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Type of Event

Event Calendar

September 2018

Sat, Sep 1, 2018

Dante Brown

Dance Workshop with Dante Brown

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm Webster Hall, Studio 1 (Room 117)

Class begins with improvisatory exercises (either individually or in groups) and progresses to shorter technical exercises and movement phrases that include plies, footwork and floorwork. Class ends with a dynamic, communal and highly physical phrase performed with vigor – dancers moving in and out of the floor, taking risks and eating up space.

Sun, Sep 2, 2018

Photo of Danielle Allen

2018 DeMott Lecture - Danielle Allen

The annual DeMott lecture will be on Sunday, September 2, at 4 p.m. in Johnson Chapel, and will be given by Danielle Allen, a former trustee of Amherst College. Allen received an honorary degree from Amherst College at the 2018 Commencement ceremony. She is a classicist and political theorist, the James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University and director of Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics.

The DeMott lecture is the welcome address to incoming students. It will be live streamed for returning students, alumni and trustees who may wish to watch. Livestream is available at www.amherst.edu/go/webcast

Information about Professor Benjamin DeMott and previous DeMott lectures, including last year’s talk given by attorney Rev. Phillip Jackson '86, is available on the DeMott portion of our website.

Audience in seats of Buckley Recital Hall

Music Department Orientation Showcase

Experience the Amherst music department ensembles: Choral Society, Jazz Ensemble and Amherst Symphony Orchestra offer an introductory showcase performance. The performance is free and open to all.

New and returning students are welcome to stop by for pizza before the ensemble showcase and find out about music department opportunities in Room 3 of Arms Music Center from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Tue, Sep 4, 2018

Dave Gloman painting

Re-presenting Nonotuck: The Landscape Paintings of Hitchcock and Gloman

until Oct 29 Frost Library, Mezzanine Gallery

Professor David Gloman has partnered with Kurt Heidinger, director of the Biocitizen School, to create an art event that inspires the public to imagine the unique biocultural character of the Nonotuck biome (also known as the central Connecticut River Valley) by “re-presenting” the landscapes that Orra Hitchcock depicted in the mid 19th century. Professor Gloman has located the sites where they were painted and created his own painted landscape portraits of those sites. View Gloman and Hitchcock's illustrations together in Frost Library's Mezzanine Gallery from September 4 - October 29.

The opening reception will be on September 27 from 4:30 - 6 p.m. in the Center for Humanistic Inquiry (2nd Floor, Frost Library).

Entrance to Mead Art Museum, near which are lampposts, foliage and Stearns Steeple

Meet and Greet at the Mead

Ever wonder who curates the shows on view and plans events at your college art museum? Stop by the Mead to get to know the people who make up the collections, curatorial, education and security departments.

This event is designed for students, but open to everyone! It is offered in conjunction with Student Activities.

god's issue flyer

Auditions: "God's Issue"

Written and directed by David Green '19E, God’s Issue re-imagines the biblical stories of Adam and Eve, Jesus and others to explore the relationship between God and humankind. Funny, irreverent and deeply serious, God’s Issue is intended for a diverse cast, so religious and non-religious folk of all races and gender identities are encouraged to audition. First-year and Five-College students are especially welcome! The show includes songs, but singing ability is not needed for most roles. The 10-12 actors in God’s Issue will play multiple parts, so auditions will involve reading a variety of roles. There is no need to prepare! Come read some scenes!

Students may attend auditions on either Tuesday or Wednesday.

Wed, Sep 5, 2018

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

ensemble performance

Auditions: Ensemble: Dancing in Community

6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Webster Hall, Studio 1 (Room 117)

Ensemble: Dancing in Community is an intermediate/advanced composition course where students will collaborate to produce a full weekend showcase of their personal choreographic works. In addition to their own work, students will learn repertory from Visiting Assistant Professor Danté Brown, be immersed in a multitude of master classes from professional artists and learn the administrative/business component of being an independent artist. Students who audition must have a strong background in composition and a technique of their choosing.

Auditions will take place on September 5 and 10. Students are encouraged to attend BOTH audition dates.

god's issue flyer

Auditions: "God's Issue"

Written and directed by David Green '19E, God’s Issue re-imagines the biblical stories of Adam and Eve, Jesus and others to explore the relationship between God and humankind. Funny, irreverent and deeply serious, God’s Issue is intended for a diverse cast, so religious and non-religious folk of all races and gender identities are encouraged to audition. First-year and Five-College students are especially welcome! The show includes songs, but singing ability is not needed for most roles. The 10-12 actors in God’s Issue will play multiple parts, so auditions will involve reading a variety of roles. There is no need to prepare! Come read some scenes!

Students may attend auditions on either Tuesday or Wednesday.

Thu, Sep 6, 2018

lermontov portrait

First Meeting of Russian 401: Advanced Studies in Russian Literature and Culture

4:00 pm Webster Hall, 207 (Lounge)

The first meeting of RUSS-401: Advanced Studies in Russian Literature and Culture with Tatiana Iurievna will take place on Thursday, September 6 at 4 p.m. in the Russian Department Lounge (207 Webster Hall).

During that meeting, the regular meeting times for the semester will be discussed and decided on.

Depiction of the cratered surface of the moon with a spacecraft on it

Midnight Tour of the Mead!

Did you know that the Mead is open until midnight on school nights? Stop by your favorite college art museum for a special midnight tour with our student educators.

This program is offered in conjunction with the Mead’s Student Educator Program and Student Activities.

Fri, Sep 7, 2018

Poster board on an easel

Annual Summer Research Poster Session

The annual Summer Research Poster Session is on Friday, Sept. 7, in the new Science Center. Join us for an opportunity recognize student achievement and experience the state-of-the-art 250,000-square-foot facility, which is home to the Departments of Biology, Biochemistry and Biophysics, Chemistry, Computer Science, Physics and Astronomy, Neuroscience and Psychology. While there, cast your vote for your favorite research project, take a tour of the facility, and enjoy appetizers, hand-piped cannoli from Meriano’s Bake Shoppe and one of many science-themed treats. All are welcomed and encouraged to attend.

Every summer, dozens of Amherst College students engage in research in the physical sciences, natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. From laboratories to archives to the field, students can spend six or more weeks extending their classroom research, working on their senior theses or assisting in faculty experiments. The Summer Research Poster Session is an opportunity for student researchers to share works in progress, summer research stories, thesis ideas and experimental results.

Triadic Possibilities: Workshop with Guitarist David Goodrich

Triadic Possibilities: Workshop with Guitarist David Goodrich

This workshop is for listeners and musicians of any level. "Triadic Possibilities" is a concept of simple harmonic substitutions on chord progressions. By using relative and parallel relationships of major and minor chords we will create a twelve chord lattice of choices. These choices add color and variety and build a strong sense of harmonic fluency. New harmonic combinations will inspire melodies, rhythms and, best of all, songs. Reading musical notation and previous knowledge of theory is not needed to learn this simple but expansive concept.

David Goodrich (Goody) is a veteran touring and session musician, producer, composer and teacher living in Austin, Texas. With more than 25 years of international touring experience, Goodrich has played on hundreds of recordings, scored multiple films and produced dozens of critically-acclaimed albums. A life-long student and longtime music teacher and coach, Goodrich studied at Berklee College of Music with Pat Metheny, Joe Henderson and Mick Goodrick.

Four dancers in various seated positions on an otherwise bare stage

Fall Orientation Dance Concert and Dance Party

Join the theater and dance department as we us kick off the new school year with original performances by Amherst and Five College faculty members Dante Brown, Leslie Frye Maietta, Katie Martin, Jake Meginsky and Jen Polins, as well as Dancing and Stepping at Amherst College (DASAC)!

A dance party for students will immediately follow in Holden Theater with D.J. Jake Meginksy. Join us for a meet-and-greet with pizza, music and dancing!

Both events are free and open to the Amherst and Five College communities. Tickets are not required.

Sun, Sep 9, 2018

Amherst College jazz faculty playing various instruments on Buckley Recital Hall stage

Jazz Faculty Concert

Jazz Faculty Concert in Buckley Recital Hall on Sunday, Sept. 9 at 7 p.m. The Amherst College jazz faculty welcomes new and returning students with a concert showcasing the depth and richness of jazz at the College. The concert features original compositions and arrangements of jazz standards performed by Claire Arenius (drums), Joe Belmont (guitar), Carl Clements (saxophones, flutes), Geoff Cunningham (trumpet, flugelhorn), Darryl Harper (clarinet), Ann Maggs (voice), David Picchi (bass), Jason Robinson (saxophones), Eugene Uman (piano) and Bob Weiner (percussion). The concert is free and open to the public.

Mon, Sep 10, 2018

Lisa McCarty, Louisa May Alcott’s Desk, Orchard House, 2015. Image courtesy of the artist.

Transcendental Concord: Photographs by Lisa McCarty, on view in the Eli Marsh Gallery Sept. 10–Oct. 12

until Oct 12 Fayerweather Hall, 105: Eli Marsh Gallery

Transcendental Concord: Photographs by Lisa McCarty documents the spirit of Transcendentalism, the 19th-century philosophical movement that embraced idealism, communal living and reverence for the natural world in the face of growing industrialization and inhumanity.

ensemble performance

Auditions: Ensemble: Dancing in Community

6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Webster Hall, Studio 1 (Room 117)

Ensemble: Dancing in Community is an intermediate/advanced composition course where students will collaborate to produce a full weekend showcase of their personal choreographic works. In addition to their own work, students will learn repertory from Visiting Assistant Professor Danté Brown, be immersed in a multitude of master classes from professional artists and learn the administrative/business component of being an independent artist. Students who audition must have a strong background in composition and a technique of their choosing.

Auditions will take place on September 5 and 10. Students are encouraged to attend BOTH audition dates.

First GlobeMed Meeting

Are you interested in easing global health inequities? Come to the first meeting of one of the most active groups on campus, GlobeMed! GlobeMed at Amherst is a chapter of a national organization which focuses on long-term philanthropy. GlobeMed partners with Heart and Sole Africa, which battles podoconiosis in Rwanda by empowering those affected by podoconiosis. We also have discussions on contemporary issues in public health, host speaker events, and provide opportunities to get involved in all of these activities! Come to the first meeting on Monday, September 10, from 8-9 p.m. in Webster 220 to learn more! Donuts will be served.

Students Only

Charles Drew Health Professions Society Introductory Meeting

Are you thinking about a career in the health professions? Come to Charles Drew Health Professions Society's introductory meeting on Monday, September 10. Our first meeting is a great opportunity to get to know one another, learn about several awesome events we have planned for the semester, ask questions, and help shape the direction of CDHPS this year! Find us in the McCaffrey Room (the first door on the right-hand side when you enter Keefe) at 8 p.m. with snacks -- we're looking forward to meeting you! If you can't make the meeting, but you'd like to receieve a copy of the meeting notes, please email our president, Alexandra Theall, at atheall19@amherst.edu .

Students Only

Tue, Sep 11, 2018

Insight (Mindfulness) Meditation Group

Whether you have meditated for a long time or have never meditated, come join us for this time of practice together. Come to relax, quiet your mind, learn how to experience less suffering and stress, explore Buddhist philosophy and psychology, just talk about what it means to live from compassion and awareness -or because you are curious. This event will be led by Mark Hart, Buddhist Advisor.

Wed, Sep 12, 2018

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

La Causa Latinx Dance Team Practice Session

Interested in Latin music/dance? Salsa? Bachata? Merengue? Come join La Causa’s dance team! All levels of dancers are encouraged to come! It will be led by professional Anastasia Christie with over 15 years of teaching experience!

*OPEN TO ALL 5 COLLEGE STUDENTS*

Questions? Email lacausa@amherst.edu

Students Only

Thu, Sep 13, 2018

Weekly Canine Office Hours

Whether you miss your dog, or simply want some canine affection, Huxley or Evie would love to see you! One or the other will be available weekly!

Lisa McCarty, Louisa May Alcott’s Desk, Orchard House, 2015. Image courtesy of the artist.

Opening Lecture, Reception and Book Signing with Lisa McCarty

4:30 pm Fayerweather Hall, 115 - Pruyne Lecture Hall

Transcendental Concord: Photographs by Lisa McCarty will be on view Sept. 10 – Oct. 12 in the Eli Marsh Gallery, 105 Fayerweather Hall. Join the artist, Lisa McCarty, for an opening lecture, reception and book signing.

Katja Oxman (American, born in Germany, 1942). Sound of Water Over Rock, 2003. Etching and aquatint. Mead Art Museum, Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts. Anonymous gift.

Fall Exhibitions Opening Reception

Please join us to celebrate the opening of our new lineup of fall exhibitions at the Mead Art Museum. Drawn from our permanent collection, these exhibitions offer new narratives of gender and time, and reveal new directions in the Mead’s collecting practices. All are invited for an artistic experience that explores themes across centuries, continents and media!

5–5:30 p.m. | Director’s welcome followed by curatorial remarks by american art curator Vanja Malloy and European print specialist and study room manager Mila Hruba

5:30–7 p.m. | Reception featuring DJ Quills, refreshments and more!

Free and open to all!

Headshot of William Mazzarella

"Why Is Trump So Enjoyable?" with William Mazzarella

How can we begin to explain the apparent imperviousness of Trump’s popularity to gaffes and scandals that would long since have brought down any other politician? In order to begin to answer this question, we need to come grips with the dimension of enjoyment that drives attachment – as well as opposition – to the Trump phenomenon. One of the most important implications of interpreting politics through the lens of enjoyment is the necessity of moving beyond merely interest-based and utility-based analyses of public life.

Join us as William Mazzarella, professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago, speaks on "Why Is Trump So Enjoyable?" This talk will include responses from Kenneth Tucker of Mount Holyoke College, Monique Roelofs of Hampshire College and Andrew Poe of Amherst College.

George Will

George Will: "Globalism and Its Discontents: Point/Counterpoint with Ilan Stavans"

Join us as Professor Stavans speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist George Will.

The "Globalism and Its Discontents: Point/Counterpoint" conversation series features Amherst College professor, and host of NEPR's In Contrast, Ilan Stavans and a guest engaging in thoughtful discussion and attempting to bridge the ideological divide growing in our nation.

The rise of populism worldwide today, personified by Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin, is a fierce reaction to globalism policies of the past few decades. Anti-immigration movements in Europe and the United States; assaults on free speech; racial profiling; polarized politics; intolerance for gender, economic and linguistic diversity; the building of walls and the renegotiation of international trade treaties; the tension between rural and urban communities; and the questioning of the basic tenets of pluralism are some of the symptoms. Democracy itself might be at peril.

George Will writes a twice-weekly column on politics and domestic and foreign affairs. He began his column with The Washington Post in 1974, and he received the Pulitzer Prize for commentary in 1977. He is also a regular contributor to MSNBC and NBC News. His books include: One Man’s America: The Pleasures and Provocations of Our Singular Nation (2008), Restoration: Congress, Term Limits and the Recovery of Deliberative Democracy (1992), Men at Work: The Craft of Baseball (1989), The New Season: A Spectator’s Guide to the 1988 Election (1987) and Statecraft as Soulcraft (1983). Will grew up in Champaign, Ill., attended Trinity College and Oxford University, and received a Ph.D. from Princeton University.

Free and open to the public
"Point/Counterpoint" is co-sponsored by NEPR’s In Contrast and by a generous gift from 36 members of the 50th Reunion Class of 1970.

Find more information about the other speakers in the series here.

Interviews with previous guests, and others, are available through Ilan Stavans' NEPR show In Contrast. Have a listen!

Fri, Sep 14, 2018

Math & Stats WELCOME TEA, Sept. 14, 3:00 p.m., Ford Hall Event Space 107

Welcome Tea: Department of Math & Stats

The Department of Mathematics & Statistics welcomes students to a new academic year! Please join us for our annual "Welcome Tea" event. We look forward to hearing what you have been up to over the summer. We will have food, drinks and games. Please come for as long or as short a time as you can. This event is open to Math & Stats majors, prospective majors, fellow travelers and Math & Stats enthusiasts.

Black-and-white photo of Chonghyo Shin seated at a grand piano

Adjunct Faculty Concert: Chonghyo Shin, Piano

Amherst College adjunct faculty member Chonghyo Shin presents an evening of solo piano at 7 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 14, in Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Building. The concert is free and open to the public.

Shin will present works by Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Chopin and Debussy.

A native of Seoul, Korea, Shin received bachelor's and master's degrees from the New England Conservatory of Music, where she also taught in the preparatory division. A former teacher at the preparatory division of the New England Conservatory and at Keene State College, she teaches at Amherst College and the Brattleboro Music Center Music School. She has been a soloist with the Boston Pops, the Pioneer Valley Symphony, the New England Conservatory Orchestra and the Windham Orchestra.

Amherst Cinema Late Nights

Join Amherst Cinema every Friday for a free late-night flick featuring the best cult, genre and outré on the big screen. Free for Amherst College students with presentation of student ID at box office. Visit the Amherst Cinema website for more information on programming.

Tickets Required

Sat, Sep 15, 2018

Image of a bullet tearing through an apple that is held up on a metal post

Close Looks at the Mead

Stop by the Mead to find new connections among works on view with student museum educators. Each week we’ll focus on different themes, so feel free to keep coming back for more and check our website and Facebook page for weekly themes.

Free and open to all!

Sun, Sep 16, 2018

Amherst Dance Auditions!

Amherst dance auditions will be held this Sunday from 2-4 p.m. Auditions are open to all students of all experience levels! Come prepared to have fun and dance!

Students Only

Mon, Sep 17, 2018

Holda Anagho ’14 wearing a black shirt, standing in front of green foliage and smiling

Biology Monday Seminar: "Uukuniemi Virus Entry and Fusion in Mammalian Cells" with Holda Anagho '14

Holda Anagho ’14 is a doctoral student in infection biology at Hannover Medical School in Germany, where she studies interactions between Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) and host cells in the lab of Professor Thomas von Hahn, M.D. At Amherst, she majored in biology, where she first became excited about research after a summer internship in Professor Caroline Goutte’s lab. While at Amherst, she also took several German language courses and served as president of the German theme house. After graduation, she spent a year as a research fellow at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, where she conducted research on the effects of immunomodulatory drugs in primary effusion lymphoma, caused by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in the lab of Dr. Robert Yarchoan '71, M.D. There she first became interested in viruses. With generous support from Amherst College through the Kellogg Fellowship, she enrolled in the master's program in molecular biosciences at the University of Heidelberg in Germany, where she majored in infectious diseases. She did her master's thesis research in the lab of Dr. Pierre-Yves Lozach on entry and fusion of the Uukuniemi phlebovirus (UUKV) in mammalian cells. UUKV is an arthropod-borne virus closely related to emerging viruses that are highly pathogenic to humans, including Rift Valley fever virus, Heartland virus and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. UUKV, which is nonpathogenic to humans, is therefore used as a model system to study its more pathogenic counterparts.

UUKV is closely related to emerging pathogenic viruses in the Phenuiviridae family that cause severe and sometimes fatal disease in humans, animals and plants. To release its viral genome into a cell, Uukuniemi virus must fuse its viral membrane with the host cell membrane. Fusion of the UUKV membrane is mediated by the viral Glycoprotein C (GC), which is thought to be a class II fusion protein. We aimed to characterize mechanisms of UUKV fusion in mammalian cells. To this end, we analyzed the effect of low pH on virus binding and entry, conducted functional studies of UUKV GC mutants to analyze effects on viral fusion, and tested peptides corresponding to regions of the GC ectodomain for their ability to inhibit viral entry.

Poster featuring lecture information on stripes of orange over a background sketch of a Chinese scholar

"Trying Not to Try: Ancient China, Modern Science and the Power of Spontaneity"

Edward Slingerland is Distinguished University Scholar and Professor of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia, with associate appointments in philosophy and psychology. His research specialties and teaching interests include early Chinese thought, religious studies, cognitive linguistics, ethics, and the relationship between the humanities and the natural sciences. His publications include several academic monographs and edited volumes and approximately 30 refereed articles in top journals in a wide variety of fields.

Many early Chinese thinkers had as their spiritual ideal the state of wu-wei, or effortless action. By advocating spontaneity as an explicit moral and religious goal, they inevitably involved themselves in the paradox of wu-wei—the problem of how one can try not to try—which later became one of the central tensions in East Asian religious thought. In this talk, Slingerland will look at the paradox from both an early Chinese and a contemporary perspective, drawing upon work in economics, social psychology, cognitive neuroscience and evolutionary theory to argue that this paradox is a real one, and is moreover intimately tied up with cooperation dilemmas in large-scale societies and concerns about trust and moral hypocrisy.

The public is welcome. Refreshments and meet-and-greet will follow the lecture.

Tue, Sep 18, 2018

Insight (Mindfulness) Meditation Group

Whether you have meditated for a long time or have never meditated, come join us for this time of practice together. Come to relax, quiet your mind, learn how to experience less suffering and stress, explore Buddhist philosophy and psychology, just talk about what it means to live from compassion and awareness -or because you are curious. This event will be led by Mark Hart, Buddhist Advisor.

Wed, Sep 19, 2018

Food for Thought with Bill Ackerman ’88: An Unconventional Career Path in Business

Bill Ackerman ’88 epitomizes how the Amherst College liberal arts education prepares you to think innovatively, constantly seek new opportunities, and explore different career paths. Bill will be speaking at the Loeb Center's Food For Thought Lunch on September 19. Come learn more about Bill’s career and how his liberal arts education at Amherst College led to his unique career path in business, including roles in financial management, journalism, corporate audit, sales, strategy, investment advice, and now as the head of human resources at Fidelity Investments.

Bill is passionate about identifying and solving business opportunities and problems in unique ways rather than the easy way. He believes that an organization’s strongest assets are often their people and that for an organization to thrive, it is important that every person in the organization feels valued. He has brought this philosophy to his latest opportunity, and his first stint in HR, as the head of human resources at Fidelity Investments. He is eager to share his insights and perspectives on how your liberal arts education can lead you on a path not only of self-discovery, but also a constant weaving path of learning and new opportunities (in and out of business). Bill’s full biography is below.

Lunch will be served. Please register in advance through Handshake. Space is limited and a waiting list will begin once the seats are filled.

Full Biography for Bill Ackerman ’88
Bill Ackerman is head of Human Resources (HR) for Fidelity Investments, a leading provider of investment management, retirement planning, portfolio guidance, brokerage, benefits outsourcing and other financial products and services to more than 26 million individuals, institutions and financial intermediaries. During his tenure with the firm, Mr. Ackerman has held a variety of leadership positions across several of the company’s divisions. He was named head of Human Resources in 2014 and currently oversees the HR function, the Fidelity Real Estate Company, and Enterprise Events & Corporate Sponsorships. Prior to this role, he led the firm’s Strategy and Planning Office.

Mr. Ackerman has acted in strategic operating roles in various parts of Fidelity, including the company’s Personal Investing and Workplace Solutions divisions. In addition, he held several leadership positions within Fidelity’s COLT Telecom Group in London, including: COLT Finance & Planning; COLT Marketing Development; and COLT eBusiness. He also held the roles of senior vice president, Business Development and chief financial officer for Fidelity Ventures Telecom Group in Boston and Tokyo.

Prior to joining Fidelity, Mr. Ackerman worked at General Electric (GE) where he held a number of business and finance-related roles at GE business units around the world. He is a graduate of GE’s Financial Management program and Corporate Audit Staff. Mr. Ackerman was a journalist in California and a freelance writer for other publications.

Mr. Ackerman earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Amherst College, where he majored in economics. He earned his master’s degree in Communications from Stanford University.

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Tess Taylor by the seaside

CHI Salon: Tess Taylor '99

Tess Taylor's chapbook The Misremembered World was selected by Eavan Boland for the Poetry Society of America’s inaugural chapbook fellowship. The San Francisco Chronicle called her first book, The Forage House, “stunning,” and it was a finalist for the Believer Poetry Award. Her second book, Work & Days, was called “our moment’s Georgic” by critic Stephanie Burt and named one of the 10 best books of poetry of 2016 by The New York Times. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, Boston Review, Harvard Review, The Times Literary Supplement and other publications. Taylor chairs the poetry committee of the National Book Critics Circle, is currently the on-air poetry reviewer for NPR’s All Things Considered, and has taught at UC Berkeley, St. Mary’s College and Whittier College. She was most recently a Distinguished Fulbright U.S. Scholar at the Seamus Heaney Centre at Queen’s University in Belfast. This spring she is Anne Spencer Poet-in-Residence at Randolph College in Lynchburg, Va.

At our salon, Tess Taylor will be doing select poetry readings from her books The Forage House and Work & Days.

Childcare will be provided.

Thu, Sep 20, 2018

Image on blue suggesting a chapel with a cone shape projecting from the steeple

Gallery Talk with Curator of American Art Vanja Malloy

Drawn entirely from the Mead’s permanent collection, Timing Is Everything presents artworks that visualize concepts of time: linear and cyclical, absolute and relative. It questions the role of time in memory and the many factors that have influenced human perception of the past, present and future, including seasons, geography and technology. Join us for a gallery talk with Curator of American Art Vanja Malloy to learn more about this exhibition.

Free and open to all!

Weekly Canine Office Hours

Whether you miss your dog, or simply want some canine affection, Huxley or Evie would love to see you! One or the other will be available weekly!

LJST Lecture Series presents "Post-Truth as a Precursor to Authoritarianism"

Lee McIntyre will present a paper entitled “Post-Truth as a Precursor to Authoritarianism.” This is the first presentation in a series of seminars that will take place this year on the theme “Law and Illiberalism.”

Lee McIntyre is a research fellow at the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University and a lecturer in ethics at Harvard Extension School. Formerly Executive Director of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University, McIntyre is the author of Dark Ages: The Case for a Science of Human Behavior and Respecting Truth: Willful Ignorance in the Internet Age. His latest book Post-Truth explores the problem of “fake news” and “alternative facts” as they relate to the defense of truth.

To receive a copy of the paper which will explore the conceptual and historical roots of how the recent attack on truth in the United States may be exploited for political purposes, and how those of us who are concerned about the values of liberalism can learn to fight back, please email Megan Estes, the Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought (LJST) Department Coordinator.

Amherst Poetry Festival

Amherst Poetry Festival

The Amherst Poetry Festival returns for a sixth year, celebrating the literary legacy and contemporary creativity of the Pioneer Valley and beyond.

Anchored by the annual Emily Dickinson Poetry Marathon, the 2018 festival features Ocean Vuong, the Astro Poets, Shayla Lawson, a screening of the new feature film Wild Nights with Emily, the No-No project, the art exhibition, reading Dickinson's poem "We Grow Accustomed to the Dark" and much more!

A poetry master class with Amherst College writer-in-residence Shayla Lawson and Astro poet Dorothea Lasky is free to all on Saturday, September 22, at 2:30 p.m. in the Powerhouse.

Organized by the Emily Dickinson Museum, and funded in part by the Mass Cultural Council and Amherst Business Improvement District, this year's festival partners include Mass Poetry, the Jones Library, UMass Amherst, Amherst College, Hope & Feathers Framing and Printing, Attack Bear Press, Union St. Records and other local businesses and organizations.

Purple, teal and white image showing the name SASKIA SASSEN above dialogue bubbles and a globe

Saskia Sassen - "Globalism and Its Discontents: Point/Counterpoint with Ilan Stavans"

Join us as Professor Stavans speaks with sociologist and professor Saskia Sassen.

The "Globalism and Its Discontents: Point/Counterpoint" conversation series features Amherst College professor, and host of NEPR's In Contrast, Ilan Stavans and a guest engaging in thoughtful discussion and attempting to bridge the ideological divide growing in our nation.

The rise of populism worldwide today, personified by Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin, is a fierce reaction to globalism policies of the past few decades. Anti-immigration movements in Europe and the United States; assaults on free speech; racial profiling; polarized politics; intolerance for gender, economic and linguistic diversity; the building of walls and the renegotiation of international trade treaties; the tension between rural and urban communities; and the questioning of the basic tenets of pluralism are some of the symptoms. Democracy itself might be at peril.

Saskia Sassen is the Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology at Columbia University and a member of its Committee on Global Thought, which she chaired till 2015. She is a student of cities, immigration and states in the world economy, with inequality, gendering and digitization three key variables running though her work. Born in the Netherlands, she grew up in Argentina and Italy, studied in France, was raised in five languages and began her professional life in the United States. She is the author of eight books and the editor or co-editor of three books. Together, her authored books are translated in over 20 languages. She has received many awards and honors, among them multiple doctorates honoris causa, the 2013 Principe de Asturias Prize in the Social Sciences, election to the Royal Academy of the Sciences of the Netherlands and being made a Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et Lettres by the French government.

This event is free and open to the public.

"Point/Counterpoint" is co-sponsored by NEPR’s In Contrast and by a generous gift from 36 members of the 50th Reunion Class of 1970.

Find more information about the other speakers in the series href="https://www.amherst.edu/mm/564883">here.

Interviews with previous guests, and others, are available through Ilan Stavans' NEPR show In Contrast. Have a listen!

Association of Women in Science (AWIS) Welcome Hour

Come to the intro meeting the Association of Women in Science (AWIS) at Amherst College to learn about the events that we organize throughout the semester and how to get involved. There will be donuts from Glazed!

AWIS Welcome Coffee Hour

The Association for Women in Science (AWIS) is holding our welcome coffee hour! This is a great chance to learn more about AWIS and our goals on campus, as well as to meet members of our organization. AWIS members will discuss upcoming events this semester, and we will have an informal panel of students representing various STEM disciplines share their experiences. Donuts from Glazed will also be provided. Feel free to come as long as you're able, we'd love to see you there! Note that this event is open to all regardless of gender.

Screenshot of two women lying on a bed with their arms around each othe

"Wild Nights with Emily" Film Screening in Emily Dickinson's Garden

Fresh from its SXSW premiere, the Amherst Poetry Festival is pleased to present the dramatic comedy Wild Nights With Emily about the life of Emily Dickinson. IndieWire called Molly Shannon's portrayal of Dickinson "brilliant," saying the film "could forever change the narrative of the world's most famous woman poet." Bring your picnic blankets, camp chairs and snacks for this lawn screening that runs 84 minutes. Join Jane Wald, executive director of the Dickinson Museum, in a Q&A after with filmmaker Madeleine Olnek, at this exciting outdoor screening on the lawn at Dickinson’s home!

Fri, Sep 21, 2018

Niko Vicario Photo

"Transnational Materiality and the Geopolitical Work of Art" presented by Niko Vicario

The Faculty Colloquium Series for 2018-19 presents a lecture titled " Transnational Materiality and the Geopolitical Work of Art" presented by Niko Vicario, assistant professor of Art and the History of Art.

wellness fair

6th Annual Wellness Fair

Drop by to get to know Amherst’s wellness resources, including student groups. Get a free chair massage, enjoy yummy snacks, participate in fun activities, pick up giveaways and more! Rain date September 28. This event is sponsored by Mental Health Promotion and made awesome by the many wellness resources in the Amherst community.

Arts & Comm Field Trip Fridays: Artist Visit/Mead Museum

Arts & Communication Field Trip Friday site visits are a direct connect to the people and places at the heart of the Pioneer Valley’s creative communities. This year’s trips offer you the opportunity to engage with the issues and ideas driving innovative work in the visual arts, advertising, journalism, museums/archives, publishing, and community arts.

Field Trip Fridays start at 2 p.m. sharp in front of Frost Library.

September 14: Artist Visit/Mead Museum
Meet Donnabelle Casis, a Filipina-American artist whose current work draws from varied sources--ancient Filipino tribal tattoos and textiles, bullfighting costumes, and facial recognition software.

Donnabelle Casis is a Filipina-American artist living and working in Western Massachusetts. Her current work explores identity and its relationship to markers and patterns. Casis looks for the hidden geometries that connect disparate and discrete perspectives to form a greater whole.

She earned an MFA in painting from the University of Washington and a BFA from the University of Connecticut. She has received numerous awards and grants, including the Neddy Artist Fellowship for painting granted by the Behnke Foundation, a New Works Laboratory residency from 911 Media Arts Center in Seattle, an Artist Trust Gap Grant, and grants from the Northampton Arts Council. She was also a finalist for the Pollack-Krasner Foundation Grant. Her work is included in several public and private collections and has been featured in group and solo exhibitions at across the country.

Donnabelle is a member of the Curatorial Committee of The ArtSalon. She is also a board member of LiveArt Magazine.

Seating is very limited, so RSVP quickly through Handshake to reserve your spot!

UPCOMING FIELD TRIPS:
October 12: School for Contemporary Dance and Thought (SCDT)
Founding Director and dancer, Jennifer Polins, hosts our visit to this regionally renowned center for movement training and performance practices.

November 9: Daily Hampshire Gazette
Founded in 1786, the Gazette serves more than 15,000 readers a day and is an essential daily news source for the Pioneer Valley.

December 7: Northampton Community Arts Trust
Lighting designer Kathy Couch ’95 and photographer Stephen Petegorsky ’75 describe how they used the land trust model to preserve affordable and accessible space for Northampton’s creative community.

Professor Trisha Andrew

"Garment-Integrated Technologies Created Using Reactive Vapor Deposition": Chemistry Seminar with Professor Trisha Andrew of UMass

Off-the-shelf garments, textiles and threads/yarns can be nondestructively transformed into electronic circuit components using reactive vapor deposition. Selected technologies created using vapor-coated fibers and textiles will be described, including: (1) smart elbow braces for movement sensing; (2) textile triboelectric generators that convert small body motions into stored energy; (3) thread/yarn supercapacitors that can be sewed or knitted into garments for wearable and portable energy storage; (4) fabric electrodes for bioimpedance spectroscopy; (5) wear-, wash- and ironing-resistant active heating garments; and (6) thermoelectric wristbands that convert stray body heat into stored power.

Black-and-white closeup of Gierre Godley

Dance Master Class with Gierre Godley

A 2010 graduate of NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts (M.F.A.), Gierre J. Godley is a dancer, choreographer and teacher currently living in NYC. He began his training under the direction of C. Michael Tidwell and Arleen Sugano. Gierre has also had the privilege of training at the Ailey School and Millikin University (B.S. in biology, dance minor). He has been on faculty at the Debbie Allen Dance Academy (Los Angeles), Fancy Feet Dance Studio (Bronx, N.Y.) and the Centre for the Dansarts (Arkansas), and is currently an adjunct professor at the College of Mount Saint Vincent in Riverdale, N.Y. As a choreographer, Gierre has created works for the Steffi Nossen Dance Co., The Ailey School, Threads Dance Projects and the Tidwell Project Dance Ensemble. In 2010, Gierre created PROJECT 44, an all-male troupe dedicated to showcasing the beauty of male artistry throughout the arts. The group has performed in various national and international venues.

This event is part of the theater and dance department's Fall 2018 Guest Artist Series.

interior_nakamuraza_theater_illustration

This Summer in Japan: Presentations by 2018 Nagle Fellows Mika Obayashi '19 and Lorelei Dietz '20

The Scott H. Nagle ’85 Fund for Summer Fellowships in Asian Art and Culture supports summer research and travel on topics related to Asian art every year. The 2018 recipients were Mika Obayashi ’19 and Lorelei Dietz ’20. They will be speaking about their experiences on Friday, September 21 at 5 p.m. in Fayerweather 113. Please join us to hear about what they did in Japan this past summer.

Poster for Amherst College Presents Arabic Movie Night Teer Enta

Arabic Movie Night: Teer Enta

You are cordially invited to the first Arabic movie night screening organized by The Arabic Program at Amherst College, Teer Enta (translates to "You May Go").

The movie is a great light-hearted Egyptian comedy that features a vet who falls in love with the owner of a sick puppy in his clinic. On his birthday, he finds a genie who transforms his life! English subtitles are available.

Arabic light refreshments will be served.

project 44 dancers

Dance Showcase: Project 44

7:30 pm - 8:30 pm Webster Hall, Studio 1 (Room 117)

While in residency at Amherst, the men of PROJECT 44 will explore and examine memory: how is it manifested, retained and received. Inspired by Gierre J. Godley’s fleeting memories of his grandmother who passed in 1999, the work also investigates the male figure’s relationship to the matriarchs of his life. The work will premiere in December in Queens, N.Y.

This event is part of the theater and dance department's Fall 2018 Guest Artist Series. It is open to the five college community.

Amherst Cinema Late Nights

Join Amherst Cinema every Friday for a free late-night flick featuring the best cult, genre and outré on the big screen. Free for Amherst College students with presentation of student ID at box office. Visit the Amherst Cinema website for more information on programming.

Tickets Required

Sat, Sep 22, 2018

StatFest 2018

StatFest is a one day conference aimed at encouraging undergraduate students from historically underrepresented groups (African American, Hispanic, Native Americans) to consider careers and graduate studies in the statistical sciences. StatFest 2018 will be hosted by Amherst College in the new Science Center.

The conference is free but preregistration is required; the deadline to register is Wednesday, September 19th.

Registration Required
Event poster showing rows of empty theater seats

"Theaters of Marginality"

8:30 am - 3:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

The two-day event will take place at UMass (Conference Center) and Amherst College (Fayerweather Hall & Center for Humanistic Inquiry) on Friday, Sept. 21, and Saturday, Sept. 22. It includes panels on Spanish, Catalan and Galician theater and performance dealing with topics of exile, gender, sexuality, religion, translation, adaptation and performance traditions.

Image of a bullet tearing through an apple that is held up on a metal post

Close Looks at the Mead

Stop by the Mead to find new connections among works on view with student museum educators. Each week we’ll focus on different themes, so feel free to keep coming back for more and check our website and Facebook page for weekly themes.

Free and open to all!

A woman standing on a dark stage holding a broom, with a rug and books scattered behind her

"De algún tiempo a esta parte"

On Saturday, Sept. 22, at 5 p.m., Amherst College’s Holden Theater will host "De algún tiempo a esta parte," a monologue by Max Aub, Spanish exile author in Mexico. Spanish actress and researcher Esther Lázaro has masterfully adapted and played Aub’s monologue in the theaters of Barcelona, Madrid, Mexico City, Paris and Vienna, among others. This play chronicles the harrowing experience of a Jewish woman in the Vienna of 1938, before the onset of World War II.

Sun, Sep 23, 2018

Members of the Amherst Symphony Orchestra playing onstage while Mark Lane Swanson conducts

Amherst College Symphony Orchestra: Welcome Concert Class of 2022: "¡Viva México!"

The Amherst Symphony Orchestra launches the fall 2018 season with the music of Spain and Latin America, starting with a showcase of 20th-century concert music from Mexico on Sunday, Sept. 23, at 3 p.m. in Buckley Recital Hall, Amherst College. Tickets are available on the day of the concert beginning at 2 p.m. in the lobby of Arms Music Center. For more information, please call 413-542-2195, email concerts@amherst.edu or visit amherstsymphonyorchestra.com.
 
The concert opens with the boisterous "Sensemayá" (1938) by Silvestre Revueltas (1899–1940), which fuses popular and Stravinsky-like elements in a vibrant tapestry, all in a 7/4 metric scheme. It continues with "El Salón México" (1940), a love letter to the popular music of Mexico's dance halls, which the American master Aaron Copland (1900–1990) absorbed during his frequent tours as a New Deal south-of-the-border arts ambassador for Franklin D. Roosevelt.  
 
The program also includes the 12-minute masterpiece "Sinfonía india" (Symphony No. 2), by Mexico's most influential concert composer, Carlos Chávez (1899–1978) — a work of such vital authenticity and Mexican identity that it has been described as “profoundly non-European.” Finally, the concert closes with "Danzón No. 2" (1994) by Arturo Márquez (born 1950), which is almost cinematic in approach and was inspired by a visit to a ballroom in Veracruz.

Information on the ASO's entire 2018–19 season is available online at amherstsymphonyorchestra.com.

Tickets may be purchased only at the door. Tickets are $10 for the general public; $5 for senior citizens, students with ID and children under 12; and free to Amherst students and all Five College students with ID.

Mon, Sep 24, 2018

Multilingual storytime flyer

Multilingual Storytime

4:30 pm - 5:30 pm Frost Library, Periodicals Reading Room

Come and listen to children's books read in a variety of languages by Amherst College students and local elementary school students. This event is free and open to the local community, including children of all ages. Snacks will be provided.

Multilingual Storytime is the culminating celebration of the Amherst College/Fort River Elementary School Multilingual Children's Book Collection Exhibit, on display in Frost Library during the month of September. The exhibit is a sampling of the books included in a collection created during the winter 2018 Interterm course "Building a Multilingual Children's Book Collection." Students researched and selected a list of the greatest children's books around the world to share with the community here in Amherst. The collection will be expanded to include more languages, so please offer your own suggestions. For more information, visit the Multilingual Booklist below.

This program is the result of a collaboration between Frost Library, the Writing Center and the Center for Community Engagement.

Kaganovsky portrait

"The Woman with the Movie Camera": Talk by Lilya Kaganovsky

Lilya Kaganovsky will continue her inquiry into the question of a "Soviet women’s cinema" with this presentation on the cinematography of Margarita Pilikhina, the camerawoman on Marlen Khutsiev’s Thaw-era classic film Lenin’s Guard/ I Am Twenty (Zastava Il’icha / Mne dvadtsat’ let). Kaganovsky looks at Pilikhina's work on the film as part of the new wave of Soviet cinema in the 1960s, but also in the context of her other, conventionally Socialist Realist films. This talk will take into consideration other Soviet female cinematographers-- including Tamara Lobova and Marina Goldvoskaya, as well as Iana Sekste, who in 2013 played the role of a camerawoman in Valery Todorovsky’s The Thaw (Ottepel’) --in the broader context of Western feminist film theory and the history of women’s participation in the cinema industries in Hollywood and beyond.

Lilya Kaganovsky is a professor of Slavic, comparative literature, and media & cinema studies, and the director of the Program in Comparative & World Literature at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her publications include How the Soviet Man was Unmade, the edited volumes Mad Men, Mad World: Sex, Politics, Style and the 1960s and Sound, Speech, Music in Soviet and Post-Soviet Cinema as well as articles on Soviet and post-Soviet cinema. She is a member of the editorial board of the journal Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema and regularly contributes film reviews to the online cinema journal KinoKultura. Her most recent book on Soviet cinema’s transition to sound, The Voice of Technology: Soviet Cinema’s Transition to Sound, 1928-1935, was published by Indiana University Press in spring 2018.

Event poster featuring photos of Nandini Rao and a crowd of protesters

"Holding Up More Than Half the Sky: The Women's Movement in India" - Lecture by Nandini Rao

Nandini Rao is a feminist trainer, counselor and writer based in New Delhi, India. Rao’s talk will trace a herstory of the women’s movement in India, focusing on landmark moments that have inflected understandings of gender-based violence. Rao will trace the connections between recent and historical campaigns around women’s rights and contemporary activism around casteism, queer rights, disability rights and tribal rights.

A private dinner (for STUDENTS only) will follow at 6:30 p.m.; if you are interested, kindly R.S.V.P. before Sept. 20. Pita Pockets will be provided!

Event poster featuring images of Chloe Bass and her artwork

Chloë Bass: Visiting Artist Lecture

Chloë Bass is visiting campus as part of Artist-in-Residence Macon Reed's course "Installation, Site and The Embodied Spectator." Bass will lead students in activities around themes of collaboration and participatory strategies in installation art. Additionally, Bass will speak about her work in a unique, salon-style event in Reed's studio.

All are welcome to attend this special conversation. Tea and snacks will be provided.

green grass with a grey sky in background.  Event details over the image.

Mini Meditations

7:30 pm - 8:30 pm Chapin Hall, Pemberton Lounge, Room 108

In this workshop you'll add some simple yet profound skills to your healing toolkit. Yoga teacher Molly Kitchen will offer a variety of body-based and contemplative techniques for finding calm presence and re-centering when you feel off balance. No experience with meditation is necessary. This event is brought to you by the Peer Advocates for Sexual Resect and is part of our Survivor Support Series.

Tue, Sep 25, 2018

Stephen Nachmanovitch pictured with Violin

"The Art of Is" with Stephen Nachmanovitch

The Mead is teaming up with the First-Year Seminar "Thinking Through Improvisation," taught by Darryl Harper, visiting professor of music, to bring Stephen Nachmanovitch to campus. Nachmanovitch, author of Free Play: Improvisation in Life and Art, argues that improvisation and creativity are important tools for everyone.

Join us for a talk by Nachmanovitch about the connection between time and improvisation. This program is offered in conjunction with the "Thinking Through Improvisation" First-Year Seminar and the Arts at Amherst Initiative. This event is free and open to all!

Insight (Mindfulness) Meditation Group

Whether you have meditated for a long time or have never meditated, come join us for this time of practice together. Come to relax, quiet your mind, learn how to experience less suffering and stress, explore Buddhist philosophy and psychology, just talk about what it means to live from compassion and awareness -or because you are curious. This event will be led by Mark Hart, Buddhist Advisor.

Psychology Club

Are you a psychology major? Just interested in psychology? Can't get enough of thinking about psychology? Come to the first meeting of the Psychology Club (previously the student-faculty committee)! We'll be discussing our goals and plans for the year, and we want you to be there! Everyone is welcome, no previous affiliation with psychology necessary. Snacks provided!

Athletes and Allies logo

Athletes and Allies Meeting

Join Athletes and Allies for our first meeting of the semester! We are a safe space for LGBTQ+ athletes to come together and discuss our unique experiences. We join with our many allies to promote the inclusion and support of the LGBTQ+ community within the athletic department. Past projects have included the "Safe Space" poster campaign, as well as numerous Pride Games.

Students Only

Wed, Sep 26, 2018

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Grosvenor House with leaf border

SWAGS Fall Reception

Join the Sexuality, Women's and Gender Studies (SWAGS) Department as we kick off an exciting new year.
Connect with colleagues, chat with students about sexuality and gender studies, participate in the student raffle and enjoy some delicious refreshments!

Monique Truong

Fiction Reading: Monique Truong

Kirkus Reviews called Monique Truong’s first book, The Book of Salt, “a tour de force,” and accurately predicted, “Truong should take the literate world by storm.” Her other books include Bitter in the Mouth and The Sweetest Fruits, forthcoming from Viking Books. She is also an essayist and a lyricist, working in collaboration with the composer Joan La Barbara. She has been a Guggenheim Fellow, U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Fellow in Tokyo, Visiting Writer at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, and Princeton University’s Hodder Fellow. She lives in Brooklyn.

The reading will be followed by refreshments.

Thu, Sep 27, 2018

Weekly Canine Office Hours

Whether you miss your dog, or simply want some canine affection, Huxley or Evie would love to see you! One or the other will be available weekly!

David Fowler, University of Cambridge

“American Student Revolutionaries in Britain’s ‘1968’: A Study of the Transnational Sixties”

Please join the Education Studies Initiative for a public lecture featuring David Fowler of the University of Cambridge.

Abstract:
The role American students played in the British, and indeed European, student protests of the late 1960s and early 1970s was much discussed at the time in the national and international media, as well as the senior common rooms of Oxford and Cambridge. No historian has yet examined this issue systematically. Drawing on extensive archival research for my forthcoming study of Britain’s “1968,” this lecture will illuminate the international and trans-Atlantic dimensions of the British student protests of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Who were the student protesters who forced the closure of the world-renowned London School of Economics in February 1969, which attracted international media attention and led to debates in the British House of Commons and House of Lords? The British Education Secretary at the time, Edward Short, described the American students who participated in the protests as "the thugs of the academic world." But who were these American student activists? How radicalized were the American Rhodes Scholars at Oxford University in 1968? How central were American students in radicalizing British university campuses in the Global Sixties? How central were they to Britain's, and indeed Europe's, 1968? What legacy did they leave in Britain and Europe? The lecture will explore these questions, and more, in this under-researched but fascinating strand of the British and American "Special Relationship" of the 1960s and beyond.

Speaker Bio:
David Fowler teaches modern history and politics at the University of Cambridge, where he is a Life Member of Clare Hall Cambridge. He also holds a lectureship in modern history at Cardiff University and is currently a visiting scholar at Amherst College, where he is preparing the first scholarly biography of the transnational sixties student radical, Marshall Bloom '66. The book will shine a light on one of the prime movers of the sixties’ cultural revolutions in the United States, Britain and Europe.

Fowler has published two acclaimed monographs on youth culture in 20th-century Britain: The First Teenagers: the Lifestyle of Young Wage-Earners in Interwar Britain and Youth Culture in Modern Britain, c.1920-c.1970: From Ivory Tower to Global Movement--A New History. His latest book, Oxford and Revolution: Student Power, “1968” and a British Cultural Revolt, will be published by Oxford University Press in 2019.

Humanist Dinner

Join the Amherst College Humanists for an informal dinner! We will be discussing the consequences of a change in the balance of the Supreme Court for the separation of church and state.

Fri, Sep 28, 2018

"Timing Is Everything" Exhibition Installation Shot

"Museums Are Not Neutral" with Emily Potter-Ndiaye

All are invited to meet the Mead’s new head of education, Emily Potter-Ndiaye, and participate in a hands-on gallery workshop at the Mead. Potter-Ndiaye’s education philosophy is two-directional and participatory—come ready to share your thoughts and learn about art in a fun and exciting way. No experience in the arts necessary, but curiosity is a must!

This event is free and open to all.

Life Stories

Life Stories Lunch with Shreeansh Agrawal '20E

The Life Stories series provides a forum to foster community through sharing stories of challenge, growth and meaning. At each lunch, a student, faculty or staff member talks about an aspect of their lives that may be meaningful to others, followed by questions and comments. Lunch is provided. Sponsored by Mental Health Promotion and the Wellness Team.

Suicide Prevention Awareness

Join Active Minds on the Valentine Quad for the planting of 1,100 flags. These flags represent the number of college students who commit suicide each year. Write a message on a flag and plant it in the ground in honor of these individuals and suicide prevention awareness.

Bob Weiner playing drums

Music Workshop for Non-Majors and Majors: Rhythm (with Bob Weiner)

Do you think about music? Are you interested in music but haven’t played an instrument or taken a music course? Are you an experienced performer or composer? This is the music workshop series for you! Thinking about music takes many forms. It could mean performing and composing, or developing historical and cultural research into specific forms of music or using software to make or analyze music. Sponsored by the Department of Music, this series is open to all and offers the campus community different models for thinking about and doing music. Paired with the Music Department Tea Time (which takes place at 4:30 p.m. and immediately follows the workshop), the workshop series is an exciting, low-pressure way of expanding your understanding of music.

Drummer and percussionist Bob Weiner has toured and performed with Harry Belafonte, Itzhak Perlman, Betty Buckley, Jon Lucien, Dianne Reeves, Andy Statman, Rebecca Paris, Kenny Werner, Bob Moses and many others. He has taught at the Drummers Collective in New York, the New England Conservatory in Boston and Berklee College of Music in Boston. He currently plays at Earthdance for Contact Improvisation Jams, and he also plays with many movement/dance formats.

Bob is co-author of two important percussion books, Afro-Cuban Rhythms for Drumset with Frank Malabe and Brazilian Rhythms for Drumset with Duduka da Fonseca (Alfred Music). He holds a master's degree in interdisciplinary studies from Lesley University, where he taught a course in the Expressive Therapies program titled “Community and Therapeutic Applications of Drumming.” He also recently co-taught a course entitled "Arts Entrepreneurship" via Bachelor Degree Independent Concentration at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Bob currently teaches percussion and drumming to music students in the Five College Consortium, as well as privately. Bob also has a particular interest in depth psychology (Jungian studies) and contemplative practices (meditation, tai chi/qi gong) and how they apply to the arts and improvisation.

Music Department Tea Time

Music Department Tea Time

Come take a break from your busy week and enjoy tea, coffee, snacks and good company in the Arms Green Room. The music department's tea times are casual get-togethers where you hang out and chat with other musical folks from around campus. Everyone is welcome — students, faculty, staff, visitors. No affiliation with the department is required!

This event follows the "Workshop for Non-Majors and Majors: Rhythm" hosted by Bob Weiner.

Camille A. Brown headshot

Five College Dance Annual Fall Lecture: "Moving Culture, Dancing Justice, A Conversation with Camille A. Brown"

4:30 pm - 6:00 pm Hampshire College, Robert Crown Center (RCC)

Camille A. Brown is a dancer and choreographer for our times. Her commitment to "reclaiming the cultural narrative of African American identity" is a kind of connective tissue running through all of her artistic endeavors—from her early work as a performer with Ronald K. Brown/EVIDENCE, to her acclaimed dance-making with her company Camille A. Brown & Dancers, her viral TED-Ed video on the history of African-American social dance, her choreography for the recent Broadway revival of "Once on This Island" and her choreography for the NBC production of "Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert." In each instance, Ms. Brown's "bold work taps into both ancestral stories and contemporary culture to capture a range of deeply personal experiences."

Don't miss this unique opportunity to hear directly from Camille A. Brown in a conversation moderated by Deborah Goffe, assistant professor of Modern and Contemporary Dance at Hampshire College. The two will discuss Ms. Brown's intersecting career pathways through concert dance, choreography for theater and in commercial contexts and her community engagement initiatives as social justice interventions.

Presented by Five College Dance, with support from generous co-sponsors Five Colleges Inc., Hampshire College Office of the President, the Office of the Dean of Faculty, the School of Humanities Arts and Cultural Studies, the Office of Multicultural Education and Inclusion, and the Ethics and the Common Good Project, and made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Amherst Cinema Late Nights

Join Amherst Cinema every Friday for a free late-night flick featuring the best cult, genre and outré on the big screen. Free for Amherst College students with presentation of student ID at box office. Visit the Amherst Cinema website for more information on programming.

Tickets Required

Sat, Sep 29, 2018

Image of a bullet tearing through an apple that is held up on a metal post

Close Looks at the Mead

Stop by the Mead to find new connections among works on view with student museum educators. Each week we’ll focus on different themes, so feel free to keep coming back for more and check our website and Facebook page for weekly themes.

Free and open to all!

Black-and-white image of Brooklyn Rider and Magos Herrera

M@A: Brooklyn Rider and Magos Herrera: "Dreamers"

Music at Amherst Parallels Series

Tickets are available though package sales on sale from July 23 to Aug. 29, and thereafter in the 14 days before each concert through amherst.universitytickets.com, or through the Concert Office at (413) 542-2195 or concerts@amherst.edu.

In society, poets and songwriters play the essential role of dreamers, opening up avenues of hope for others. Despite the oppressive regimes that prevailed throughout much of Latin America and Spain in the 20th century, the dreamers held onto an unending love for beauty and humanity. Mexican-born jazz singer Magos Herrera and the omnivorous string quartet Brooklyn Rider join forces for an unforgettable musical journey, reinterpreting classics of the era from Mexico, Cuba, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Argentina and Spain, and celebrating such luminaries as Octavio Paz, Federico García Lorca and Rubén Darío.

Brooklyn Rider offers eclectic repertoire in gripping performances that continue to attract legions of fans and draw rave reviews from classical, world and rock critics alike.

“They are four classical musicians performing with the energy of young rock stars jamming on their guitars, a Beethoven-goes-indie foray into making classical music accessible but also celebrating why it was good in the first place.” –Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Magos Herrera is regarded as one of the most expressive, beautiful voices and most active vocalists in the contemporary Latin American jazz scene. She is best known for her eloquent vocal improvisation and a bold style that elegantly blends and surpasses language boundaries.

“Herrera is stretching the very notion of jazz singing, pushing past the diva pleasantries into a sound that’s bold, thrilling and effortlessly global.” –NPR

A public masterclass/workshop follows this M@A Series performance at 10 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 30. It is free and open to the public. For room postings, please see signage upon arrival.

Tickets Required

Sun, Sep 30, 2018

Black-and-white image of Brooklyn Rider and Magos Herrera

M@A: Brooklyn Rider and Magos Herrera: Masterclass

The Amherst College Music Department M@A Series presents a public masterclass/workshop with Brooklyn Rider and Magos Herrera at 10 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 30.

Free and open to the public

For room postings, please see signage upon arrival.