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Type of Event

Event Calendar

Monday, September 23, 2019

Mon, Sep 23, 2019

Photo of Matthew Dane, wearing a white shirt and smiling

Matthew Dane '93 and Gregory Hayes '73: "Reflections" - Viola d’Amore Recital

Violist Matthew Dane '93 and harpsichordist Gregory Hayes '73 present Reflections, a program showcasing the viola d'amore as an extraordinary instrument to express the diverse music of our time and world. The program includes music by Antonio Vivaldi, Arvo Pärt and Reena Esmail, and features a premiere by Amherst College's Professor Eric Sawyer. The concert is free and open to the public.

Headshot of Juan Castro

“Territory as Home: Maya Resistance Against Extractivism in Guatemala”

Lawyer and scholar Juan Castro will discuss Maya concepts of home, including the deep and complex roots of Mayan conceptualization of place. He will show how this concept of home arises from the longstanding historical and literary traditions of Mayan people and informs ongoing resistance to colonization and extraction. This talk is a vital aspect of the courses that we are teaching, which embed interaction with Indigenous scholars, knowledge keepers and activists. We are especially aware of the crucial relevance of this discussion in light of both global climate change and localized manifestations, including the burning of the forests in Brazil and the continuing dispossession of Mayan and other indigenous people.
Castro can speak directly to the criminalization of Maya authorities defending lands and rivers in Guatemala, including women. In doing so, he analyzes the legal mechanisms by which the state of Guatemala has historically appropriated Maya territories for the profit of extractive industries. He complements this historical approach with insights into the politics of state repression against Indigenous resistance today, which has resulted in the state-orchestrated assassination of leaders like Berta Caceres. Castro argues that “our Maya identity is a political one; we defend our territories, we speak Indigenous languages and understand Maya cosmovision.” A Maya lawyer is a political identity, one that challenges conventional legalities and quietly redefines state authority. His presentation offers a decolonial approach to litigation.
Juan Castro is an indigenous Maya lawyer and scholar in Guatemala. He is the founder and director of the Legal Center for Indigenous Peoples in Guatemala. He is a dynamic member of the Association of Maya Lawyers and Notaries of Guatemala and also teaches law at the Maya University of Guatemala. He has previously worked at the OHCHR in Guatemala. He specializes in Indigenous collective rights and is considered by Maya Indigenous authorities as their representative in state courts. He is currently one of Guatemala’s most prominent lawyers, working on 19 such cases, some very emblematic, like the defense of Maya authorities taken as political prisoners for contesting extractivism in their territories.

Kurt Morris standing outdoors with his arms folded in front of him

"Combating Loneliness and Finding Belonging"

Loneliness is one of the biggest issues facing college students today. In this presentation, award-winning mental health speaker Kurt Morris shares his struggle with depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety, and how it led to severe loneliness in his life. Additionally, he explains why students have such difficulty finding belonging in college and methods they can use to empower themselves to combat loneliness.

Ongoing Events

Untitled, ripped and damaged black-and-white photo from the series "Love Notes," showing shrubbery in a field by the side of a road, under a cloudy sky

“Do Things to Images”: An Exhibition by Odette England

Do Things to Images presents for the first time a selection of photographs from 2014 to 2019 by the artist Odette England. It includes images from her newest series Love Notes.

England’s parents’ former dairy farm, and the archive of snapshots her family made there, serve as raw material for England’s practice. Many of her photographs are unique pieces. By mixing preciousness with low-fi, unrepeatable processes, England highlights the infidelity of memory.

This exhibition includes prints from negatives that England buried and then dug up, and hand-torn paper prints. It features pages ripped from family photo albums, and vintage snapshots that have been hole-punched, among other works. Her need to cut, crop, sand, fold and otherwise manipulate photographs is in contrast to the French meaning of her name, Odette, “Lover of Home.”

Join Odette England for a lecture and the opening of her exhibition on Thursday, Sept. 19, at 4:30 p.m. in Pruyne Lecture Hall, 115 Fayerweather.