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Event type

Event Calendar

Sunday, October 1, 2017

Sun, Oct 1, 2017

Pixelated image of three members of the Amherst College Gospel Choir in purple robes with their hands clasped in front of them

The Hermenia T. Gardner Bi-Semester Christian Worship Service

1:00 pm Chapin Hall, Chapin Chapel

The Hermenia T. Gardner Bi-Semester Worship Series will offer service on Sunday, Oct. 1, at 1 p.m. in Chapin Chapel.

Since 1993, the series has provided Christian worship services rooted in the African-American tradition to the Amherst community. The Rev. Jean-Luc Charles '94 will be the preacher.

The service features the Amherst College Gospel Choir, Resurrect and a soul food reception immediately following. All are welcome!

Ongoing Events

Rotherwas Room, photo by Maria Stenzel

Study at the Mead!

Throughout the week, we will have lots of art activities to help you destress from finals period. We also have comfy chairs, plenty of outlets, great lighting, and extra tables to give you an inspirational place to work and study.

Closed on Mondays, but open until Midnight on school nights!

"Our" Story Exhibit: 400 Years of Wampanoag History

“Our” Story is an interactive, multimedia exhibit that frames the 1620 Pilgrim arrival in Plymouth within a long history of Wampanoag adaptation and innovation. The exhibit's content ranges from videos by award-winning Mashpee journalist, author and filmmaker Paula Peters, to art by Mashpee artist, writer and activist Robert Peters and his son, Robert Peters Jr.

Each year, a new theme is added to the traveling exhibit; the first installation debuted in 2014 with “Captured 1614” providing a critical back story to colonization and the roots of the American holiday of Thanksgiving. “The Messenger Runner” added new context regarding the Wampanoag tribe’s communication traditions. The newest panel “The Great Dying” depicts the catastrophic effects of a plague that devastated the Wampanoag nation between 1616 and 1619.