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Type of Event

Event Calendar

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Thu, Mar 5, 2020

Neuroscience Lecture by Torsten Klengel: “Translational Research in Psychiatry from Humans to Monkeys and Back”

Torsten Klengel, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and director of the Translational Molecular Genomics Laboratory at McLean Hospital, will speak on “Translational Research in Psychiatry from Humans to Monkeys and Back.”

Abstract: Genetic and environmental factors profoundly influence the risk to develop psychiatric disorders. A number of large clinical studies provide evidence for the long-term effects of early life stress on disease trajectories across the lifespan and even across generations. My talk will focus on the concept of gene-environment interaction and how the environment influences epigenetic cellular programming with a focus on HPA axis function. I will introduce the concept of inter- and transgenerational effects of environmental exposure and how nonhuman primate studies can bridge a translational gap between studies in rodents and clinical studies in humans.

Refreshments will be served.

Portrait of Chon Noriega

Helene Keyssar Lecture: “Seeing Ghosts: Latinx Video in the American Art Museum” with Chon A. Noriega

Chon A. Noriega is professor of cinema and media studies and director of the Chicano Studies Research Center, both at UCLA, and consulting curator at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). He has published on media, performance and the visual arts. Noriega has curated or co-curated numerous exhibitions, including Home—So Different, So Appealing (2017-18), Asco and Friends: Exiled Portraits (2014), L.A. Xicano (2011-12) and Phantom Sightings: Art After the Chicano Movement (2008-10). He is currently completing a book on artist Raphael Montañez Ortiz (b. 1934) and an oral history project on Daniel Joseph Martinez (b. 1957).

Noriega describes the subject of his lecture as follows: “I remember walking through the WACK!: Art and the Feminist Revolution exhibition with Barbara Hammer in spring 2007. She had insisted that the curators show her films in the museum galleries and play them on a loop, not exile them to a side theater where they would be shown on a schedule. But letting her speak during the walkthrough was another matter. So Barbara grabbed the microphone and stood by her work: ‘Film is an art form,’ she began. Today, media installations and even two-dimensional media works like Barbara’s are quite common in contemporary art exhibitions. This talk is not so much about the aesthetic status of film/video in the gallery space—one dealt with quite well by Kate Mondloch and Catherine Elwes—as it is about the curatorial frameworks that render certain artists and artworks as ‘orphans of modernism’ or ‘ghosts of modernity.’ I will draw on my own experiences as a curator and art historian who was trained in cinema and media studies.”

A reception will follow.

Professor Andrea Frisch

Biennial Lecture in Honor of Professor Jay L. Caplan: “The Histoire Mémorable Between News and History: Framing Accounts of Current Events in the French Wars of Religion”

Professor Andrea Frisch from the University of Maryland, College Park, and Leibniz Universität Hannover will give the biennial lecture in honor of Professor Jay L. Caplan. Her talk, “The Histoire Mémorable Between News and History: Framing Accounts of Current Events in the French Wars of Religion,” will address the ways in which current or very recent events were packaged generically in the turbulent context of the French Wars of Religion.

“At the center of my investigation is the histoire mémorable, since in 16th-century France – in contrast to her European neighbors – some form of this label was regularly applied to accounts of current events. As a generic indicator, the category is deeply ambiguous: On the one hand, the term 'mémorable' implied a shared inheritance of consensually venerated material that one had a duty to remember, and that was traditionally associated with History; on the other, in the glut of printed matter in the age of confessional conflict, the epithet 'mémorable' was repeatedly attached to material that was recent, undigested and frequently contentious, characteristics more typical of what was coming to be known as news. Ultimately, the histoire mémorable was the terrain upon which personal, polemical, pamphlet-style accounts could make a bid for entry into the long-term, capital-H historical record.”

This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.

This event is co-sponsored by the Georges Lurcy Lecture Series at Amherst, the Amherst College Department of French and the Turgeon Fund.

Event poster featuring a black-and-white photo of a mushroom cloud and a color headshot of David Eng

Dr. David Eng Presents “Absolute Apology, Absolute Forgiveness”

5:00 pm - 7:00 pm Science Center, Kirkpatrick Hall, Room A011

Five College Asian/Pacific/American Studies Symposium: “Looking Back to the Future: 20 Years of A/P/A Studies in the Five Colleges” presented by Dr. David Eng, the Richard L. Fisher Professor of History, University of Pennsylvania

Headshot Dr. Freeman Hrabowski III

Keynote with Freeman Hrabowski

7:30 pm - 9:00 pm Science Center, Lipton Lecture Hall (E110)

At age 12, Freeman Hrabowski marched with Martin Luther King. Now he is president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), where he works to create an environment that helps under-represented students—specifically African-American, Latino and low-income learners—get degrees in math and science. His TED Talk on the four pillars of college success has been viewed over 1 million times.

He will be visiting Amherst College March 5-6 and will present a keynote lecture about his new book The Empowered University: Shared Leadership, Culture Change, and Academic Success. The book probes the way senior leaders, administrators, staff, faculty and students facilitate academic success by cultivating an empowering institutional culture and broad leadership for innovation. They examine how shared leadership enables an empowered campus to tackle tough issues by taking a hard look in the mirror, noting strengths and weaknesses while assessing opportunities and challenges.

This event is free and open to the public.

Russian Tea

9:00 pm Porter House, Common Room

Come and join the Russian House for Russian Tea! All students interested in Russian language or culture, no matter their level of language proficiency, are welcome. Food and tea are included!