Event Calendar

Today - Tue, Sep 26, 2017

City Year Information Table

City Year believes education has the power to help every student reach his or her potential. But, in high-poverty communities, there are external factors and obstacles students are faced with every day that can interfere with their ability to both get to school and show up ready and able to learn. These are the students who need a bit of extra, individualized support. However, there’s a gap between the kind of help they need and the support the schools are designed to provide. Meet with representatives from City Year to learn more about opportunities the organization offers to help address those issues

Book cover for "The Chemical Story of Olive Oil"

Olive Odyssey

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm Frost Library, Friendly Reading Room (1st floor)

You are invited to an olive oil tasting and book odyssey in Frost Library’s Friendly Reading Room, Tuesday, Sept. 26, at 4 p.m. Chemistry professor Patricia O’Hara will discuss the exotic realms of olives and olive oil, and the circuitous journey that propelled her and her colleagues through Turkey, Spain, Italy, Greece, South Africa and Australia. Join us for a tale of travel that evolved into the book The Chemical Story of Olive Oil: From Grove to Table. Refreshments will be served!

Evie

Weekly Canine Office Hours

Whether you miss your dog, or simply want some canine affection, Huxley or Evie would love to see you! One or the other will be available weekly on Tuesdays from 4 - 5 p.m. for office hours at Frost Library. In nice weather, this will be held on the lawn in front of Frost. In poor weather, it will be beside Frost Cafe. This event is co-sponsored by the wellness team and Amherst College library.

"Quantum Magnets and Time Crystals: Having Fun with Trapped Ions" - Talk by Paul Hess

Professor Paul Hess of Middlebury College will discuss how understanding magnetic particles' interactions can help unravel the physics of exotic materials like high-temperature superconductors. It is known that such systems are governed by the laws of quantum mechanics, but when many quantum particles start interacting, the physics gets messy and hard to predict. To better understand these complicated systems, Hess and his colleagues built a quantum magnet from the ground up, using trapped and levitated atomic ions.

Hess will discuss how they used this experimental platform to realize a new phase of matter called a discrete time crystal. These time crystals are a kind of self-stabilizing clock, a behavior which could be turned on and off by changing the interactions between the magnetic spins in the trapped ion crystal.

Amherst Select Internship Program Orientation Session

Come to this orientation for the Amherst Select Internship Program - internships offered by alumni, parents and friends of the college specifically for Amherst students. You'll learn about the program, the types of internships offered, and what the requirements are for participation. Get a head start on your summer internship search and attend!

Insight Meditation Group

Whether you have meditated for a long time or have never meditated, come join us for this time of practice together. Come to relax, quiet your mind, learn how to experience less suffering and stress, explore Buddhist philosophy and psychology, or just talk about what it means to live from compassion and awareness--or because you are curious.
Led by Mark Hart, Buddhist advisor
mhart@amherst.edu

English Department Welcome Back Party

5:00 pm Johnson Chapel, The Chapel and Room 202

Chat with English professors, meet our wonderful majors and potential majors, learn about upcoming events, ask questions and enjoy delicious treats! Everyone is welcome. Bring your friends.

Success Kid

Start Off on the Right Track: Time Management Workshop (First-Year Experience)

This workshop for first-years will explore students' strategies on how to meet the many demands of being a student at Amherst College. Time management strategies will be shared through individual and group discussions. The goal of the workshop is to help students explore ways to be socially and academically successful. Date books will be available, but students are also encouraged to bring with them the tools they use to help them meet their personal goals and deadlines. This event will be facilitated by Kristen Brookes, Senior Writing Associate, Writing Center, and Charri Boykin-East, Senior Associate Dean of Students. Pizza will be provided. The first 25 people to arrive get a planner! Please reserve your spot.

Students Only

Amherst Queer and Trans People of Color Affinity Dinner

Amherst Queer and Trans People of Color (QTPOC) affinity group seeks to support students, staff and faculty in the five colleges who identify as queer/trans/genderqueer people of color. This closed QTPOC affinity group seeks to provide a safe space for queer people of color to build community, to celebrate all facets of our identities and to engage in meaningful discussion.

Join us for our QTPOC affinity kickoff dinner! We will be discuss both our expectations for this space and community agreements.

Film Screening: "Deep Play: Sport & Experimental Media"

The department of English and the film and media studies program are very pleased to be hosting Brett Kashmere next week for a screening of his curated film/video program, "Deep Play: Sport & Experimental Media." The program will screen on Tuesday, Sept. 26, at 7 p.m. in the Keefe Campus Center Theater and is free and open to the public.

Originally commissioned by the VISIONS screening series in Montreal, Deep Play features films and videos by Stan Brakhage, Nathaniel Dorsky, Kevin Jerome Everson, Ana Husman, Tara Mateik, Nam June Paik, Keith Piper and Lillian Schwartz. The program offers a cross-sectional overview of the ways that athletics have been treated in artists’ film and video, from examinations of vernacular and mass-mediated games to interplays with their geographies, architectures, histories and audiovisual grammar, to incisive analyses of sports’ gender codes and racialized dynamics. In exploring the convergences of sports and experimental media, Kashmere aims to suggest a cross-disciplinary equivalence of practice, skill and flow-- the state of intensified, rapturous performance known as “deep play.”

Brett Kashmere is a media artist, historian and curator living in Oakland, Calif. Combining archival research with materialist aesthetics and hybrid forms, Kashmere’s work explores the intersection of history and (counter-) memory, sports media and popular culture. His films and videos have screened internationally at the BFI London Film Festival, Milano Film Festival, Anthology Film Archives, British Film Institute and other venues. Kashmere has curated projects for La Cinematheque Quebecoise in Montreal, the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Strasbourg, New York's Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology, Light Cone in Paris, the Seoul Film Festival and other venues. His writing has appeared in journals, magazines and anthologies such as The Canadian Journal of Film Studies, Millennium Film Journal, Moving Image Review & Art Journal (MIRAJ), Carolee Schneemann: Unforgivable, Senses of Cinema and other publications. He was a founding director of The Antechamber Art Gallery & Cinematheque and Syracuse Experimental, a grassroots film and media collective. He is also the founding editor and publisher of INCITE Journal of Experimental Media. Kashmere holds bachelor of arts degree in film and video studies from the University of Regina, as well as a master of arts in film studies and a master of fine arts in studio arts from Concordia University in Montreal. He is currently a Ph.D. student in film and digital media at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Kashmere has taught film and video production at Concordia University's Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema and in the cinema studies program at Oberlin College.

Black-and-white, off-center closeup of Maaza Mengiste

Fiction Reading: Maaza Mengiste

Maaza Mengiste is a novelist and essayist. Her debut novel, Beneath the Lion’s Gaze, was selected by The Guardian as one of the 10 best contemporary African books; The New York Times Book Review called it “an important novel, rich in compassion for its anguished characters.” Both Mengiste's fiction and her nonfiction examine the individual lives at stake during migration, war and exile, and can be found in The New Yorker, Granta and The New York Times and on BBC Radio, among other places. Mengiste was a writer on the social activist documentary film Girl Rising. Her second novel, The Shadow King, is forthcoming.

This event will be followed by refreshments.

Kaffeeklatsch

German Kaffeeklatsch

Every Tuesday at 9 p.m. the German House hosts Kaffeeklatsch, an informal gathering for conversation and refreshments. This is a great opportunity to meet others interested in German language and culture. Come join us for Kaffeeklatsch Tuesdays at Porter House!

Tomorrow - Wed, Sep 27, 2017

Writing Retreat for Faculty and Staff

9:00 am - 12:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

The Writing Center supports faculty and staff in their own writing projects by hosting two weekly morning retreats. Our retreats are designed to encourage a regular writing practice, to emphasize healthy and sustainable approaches to productive writing and to support a community of writers at the College. Retreats will be held Wednesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. until noon. Attend regularly or drop in when you can.

Russian Table

The Russian Table is an opportunity for all interested in conversing in Russian to meet regularly with Russian faculty and students. We'll meet from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays on the Mezzanine level in Valentine Dining Hall. Russian speakers at all levels are very welcome!

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly, informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon - 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

SAGA Innovations Information Table

SAGA Innovations helps students in a very direct way. Students in participating schools receive personalized instruction in their regular school day in groups of two from professional, full-time tutoring fellows. In addition to academic instruction, their tutors mentor students on the behaviors, skills, attitudes and strategies that are critical to academic achievement. SAGA provides regular communication to families, keeping them engaged in their children’s learning, and address the needs of chronically underperforming students in a way that schools have not be able to effectively, given the school schedule and staffing constraints. Stop by SAGA Innovations' information table in Keefe Campus Center to learn more about their mission and opportunities.

Zotero Workshop

Want to make your research process more organized and efficient? Attend a one-hour tutorial to get started with Zotero! Zotero [zoh-TAIR-oh] is a free application that helps you collect, manage and cite your sources. It's available in all computer labs on campus and you can download it on your personal computer for free. If you're interested but can't make it to the workshop, click on the more information link below to see the full workshop schedule or to make an individual appointment.

Wednesday Wellness: Introduction to Feldenkrais with Fritha Pengelly

What does it mean to be ‘grounded?’ How can we improve our balance? As humans we stand on a relatively small base of support, and our center of gravity is high – making us a fairly unstable species. Moshe Feldenkrais understood this relationship and actually described ‘good posture’ as the ability to move in any direction without hesitation. In other words, our balance is dependent upon a dynamic stability, not a static one.

In this workshop we will explore how to find clear support through the skeleton in relationship to the ground for ease of movement and a sense of stability. When we find this support we lesson the pressures on our soft tissues and reduce general wear and tear and overall muscular tension.

Workshop will include exploration of one Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement lesson. No experience necessary – this workshop is open to faculty, staff and students! Yoga mat recommended.

R.A.D. At Amherst

R.A.D. is an internationally recognized self-defense program designed to develop and enhance your options for staying safe. This class is open to women, non-binary, transgender and gender non-conforming participants. All physical ability and skill levels are welcome. No prior experience is required. R.A.D. grads are always encouraged to come back! Sign up at rad@amherst.edu.

Nonbinary Community Forum

Join the Women's and Gender Center (WGC) and Queer Resource Center (QRC) in the WGC for a community forum for nonbinary, genderqueer, gender non-conforming and gender creative students, faculty and staff. This is a closed space for people who identify within these groups or who exploring their identities. We will discuss community needs and aspirations. We will build community together and share snacks and drinks. For questions and/or more information contact Jesse Beal.

Q&A with Ben Gold '11: Thriving in a Career in Medicine

Please join us for a talk and Q&A with Dr. Benjamin Gold ’11, a third-year internal medicine resident at Baylor College of Medicine. He is a medical writer, with pieces featured in the Houston Chronicle, KevinMD.com, and TMC Pulse. He blogs regularly at www.bengoldmd.com. His most recent article featured in the Houston Chronicle was about his 60-hour shift at a Houston ER during Hurricane Harvey. He is also a musician, playing French Horn for the Texas Medical Center Orchestra.

International Affairs Graduate Programs Info Session (featuring Tufts, Georgetown, Columbia, Johns Hopkins, Princeton)

Join representatives from a consortium of graduate schools focused on international affairs, which includes Tufts University (The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy), Georgetown University (Walsh School of Foreign Service), Columbia University (School of International and Public Affairs, SIPA), Johns Hopkins University (School of Advanced International Studies, SAIS) and Princeton University (The Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs). The representatives attending are Dan Birdsall, associate director of admissions and financial Aid at the Fletcher School, Erin Guild, associate director of Georgetown's Master of Science in Foreign Service program, Diane Nguyen, associate director of admissions at Columbia's SIPA, David Spaulding, assistant director of admissions at Johns Hopkins' SAIS and Melissa Lee, assistant director of graduate admissions at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School. This session will provide students with both specific information about each school's graduate degrees, as well as general information about applying to graduate school and potential careers in international affairs.

Information Session on SPAN 345: Puerto Rico: Diaspora Nation

This will be an information session on SPAN 345: Puerto Rico: Diaspora Nation, a spring semester course that includes travel to Puerto Rico during Spring Break 2018, with travel costs covered for all accepted students. If you are interested but cannot attend the meeting, please contact Professor Paul Schroeder Rodríguez at pschroeder@amherst.edu for instructions on how to apply.

The course description is as follows: Puerto Rico’s colonial relationship to the United States has generated waves of migration to the point that today, more Puerto Ricans live in the United States than on the island. In this course, we will examine the literary and cultural manifestations of this diaspora. The course will also integrate a community-based learning component in partnership with the Holyoke Public Library, which is working to preserve and make available artifacts and stories about Puerto Ricans in Holyoke. As part of this community component, students will conduct oral history interviews in Holyoke, and then travel to Puerto Rico during Spring Break in order to visit relatives of the interviewees, share this knowledge, interview them in turn, and bring the gathered oral histories and artifacts back to Holyoke for sharing and archiving. During the trip to Puerto Rico we will also conduct cultural visits directly related to the course material. Conducted in Spanish. Limited to 12 students, with priority given to Spanish majors.

Students Only

Ongoing Events

Rotherwas Room, photo by Maria Stenzel

Study at the Mead!

Throughout the week, we will have lots of art activities to help you destress from finals period. We also have comfy chairs, plenty of outlets, great lighting, and extra tables to give you an inspirational place to work and study.

Closed on Mondays, but open until Midnight on school nights!

"Our" Story Exhibit: 400 Years of Wampanoag History

“Our” Story is an interactive, multimedia exhibit that frames the 1620 Pilgrim arrival in Plymouth within a long history of Wampanoag adaptation and innovation. The exhibit's content ranges from videos by award-winning Mashpee journalist, author and filmmaker Paula Peters, to art by Mashpee artist, writer and activist Robert Peters and his son, Robert Peters Jr.

Each year, a new theme is added to the traveling exhibit; the first installation debuted in 2014 with “Captured 1614” providing a critical back story to colonization and the roots of the American holiday of Thanksgiving. “The Messenger Runner” added new context regarding the Wampanoag tribe’s communication traditions. The newest panel “The Great Dying” depicts the catastrophic effects of a plague that devastated the Wampanoag nation between 1616 and 1619.