Event Calendar

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Thu, Oct 12, 2017

Writing Retreat for Faculty and Staff

9:00 am - 12:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

The Writing Center supports faculty and staff in their own writing projects by hosting two weekly morning retreats. Our retreats are designed to encourage a regular writing practice, to emphasize healthy and sustainable approaches to productive writing and to support a community of writers at the College. Retreats will be held Wednesdays and Thursdays from 9 a.m. until noon. Attend regularly or drop in when you can.

French Table

If you are interested in speaking French or learning about French culture, come and join the French table on the Mezzanine in Valentine Hall on Thursdays from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. The French table is open to students, faculty, staff and anyone who is interested in having informal conversations in French. All levels are welcome! We look forward to meeting you!

Food for Thought Lunch - Microsoft Cloud AI Enablement Senior Program Manager, Marla Michel

Join us in the Loeb Center for a lunch discussion with Marla Michel, senior program manager for Cloud AI Enablement at Microsoft. Marla will discuss her career in software engineering and data science, her current work at Microsoft, and her perspective on the future of AI and cloud technologies. Lunch from The Works Bakery Café will be provided. Space is limited to 15 students; RSVP in Quest.

Marla Michel is a Senior Program Manager in the Microsoft Cloud AI Enablement team where she iss working to bring Microsoft AI technology to businesses through training. Prior to joining Microsoft in 2016, she worked for the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in a variety of roles including: Director of Strategic Programs for the UMass Center for Data Science, Director of Regional Engagement, and Executive Director of Research Liaison and Development. She also served as the Director of the Scibelli Enterprise Center at the Springfield Technology Park, growing the Pioneer Valley’s future businesses and its leaders. She received a B.S. in Computer Science and Mathematics from the University at Albany - SUNY and a M.S. in Software Engineering from Monmouth University. She moved to the Pioneer Valley in 1996 from New Jersey where she worked for AT&T Bell Laboratories as a member of the Software Technology Center and a member of the original AT&T Smart Phone team. She is also a founding board member of Leadership Pioneer Valley.

Michel will also be holding office hours to discuss graduate school and career options related to engineering and data science with students from 1:30–3 p.m. Space is limited; to participate, students must register for a specific appointment time through Quest.

Lunch in McCaffrey with DIS Academic Director and Faculty Member

Come learn the many options available in Copenhagen on DIS-Study in Scandinavia with Dr. Helle Rytkønen, academic director & faculty member, over lunch in McCaffrey. DIS has many program tracks, each with a core course that includes a study tour. Students have successfully studied with many of their options (though not all are approved). Dr. Rytkønen has a Ph.D. in Modern Thought and Literature from Stanford University and received both an M.S. and B.S. from the University of Copenhagen. Students who have studied abroad with DIS will also be in attendance!

Office Hours with Microsoft Cloud AI Enablement Senior Program Manager, Marla Michel

Marla Michel, senior program manager of Microsoft Cloud AI Enablement, will be coming to campus to host 20-minute informational meetings for students interested in learning about a careers in data science, software engineering, and technical project management and strategy. RSVP through Quest to reserve a 20-minute appointment. Space is limited.

Marla Michel is a Senior Program Manager in the Microsoft Cloud AI Enablement team, where she is working to bring Microsoft AI technology to businesses through training. Prior to joining Microsoft in 2016, she worked for the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in a variety of roles including: Director of Strategic Programs for the UMass Center for Data Science, Director of Regional Engagement, and Executive Director of Research Liaison and Development. She also served as the Director of the Scibelli Enterprise Center at the Springfield Technology Park, growing the Pioneer Valley’s future businesses and its leaders.

She received a B.S. in Computer Science and Mathematics from the University at Albany - SUNY and a M.S. in Software Engineering from Monmouth University. She moved to the Pioneer Valley in 1996 from New Jersey where she worked for AT&T Bell Laboratories as a member of the Software Technology Center and a member of the original AT&T Smart Phone team. She is also a founding board member of Leadership Pioneer Valley.

Michel will also be sharing about her career in software engineering and data science, her current work at Microsoft, and her perspective on the future of AI and cloud technologies at the Loeb Center Food for Thought Lunch. Space is limited to 15 people; RSVP required through Quest.

Keefe Campus Center Community Hour

Stop by the Amherst College Campus Center every Thursday for a fun filled hour of community, popcorn and music! Throughout the semester we will offer various community building events in the campus center and on the Green. Make sure to stop by for bonfires, dance parties and self-care activities. All are welcome to join.

This event is sponsored by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Office of Student Affairs, the Dean of the Faculty, The Office of the President, Dining Services, Facilities and the Mail Room.

Keefe Community Hour: Pumpkin Painting & S'mores!

Stop by the Amherst College Campus Center every Thursday for a fun filled hour of community, popcorn and music. Throughout the semester we will offer various community building events in the campus center and on the Green.

This week, the WGC will be co-hosting the Keefe Campus Center Community Hour. Please join us for s'mores and pumpkin decorating! All are welcome! For more information contact wgc@amherst.edu

Lesley Stern sitting behind a table, speaking into a microphone and holding up both hands

Keyssar Lecture: Lesley Stern

The Film & Media Studies Program at Amherst College presents the Helene Keyssar Distinguished Lecture Series, featuring Lesley Stern this fall! Please join us Oct. 12 from 4 to 6 p.m. in Merrill Science 2. This event is free and open to the public.

Lesley Stern is the author of Dead and Alive: The Body as Cinematic Thing, The Smoking Book and The Scorsese Connection, and she is the co-editor of Falling For You: Essays on Cinema and Performance. Her work moves between a number of disciplinary locations and spans both theory and production. Although her reputation was established in the fields of film theory and history, she is also known for her fictocritical writing. Stern was born and raised in Zimbabwe, and she has taught in a number of universities around the globe (including at the University of Zimbabwe, Glasgow University, La Trobe and Murdoch Universities, The University of New South Wales and the University of California, Irvine) before moving to the University of California, San Diego, in 2000. In thinking through the “poetry” of the videographic essay, her talk draws on her innovative critical-creative approach to moving-image media.

Closeup of a young woman with long dark hair and a crown of flowers, her eyes and fingers open wide; behind her is a blurry, monstrous figure

Russian Film Screening: VIY (ВИЙ)

4:30 pm Keefe Campus Center, Theater (Room 008)

A cult-classic, Soviet-era adaptation of Nikolai Gogol’s 1835 horror novella, in which a chance encounter between a seminary student and a witch leads to murder and mayhem in the Ukrainian countryside. This film is directed by Konstantin Ershov and became one of the most popular films of 1968, with over 30 million viewers across the Soviet Union.

This movie is 78 minutes long and will be screened at both 4:30 and 7:30 p.m.

Event poster featuring black silhouettes of two hands reaching out to each other, against a green background

"What Are Moral Reasons?": Stephen Darwall Presents the 12th Amherst Lecture in Philosophy

4:30 pm - 7:00 pm Fayerweather Hall, Pruyne Lecture Hall (Room 115)

Stephen Darwall, the Andrew Downey Orrick Professor of Philosophy at Yale University, will give the 12th Amherst Lecture in Philosophy on Thursday, Oct. 12. The title of his talk is "What Are Moral Reasons?," and it is event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow. For further information, please contact Dee Brace of the Department of Philosophy at Amherst College.

DIS Abroad Info Session

Did you know that the UN World Happiness Report has rated Danes as the happiest people on earth two years in a row? We have an opportunity for you to study among the "happiest" people on earth, at least according to the UN.

Come learn about DIS Abroad and learn how you can study abroad in Copenhagen, Denmark during their info session in FAYE 113 between 4:30 and 5:30 p.m.

Building Your Pathway to a Summer Internship

Searching for a summer internship can feel daunting and it’s difficult to know where or how to start. Come learn from Loeb Center staff about tools and best practices, including reflecting on skills, values and interests, to creative an effective strategy for landing the right internship for you.

R.A.D. At Amherst

R.A.D. is an internationally recognized self-defense program designed to develop and enhance your options for staying safe. This class is open to women, non-binary, transgender and gender non-conforming participants. All physical ability and skill levels are welcome. No prior experience is required. R.A.D. grads are always encouraged to come back! Sign up at rad@amherst.edu.

Digital Africas Thumbnail

Digital Africas Symposium

The symposium addresses how 21st century sub-Saharan African writers use and respond to digital technologies when they publish traditional print texts, experiment with online platforms or interact with local and international audiences through social media. Apart from showcasing the formal innovations such new modes of delivery facilitate, we will consider the often unanticipated connections they facilitate among writers, texts and reading publics. Ultimately, the questions we hope to explore about the relationship between forms of representation and modes of production will help re-situate the work of today’s African writers and artists within the digital contexts that have enabled and circumscribed their success. The schedule is as follows:

Thursday, October 12:
5 p.m. “Aesthetic Judgment in the Era of the Digital” - Keynote by Ato Quayson

Friday, October 13:
10:30 a.m. "Why Walk the Line?" - Panel discussion with Kwabena Opoku-Agyemang, Moses Kilolo and Dami Ajayi, facilitated by Kim Dionne

1 p.m. "When Poetry Goes Public" - Panel discussion with Meg Arenberg, Shola Adenekan and Kwame Dawes, facilitated by Katwiwa Mule

2:45 p.m. "Who Reads, Who Writes?" - Panel discussion with Bhakti Shringapure, James Yeku and Stephanie Bosch Santana, facilitated by Stephen Clingman

5 p.m. "Shifting Margins: Digital Media and New African Textual Practices" - Keynote by Akin Adesokan

Saturday, October 14:
10:30 a.m. "What's Code Got to Do with It?" - Panel discussion with Ainehi Edoro, Sandy Baldwin and Marisa Parham, facilitated by Amelie Hastie

1 p.m. "New Directions - Old Challenges" - Panel discussion with Keguro Macharia, Kristen Stern and Wambui Mwangi, facillitated by Dawn Fulton

Computer chip in the shape of the African continent

“Aesthetic Judgment in the Era of the Digital": Digital Africas Keynote by Ato Quayson

5:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

Ato Quayson will present the first Digital Africas keynote address, “Aesthetic Judgment in the Era of the Digital.” Quayson is professor of English and director of the Centre for Diaspora Studies at the University of Toronto and visiting professor in the Department of English at New York University. His teaching and research interests include postcolonial and diasporic writing, literary theory, tragedy (from the Greeks to the present day), Shakespeare, representations of disability, magical realism and postmodernism and urban studies. His book, Oxford Street, Accra: City Life and the Itineraries of Transnationalism, was co-winner of the Urban History Association's top award in the international category for books published in 2013–14.

Abstract: Marshall McLuhan famously noted that “the medium is the message.” At the time when he wrote this in 1964, he had in mind primarily televisual and radio cultures. But what do we make now of the specific character of aesthetic judgement in an era of electronic multimodality made available by and through the internet with respect to text (literature), still images (art and photography), moving images (film), sound (music) and infrastructure (architecture)? How are these to be explored together as part of a new paradigm of aesthetic judgement, and what concepts do the humanities have to contribute to this exploration? Related to this is a second question pertaining to stories. The telling of stories has historically provided humans with the means of social identification, and also with ways by which to invite others’ identification with the self. These have changed historically from oral storytelling throughout human history, to newspapers and the novel in the 19th and much of the 20th century (recall Benedict Anderson’s Imagined Communities), through the soap operas and telenovelas of the 1970s, to the reality TV shows of the 1990s and on to the social media we have today. If stories shape our view of the world, then in what ways are the different media of telling stories in the world today affecting the shaping of aesthetic judgement? The lecture will be devised as a series of provocations around these and related questions.

The symposium addresses how 21st-century sub-Saharan African writers use and respond to digital technologies when they publish traditional print texts, experiment with online platforms or interact with local and international audiences through social media. Apart from showcasing the formal innovations such new modes of delivery facilitate, we will consider the often unanticipated connections they facilitate among writers, texts and reading publics. Ultimately, the questions we hope to explore about the relationship between forms of representation and modes of production will help re-situate the work of today’s African writers and artists within the digital contexts that have enabled and circumscribed their success.

First Year Loeb Seminar: Finding Your Foundation

First year students, the Loeb Center for Career Exploration and Planning is part of your journey here at Amherst, from start to finish. We expect you to start your journey this fall through this fun and interactive workshop. You can get to know other first year students, identify your skills, understand how your values, culture and family influence your thinking about work and careers and also prepare for meaningful summer experiences such as internships, research, summer jobs, studying abroad, volunteering and more. R.S.V.P. required. Don’t miss out!

Peer Advocates Meet and Greet

Do you fondue? We do! Come meet the Peer Advocates over chocolate fondue-- everything you need to make chocolate-covered treats will be provided! The PAs will be getting to know people and talking about our upcoming hiring process Thursday, October 12, in the Morris Pratt Ballroom.

Students Only
Event poster featuring photos of Singh and Malley and a map of the Middle East

"America and the Middle East: Where to From Here?"

6:30 pm Fayerweather Hall, Pruyne Lecture Hall

Robert Malley, former Middle East Advisor to President Obama, and Michael Singh, former senior director for Middle East and North Africa on the National Security Council under President Bush, will join Professor Steven Simon to discuss the future of U.S. involvement in the Middle East.

Trump: Point/Counterpoint series - Trump and the Middle East

The "Trump: Point/Counterpoint" conversation series features Amherst College Professor, and host of NEPR's "In Contrast", Ilan Stavans and a guest engaging in thoughtful discussion and attempting to bridge the ideological divide growing in our nation.

For part three of the series, join Ilan and his guest, Robin Wright, as they discuss "Trump in the Middle East".

Robin Wright is a contributing writer to The New Yorker and a joint fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. She has reported from more than 140 countries on six continents. She is a former diplomatic correspondent for The Washington Post. She has also written for The New York Times Magazine, TIME, The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, The Atlantic, Foreign Affairs and many others. Wright has been a fellow at the Brookings Institution, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace as well as Yale, Duke, Dartmouth, and the University of California.

Among several awards, Wright received the U.N. Correspondents Gold Medal, the National Magazine Award for reportage from Iran in The New Yorker, and the Overseas Press Club Award for "best reporting in any medium requiring exceptional courage and initiative" for coverage of African wars. The American Academy of Diplomacy selected Wright as the journalist of the year for her “distinguished reporting and analysis of international affairs.” She also won the National Press Club Award for diplomatic reporting and has been the recipient of a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation grant.

She lectures extensively around the United States and has been a television commentator on morning and evening news programs on ABC, NBC, CBS, PBS, CNN and MSNBC as well as "Meet the Press," "Face the Nation," "This Week," “Nightline," “PBS Newshour,” "Frontline," “Charlie Rose,” "Washington Week in Review," “Hardball,” “Morning Joe,” “Anderson Cooper 360,” “The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer,” “The Colbert Report” and HBO’s “Real Time.”

Wright’s most recent book is “Rock the Casbah: Rage and Rebellion across the Islamic world.” It was selected as the Best Book on International Affairs by the Overseas Press Club. Her other books include “Dreams and Shadows: The Future of the Middle East” (2008), which The New York Times and The Washington Post both selected as one of the most notable books of the year. She was the editor of “The Iran Primer: Power, Politics and U.S. Policy” (2010). Her other books include “The Last Great Revolution: Turmoil and Transformation in Iran” (2000), which was selected as one of the 25 most memorable books of the year 2000 by the New York Library Association, "Sacred Rage: The Wrath of Militant Islam" (2001), "Flashpoints: Promise and Peril in a New World" (1991), and "In the Name of God: The Khomeini Decade" (1989).

This event is free and open to the public.
Presented by the Amherst College Class of 1970

Series Information

"A Brief History of the North Korea Nuclear Weapons Issue"

This Amherst Political Union event features Bonnie Jenkins, the State Department's Coordinator for Threat Reduction Programs in the Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation and the U.S. representative to the G7 Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons of Mass Destruction.

The event will take place on Thursday, Oct. 12, at 7 p.m. in Paino Lecture Room. Refreshments will be served.

Teach For America Information Session

Education opens doors of opportunity. It transforms life outcomes and empowers communities. Teach For America leaders work to ensure all kids receive a fair and just education. During the two years that participants teach with Teach For America, they are called corps members.

Corps members have the opportunity to partner with students and families in one of 53 regions across the nation where school leaders rely on TFA teachers to fill open roles. Participants will be challenged to think creatively and lead boldly, while creating opportunity for students. Join TFA representative Abigail Schnibbe for this information session to learn more about opportunities and the application process.

CISE Late Night Study Hours

The Center for International Student Engagement (CISE) is holding late night study hours each Thursday, from 7-10 p.m. Join us for snacks, camaraderie, and a collective attempt to chip away at all of the work we have to do! For more information, contact internationalstudents@amherst.edu

La Tertulia

8:00 pm - 9:00 pm Newport House, Common Room (1st Floor)

Do you want to practice your Spanish language skills and learn more about Hispanic culture? Please come join us at La Tertulia, a weekly informal Spanish conversation gathering with hot chocolate and cookies! La Tertulia is held every Thursday from 8 - 9 p.m. in the Common Room of Newport House. Students of all levels, faculty, staff and community members are welcome. We hope to see you there!

Jazz@Schwemm's featuring the Geoff Cunningham Trio

Join us on Thursday nights in October for our fall semester run of Jazz@Schwemm's performances. Each performance brings a local professional group to campus, who will perform in the 9 p.m. hour. This is followed by a student jazz combo in the 10 p.m. hour.
October 12 features trumpeter Geoff Cunningham accompanied by Jason Schwartz and Jon Fisher with an added appearance by pianist Stephen Page. The student jazz combo Mustang Madness will follow in the 10 p.m. hour.
We wish to thank Paul Gallegos, Jazz@Amherst and the management of Schwemm's Coffeehouse for the support and opportunity to present music in this space.

Ongoing Events

"Our" Story Exhibit: 400 Years of Wampanoag History

“Our” Story is an interactive, multimedia exhibit that frames the 1620 Pilgrim arrival in Plymouth within a long history of Wampanoag adaptation and innovation. The exhibit's content ranges from videos by award-winning Mashpee journalist, author and filmmaker Paula Peters, to art by Mashpee artist, writer and activist Robert Peters and his son, Robert Peters Jr.

Each year, a new theme is added to the traveling exhibit; the first installation debuted in 2014 with “Captured 1614” providing a critical back story to colonization and the roots of the American holiday of Thanksgiving. “The Messenger Runner” added new context regarding the Wampanoag tribe’s communication traditions. The newest panel “The Great Dying” depicts the catastrophic effects of a plague that devastated the Wampanoag nation between 1616 and 1619.

Mammoth in library space

Mammoths in (library) space: A library orientation

Never been in a six floor library before? Need to find books “on reserve” but not sure where to go? Looking to learn more about the library’s spaces, resources and services? Stop by Frost Library anytime this month and explore library space: take the self-directed Mammoths in (Library) Space Tour! To begin the tour, go to the welcome station across from Frost's circulation desk (look for the poster with balloons) and pick up a library orientation sticker card.

Complete the tour and receive a gift card to Frost Cafe plus a chance to win our grand prize: a unique space mammoth t-shirt or tote and a gift card to Antonio’s Pizza!