Navigation

Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 
 
 
Type of Event

Event Calendar

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Wed, Oct 10, 2018

Photo of Aatish Taseer

Aatish Taseer ’03: "We Shall Be a Country with No History"

8:00 pm Converse Hall, Cole Assembly Room

Join us for an evening with Aatish Taseer ’03, author and contributing opinion writer for The International New York Times.

Taseer will discuss his experiences at Amherst, with its moments of protest, racial tension and self-reflection, and how they gave him a new perspective on his country of origin, India. His experiences gave him an important lesson: history is a strong vessel for self-improvement, and historical awakening elicits a demand to be seen. Taseer now notices those who need to be heard and has worked to be an active voice for these people.

Aatish Taseer was born in 1980. He is the author of the memoir Stranger to History: A Son’s Journey Through Islamic Lands and three acclaimed novels: The Way Things Were, a finalist for the 2016 Jan Michalski Prize; The Temple-Goers, which was short-listed for the Costa First Novel Award; and Noon. His work has been translated into more than a dozen languages. He is a contributing writer for The International New York Times and lives in New Delhi and New York.

In his forthcoming book, The Twice-Born: Life and Death on the Ganges, Taseer embarks on a journey of self-discovery in an intoxicating, unsettling personal reckoning with modern India, where ancient customs collide with the contemporary politics of revivalism and revenge

When Taseer first came to Benares, the spiritual capital of Hinduism, he was 18, the Westernized child of an Indian journalist and a Pakistani politician, raised among the intellectual and cultural elite of New Delhi. Nearly two decades later, Taseer leaves his life in Manhattan to go in search of the Brahmins, wanting to understand his own estrangement from India through their ties to tradition.

Known as the "twice-born"—first into the flesh, and again when initiated into their vocation—the Brahmins are a caste devoted to sacred learning. But what Taseer finds in Benares, the holy city of death also known as Varanasi, is a window on an India as internally fractured as his own continent-bridging identity. At every turn, the seductive, homogenizing force of modernity collides with the insistent presence of the past. In a globalized world, to be modern is to renounce India—and yet the tide of nationalism is rising, heralded by cries of “Victory to Mother India!” and an outbreak of anti-Muslim violence.

From the narrow streets of the temple town to a Modi rally in Delhi, among the blossoming cotton trees and the bathers and burning corpses of the Ganges, Taseer struggles to reconcile magic with reason, faith in tradition with hope for the future and the brutalities of the caste system, all the while challenging his own myths about himself, his past, and his countries old and new.

The event is funded by the Croxton Lecture Fund.

Ongoing Events

Dave Gloman painting

Re-presenting Nonotuck: The Landscape Paintings of Hitchcock and Gloman

until Oct 29 Frost Library, Mezzanine Gallery

Professor David Gloman has partnered with Kurt Heidinger, director of the Biocitizen School, to create an art event that inspires the public to imagine the unique biocultural character of the Nonotuck biome (also known as the central Connecticut River Valley) by “re-presenting” the landscapes that Orra Hitchcock depicted in the mid 19th century. Professor Gloman has located the sites where they were painted and created his own painted landscape portraits of those sites. View Gloman and Hitchcock's illustrations together in Frost Library's Mezzanine Gallery from September 4 - October 29.

The opening reception will be on September 27 from 4:30 - 6 p.m. in the Center for Humanistic Inquiry (2nd Floor, Frost Library).

Lisa McCarty, Louisa May Alcott’s Desk, Orchard House, 2015. Image courtesy of the artist.

Transcendental Concord: Photographs by Lisa McCarty, on view in the Eli Marsh Gallery Sept. 10–Oct. 12

until Oct 12 Fayerweather Hall, 105: Eli Marsh Gallery

Transcendental Concord: Photographs by Lisa McCarty documents the spirit of Transcendentalism, the 19th-century philosophical movement that embraced idealism, communal living and reverence for the natural world in the face of growing industrialization and inhumanity.