Event Calendar

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Thu, Oct 18, 2018

photo shows pathway leading to Chapin Hall.  Different colored T-shirts are hung on clothesline on either side of the path.  The writing not the shirts is not readable.

The Clothesline Project Display

On October 18 (9 a.m.-7 p.m.) and October 19 (9 a.m.-2 p.m.), the Peer Advocates of Sexual Respect will be displaying the Five College Clothesline Project on the Valentine Quad. (Content Warning: Sexual Violence).

The Five College Clothesline Project is an opportunity to break the silence about sexual violence by providing space for people to create shirts that give voice to personal experiences. The shirts are then hung shoulder to shoulder on a clothesline for public viewing. The goals of the project are:

· To bear witness to victims and survivors of violence.
· To aid and support in the healing process of those who have lost a loved one or who have themselves been victims/survivors of violence.
· To break the silence and unite people in a demonstration of solidarity against physical, verbal, sexual and psychological abuse.

The Five College Project has over 800 shirts that have been created by survivors, as well as friends and family members of survivors. We embrace the clothesline as a healing and emotional tool for people of all genders. We recognize this project can be a crucial and much needed part of an individual healing process.

We also recognize that seeing the Clothesline can be difficult, if you want to avoid the Clothesline Project display we encourage people to use the Route 9 entrance of Valentine. We will also hang shirts so only the blank side is facing the entrance to Morrow Residence Hall and the Morrow path will remain clear.

Please stop by and greet the Peer Advocates tables in front of Val. The self-care table will have self care tips and giveaways. We will also have a table with lots of information on how you can start thinking and doing things to change the culture and to create a safer more respectful community. Add to our wall by sharing the one thing you will do to help us change the culture to end sexual violence.

Screenshot of a person leaning on the hood of a vehicle while making marks on a map

German Film Series: "The Journey to Kafiristan"

There will be two screenings of The Journey to Kafiristan. One will be at 4 p.m. and the other at 7:30 p.m.

The Journey to Kafiristan is a docudrama about two women who leave their home in Switzerland to journey together to Kabul, Afghanistan, in 1939, when Europe is on the brink of war. This movie is based on the lives of Annemarie Schwarzenbach, a socialite and writer, and Ella Maillart, an ethnologist and photographer.

This film will be shown in German with English subtitles. Please contact mhowes@amherst.edu for more information.

Weekly Canine Office Hours

Whether you miss your dog, or simply want some canine affection, Huxley or Evie would love to see you! One or the other will be available weekly!

Screenshot of a woman standing in front of a building with her arms crossed

Russian Film Screening: ARRHYTHMIA • АРИTMИЯ

4:30 pm Keefe Campus Center, Theater (Room 008)

Join us for a showing of АРИTMИЯ (ARRHYTHMIA), directed by Boris Khlebnikov. This 2017 movie is about a dedicated paramedic's struggles to make time for his wife, who is fed up with him caring more about his patients than about her.

This movie will be shown in Russian with English subtitles, and will be screened at both 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Runtime: 116 minutes.

Cover of Wong's book

"Imperial Cities as Capitals of Buddhist Empires"

Dorothy Wong will introduce and discuss her new book Buddhist Pilgrim-Monks as Agents of Cultural and Artistic Transmission: The International Buddhist Art Style in East Asia, Ca. 645-770. This event is free and open to the public, and all with an interest in the Buddhist arts of Asia are welcome to attend.

Abstract:
The period ca. 645–770 marked an extraordinary era in the development of East Asian Buddhism and Buddhist art. Increased contacts between China and regions to both its west and east facilitated exchanges and the circulation of ideas, practices and art forms, giving rise to a synthetic art style uniform in both iconography and formal characteristics. The formulation of this new Buddhist art style occurred in China in the latter part of the seventh century, and from there it became widely disseminated and copied throughout East Asia, and to some extent in Central Asia, in the eighth century. This book argues that notions of Buddhist kingship formed the underpinnings of Buddhist states experimented in China and Japan from the late seventh to the mid-eighth century. For brief periods, the imperial cities of the Tang and Nara courts—Chang’an, Luoyang and Heijōkyō (present-day Nara)—became transformed into capitals of Buddhist empires. The volume also argues that Buddhist pilgrim-monks were among the key agents in the transmission of the religio-political ideals of state Buddhism, its visual language, and attendant rituals and practices. As this visual style of state Buddhism was spread, circulated, adopted and transformed in faraway lands, it transcended cultural and geographical boundaries and became cosmopolitan.

Photo of a large crowd of people at a religious event, with eyes closed and hands held up

Tanya Luhrmann: "How Local Theory of Mind Shapes Spiritual Experience"

Tanya Marie Luhrmann is the 2018 Willis Wood Lecturer for the Amherst College Department of Religion. She is the Watkins University Professor at Stanford University in the Department of Anthropology. Her work focuses on the edge of experience: on voices, visions, the world of the supernatural and the world of psychosis. She has done ethnography on the streets of Chicago with homeless and psychotic women, and worked with people who hear voices in Chennai, Accra and the South Bay. She has also done fieldwork with evangelical Christians who seek to hear God speak back, with Zoroastrians who set out to create a more mystical faith, and with people who practice magic. She uses a combination of ethnographic and experimental methods to understand the phenomenology of unusual sensory experiences, the way they are shaped by ideas about minds and persons, and what we can learn from this social shaping that can help us to help those whose voices are distressing.

Luhrmann was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2003 and received a John Guggenheim Fellowship award in 2007. When God Talks Back was named a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and a Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year. It was awarded the $100,000 Grawemeyer Prize for Religion by the University of Louisville. She has published over thirty op-eds in The New York Times, and her work has been featured in The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, Science News and many other publications. Her new book, Our Most Troubling Madness: Schizophrenia and Culture, was published by the University of California Press in October 2016.

This talk makes the argument that the way we think about our minds matters, and may shape the phenomenology of our mental events. It makes the case that different practices of attending to mental events have identifiable phenomenological consequences; and that different cultures and different theologies emphasize mind and mental process in distinctive ways. The way that people map the territory of the mind works as a kind of practice of attention: with practiced attention and cultural invitation, Christians report that some kinds of events come to feel more “external”—they develop more confidence that God has spoken, and they report a more sensory quality to the voice. The data suggest that one consequence of culturally different ways of representing mind and mental experience is that Americans have a harsher experience of psychosis, and less spiritual experience.

The talk is open to the public.

Japanese Language Table

The Japanese Language Program will be hosting a Japanese Language Table on Tuesday and Thursday evenings all semester. Please join Hikari Yoshida '19, a student from Doshisha University, and practice your Japanese! Everyone is welcome to join the Japanese Language Table for all or part of the time we are there.

Mastering the Internship Interview

Internship interviews can be stressful, but they don’t have to be. Join us to learn how to best prepare for interview day, to answer challenging questions and to present yourself in a professional manner.

*This workshop will fulfill the Internship Preparation Workshop requirement for the Amherst Select Internship Program.

"The Bamboo Stalk" book cover

An Evening of Arabic Literature and Music

7:00 pm Converse Hall, Cole Assembly Room

The Arabic Program at Amherst College and the International Prize for Arabic Fiction (IPAF) are proud to present an evening of Arabic literature and music as part of the first U.S. IPAF book tour.

The International Prize for Arabic Fiction is the most prestigious and important literary prize in the Arab world. Its aim is to reward excellence in contemporary Arabic creative writing and to encourage the readership of high-quality Arabic literature internationally through the translation and publication of winning and shortlisted novels in other major languages.

Featuring:
Saud Alsanousi, author of the IPAF-winning novel The Bamboo Stalk
Jonathan Wright, award-winning translator of The Bamboo Stalk

Live performance by:
Layaali Arabic Music Trio

This event is free and open to the public. A reception with light refreshments will follow.

Sponsored by the Five College Arabic Language Initiative, the International Prize for Arabic Fiction and the Tagliabu Fund

About The Bamboo Stalk:
Josephine escapes poverty by coming to Kuwait from the Philippines to work as a maid, where she meets Rashid, an idealistic only son with literary aspirations. Josephine, with all the wide-eyed naivety of youth, believes she has found true love. But when she becomes pregnant, and with the rumble of war growing ever louder, Rashid bows to family and social pressure and sends her back home with her baby son, José.

Brought up struggling with his dual identity, José clings to the hope of returning to his father's country when he is 18. He is ill-prepared to plunge headfirst into a world where the fear of tyrants and dictators is nothing compared to the fear of "what people will say." And with a Filipino face, a Kuwaiti passport, an Arab surname and a Christian first name, will his father’s country welcome him?

The Bamboo Stalk takes an unflinching look at the lives of foreign workers in Arab countries and confronts the universal problems of identity, race and religion.

About the author:
Saud Alsanousi is an award-winning Kuwaiti novelist and journalist, born in 1981. His debut novel, The Bamboo Stalk, won the International Prize for Arabic Fiction. His work has appeared in a number of Kuwaiti publications, including Al-Watan newspaper and Al-Arabi, Al-Kuwait and Al-Abwab magazines, and he currently writes for Al-Qabas newspaper.

About the translator:
Jonathan Wright studied Arabic, Turkish and Islamic civilization at St John’s College, Oxford. He joined Reuters news agency in 1980 as a correspondent, and has been based in the Middle East for most of the last three decades. He has translated numerous novels from Arabic, including, most recently, Ahmed Saadawi’s award-winning novel Frankenstein in Baghdad. He won the 2016 Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation for his translation of The Bamboo Stalk.

Understanding Transcripts and LSAT Scores on the Law School Application, Presented by Boston University School of Law

Anne Taylor, an admissions representative from the Boston University School of Law, will be on campus to speak in depth about the quantitative aspects of the law school application, including transcripts, GPA, and LSAT scores.

Boston University School of Law combines extraordinary teaching with a forward-thinking curriculum, offering over 200 courses and seminars in 18 areas of legal study, more study abroad opportunities than almost any US law school, and one of the widest selections of clinics and externships among the nation’s top 50 law schools.

Through a holistic admissions process, BU Law seeks to enroll annually a class of students characterized by extraordinary academic achievements and diverse life experiences. A variety of factors are considered when reviewing law school applications, providing applicants with the opportunity to convey accomplishments, as well as capacity for growth in law school.

coffee mug reading "Caution: Thesis Writing in Progress"

Thesis Write-In

8:00 pm - 11:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

Every Thursday night, the Writing Center and Library open up the Center for Humanistic Inquiry to students writing theses (and similar long-term, complex writing projects) to work side-by-side, fueled by snacks, coffee and camaraderie. Join the group Thursdays from 8-11 p.m. in the CHI.

Students Only

La Tertulia

8:00 pm - 9:00 pm Newport House, Common Room on first floor

Do you want to practice your Spanish language skills and learn more about the Hispanic culture? Please join us at La Tertulia, a weekly informal Spanish conversation gathering with hot chocolate and cookies!
La Tertulia is held every Thursday from 8:00 pm to 9:00 pm on the first floor common room of Newport House. The primary purpose of this event is to encourage the use of the Spanish language and to promote the Hispanic culture among the Amherst community. La Tertulia is a great opportunity to speak Spanish in a relaxed setting and to meet students of all levels, Spanish House residents, Spanish language assistants, faculty, staff and community members. La Tertulia is free and open to anyone who wants to speak Spanish and have fun!
We hope to see you there!

First Years: Fall in "Loeb" with the Loeb Center (Charles Pratt)

Fall in "Loeb" with the Loeb Center as the Peer Career Advisors (PCAs) visit First Year Residence Hall tea times this October! We'll share with you the resources available at the Loeb Center, what you can do on Handshake, and how PCAs can guide you on your career exploration journey! There will be snacks, and we'll raffle off an adorable mammoth plush toy and other prizes at each session.

We will be in the Charles Pratt common room from 8–8:30 p.m.

French Film Screening: "Indigènes"

8:00 pm King Hall, French House Common Room

This 2006 film was directed by Rachid Bouchareb. “In French North Africa in 1943 large numbers of men from France's overseas possessions have been recruited into the French First Army of the Free French Forces to fight alongside the other Allies against Nazi Germany and liberate France from occupation. The army consists of two main elements: pieds-noirs, that is people of mostly European descent, and indigènes, those of mostly African descent. The "indigènes" in turn consist of three main groups: Algerians, Moroccans (known as goumiers), and troops from Sub-Sahara Africa. The film deals with the contribution of North African soldiers to the Free French Forces during the Second World War and, controversially, with the discrimination against them. The film's release contributed to a partial recognition of the pension rights of soldiers from former French possessions by the French government.”

Film will be screened in French with English subtitles. All are welcome! Refreshments will be served.

Select Equity Group Information Session

Select Equity Group manages over $20 billion across long-only and long/short equity strategies that share a fundamental investment philosophy and centralized research effort. The firm was founded on the premise that rigorous, independent research and disciplined investing will generate superior returns for clients.

The firm seeks to identify the highest quality businesses that the public markets have to offer – those with strong, predictable growth, high returns on invested capital and well-established barriers to competition. Select Equity’s investment team of over 40 professionals includes a 12-person field research division composed of former journalists and sourcing specialists.

Select Equity is employee owned and has been located at 380 Lafayette Street in lower Manhattan since the early 1990s. Attend this information session to learn more about the firm’s business practices and its entry-level opportunities.

Ongoing Events

Dave Gloman painting

Re-presenting Nonotuck: The Landscape Paintings of Hitchcock and Gloman

until Oct 29 Frost Library, Mezzanine Gallery

Professor David Gloman has partnered with Kurt Heidinger, director of the Biocitizen School, to create an art event that inspires the public to imagine the unique biocultural character of the Nonotuck biome (also known as the central Connecticut River Valley) by “re-presenting” the landscapes that Orra Hitchcock depicted in the mid 19th century. Professor Gloman has located the sites where they were painted and created his own painted landscape portraits of those sites. View Gloman and Hitchcock's illustrations together in Frost Library's Mezzanine Gallery from September 4 - October 29.

The opening reception will be on September 27 from 4:30 - 6 p.m. in the Center for Humanistic Inquiry (2nd Floor, Frost Library).