legislation and campaigns, 2) the primary science of subjective well-being measures and 3) learning and peer effects in social networks. Throughout their work, their methodological choice is question-driven—they use text analysis, survey experiments, laboratory experiments and network analysis methods in addition to more traditional econometrics. In teaching, Guzman prioritizes constructive critical inquiry into economic knowledge and methods, and particularly enjoys teaching behavioral economics both the introductory and the advanced levels.

Eleonora Mattiacci, assistant professor of political science at Amherst, focuses on international politics, with a special emphasis on security studies. Mattiacci’s research sheds light on an unexplored puzzle: under what conditions do technological advancements influence the competition between both state and non-state actors to achieve their preferred political outcome in the international arena? Grasping the role of technological change challenges our understandings of how this competition unfolds and sheds light on the increasingly volatile nature of its outcomes. In a recent publication, Mattiacci investigated why rebel groups spend precious resources on using social media during conflict, arguing that the rapid pace of communication made possible by access to social media technology uniquely empowers these actors to reach out internationally for support against the government. Mattiacci’s research aims at elucidating one crucial aspect of the contemporary international system, namely how, in a time and place when traditional inter-state conflict is perceived as less legitimate and effective, competition for the definition of the international political landscape has shifted to the dimension of technology.

Sun, Nov 8, 2020

What’s Happening / What Happened? Reflections on the Election and Its Aftermath

This reflection on the post-election picture will feature Tom Davis ’71 H’09, former chair of the House Oversight Committee and seven-term member of the U.S. House of Representatives and partner at the law firm Holland and Knight; Chloe McKenzie ’14, founder and CEO of BlackFem, Inc., and CEO of On a Wealth Kick; Jennifer Peter ’90, managing editor at The Boston Globe; and Paul Smith ’76 P’09 H’15, Amherst College trustee, professor from practice at Georgetown Law School and vice president for litigation and strategy at the Campaign Legal Center. Attendees will have the opportunity to share their reflections and ask questions.

Tom Davis ’71 H’09 served in Congress from 1994 to 2008, representing Virginia’s 11th district. During that time, he served as House GOP campaign chairman for two cycles (2000 and 2002) and chairman of the House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight before retiring, undefeated, in 2008. He is a graduate of Amherst College and the University of Virginia Law School. With Martin Frost and Richard Cohen, he is the author of The Partisan Divide: Congress in Crisis.

Chloe McKenzie ’14 works at the intersection of education, finance, social justice and the visual and performing arts. She is a Ph.D. candidate in social work research at the University of Kentucky and the leading researcher in financial trauma, abuse and shame. An LJST major at Amherst, she has a graduate certificate in financial planning and services from Boston University and a master’s in public administration from New York University.

Jennifer Peter ’90 helps run the newsroom as one of The Boston Globe’s senior editors, coordinating between departments and ensuring that a steady flow of enterprising and interesting stories flow to the website throughout the day. She switched to this position after more than seven years as the Globe’s metro editor, overseeing almost all aspects of local news. She began her career as a reporter for 12 years, covering mainly politics at newspapers in Idaho, Connecticut, Virginia and Massachusetts. Peter studied English and fine arts at Amherst and started at the Globe in 2004.

Trustee Paul Smith ’76 P’09 H’15 is a professor from practice at Georgetown Law School and vice president for litigation and strategy at the Campaign Legal Center, which seeks to protect voting rights, to defend reasonable campaign finance regulation and to enforce government ethics rules. Prior to this, at Jenner & Block LLP, he became one of the most prominent Supreme Court advocates of his generation. He has handled many cases involving civil rights and civil liberties, notably in the areas of free speech, voting rights and gay rights. He has argued 21 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, including the landmark gay-rights case Lawrence v. Texas and Brown v. EMA, which established the First Amendment rights of video game producers.

Mon, Nov 9, 2020

Amherst College + Loeb Center logo

Demystifying the Internship Search Process — Hosted by the Loeb Center's Charles Hamilton Houston Internship Program

Are you ready to search for a summer internship or research opportunity, but need to know where to start? Have you started looking for opportunities, but feel like you’re not having much luck? Consider attending this workshop to learn tips you can use to search for and secure the right internship or research opportunity for you.

Topics covered in this workshop include:
--Goals and priorities to guide your internship search
--Advantages and disadvantages of different search methods (using job boards, cold calling companies, networking)
--Overview of crafting effective applications and the interview process
--Staying organized and on track with your applications
--Handling multiple internship offers

Note: This workshop will fulfill the Internship Preparation Workshop requirement for the Charles Hamilton Houston Internship Program. Learn more about the Program here: https://www.amherst.edu/mm/575805

Tue, Nov 10, 2020

OHR Office Hours for Staff and Faculty

The Office of Human Resources is pleased to offer Zoom office hours for staff and faculty as an opportunity to ask questions, provide feedback and receive information on a variety of topics. We will engage in a conversation about workplace developments and communication highlights, and will offer group discussion or private consultation in break-out rooms with HR Representatives.

Please see the OHR Newsletter or the Daily Mammoth for the Zoom link. You can also contact hr@amherst.edu for the access information. We look forward to connecting with you!

Making Gifts to Loved Ones and Charities

OHR Learning & Development invites you to a live webinar presented by TIAA.
You can maximize the value of your life’s work and help to take are of your survivors and philanthropic causes with a little planning. This webinar will review basic strategies for giving to individuals and charities during your lifetime, as well as legacy planning.

Money at Work 1: Foundations of Investing

3:00 pm - 4:00 pm Live Webinar

OHR Learning & Development invites you to a live webinar presented by TIAA.
Discover how you can manage risk versus reward as well as understand the role of investing and managing risks, ways to help accelerate savings and tools that can help sustain a portfolio.

Loeb Center logo

Intro to Careers in the Arts — Hosted by the Loeb Center

Are you a creative problem solver with a desire to document, shape, and transform culture? Do you wonder if you can really “become” a filmmaker, painter, poet or performer? From museums and archives, to film and television, to the behind-the-scenes business of artistic practices—careers in the arts are a great fit for those looking to design professional pathways that combine rigor, creativity, and curiosity.

Regardless of experience level, you’ll leave this session with an understanding of:
• potential career trajectories
• industry timelines for internships and jobs, and
• Loeb Center resources designed to support your search.

Mairead Case

Mairead Case: A Reading and Conversation

Join Mairead Case for a reading from her new novel Tiny, a contemporary, poetic retelling of Sophocles’ Antigone, set in the Pacific Northwest. A Q&A will follow.

Case is the author of the forthcoming The Georgetown Steamplant Graphic Novel with David Lansky, as well as the poetry chapbook TENDERNESS and the novel See You in the Morning, which Electric Literature called “[h]eartbreaking and familiar, liable to trigger flashbacks of alienation so vivid, they’ll make your feet sweat.”

Case teaches English full-time to eighth-graders and part-time at the Denver Women’s Jail. She is also a legal observer with the National Lawyers Guild and volunteers for a community response team supporting queer and trans survivors of violence. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Denver and is a former birthday party clown.

Registration Required
Alumni-in-Residence

Alumni-in-Residence: Paths into Biotechnology — Developing Treatments for Humans and More, with Dr. Wendy Halpern ’88

In this Loeb Center Alumni-in-Residence session, Dr. Wendy Halpern ’88 will discuss her journey into biotechnology, including her experiences working toward developing treatment strategies for both humans and animals. She will also provide insight into how to step beyond the office to work to impact change at the national and international levels.

Dr. Wendy Halpern ’88 is a veterinary pathologist with more than 20 years of drug development experience. She earned her DVM from Ohio State University, where she also completed an M.S. in Veterinary Pathobiology, followed by a Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from the University of New Mexico. Drawn by the appeal of biotechnology, she joined Human Genome Sciences in 2000, and subsequently transitioned to Genentech as a Scientist and Veterinary Pathologist in 2007.

In addition to specific project support at Genentech, she actively contributes to the nonclinical strategy and safety assessment for pediatric drug development, with emphasis on challenges in pediatric oncology. She represents the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) on an International Committee for Harmonisation (ICH) Working Group, which recently completed a new globally-harmonized, nonclinical safety guidance document for pediatric medicines (ICH S11). She has been an active member of the American College of Veterinary Pathology, the BioSafe group of BIO, the Birth Defects Research and Prevention Society, Safety Pharmacology Society, and the Society of Toxicologic Pathology.

This Alumni-in-Residence programming is presented by Amherst College's Loeb Center for Career Exploration and Planning. Learn more about the program here: https://www.amherst.edu/mm/575486

Wed, Nov 11, 2020

The Power of Saving

OHR Learning & Development invites you to a live webinar presented by TIAA.
Whether you’re the kind of person that lives and spends in the now or plans for what’s ahead, there are always ways to save smarter. In this seminar, you’ll learn a number of strategies for better managing your money, so you have the knowledge and confidence to pay your bills, save for a rainy day, and achieve any larger financial goals you’ve set for yourself.

Supporting a Remote Workforce

OHR Learning & Development invites you to a live webinar presented by the EAP, New Directions.
With an increasing number of employees working remotely, managers are tasked with developing diversified strategies to support remote workers. Explore the characteristics and dynamics of the remote worker. Develop an appreciation for the needs of remote workers and specific support recommendations. This webinar is designed for anyone who actively supervises others.

Stories in STEM with Dr. Brielle Ferguson

Dr. Brielle Ferguson, the co-founder of Black in Neuro and the Standford Black Postdoc Association, will be sharing her journey in STEM with Bio 191 students. All are welcome to attend the talk and Q&A.

Link: https://amherstcollege.zoom.us/j/98207481764?pwd=NHFrTWwxTTN3dGR0M3R3blJ...

Making it Easier for You: Online Tools and Resources

3:00 pm - 4:00 pm Live Webinar

OHR Learning & Development invites you to a live webinar presented by TIAA.
Save time, manage your money, and feel empowered by learning and using the latest digital enhancements.

Supporting a Remote Workforce

3:00 pm - 4:00 pm Live Webinar

OHR Learning & Development invites you to a live webinar presented by the EAP, New Directions.
With an increasing number of employees working remotely, managers are tasked with developing diversified strategies to support remote workers. Explore the characteristics and dynamics of the remote worker. Develop an appreciation for the needs of remote workers and specific support recommendations. This webinar is designed for anyone who actively supervises others.

Ashley Smith headshot

CHI Salon: "So You Want to 'Include' Indigenous Histories?: Monuments, Public History and the Dangers of 'Inclusion'"

In 2012, the town of Madison, Maine, erected a series of new monuments at the site of Nanrantsouak, a Wabanaki homeplace and Jesuit Mission Village that was destroyed in a brutal attack by English colonial forces in 1724. Despite the ongoing relationship that Wabanaki peoples have with this place, mainstream narratives about the site’s history proclaim the 1724 attack to be the end of Wabanaki belonging in this region. Drawing on these narratives as foundational, the new monuments were designed to convey “the national significance” of the site and spark interest in its history among visitors. Yet, despite the project manager’s intensions to include Indigenous histories, the project sparked deep concern among Wabanaki peoples regarding its representation of history and the tendency for projects like this one to reinforce popular stories of Indigenous “vanishing.” What would it mean to “include” Indigenous voices into histories that were designed to erase them from their own lands?

In this presentation, CHI Fellow and Assistant Professor of Native American Studies and Environmental Justice Ashley Smith shares the story of competing forms of “memory work” at the site of Nanrantsouak in her hometown. Engaging deeply with Indigenous methods and place-based ethnography, her talk considers the ongoing relationship Wabanaki peoples have with this place and the production and repetition of settler narratives that deny this relationship in order to unpack the potential dangers of “inclusion” in local public history projects such as this one.

Ashley Smith is a CHI Fellow and visiting lecturer in the Department of American Studies at Amherst College. She is assistant professor of Native American studies and environmental justice at Hampshire College. Smith will discuss her current work, which focuses on the place, history and memory of the Wabanaki village at Nanrantsouak on the upper Kennebec River in Maine. In this work, she considers how Wabanaki story, memory,and kinship to this place resist settler colonial productions of history and memory that have narrated this place as the “end” of the Wabanaki in this area while simultaneously enacting new possibilities for the future.

This event will take place over Zoom. It is open to the public. Pre-registration is required.

Registration Required
Amherst College + Loeb Center logo

Introduction to Networking — Hosted by the Loeb Center's Charles Hamilton Houston Internship Program

What do you think of when you imagine networking? Networking is a catch-all term for making and sustaining connections over time. How can you imagine making connections in an authentic way that contributes to your career exploration and growth?

In this virtual workshop, learn about cultivating personal relationships, re-activating past connections, engaging in your field through news and social media communities, and more. At the end of this workshop, you will identify five different ways you can begin networking that align with you and your interests.

Note: This workshop will fulfill the Internship Preparation Workshop requirement for the Charles Hamilton Houston Internship Program. Learn more about the Program here: https://www.amherst.edu/mm/575805

Johnson Chapel 1870

Archival Explorations: A Brief Introduction to Amherst College History

More than 200 years of Amherst College history is held in the Archives & Special Collections inside Frost Library. In preparation for the Bicentennial, the team in Frost has made a wealth of materials available online for everyone to explore. Meet Martin Garnar, the newly-arrived Library Director, and hear Mike Kelly give a brief overview of college history, including an introduction to Amherst College Digital Collections. We will leave ample time for your questions about college history and library services during the pandemic.

Students Only

Thu, Nov 12, 2020

Swift Skills Collection: Collaborate Across Groups

Does the word “collaboration” strike fear in you? Does it harken back to group projects where one person inevitably does all the work? In this session we will explore what collaboration actually means, when it is useful, and work through some methods for fostering true collaboration.

Retiring in the "New Normal"

OHR Learning & Development invites you to a live webinar presented by TIAA.
We all know how important it is to save for retirement. This presentation brings many of the risks to light so you have a better understanding of what you may be facing and what you can do about it, especially in this new environment. Namely, shifting your strategy from just growing your money to protecting what you’ve saved as it grows. And for those still working, we’ll talk about protecting your income in retirement, by creating a guaranteed income stream to help cover essential expenses and next steps you can take to help protect your retirement future.

“Sharenting”: Protecting your kids’ privacy in our digital world

This holiday season, digital technology will take center stage in how we connect and celebrate with our families and friends. Whether it’s bonding over meals and opening gifts virtually, sharing festive social media posts, or gifting “smart” devices, we need to be thinking about how to protect the safety and privacy of our kids online. Leah Plunkett, a faculty member at Harvard Law School, will join us for a lively and eye-opening discussion about “sharenting”: all of the ways that everyday tech choices by parents, grandparents, and other trusted adults impact our kids' privacy and their opportunities – now and in the future.

Leah Plunkett is a faculty associate with the Youth & Media team at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and the Special Director for Online Education at Harvard Law School. She’s a mother of two children and author of the best-selling book, SHARENTHOOD: Why We Should Think Before We Talk About Our Kids Online, which has been praised by WIRED, The New Yorker, and Fatherly, among others. After appearing on his podcast, Armchair Expert, host and actor Dax Shephard called Leah a "fascinating woman and also very funny." (We agree!)

OHR Office Hours for Supervisors/Department Chairs

The Office of Human Resources is pleased to offer Zoom office hours for staff and faculty as an opportunity to ask questions, provide feedback and receive information on a variety of topics. We will review recent communications and important developments in the workplace as the semester progresses, and provide a resource takeaway to support effective communication within departments. You will also have opportunities to hear specific tips and best practice examples from other supervisors/department chairs.

Please see the OHR Newsletter or the Daily Mammoth for the Zoom link. You can also contact hr@amherst.edu for the access information.

We look forward to connecting with you!

Loeb Center logo

Loeb Center Student Affinity Group Focus Groups

The Loeb Center for Career Exploration and Planning wants to hear from you!

The Loeb Center is committed to creating an inclusive and supportive environment for all Amherst students regardless of their backgrounds. We need your help to achieve that goal. Do you have suggestions about programming or resources the Loeb Center can implement to support students across affinity groups? Would you like to share your experiences searching for internships and/or jobs to give the Loeb Center better insight into the needs of you and your peers?

Please consider signing up to participate in a Loeb Center Affinity Group Focus Group session, which will consist of a small discussion via Zoom, facilitated by trained Loeb Center student workers.

Register to participate on Handshake, and if you have any questions, please contact Victoria Wilson at vwilson@amherst.edu.

Math Colloquium: "Polyhedra: Plato, Archimedes, Euler"

A polyhedron is a three-dimensional analog of a polygon, such as a cube, pyramid or prism. This talk is about two special classes of polyhedra with elegant structures, and their study over the past 25 centuries. Regular polyhedra were known to Pythagoras and Plato, and semiregular polyhedra were introduced later by Archimedes. We will present all these regular and semiregular polyhedra and discuss their history. There will be some simple counting arguments to go with the many pretty pictures, but otherwise no prior mathematical background is required to understand this talk.

Rob Benedetto has been a professor of mathematics at Amherst College since 2002. Previously, he held postdoctoral positions at the University of Rochester and Boston University. His research is in number theory and dynamical systems.

*The link will be sent to the Math & Stats listserv on the day of the event. If you are not part of that group and would like to attend, please email kglista@amherst.edu and the link will be sent the day of the event.

Statistics and Data Science Colloquium: "Migraine: More Than Just a Headache"

Nearly 15 percent of the U.S. population experiences migraine headaches, and migraine ranks as one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. In this talk, Pamela Rist will discuss some of her team's research on the health effects of migraine, including the association between migraine and cardiovascular disease risk factors, stroke and cognitive decline. She will also provide an overview of some of the unique methodological challenges facing migraine researchers and highlight some future research directions.

Pamela Rist, Sc.D., is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and an associate epidemiologist in the Division of Preventive Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Her academic research interests are primarily focused on the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease (particularly stroke) and neurologic diseases (especially those with a vascular component), with the goal of identifying ways to reduce the morbidity burden associated with stroke, migraine and cognitive decline. In addition to her research activities, Dr. Rist is actively involved in teaching at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School.

The Amherst Uprising: Alumni Reflections Five Years Later

7:00 pm Virtual

President Biddy Martin will reflect on the Uprising and its impact with Christine Croasdaile ’17, Katyana Dandridge ’18, Bella Edo ’21, Lola Fadulu ’17, Amir Hall ’17 and Andrew Smith ’18. A new Digital Memorial will be revealed.

Registration is required; see webpage for a registration link. This is part of a series of events commemorating the fifth anniversary of the Amherst Uprising, which began on Nov. 12, 2015.

Registration Required

Fri, Nov 13, 2020

Loeb Center logo

Loeb Center Student Affinity Group Focus Groups

The Loeb Center for Career Exploration and Planning wants to hear from you!

The Loeb Center is committed to creating an inclusive and supportive environment for all Amherst students regardless of their backgrounds. We need your help to achieve that goal. Do you have suggestions about programming or resources the Loeb Center can implement to support students across affinity groups? Would you like to share your experiences searching for internships and/or jobs to give the Loeb Center better insight into the needs of you and your peers?

Please consider signing up to participate in a Loeb Center Affinity Group Focus Group session, which will consist of a small discussion via Zoom, facilitated by trained Loeb Center student workers.

Register to participate on Handshake, and if you have any questions, please contact Victoria Wilson at vwilson@amherst.edu.

Amherst College + Loeb Center logo

Loeb Center Resume Clinic — Hosted by the Charles Hamilton Houston Internship Program

Are you seeking some extra support in getting your resume approved or making it fresh for this semester? Our biweekly virtual drop-in clinics are the perfect way to gain feedback from Loeb Center staff.

Please RSVP in advance via Handshake! We will confirm Zoom login and additional information via e-mail.

Hosted by the Loeb Center's Charles Hamilton Houston Internship Program.

Mon, Nov 16, 2020

Dr. Nadia Biassou '88, Amherst College Wade Fellow 2019-21

Biology Monday Seminar: "Network Neuroscience Approaches to Language"

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm Virtual, Zoom

Nadia M. Biassou '88, M.D., Ph.D.
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center
Board-certified physician and staff clinician in the Radiology and Imaging Sciences Department

Amherst alum and 2019-21 Amherst Wade Fellow Dr. Nadia Biassou '88 is a renowned diagnostic neuroradiologist and is currently a senior research physician in the Radiology and Imaging Sciences Department at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. In addition to her NIH responsibilities, Biassou has taught and mentored numerous physicians-in-training from George Washington University Hospital, where she serves as clinical professor of radiology, and Georgetown University Hospital, where she is a member of the core faculty in the division of neuroradiology. She also lectures around the world.

In addition to her work as a physician, Biassou is a trained linguist and obtained her master’s and doctorate in linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania. She specialized in the relationship between brain and language and studied under the tutelage of renowned neuroscientists Professors Jean-Luc Nespoulous of the University of Toulouse (France); Loraine Obler of the Boston University School of Medicine; and Murray Grossman and Mark Liberman of the University of Pennsylvania. Biassou went on to study medicine at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, graduating with distinction in internal medicine and neurology. She is one of less than a handful of cognitive neuroscientists worldwide to have achieved training in both medicine and linguistics. She is the only African American woman in the nation with combined formalized training in medicine, biomedical imaging and linguistics and cognitive science. Biassou collaborates in numerous cutting-edge interdisciplinary research with other federal agencies, universities and industries. She was appointed as a senior fellow to the Linguistics Data Consortium at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania in 2018.

Persons from the Amherst College community who wish to attend should please register by sending an email request to the biology chair, Joe Trapani.

Tue, Nov 17, 2020

OHR Office Hours for Staff and Faculty

The Office of Human Resources is pleased to offer Zoom office hours for staff and faculty as an opportunity to ask questions, provide feedback and receive information on a variety of topics. We will engage in a conversation about workplace developments and communication highlights, and will offer group discussion or private consultation in break-out rooms with HR Representatives.

Please see the OHR Newsletter or the Daily Mammoth for the Zoom link. You can also contact hr@amherst.edu for the access information. We look forward to connecting with you!

Mid-Year Check In 2020 Workshops for Supervisors/Chairs

The Performance Management Process (PMP) is intended as an opportunity for a supervisor or chair to have a conversation with their staff to review progress on the goals created during the last Performance Evaluation and the Mid-Year Check In. The Mid-Year Check In workshop offers an opportunity to review the performance evaluation form, explores strategies and techniques for having a productive dialogue, and offers suggestions for how to prepare for the discussion and goal setting. This workshop is also offered on Wednesday, November 18, 3:00 - 4:00PM.

Mid-Year Check In 2020 Workshops for Staff

The Performance Management Process is intended as an opportunity for a supervisor or chair to have a conversation with their staff to review progress on the goals created during the last Performance Evaluation and the Mid-Year Check In. The Mid-Year Check In Training offers an opportunity to review the performance evaluation form, explores strategies and techniques for having a productive dialogue, and offers suggestions for how to prepare for the discussion and set goals. This workshop is also offered on Wednesday, November 18, 10:00 - 11:00 AM.

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Loeb Center Student Affinity Group Focus Groups

The Loeb Center for Career Exploration and Planning wants to hear from you!

The Loeb Center is committed to creating an inclusive and supportive environment for all Amherst students regardless of their backgrounds. We need your help to achieve that goal. Do you have suggestions about programming or resources the Loeb Center can implement to support students across affinity groups? Would you like to share your experiences searching for internships and/or jobs to give the Loeb Center better insight into the needs of you and your peers?

Please consider signing up to participate in a Loeb Center Affinity Group Focus Group session, which will consist of a small discussion via Zoom, facilitated by trained Loeb Center student workers.

Register to participate on Handshake, and if you have any questions, please contact Victoria Wilson at vwilson@amherst.edu.

Elizabeth Hinton sitting in front of a bookshelf

"From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime"

Elizabeth Hinton is associate professor in the Department of History and the Department of African American Studies at Yale, and professor of law at Yale Law School. Before joining the Yale faculty, Hinton was a professor in the Department History and the Department of African and African American Studies at Harvard. A Ford Foundation and Carnegie Corporation Fellow, Hinton completed her Ph.D. in United States history at Columbia University in 2013.

Professor Hinton will discuss the implementation of federal law enforcement programs beginning in the mid-1960s that transformed domestic social policies and laid the groundwork for the expansion of the U.S. prison system.

This event is part of the Provost’s Lecture Series, which will focus on “The History of Anti-Black Racism in America” for the 2020-2021 academic year. Students, faculty, staff, alumni and the public are all welcome.

Wed, Nov 18, 2020

Swift Skills Collection: Celebrate Others

When was the last time you highlighted a colleague for their good work? Why do we not build celebration into the culture of our groups? This session will focus on celebrating those around us as a tool for supporting comradery and community.

Mid-Year Check In 2020 Workshops for Staff

The Performance Management Process is intended as an opportunity for a supervisor or chair to have a conversation with their staff to review progress on the goals created during the last Performance Evaluation and the Mid-Year Check In. The Mid-Year Check In Training offers an opportunity to review the performance evaluation form, explores strategies and techniques for having a productive dialogue, and offers suggestions for how to prepare for the discussion and set goals. This workshop is also offered on Tuesday, November 17, 3:00 - 4:00 PM.

CRG: Doing the Work: White People Committing to Anti-Racism (Group B)

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Zoom (link will be shared before meeting)

The current racial justice movement has most likely motivated you to think more about racism and in many ways, question how you participate and perpetuate racism in your own life. Fortunately there are many steps one can take to embark on the journey of anti-racism. Many of us are at different stages of learning and unlearning how racism operates in our lives and often the question is where to start? This new CRG will guide us through a series of self-reflection activities and action steps to begin and dive deeper into the work of anti-racism. We will utilize the book Me and White Supremacy by Layla F. Sadd, to guide our process.

A space for staff to examine what it means to be white, learn how to identify and confront racism in ourselves, the systems and people surrounding us, and to critically reflect on our actions and socialization. We will emphasize building our own capacity as white people doing anti-racism work that centers BIPOC.

For the Fall semester we will host two separate groups of 20 people each. Both sessions will be co-facilitated by Angie Tissi-Gassoway and Dr. Sarah Erickson. Please email Angie at atissi@amherst.edu to request your book and learn about next steps.

Registration Required

Mid-Year Check In 2020 Workshops for Supervisors/Chairs

The Performance Management Process (PMP) is intended as an opportunity for a supervisor or chair to have a conversation with their staff to review progress on the goals created during the last Performance Evaluation and the Mid-Year Check In. The Mid-Year Check In workshop offers an opportunity to review the performance evaluation form, explores strategies and techniques for having a productive dialogue, and offers suggestions for how to prepare for the discussion and goal setting. This workshop is also offered on Tuesday, November 17, 10:00 - 11:00 AM.

Headshot of Jallicia Jolly

CANCELLED: CHI Salon: “I Will Fight HIV and Hypertension!”: Black Caribbean Women and the Fight Against Illness and Inequality

When the famed civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer exclaimed that she was "sick and tired of being sick and tired" in a 1964 speech in Harlem, she not only brings attention to the extreme fatigue and rage at living under the violence of white supremacy and anti-Black racism; Hamer also sheds light on the physical and psychic toll of literal pain, bodily vulnerabilities and poor health outcomes among Black people that have historically been overlooked. This presentation articulates how this embodied marginalization mirrors the process and impact of oppression faced by HIV-positive, working-class women in postcolonial Jamaica.

Postdoctoral Fellow and incoming Assistant Professor in American Studies and Black Studies Jallicia Jolly grapples with the contemporary grassroots politics of Black Caribbean women’s organizing around health and illness as they expand the conception of rights and the human. She will contextualize the connections that Afro-diasporic scholars and actors-- such as Hamer as well as Frantz Fanon, James Baldwin, the Black Panthers, Peggy Antrobus and Loretta Ross --have long made between their political and structural conditions, the experiences of Black poor people, diseases and poor health outcomes. After describing the personal histories and situated contexts of HIV-positive Jamaican women in Kingston, Jolly will offer an analysis of how women’s racialized, class-based struggles over health care access and basic resources in their urban and rural communities demonstrate how they respond to local understandings of structural power relations and the attendant social meanings of politics, identity and what it means to be human while living with illness and inequality.

This talk will take place over Zoom. It is open to the public. Pre-registration is required.

Registration Required
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Black Law Students Association at Fordham University School of Law: Info Session and Q&A

The Black Law Students Association at Fordham University School of Law, in partnership with Amherst College's Loeb Center for Career Exploration & Planning, invites you to a virtual chat hosted by a Fordham Law student and Amherst College alum, Shayonna Cato (Class of 2013).

In this session, Shayonna will discuss her Fordham Law experience and answer any questions attendees may have about the law school admissions process and Fordham Law. This event is open to any students who are applying to or are interested in attending law school or Fordham Law.

Thu, Nov 19, 2020

OHR Office Hours for Supervisors/Department Chairs

The Office of Human Resources is pleased to offer Zoom office hours for staff and faculty as an opportunity to ask questions, provide feedback and receive information on a variety of topics. We will review recent communications and important developments in the workplace as the semester progresses, and provide a resource takeaway to support effective communication within departments. You will also have opportunities to hear specific tips and best practice examples from other supervisors/department chairs.

Please see the OHR Newsletter or the Daily Mammoth for the Zoom link. You can also contact hr@amherst.edu for the access information.

We look forward to connecting with you!

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BMO Capital Markets Presents: Understanding SPACs

Have you ever wondered what BMO stands for? Have you been considering whether finance, investment banking or investing in general is right for you? Are you curious what a SPAC is?

Now is your opportunity to LEARN. In this session, Mike Cippoletti ’94, Managing Director and Head of Food, Consumer & Retail at BMO Capital Markets, will first give a short (10 minute) presentation about BMO, including information on their diversity & inclusion initiatives. Then, his colleague, Brian DiCaprio, will provide an overview of SPACs and their rising prominence in the finance industry. After this 20-minute presentation, there will be time for Q&A, followed by breakout rooms for diversity candidates (BIPOC, Women, LGBTQ+ community, etc.) to meet with BMO representatives and hear firsthand what it’s like at the company.

Presenters strongly encourage attendees to read this quick primer on SPACs BEFORE the event, if possible: https://capitalmarkets.bmo.com/en/news-insights/covid-19-insights/specta...

Amherst uprising logo with #AmherstUprising, #SitInSolidarity, #RadicalCompassion on top; in middle: left solidarity fist in circle, center Amherst seal, right solidarity fist in circle; bottom: HSTEM logo with four head sillouettes and "HSTEM" above "Being Human in STEM"

From Protest to Progress Through Partnership: Five Years of Being Human in STEM @ Amherst & Beyond

Catalyzed by the Amherst Uprising, the "Being Human in STEM" (HSTEM) course started as a partnership between students, faculty and staff interested in enhancing student experiences in STEM at Amherst College and beyond. Offered since Spring 2016, the course is an engine for student-led inquiry and action that has shaped the STEM culture at Amherst and has been adopted by over a dozen institutions. Join us to learn more about why HSTEM is a national model for inclusion in STEM and engage in small-group conversations with HSTEM founders, course alumni and faculty and staff partners. Please register to get the Zoom link.

Tue, Nov 24, 2020

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Education Politics and Policy: A Conversation with Ruthanne Buck

Through this collaboration between Amherst College's Education Pro Fellows and Mount Holyoke College's Education Division, we are delighted to welcome Ruthanne Buck (Smith '20) to a virtual conversation with students about education policy and politics.

Ruthanne Buck served as a Senior Adviser to U.S. Secretaries of Education John King and Arne Duncan. She was appointed by President Barack Obama from April 2012 through January 2017. Prior to joining the Department, Ruthanne served as Assistant to the President for Special Projects and National Field Director at the American Federation of Teachers.

She began her career in 2001 at the Democratic National Committee, working on women's and LGBT issues. Over the course of her career, she has led major field and political operations on behalf of progressive issues, agencies and candidates, with a particular focus on education. She was raised in Alexandria, Louisiana, and educated at Smith College in Northampton.

Join us for an online conversation with Ruthanne Buck to discuss the current state of education politics and policy, as well as Ruthanne’s career trajectory from attending college in Western Massachusetts to becoming a Senior Advisor to two U.S. Secretaries of Education.