Event Calendar

Today - Mon, Feb 19, 2018

MCAT Study Group

Are you preparing for medical school and taking the MCAT this winter or spring? Come join other Amherst students and study with your peers on Monday evenings! Drop-in when you can. Some MCAT resources and snacks will be available. This event is sponsored by the health professions office at the Loeb center for career exploration and planning.

Food Justice League––Intro Meeting

Interested in doing work around food justice on campus and in the community? Want to know where your food in Val comes from? Wondering how to protect SNAP benefits from being cut? Come to the intro meeting for the Food Justice League to share some ideas and hear what fellow students have in mind for the semester.

Tomorrow - Tue, Feb 20, 2018

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Flr.

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The conference room is just inside the main entrance, on the right hand side. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday and Tuesday from noon - 1 p.m., and Fridays from 1 - 2 p.m.

Primary-colored illustration of a house against a gray background

Gallery Talk with Mead Director and Chief Curator David E. Little

HOUSE: Selections from the Collection of John and Sue Wieland features 58 artworks that present provocative interpretations of the house in various shapes, sizes, materials and imaginative manifestations. You’re invited to a gallery talk about this exhibition with David E. Little.

This event is free and open to all.

Regina Carter holding a violin in her arms vertically, so that its neck partially covers her face

Performance of "The Hair Bow Anthems" by Regina Carter

Regina Carter is a master jazz violinist and MacArthur Fellow. She will perform "Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing" and "The Star-Spangled Banner" using violin bows that have been restrung with human hair by contemporary artist Sonya Clark. This performance will be followed by an artist talk with Regina Carter, Sonya Clark and Darryl Harper.

This program is a part of the Embodied Knowledge Program Series.

office hours

Weekly Office Hours with Huxley or Evie

Canine office hours will be held every Tuesday from 4 - 5 p.m., in the area beside Frost Cafe, staffed by Huxley and Evie on alternating weeks. Drop in for some canine affection and advice. If the weather is nice, this event will move to the lawn in front of Frost Library.

Closeup of Bill Porter / Red Pine wearing a black shirt and red bandana around his neck

"The Search for Solitude": Bill Porter / Red Pine

4:30 pm - 6:30 pm Fayerweather Hall, Pruyne Lecture Hall (115)

The search for solitude has been at the core of Chinese civilization ever since it began 5,000 years ago. Spending time alone, usually in the mountains, has been an essential part of all three major spiritual traditions in China from their very beginning, and it continues to be so today. Bill Porter, a renowned scholar of Chinese poetry and Buddhist texts who writes under the pseudonym Red Pine, will give a slide presentation and talk about this tradition based on his book Road to Heaven: Encounters with Chinese Hermits. His book has become a best-seller in China, where it has sold a quarter of a million copies in its Chinese translation 空谷幽蘭. He will also share poetry from his recent book, Finding Them Gone: Visiting China's Poets of the Past.

Books for purchase will be available immediately following the lecture, and Bill Porter will sign and greet guests at this time. This event is open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Insight Meditation Group (Mindfulness)

Whether you have meditated for a long time or have never meditated, come join us for this time of practice together. Come to relax, quiet your mind, learn how to experience less suffering and stress, explore Buddhist philosophy and psychology, just talk about what it means to live from compassion and awareness -- or come because you are curious. This group meets on Tuesdays from 5 - 6 p.m. in in Chapin Chapel, and is led by Mark Hart, Buddhist Advisor.

At The Intersection: Gender & Religion

Join us for the second program in the "At the Intersections" series, featuring a panel discussion on how gender, religion, faith and spirituality intersect. We will be addressing the ways in which gender within a faith or spiritual tradition can be designated, as well as the ways those outside of the faith may interpret gender within it. How do faith and spirituality impact our relationship to gender, and how can gender be understood through faith and spirituality? There will be pizza!
For more information, contact wgc@amherst.edu

The Fresh Air Fund: Summer Job and Internship Opportunities

Each summer, the Fresh Air Fund, an independent, not-for-profit agency, provides thousands of New York City children with unforgettable summer experiences that unlock their limitless potential.

Perhaps you love working with children. Running across the ball field, washing off the glitter glue, or swimming in the lake; with your cabin group laughing around you you’ll be in your element. Or maybe you’re more organized than artsy; better at making plans than making s’mores. You can’t carry a tune, but your writing skills are top-notch.

Since 1877, the Fresh Air Fund has worked with more than 1.8 million New York City children from low-income communities. Each year, thousands of children experience outdoor summer adventures through visits with volunteer host families along the East Coast and Southern Canada and at the Fund’s five overnight camps in Fishkill, NY. Fresh Air children also participate in year-round leadership and educational programs.

Whether you yearn to become a camp counselor, or look forward to working in our Manhattan offices, there is a position that’s right for you. Join representative Michelle Gottlieb for this information session to learn more about the organization's summer job and internship opportunities.

First Year Loeb Seminar: Making Mammoth Plans

First years, let's think summer! Whether you have plans or not, we can help you make the most of your summer. It all starts with "Making Mammoth Plans," the Loeb Center's spring seminar for first year students.

What to look forward to in the seminar:

– Help determining what you want to do over the summer
– In-depth information about how to pursue internships, summer jobs, research, summer abroad, volunteering, and job shadowing
– Time to create a plan of action to accomplish your own unique summer goals

RSVP in QUEST as space is limited. RSVP by clicking on the left column “Info Sessions/ Workshops” and then “Workshops.” You can either use the keyword search or scroll down, and then select “First Year Loeb Seminar: Making Mammoth Plans." Click “RSVP," and you are all set!

ChiralLogic: Healthcare Consulting Start-Up Opportunity with Josh Parks ’95

ChiralLogic LLC is a start-up, boutique healthcare pricing, market access and patient assistance programs consultancy serving growing companies. Josh Parks ’95, founder, has more than twenty years of experience in the biopharmaceutical and medical device industry and is seeking a senior or recent graduate to help build his company.

ChiralLogic offers comprehensive partnerships for developing early stage value and maximizing that value at launch. The job will utilize your analytical and communication skills to perform advance modeling and data presentation. Participants will address problems, find data to objectively address the issue, and then tell a story to others who may not fully understand the research that was completed. Together with Josh, participants will complete qualitative and quantitative research using techniques that are industry standard and company proprietary. They’ll also complete direct market research with the largest and most influential players in the country and speak directly to decision makers to enhance your analysis and story-telling.

Attend this information session to meet with Josh Parks ’95, learn more about ChiralLogic's start-up business structure, and find out how to successfully apply for his open opportunity.

German Kaffeeklatsch

German Kaffeeklatsch

Come and join German students and faculty every Tuesday evening at 9 p.m. in Porter House for a chat over coffee and much more! This is a great opportunity to practice your German in a casual and relaxing environment.

Wed, Feb 21, 2018

Russian Table

The Russian Table is an opportunity for all interested in conversing in Russian to meet regularly with Russian faculty and students. We'll meet from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays on the Mezzanine level in Valentine Dining Hall. Russian speakers at all levels are very welcome!

Quaker Voluntary Service Information Table

In advance of her evening info session, Zenaida Peterson of Quaker Voluntary Service (QVS) will be tabling in Keefe Campus Center to share information about the program.

QVS is a national organization based in the Quaker faith tradition and modeled on other faith-based volunteer programs, such as Lutheran Volunteer Corps, Mission Year and Jesuit Volunteer Corps. The purpose of QVS is to provide opportunities for recent graduates to spend a year living in an intentional community with other young adults and to directly serve marginalized people through full-time volunteer positions with nonprofit agencies, actively seeking to transform unjust social structures. QVS currently has houses of service in Atlanta, Boston, Philadelphia, Portland and will be opening its fifth house this fall in Minneapolis.

QVS makes for a great gap year opportunity, given that it's an 11-month experiment, living at the intersection of transformational spirituality and activism. Participants work full-time in professional positions at community-based organizations addressing a wide range of issues, while living in a cooperative house and being mentored by local Quakers. Fellows receive housing, transportation, food, support for health and wellness (including access to health insurance, if needed) and a small stipend, while engaging in workshops and retreats that allow for continuing education in social justice, faith and community building topics.

Stop by Zenaida's information table to learn more about the program's structure, what her own service year was like, and how interested students can apply to participate before QVS's upcoming March 15 deadline.

French Table

If you are interested in speaking French, or learning about French culture, come and join the French language table. We will meet on Wednesdays from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. on the mezzanine in Valentine Hall. The French language table is open to students, faculty, staff and anyone who is interested in having informal conversations in French. All levels are welcome! We look forward to meeting you.

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly, informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon - 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Food for Thought — Lessons from a CEO: How to Prepare for a Career in a Dynamic Global Economy

Frits Dirk van Paasschen '83, former CEO of Starwood Resorts and Coors Brewing Company, and Amazon best-selling author of The Disruptors' Feast, will be meeting with students over lunch to discuss his career journey after Amherst, and what he has learned about surviving in business during a time of tumultuous and accelerated change. If you are considering entering into the business world, pursuing a career impacted by a global economy, or wanting a better understanding of how to lead in a dynamic and disrupting the global economy, then join your classmates for this enlightening discussion with an alumnus who has achieved success through embracing the challenges that come with change.

RSVP, space is limited. Lunch from Fresh Side will be provided.

Sonya Clark unraveling a Confederate flag with her hands

A Conversation with Sonya Clark, Followed by Her Performance of "Unraveling"

Join us for a conversation with renowned artists Sonya Clark '89 and Darryl Harper '90 for an evening that blurs the lines of protest and performance. Following the discussion, Clark will perform "Unraveling" at the Mead Art Museum. All are invited to participate in this performance by working side-by-side with the artist to unravel threads of the Confederate battle flag.

This event is part of the Embodied Knowledge Program Series.

Event poster featuring a photo of Crystal Sanders

"More than Cookies and Crayons: Head Start and Mississippi's Black Freedom Struggle" - Crystal Sanders

The Amherst College Education Studies Initiative welcomes the fourth speaker of our interdisciplinary series: Crystal Sanders, associate professor of history at Pennsylvania State University. Even after passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act, black Mississippians remained disenfranchised and shut out of many public accommodations. To secure the citizenship rights that civil rights legislation alone could not provide, local people turned to an unlikely source: Project Head Start. Early childhood education in the Magnolia State was about much more than cookies and crayons. The Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM), a nonprofit entity that operated 84 Head Start centers in 24 counties in 1965, offered black children quality educational opportunities void of notions of black inferiority. The program also provided black adults with well-paying jobs outside of the local white power structure. This paper demonstrates that preschool education became controversial as Mississippi’s black working-class participants collaborated with the federal government and moved beyond teaching shapes and colors to challenge the state’s racially exploitative social practices, repressive political policies and white supremacist ideology.  

Professor Sanders is an historian of the modern United States with research interests in African American history, Southern history, and the history of Black education. Her scholarly work joins a growing body of literature that moves beyond “the two-dimensional story of oppression and submission” during the Jim Crow era of segregation and black disfranchisement to explore African Americans’ everyday acts of resistance and resiliency throughout the 20th century in efforts to secure the rights and privileges of American citizenship. The University of North Carolina Press published her first book, A Chance for Change: Head Start and Mississippi’s Black Freedom Struggle, in 2016 as part of its John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture.  

Thank you to our co-sponsors: The Lewis-Sebring Family Foundation; Amherst College Careers in Education Professions; the Lucius Root Eastman and Corliss Lamont Lectureship Funds; and the Amherst College Departments of American Studies, Anthropology and Sociology, Black Studies, Economics, English, History, Mathematics and Statistics, and Spanish.

Meaningful Gap Year Opportunities at Quaker Voluntary Service

Seeking a meaningful gap year opportunity? Quaker Voluntary Service (QVS) is an 11-month experiment, living at the intersection of transformational spirituality and activism. Participants work full-time in professional positions at community-based organizations addressing a wide range of issues, while living in a cooperative house and being mentored by local Quakers. Fellows receive housing, transportation, food, support for health and wellness (including access to health insurance, if needed) and a small stipend, while engaging in workshops and retreats that allow for continuing education in social justice, faith and community building topics.

QVS is a national organization based in the Quaker faith tradition and modeled on other faith-based volunteer programs, such as Lutheran Volunteer Corps, Mission Year and Jesuit Volunteer Corps. The purpose of QVS is to provide opportunities for recent graduates to spend a year living in an intentional community with other young adults and to directly serve marginalized people through full-time volunteer positions with nonprofit agencies, actively seeking to transform unjust social structures. QVS currently has houses of service in Atlanta, Boston, Philadelphia, Portland and will be opening its fifth house this fall in Minneapolis.

In advance of its upcoming March 15 application deadline, QVS recruiting coordinator Zenaida Peterson will be on campus to explain the program's structure, what her own service year was like and how interested students can apply to participate.

WGC Logo

Women's and Gender Center Late Night Study Hours

Join us for study hours every Wednesday from 10 p.m. to midnight in the Women's and Gender Center, Keefe 211! There will be donuts from Glazed!

Thu, Feb 22, 2018

Study Abroad in Russia and Kyrgyzstan

Don’t miss your chance to study abroad in St. Petersburg or Central Asia through Bard College. Bard’s partnership with Smolny College – Russia's first and most prestigious liberal arts institution – is an excellent opportunity to immerse oneself in Russian language and culture.

Also, don’t pass up a unique opportunity to study the liberal arts, in English, at the American University of Central Asia in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. We invite students to spend a semester or summer learning about a fascinating region at the crossroads of history, commerce and development. Numerous scholarships are available.

Students Only

Google Presents: Intro to Design Thinking for Women in STEM

In this workshop, which is open to all, but primarily targeted towards women interested in working in STEM fields, recent alums Julia Edholm '15 and Elizabeth Lefever '16 will present an introductory workshop on the design thinking process.

This is the first of three workshops that two recent Amherst College alums now working at Google will present on campus on February 22 and 23. Please view details and RSVP to each event separately in Quest!

Ongoing Events

Adventures in Photography Exhibition

During January interterm nine students from Amherst, UMass, Smith, and Mount Holyoke participated in “Adventures in Photography,” an interterm course taught by Joshua Baum and Takudzwa Tapfuma. Over the five-day course, students learned fundamental techniques of digital photography: manual exposure, composition, lighting, and post-production. The class ventured into the field for hands-on excursions to the New England Peace Pagoda, Montague Bookmill and downtown Northampton. The images in this exhibit are a selection of work created during the class.

Thank you to the Department of Art and the History of Art, and the Center for Community Engagement for sponsoring the course, and to Valentine Dining Hall for hosting this exhibition.