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Type of Event

Event Calendar

Friday, March 6, 2020

Fri, Mar 6, 2020

Fellowships for Grad Study in the UK Tea/Info Session

Sip some tea and learn about several fellowships that fund graduate study in the UK. We’ll discuss the Churchill, Gates, Marshall, Mitchell, Rhodes, Saint Andrew’s, and Fulbright UK grants, as well as what makes a strong applicant. All class years welcome. Questions? Contact Christine Overstreet, coverstreet@amherst.edu, or call 413-542-2536. Register your interest.

Registration Required

Loeb Center 2020-21 Internships - Information Table

Drop by to hear about the opportunities to join the Loeb Center team as one of our 2020-21 interns or Peer Career Advisors (PCAs). We're hiring PCAs, employer engagement interns, marketing interns, finance and consulting interns and an arts and communication intern.

Alumni-in-Residence

Alumni-in-Residence: The Value of Courageous Conversations for People/Women of Color in their Work, Lunch with Cyndy Jean ’07

Now in her thirteenth year as an educator in independent schools, and her fifth year as a senior administrator, Cyndy has learned to develop a series of strategies for personal and professional growth, as well as how to develop a strategic plan that helps her to connect with school leadership and train faculty. Over a catered lunch, she will share how she has learned to navigate the courageous conversations needed for growth and success in the workplace. Please register through Handshake to join us.

Cyndy Jean ‘07, is the Director of the Middle School at Hackley School in Tarrytown, NY. Cyndy holds a master’s degree in Private School Leadership from Teachers College, Columbia University and a second master’s degree in Teaching and Special Education in Grades 1-6 from Fordham University. She is currently a Fellow in the National Association of Independent Schools’ Aspiring Heads Program, serves on the Fairchester Alliance for hiring and retaining faculty of color, and sits on the Board of Trustees for the Tree of Life Orphanage, a non-profit organization serving and educating over 200 children in Source Matelas, Haiti.

While at Amherst, Cyndy actively participated in programs held by the Black Student Union, served on the leadership team of the Bi-Semester Worship Committee, and sang with the Terras Irradient a capella group. She was a Black Studies major and completed the pre-med concentration.

Cyndy is the proud sibling of a recent Hackley School graduate and the mother of two toddlers, Zadie (3) and Zion (1).

Registration Required
Amy Coddington smiling in front of a staircase

Professor Amy Coddington: "Containing Black Noise: Radio Responds to Hip-Hop in the Early 1990s"

Free and open to the public. Lunch provided.

The music department continues its Research in Music speaker series featuring department faculty discussing their work.

In the late 1980s, hip-hop moved from the margins to the mainstream, from New York block parties to family rooms across America. But despite this tremendous growth in popularity, many in the music industry hadn't come around to the relatively new style. In this talk, Professor Coddington will analyze how the radio industry reacted to hip-hop's popularity, tracing the emergence of "rap-free" radio stations and examining how these stations segregated the American public by protecting white listeners from hip-hop's black sounds.

For more information, contact Professor Jason Robinson (jrobinson@amherst.edu).

Tom Welsh headshot

Tom Welsh at the Mead: "When Parallel Lines Intersect: Albert Ayler, Terry Riley"

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm Mead Art Museum, William Green Study Room

Join us for a lecture by Tom Welsh, director of performing arts at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Welsh's talk, "When Parallel Lines Intersect: Albert Ayler, Terry Riley," will highlight two of the signature developments in music during the 1960s: free jazz and minimalism. Though they arrived at very different results, their roots and impulses were similar in their search for the ecstatic. Welsh's talk will be a consideration of the motivations and impact of two major artists who emerged in the 1960s, Albert Ayler and Terry Riley.

Welsh was invited to campus by Associate Professor of Music Darryl Harper '90. This lecture is presented in conjunction with Harper's class "Jazz History After 1945: Experimentalism, Pluralism, and Traditionalism" and supported by the Arts at Amherst and the music department.

It is free and open to everyone!

Professor Rory Waterman standing in a laboratory

Cheminar: “Phosphorus, Photons and Metals: Increasingly Efficient Ways to P–C Bonds”

3:15 pm - 4:30 pm Science Center, Kirkpatrick Lecture Hall - #A011

Seminar with Professor and Associate Dean Rory Waterman, University of Vermont, Chemistry Department

Story Time with Lorraine Avila

Join the MRC and La Causa for a storytelling event and Q+A session with Lorraine Avila. Through her storytelling, Lorraine Avila seeks to break free from generational trauma by continuing to rupture the traditions of silence. She will be reading from her most recent book, Malcriada. Food from El Comalito will be provided.

Ongoing Events

Image of one person with their arm around another as they look out over a body of water toward mountains at either sunrise or sunset

“Mariah Garnett Selected Video Works,” An Exhibition by Mariah Garnett

Selected Video Works presents four videos by Mariah Garnett made between 2010 and 2014. These works represent the early cornerstones of her experimental documentary practice. In all four films, the relationship between subject and filmmaker is foregrounded, calling into question the power dynamics at play in representational art practices.

“Garbage, The City, And Death” uses a Fassbinder text to reframe a real-life relationship between long-lost siblings as a romantic rivalry. It was Garnett’s first attempt to mix theatricality with a real relationship between herself and her subject.

“Picaresques” takes its inspiration from Lieutenant Nun, the autobiography of a transgender conquistador at the turn of the 17th century as its inspiration and abruptly becomes a portrait of Garnett’s own friendship with a 9-year-old tomboy from Santa Monica. It is an attempt to look to the past and future for heroes of a similar gender to the artist’s own.

“Encounters I May or May Not Have Had with Peter Berlin” moves through phases of idolization, anxiety ending in a touchdown in reality in a conversation between the artist and Berlin himself. This is the first film in which Garnett used impersonation as a strategy for representing her subject.

Finally, “Full Burn” marks a shift in Garnett’s practice away from overtly queer themes to the geopolitical. It is a portrait of four U.S. war veterans who have continued to use their own physicality to earn a living, three as stunt men and one as a massage therapist. It is a meditation on masculine duty, trauma and re-enactment.

Bio:
Mariah Garnett is an artist and filmmaker who lives and works in Los Angeles. She holds a B.A. in American civilization and an M.F.A. from California Institute of the Arts in film/video. In 2019 she was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in Film/Video for her feature film, Trouble, which premiered at the London Film Festival and was named one of the best documentaries of the year by Sight + Sound. Her work has screened and been exhibited internationally at venues including The New Museum, The Hammer Museum, Tate Belfast, REDCAT, SFMoMA and her exhibiting gallery, Commonwealth + Council. She is a MacDowell Fellow, and her work has been featured in Bomb, Artforum and Reverse Shot.