Event Calendar

September 2018

Sun, Sep 2, 2018

Photo of Danielle Allen

2018 DeMott Lecture - Danielle Allen

The annual DeMott lecture will be on Sunday, September 2, at 4 p.m. in Johnson Chapel, and will be given by Danielle Allen, a former trustee of Amherst College. Allen received an honorary degree from Amherst College at the 2018 Commencement ceremony. She is a classicist and political theorist, the James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University and director of Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics.

The DeMott lecture is the welcome address to incoming students. It will be live streamed for returning students, alumni and trustees who may wish to watch. Livestream is available at www.amherst.edu/go/webcast

Information about Professor Benjamin DeMott and previous DeMott lectures, including last year’s talk given by attorney Rev. Phillip Jackson '86, is available on the DeMott portion of our website.

Wed, Sep 5, 2018

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Thu, Sep 6, 2018

lermontov portrait

First Meeting of Russian 401: Advanced Studies in Russian Literature and Culture

4:00 pm Webster Hall, 207 (Lounge)

The first meeting of RUSS-401: Advanced Studies in Russian Literature and Culture with Tatiana Iurievna will take place on Thursday, September 6 at 4 p.m. in the Russian Department Lounge (207 Webster Hall).

During that meeting, the regular meeting times for the semester will be discussed and decided on.

Fri, Sep 7, 2018

Poster board on an easel

Annual Summer Research Poster Session

The annual Summer Research Poster Session is on Friday, Sept. 7, in the new Science Center. Join us for an opportunity recognize student achievement and experience the state-of-the-art 250,000-square-foot facility, which is home to the Departments of Biology, Biochemistry and Biophysics, Chemistry, Computer Science, Physics and Astronomy, Neuroscience and Psychology. While there, cast your vote for your favorite research project, take a tour of the facility, and enjoy appetizers, hand-piped cannoli from Meriano’s Bake Shoppe and one of many science-themed treats. All are welcomed and encouraged to attend.

Every summer, dozens of Amherst College students engage in research in the physical sciences, natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. From laboratories to archives to the field, students can spend six or more weeks extending their classroom research, working on their senior theses or assisting in faculty experiments. The Summer Research Poster Session is an opportunity for student researchers to share works in progress, summer research stories, thesis ideas and experimental results.

Mon, Sep 10, 2018

First GlobeMed Meeting

Are you interested in easing global health inequities? Come to the first meeting of one of the most active groups on campus, GlobeMed! GlobeMed at Amherst is a chapter of a national organization which focuses on long-term philanthropy. GlobeMed partners with Heart and Sole Africa, which battles podoconiosis in Rwanda by empowering those affected by podoconiosis. We also have discussions on contemporary issues in public health, host speaker events, and provide opportunities to get involved in all of these activities! Come to the first meeting on Monday, September 10, from 8-9 p.m. in Webster 220 to learn more! Donuts will be served.

Students Only

Charles Drew Health Professions Society Introductory Meeting

Are you thinking about a career in the health professions? Come to Charles Drew Health Professions Society's introductory meeting on Monday, September 10. Our first meeting is a great opportunity to get to know one another, learn about several awesome events we have planned for the semester, ask questions, and help shape the direction of CDHPS this year! Find us in the McCaffrey Room (the first door on the right-hand side when you enter Keefe) at 8 p.m. with snacks -- we're looking forward to meeting you! If you can't make the meeting, but you'd like to receieve a copy of the meeting notes, please email our president, Alexandra Theall, at atheall19@amherst.edu .

Students Only

Wed, Sep 12, 2018

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Thu, Sep 13, 2018

Headshot of William Mazzarella

"Why Is Trump So Enjoyable?" with William Mazzarella

How can we begin to explain the apparent imperviousness of Trump’s popularity to gaffes and scandals that would long since have brought down any other politician? In order to begin to answer this question, we need to come grips with the dimension of enjoyment that drives attachment – as well as opposition – to the Trump phenomenon. One of the most important implications of interpreting politics through the lens of enjoyment is the necessity of moving beyond merely interest-based and utility-based analyses of public life.

Join us as William Mazzarella, professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago, speaks on "Why Is Trump So Enjoyable?" This talk will include responses from Kenneth Tucker of Mount Holyoke College, Monique Roelofs of Hampshire College and Andrew Poe of Amherst College.

George Will

George Will: "Globalism and Its Discontents: Point/Counterpoint with Ilan Stavans"

Join us as Professor Stavans speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist George Will.

The "Globalism and Its Discontents: Point/Counterpoint" conversation series features Amherst College professor, and host of NEPR's In Contrast, Ilan Stavans and a guest engaging in thoughtful discussion and attempting to bridge the ideological divide growing in our nation.

The rise of populism worldwide today, personified by Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin, is a fierce reaction to globalism policies of the past few decades. Anti-immigration movements in Europe and the United States; assaults on free speech; racial profiling; polarized politics; intolerance for gender, economic and linguistic diversity; the building of walls and the renegotiation of international trade treaties; the tension between rural and urban communities; and the questioning of the basic tenets of pluralism are some of the symptoms. Democracy itself might be at peril.

George Will writes a twice-weekly column on politics and domestic and foreign affairs. He began his column with The Washington Post in 1974, and he received the Pulitzer Prize for commentary in 1977. He is also a regular contributor to MSNBC and NBC News. His books include: One Man’s America: The Pleasures and Provocations of Our Singular Nation (2008), Restoration: Congress, Term Limits and the Recovery of Deliberative Democracy (1992), Men at Work: The Craft of Baseball (1989), The New Season: A Spectator’s Guide to the 1988 Election (1987) and Statecraft as Soulcraft (1983). Will grew up in Champaign, Ill., attended Trinity College and Oxford University, and received a Ph.D. from Princeton University.

Free and open to the public
"Point/Counterpoint" is co-sponsored by NEPR’s In Contrast and by a generous gift from 36 members of the 50th Reunion Class of 1970.

Find more information about the other speakers in the series here.

Interviews with previous guests, and others, are available through Ilan Stavans' NEPR show In Contrast. Have a listen!

Fri, Sep 14, 2018

Math & Stats WELCOME TEA, Sept. 14, 3:00 p.m., Ford Hall Event Space 107

Welcome Tea: Department of Math & Stats

The Department of Mathematics & Statistics welcomes students to a new academic year! Please join us for our annual "Welcome Tea" event. We look forward to hearing what you have been up to over the summer. We will have food, drinks and games. Please come for as long or as short a time as you can. This event is open to Math & Stats majors, prospective majors, fellow travelers and Math & Stats enthusiasts.

Mon, Sep 17, 2018

Holda Anagho ’14 wearing a black shirt, standing in front of green foliage and smiling

Biology Monday Seminar: "Uukuniemi Virus Entry and Fusion in Mammalian Cells" with Holda Anagho '14

Holda Anagho ’14 is a doctoral student in infection biology at Hannover Medical School in Germany, where she studies interactions between Hepatitis Delta Virus (HDV) and host cells in the lab of Professor Thomas von Hahn, M.D. At Amherst, she majored in biology, where she first became excited about research after a summer internship in Professor Caroline Goutte’s lab. While at Amherst, she also took several German language courses and served as president of the German theme house. After graduation, she spent a year as a research fellow at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, where she conducted research on the effects of immunomodulatory drugs in primary effusion lymphoma, caused by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in the lab of Dr. Robert Yarchoan '71, M.D. There she first became interested in viruses. With generous support from Amherst College through the Kellogg Fellowship, she enrolled in the master's program in molecular biosciences at the University of Heidelberg in Germany, where she majored in infectious diseases. She did her master's thesis research in the lab of Dr. Pierre-Yves Lozach on entry and fusion of the Uukuniemi phlebovirus (UUKV) in mammalian cells. UUKV is an arthropod-borne virus closely related to emerging viruses that are highly pathogenic to humans, including Rift Valley fever virus, Heartland virus and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. UUKV, which is nonpathogenic to humans, is therefore used as a model system to study its more pathogenic counterparts.

UUKV is closely related to emerging pathogenic viruses in the Phenuiviridae family that cause severe and sometimes fatal disease in humans, animals and plants. To release its viral genome into a cell, Uukuniemi virus must fuse its viral membrane with the host cell membrane. Fusion of the UUKV membrane is mediated by the viral Glycoprotein C (GC), which is thought to be a class II fusion protein. We aimed to characterize mechanisms of UUKV fusion in mammalian cells. To this end, we analyzed the effect of low pH on virus binding and entry, conducted functional studies of UUKV GC mutants to analyze effects on viral fusion, and tested peptides corresponding to regions of the GC ectodomain for their ability to inhibit viral entry.

Poster featuring lecture information on stripes of orange over a background sketch of a Chinese scholar

"Trying Not to Try: Ancient China, Modern Science and the Power of Spontaneity"

Edward Slingerland is Distinguished University Scholar and Professor of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia, with associate appointments in philosophy and psychology. His research specialties and teaching interests include early Chinese thought, religious studies, cognitive linguistics, ethics, and the relationship between the humanities and the natural sciences. His publications include several academic monographs and edited volumes and approximately 30 refereed articles in top journals in a wide variety of fields.

Many early Chinese thinkers had as their spiritual ideal the state of wu-wei, or effortless action. By advocating spontaneity as an explicit moral and religious goal, they inevitably involved themselves in the paradox of wu-wei—the problem of how one can try not to try—which later became one of the central tensions in East Asian religious thought. In this talk, Slingerland will look at the paradox from both an early Chinese and a contemporary perspective, drawing upon work in economics, social psychology, cognitive neuroscience and evolutionary theory to argue that this paradox is a real one, and is moreover intimately tied up with cooperation dilemmas in large-scale societies and concerns about trust and moral hypocrisy.

The public is welcome. Refreshments and meet-and-greet will follow the lecture.

Wed, Sep 19, 2018

Food for Thought with Bill Ackerman ’88: An Unconventional Career Path in Business

Bill Ackerman ’88 epitomizes how the Amherst College liberal arts education prepares you to think innovatively, constantly seek new opportunities, and explore different career paths. Bill will be speaking at the Loeb Center's Food For Thought Lunch on September 19. Come learn more about Bill’s career and how his liberal arts education at Amherst College led to his unique career path in business, including roles in financial management, journalism, corporate audit, sales, strategy, investment advice, and now as the head of human resources at Fidelity Investments.

Bill is passionate about identifying and solving business opportunities and problems in unique ways rather than the easy way. He believes that an organization’s strongest assets are often their people and that for an organization to thrive, it is important that every person in the organization feels valued. He has brought this philosophy to his latest opportunity, and his first stint in HR, as the head of human resources at Fidelity Investments. He is eager to share his insights and perspectives on how your liberal arts education can lead you on a path not only of self-discovery, but also a constant weaving path of learning and new opportunities (in and out of business). Bill’s full biography is below.

Lunch will be served. Please register in advance through Handshake. Space is limited and a waiting list will begin once the seats are filled.

Full Biography for Bill Ackerman ’88
Bill Ackerman is head of Human Resources (HR) for Fidelity Investments, a leading provider of investment management, retirement planning, portfolio guidance, brokerage, benefits outsourcing and other financial products and services to more than 26 million individuals, institutions and financial intermediaries. During his tenure with the firm, Mr. Ackerman has held a variety of leadership positions across several of the company’s divisions. He was named head of Human Resources in 2014 and currently oversees the HR function, the Fidelity Real Estate Company, and Enterprise Events & Corporate Sponsorships. Prior to this role, he led the firm’s Strategy and Planning Office.

Mr. Ackerman has acted in strategic operating roles in various parts of Fidelity, including the company’s Personal Investing and Workplace Solutions divisions. In addition, he held several leadership positions within Fidelity’s COLT Telecom Group in London, including: COLT Finance & Planning; COLT Marketing Development; and COLT eBusiness. He also held the roles of senior vice president, Business Development and chief financial officer for Fidelity Ventures Telecom Group in Boston and Tokyo.

Prior to joining Fidelity, Mr. Ackerman worked at General Electric (GE) where he held a number of business and finance-related roles at GE business units around the world. He is a graduate of GE’s Financial Management program and Corporate Audit Staff. Mr. Ackerman was a journalist in California and a freelance writer for other publications.

Mr. Ackerman earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Amherst College, where he majored in economics. He earned his master’s degree in Communications from Stanford University.

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Tess Taylor by the seaside

CHI Salon: Tess Taylor '99

Tess Taylor's chapbook The Misremembered World was selected by Eavan Boland for the Poetry Society of America’s inaugural chapbook fellowship. The San Francisco Chronicle called her first book, The Forage House, “stunning,” and it was a finalist for the Believer Poetry Award. Her second book, Work & Days, was called “our moment’s Georgic” by critic Stephanie Burt and named one of the 10 best books of poetry of 2016 by The New York Times. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, Boston Review, Harvard Review, The Times Literary Supplement and other publications. Taylor chairs the poetry committee of the National Book Critics Circle, is currently the on-air poetry reviewer for NPR’s All Things Considered, and has taught at UC Berkeley, St. Mary’s College and Whittier College. She was most recently a Distinguished Fulbright U.S. Scholar at the Seamus Heaney Centre at Queen’s University in Belfast. This spring she is Anne Spencer Poet-in-Residence at Randolph College in Lynchburg, Va.

At our salon, Tess Taylor will be doing select poetry readings from her books The Forage House and Work & Days.

Childcare will be provided.

Thu, Sep 20, 2018

LJST Lecture Series presents "Post-Truth as a Precursor to Authoritarianism"

Lee McIntyre will present a paper entitled “Post-Truth as a Precursor to Authoritarianism.” This is the first presentation in a series of seminars that will take place this year on the theme “Law and Illiberalism.”

Lee McIntyre is a research fellow at the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University and a lecturer in ethics at Harvard Extension School. Formerly Executive Director of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University, McIntyre is the author of Dark Ages: The Case for a Science of Human Behavior and Respecting Truth: Willful Ignorance in the Internet Age. His latest book Post-Truth explores the problem of “fake news” and “alternative facts” as they relate to the defense of truth.

To receive a copy of the paper which will explore the conceptual and historical roots of how the recent attack on truth in the United States may be exploited for political purposes, and how those of us who are concerned about the values of liberalism can learn to fight back, please email Megan Estes, the Law, Jurisprudence and Social Thought (LJST) Department Coordinator.

Purple, teal and white image showing the name SASKIA SASSEN above dialogue bubbles and a globe

Saskia Sassen - "Globalism and Its Discontents: Point/Counterpoint with Ilan Stavans"

Join us as Professor Stavans speaks with sociologist and professor Saskia Sassen.

The "Globalism and Its Discontents: Point/Counterpoint" conversation series features Amherst College professor, and host of NEPR's In Contrast, Ilan Stavans and a guest engaging in thoughtful discussion and attempting to bridge the ideological divide growing in our nation.

The rise of populism worldwide today, personified by Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin, is a fierce reaction to globalism policies of the past few decades. Anti-immigration movements in Europe and the United States; assaults on free speech; racial profiling; polarized politics; intolerance for gender, economic and linguistic diversity; the building of walls and the renegotiation of international trade treaties; the tension between rural and urban communities; and the questioning of the basic tenets of pluralism are some of the symptoms. Democracy itself might be at peril.

Saskia Sassen is the Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology at Columbia University and a member of its Committee on Global Thought, which she chaired till 2015. She is a student of cities, immigration and states in the world economy, with inequality, gendering and digitization three key variables running though her work. Born in the Netherlands, she grew up in Argentina and Italy, studied in France, was raised in five languages and began her professional life in the United States. She is the author of eight books and the editor or co-editor of three books. Together, her authored books are translated in over 20 languages. She has received many awards and honors, among them multiple doctorates honoris causa, the 2013 Principe de Asturias Prize in the Social Sciences, election to the Royal Academy of the Sciences of the Netherlands and being made a Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et Lettres by the French government.

This event is free and open to the public.

"Point/Counterpoint" is co-sponsored by NEPR’s In Contrast and by a generous gift from 36 members of the 50th Reunion Class of 1970.

Find more information about the other speakers in the series href="https://www.amherst.edu/mm/564883">here.

Interviews with previous guests, and others, are available through Ilan Stavans' NEPR show In Contrast. Have a listen!

Association of Women in Science (AWIS) Welcome Hour

Come to the intro meeting the Association of Women in Science (AWIS) at Amherst College to learn about the events that we organize throughout the semester and how to get involved. There will be donuts from Glazed!

AWIS Welcome Coffee Hour

The Association for Women in Science (AWIS) is holding our welcome coffee hour! This is a great chance to learn more about AWIS and our goals on campus, as well as to meet members of our organization. AWIS members will discuss upcoming events this semester, and we will have an informal panel of students representing various STEM disciplines share their experiences. Donuts from Glazed will also be provided. Feel free to come as long as you're able, we'd love to see you there! Note that this event is open to all regardless of gender.

Fri, Sep 21, 2018

Niko Vicario Photo

"Transnational Materiality and the Geopolitical Work of Art" presented by Niko Vicario

The Faculty Colloquium Series for 2018-19 presents a lecture titled " Transnational Materiality and the Geopolitical Work of Art" presented by Niko Vicario, assistant professor of Art and the History of Art.

Professor Trisha Andrew

"Garment-Integrated Technologies Created Using Reactive Vapor Deposition": Chemistry Seminar with Professor Trisha Andrew of UMass

Off-the-shelf garments, textiles and threads/yarns can be nondestructively transformed into electronic circuit components using reactive vapor deposition. Selected technologies created using vapor-coated fibers and textiles will be described, including: (1) smart elbow braces for movement sensing; (2) textile triboelectric generators that convert small body motions into stored energy; (3) thread/yarn supercapacitors that can be sewed or knitted into garments for wearable and portable energy storage; (4) fabric electrodes for bioimpedance spectroscopy; (5) wear-, wash- and ironing-resistant active heating garments; and (6) thermoelectric wristbands that convert stray body heat into stored power.

interior_nakamuraza_theater_illustration

This Summer in Japan: Presentations by 2018 Nagle Fellows Mika Obayashi '19 and Lorelei Dietz '20

The Scott H. Nagle ’85 Fund for Summer Fellowships in Asian Art and Culture supports summer research and travel on topics related to Asian art every year. The 2018 recipients were Mika Obayashi ’19 and Lorelei Dietz ’20. They will be speaking about their experiences on Friday, September 21 at 5 p.m. in Fayerweather 113. Please join us to hear about what they did in Japan this past summer.

Sat, Sep 22, 2018

StatFest 2018

StatFest is a one day conference aimed at encouraging undergraduate students from historically underrepresented groups (African American, Hispanic, Native Americans) to consider careers and graduate studies in the statistical sciences. StatFest 2018 will be hosted by Amherst College in the new Science Center.

The conference is free but preregistration is required; the deadline to register is Wednesday, September 19th.

Registration Required
Event poster showing rows of empty theater seats

"Theaters of Marginality"

8:30 am - 3:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

The two-day event will take place at UMass (Conference Center) and Amherst College (Fayerweather Hall & Center for Humanistic Inquiry) on Friday, Sept. 21, and Saturday, Sept. 22. It includes panels on Spanish, Catalan and Galician theater and performance dealing with topics of exile, gender, sexuality, religion, translation, adaptation and performance traditions.

Mon, Sep 24, 2018

Kaganovsky portrait

"The Woman with the Movie Camera": Talk by Lilya Kaganovsky

Lilya Kaganovsky will continue her inquiry into the question of a "Soviet women’s cinema" with this presentation on the cinematography of Margarita Pilikhina, the camerawoman on Marlen Khutsiev’s Thaw-era classic film Lenin’s Guard/ I Am Twenty (Zastava Il’icha / Mne dvadtsat’ let). Kaganovsky looks at Pilikhina's work on the film as part of the new wave of Soviet cinema in the 1960s, but also in the context of her other, conventionally Socialist Realist films. This talk will take into consideration other Soviet female cinematographers-- including Tamara Lobova and Marina Goldvoskaya, as well as Iana Sekste, who in 2013 played the role of a camerawoman in Valery Todorovsky’s The Thaw (Ottepel’) --in the broader context of Western feminist film theory and the history of women’s participation in the cinema industries in Hollywood and beyond.

Lilya Kaganovsky is a professor of Slavic, comparative literature, and media & cinema studies, and the director of the Program in Comparative & World Literature at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her publications include How the Soviet Man was Unmade, the edited volumes Mad Men, Mad World: Sex, Politics, Style and the 1960s and Sound, Speech, Music in Soviet and Post-Soviet Cinema as well as articles on Soviet and post-Soviet cinema. She is a member of the editorial board of the journal Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema and regularly contributes film reviews to the online cinema journal KinoKultura. Her most recent book on Soviet cinema’s transition to sound, The Voice of Technology: Soviet Cinema’s Transition to Sound, 1928-1935, was published by Indiana University Press in spring 2018.

Event poster featuring photos of Nandini Rao and a crowd of protesters

"Holding Up More Than Half the Sky: The Women's Movement in India" - Lecture by Nandini Rao

Nandini Rao is a feminist trainer, counselor and writer based in New Delhi, India. Rao’s talk will trace a herstory of the women’s movement in India, focusing on landmark moments that have inflected understandings of gender-based violence. Rao will trace the connections between recent and historical campaigns around women’s rights and contemporary activism around casteism, queer rights, disability rights and tribal rights.

A private dinner (for STUDENTS only) will follow at 6:30 p.m.; if you are interested, kindly R.S.V.P. before Sept. 20. Pita Pockets will be provided!

Tue, Sep 25, 2018

Psychology Club

Are you a psychology major? Just interested in psychology? Can't get enough of thinking about psychology? Come to the first meeting of the Psychology Club (previously the student-faculty committee)! We'll be discussing our goals and plans for the year, and we want you to be there! Everyone is welcome, no previous affiliation with psychology necessary. Snacks provided!

Athletes and Allies logo

Athletes and Allies Meeting

Join Athletes and Allies for our first meeting of the semester! We are a safe space for LGBTQ+ athletes to come together and discuss our unique experiences. We join with our many allies to promote the inclusion and support of the LGBTQ+ community within the athletic department. Past projects have included the "Safe Space" poster campaign, as well as numerous Pride Games.

Students Only

Wed, Sep 26, 2018

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance, for a weekly informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon – 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Grosvenor House with leaf border

SWAGS Fall Reception

Join the Sexuality, Women's and Gender Studies (SWAGS) Department as we kick off an exciting new year.
Connect with colleagues, chat with students about sexuality and gender studies, participate in the student raffle and enjoy some delicious refreshments!

Monique Truong

Fiction Reading: Monique Truong

Kirkus Reviews called Monique Truong’s first book, The Book of Salt, “a tour de force,” and accurately predicted, “Truong should take the literate world by storm.” Her other books include Bitter in the Mouth and The Sweetest Fruits, forthcoming from Viking Books. She is also an essayist and a lyricist, working in collaboration with the composer Joan La Barbara. She has been a Guggenheim Fellow, U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Fellow in Tokyo, Visiting Writer at the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, and Princeton University’s Hodder Fellow. She lives in Brooklyn.

The reading will be followed by refreshments.

Thu, Sep 27, 2018

David Fowler, University of Cambridge

“American Student Revolutionaries in Britain’s ‘1968’: A Study of the Transnational Sixties”

Please join the Education Studies Initiative for a public lecture featuring David Fowler of the University of Cambridge.

Abstract:
The role American students played in the British, and indeed European, student protests of the late 1960s and early 1970s was much discussed at the time in the national and international media, as well as the senior common rooms of Oxford and Cambridge. No historian has yet examined this issue systematically. Drawing on extensive archival research for my forthcoming study of Britain’s “1968,” this lecture will illuminate the international and trans-Atlantic dimensions of the British student protests of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Who were the student protesters who forced the closure of the world-renowned London School of Economics in February 1969, which attracted international media attention and led to debates in the British House of Commons and House of Lords? The British Education Secretary at the time, Edward Short, described the American students who participated in the protests as "the thugs of the academic world." But who were these American student activists? How radicalized were the American Rhodes Scholars at Oxford University in 1968? How central were American students in radicalizing British university campuses in the Global Sixties? How central were they to Britain's, and indeed Europe's, 1968? What legacy did they leave in Britain and Europe? The lecture will explore these questions, and more, in this under-researched but fascinating strand of the British and American "Special Relationship" of the 1960s and beyond.

Speaker Bio:
David Fowler teaches modern history and politics at the University of Cambridge, where he is a Life Member of Clare Hall Cambridge. He also holds a lectureship in modern history at Cardiff University and is currently a visiting scholar at Amherst College, where he is preparing the first scholarly biography of the transnational sixties student radical, Marshall Bloom '66. The book will shine a light on one of the prime movers of the sixties’ cultural revolutions in the United States, Britain and Europe.

Fowler has published two acclaimed monographs on youth culture in 20th-century Britain: The First Teenagers: the Lifestyle of Young Wage-Earners in Interwar Britain and Youth Culture in Modern Britain, c.1920-c.1970: From Ivory Tower to Global Movement--A New History. His latest book, Oxford and Revolution: Student Power, “1968” and a British Cultural Revolt, will be published by Oxford University Press in 2019.

Humanist Dinner

Join the Amherst College Humanists for an informal dinner! We will be discussing the consequences of a change in the balance of the Supreme Court for the separation of church and state.

Sun, Sep 30, 2018

Black-and-white image of Brooklyn Rider and Magos Herrera

M@A: Brooklyn Rider and Magos Herrera: Masterclass

The Amherst College Music Department M@A Series presents a public masterclass/workshop with Brooklyn Rider and Magos Herrera at 10 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 30.

Free and open to the public

For room postings, please see signage upon arrival.