Event Calendar

Thursday, September 26, 2019

Thu, Sep 26, 2019

"From Spoils to Saviors: Re-valuing the First Roman Wives as Civic Actors in Livy's 'From the Foundation of the City'"

This talk will focus on the episode traditionally known as “the rape of the Sabine women,” in which the first Romans staved off the extinction of their new community and established Rome’s version of marriage, but did so by obtaining their wives through a mass bride abduction. Unlike most of the women who fall victim to violence in Rome’s founding myths, the Sabine women not only survive their assault; by the end of their story, as told by the Roman historian Livy, they’ve won universal respect and recognition for saving both new and old communities, which they risk their own lives to defend.

Movie poster for Paradise Now, featuring the backs of the two protagonists

Arabic Movie Night: "Paradise Now"

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm Science Center, E110 - Lipton Lecture Hall

The Arabic Program at Amherst College Presents Paradise Now, a riveting and timely political thriller in which two childhood friends are recruited for a suicide bombing in Tel Aviv. Palestinians Said and Khaled, now in young adulthood, have been lifelong friends living in Nablus in the West Bank.

The screening is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Point/Counterpoint Banner Image

Point/Counterpoint: "The Arc of U.S. History," with Jill Lepore and Ross Douthat, moderated by President Biddy Martin

The Point/Counterpoint conversation series features an Amherst College professor and guests engaging in thoughtful discussion and attempting to bridge the growing ideological divide in our nation.

Join Amherst College President Biddy Martin for a discussion on "The Arc of U.S. History" with Harvard University professor Jill Lepore and New York Times columnist Ross Douthat. A Q&A will follow, with books available for purchase through Amherst Books.

Jill Lepore is the David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History at Harvard University. She is also a staff writer at The New Yorker. A prize-winning professor, she teaches classes in evidence, historical methods, humanistic inquiry and American history. Much of her scholarship explores absences and asymmetries in the historical record, with a particular emphasis on the history and technology of evidence. As a wide-ranging and prolific essayist, Lepore writes about American history, law, literature and politics. She is the author of many award-winning books, including the bestselling These Truths: A History of the United States (2018). Her latest book is This America: The Case for the Nation (2019).

Ross Douthat joined The New York Times as an op-ed columnist in April 2009. His column appears every Wednesday and Sunday. Previously, he was a senior editor at The Atlantic and a blogger for theatlantic.com.

He is the author of Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics, published in 2012, and Privilege: Harvard and the Education of the Ruling Class (2005), and a co-author, with Reihan Salam, of Grand New Party: How Republicans Can Win the Working Class and Save the American Dream (2008). He is the film critic for National Review.

The Point/Counterpoint series is based on a course of the same name. The course and associated event series received special funding through a generous gift from 36 members of the 50th Reunion Class of 1970.

Russian Tea

9:00 pm Porter House, Common Room

Please come and join the Russian House for the Russian Tea! All students interested in Russian language or culture, no matter their level of language proficiency, are welcome.

Students Only

Ongoing Events

Untitled, ripped and damaged black-and-white photo from the series "Love Notes," showing shrubbery in a field by the side of a road, under a cloudy sky

“Do Things to Images”: An Exhibition by Odette England

Do Things to Images presents for the first time a selection of photographs from 2014 to 2019 by the artist Odette England. It includes images from her newest series Love Notes.

England’s parents’ former dairy farm, and the archive of snapshots her family made there, serve as raw material for England’s practice. Many of her photographs are unique pieces. By mixing preciousness with low-fi, unrepeatable processes, England highlights the infidelity of memory.

This exhibition includes prints from negatives that England buried and then dug up, and hand-torn paper prints. It features pages ripped from family photo albums, and vintage snapshots that have been hole-punched, among other works. Her need to cut, crop, sand, fold and otherwise manipulate photographs is in contrast to the French meaning of her name, Odette, “Lover of Home.”

Join Odette England for a lecture and the opening of her exhibition on Thursday, Sept. 19, at 4:30 p.m. in Pruyne Lecture Hall, 115 Fayerweather.