Event Calendar

Friday, February 22, 2019

Fri, Feb 22, 2019

Arabic Language Table First-Year Fridays

This Arabic language table is a weekly conversation group for first-year Arabic students. We meet every Friday in the upstairs seating section of the Valentine Dining Hall, and anyone who can communicate in Arabic at the first-year level is welcome to attend.

Calendar of Events for Food Justice Week

Food Justice Photo Campaign

Come tell us why food justice is important to you. Have your photo taken with your testimony on a sign to be put up in a photo installation.

Careers In Arts & Communication Logo

Designing Your Digital Portfolio

This workshop will help you understand how a digital portfolio can be useful for presenting and promoting your creative work to employers, curators, grad schools, and more—including tips for curation, a how-to on gathering digital-ready content, and a close look at a commonly used platform. This workshop was developed with artists, designers, and performers in mind, but is open to anyone who wants to learn creative ways to amp up their professional presentation.

WORKSHOP INSTRUCTOR
Fafnir Adamites is a local, visual artist who holds an MFA from the Fiber and Material Studies Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA in Photography and Women’s Studies from UMass Amherst. Using traditional craft processes such as feltmaking, weaving and papermaking, she creates sculptural and installation work that serve as meditations on trauma, memory and the legacy of emotional turmoil inherited from past generations. She teaches across the Pioneer Valley and lives in Turners Falls, MA.

Office Hours with Google

Two recent alums who now work for Google -- Emily Masten '17 and Julia Edholm '15 -- will be on campus on Friday, February 22, hosting office hours with small groups of students. This is an opportunity to ask questions about day-to-day life in the tech industry, what the culture is like at Google, how to prepare for a tech industry interview, what to expect out of its entry-level opportunities, etc… in a small and informal setting.

Drop-ins are available on a first come, first served basis, but appointments will go fast, so we recommend signing up for a slot ahead of time via Handshake to guarantee yourself a meeting time.

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

"Stalin: Waiting for Hitler": Talk by Stephen Kotkin

"Stalin: Waiting for Hitler" is a talk by Stephen Kotkin, who is the John P. Birkelund Professor in History and International Affairs at Princeton University. He is also a fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He directs Princeton's Institute for International and Regional Studies and co-directs its Program in the History and Practice of Diplomacy. His books include Uncivil Society, Armageddon Averted and Magnetic Mountain. Kotkin was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for Stalin: Volume I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928.

The talk is sponsored by the Amherst Center for Russian Culture and the Georges Lurcy Lecture Series at Amherst College. This event is free and open to the public.

Poster for HLW Residency, image description: sepia photo of two people looking at each other featured in upper left. background in dark and light blue, with yellow box object around title text. Text in blues and yellow.

HLW: Student Community Meet and Greet

All students are invited to informal lunch and conversation with Dominique C. Hill and Durell M. Callier as part of their residency as Hill L. Waters (HLW). Food will be provided.

Hill L. Waters (HLW) is a Black feminist love praxis project birthed by two queer scholar artists, Durell M. Callier and Dominique C. Hill. HLW engenders healing through community accountability and artistic productions and dialogue. The scope of HLW’s work includes workshops, classes/lectures, community organizing, and performances that all highlight Black love; race, gender, and sexuality as interwoven systems of oppressions; feminism in action; and the power of self-affirming spaces

Students Only
Fitness Center Open House

Fitness Center Open House with scavenger hunt, bubble tea and raffle!

Want to learn about what the Fitness Center has to offer? Drop by between 12:30 and 2 p.m. on Friday February 22 to meet the staff, take a tour, and/or get to know how to use the machines. Complete a quick scavenger hunt for a cup of bubble tea and to enter a raffle! Sponsored by the Wellness Team and Athletics.

Poster for HLW Residency, image description: sepia photo of two people looking at each other featured in upper left. background in dark and light blue, with yellow box object around title text. Text in blues and yellow.

HLW: Sustaining and Building Critical Coalitions

Are you a student leader and feeling overwhelmed by expectation? Questioning what the word "community" really means? Experiencing burnout/activist fatigue? Join us in this arts-centered workshop to challenge, question, and re-imagine community and necessary relationships for social justice work.

Space is limited. For more information, please visit Amherst College Student Activities Facebook Page, or contact Jelani Johnson at jejohnson@amherst.edu and Jxhn T. Martin at jsmartin@amherst.edu

Students Only

Cheminar - Senior Major Student Talks

Jayne Vogelzang and Kevin Wang will each speak about a recent journal article of interest.

Congolese basket with lid made by the Kongo people, Democratic Republic of the Congo (Zaire).

"On Appreciating and Understanding African Art" with Nichole Bridges '97 and Rowland Abiodun

Nichole Bridges, class of 1997, is the associate curator for African art and the associate curator overseeing the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas at the Saint Louis Art Museum. All are invited to a conversation with Bridges and Rowland Abiodun, the John C. Newton Professor of the History of Art and Black Studies at Amherst College.

Free and open to all!

Lama Rod Owens standing with arms crossed in front of a brick wall

"Fierce Love": Lama Rod Owens

5:30 pm - 7:00 pm Science Center, Lipton Lecture Hall

Stevie Wonder once sang, “Love’s in need of love today.” His words couldn’t be more true as we face a global community struggling with war, poverty, illness, climate instability, and the rise of political authorities and governments who do not seem to be grounded in compassion or kindness. We speak about love and attempt to practice love, but some of us are losing faith in the transformative power of the wish for ourselves and others to be happy. Our practice of love is in need of our renewed faith in love. In this talk, we will be exploring the question of how practicing love can become a strategy that resists and undoes our experiences, fear, apathy and numbness as we attempt to live and love in a challenging world.

Lama Rod is a formally trained Buddhist teacher working to be as open, honest and vulnerable as possible and to help others do the same. Because on the other side is liberation.

This event is open to the public and is generously sponsored by the Amherst College Department of Religion, Amherst College Religious & Spiritual Life, Insight Meditation Center of Pioneer Valley and the Willis D. Wood Fund.

Black-and-white photo of Joe Cantrell adjusting a piece of electronic equipment

"The Timbre of Trash": Talk and Performance by Joe Cantrell

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

Talk and Performance

"The Timbre of Trash: Anthropomorphic models to Resist Obsolescence in Technological Sound Practices"

"Electronic sound artists and musicians, in their choice of the tools of their craft, have a close, working relationship with a specific form of mass-produced commodity, that of technological audio devices. Like other manufactured goods, they originate from a global production system that is historically exploitative and environmentally unsustainable. The nature of electronic and digital technology, however, warrants an additional layer of scrutiny: they are beholden to the expectations of continuous technological improvement and obsolescence.

"To counter these continuing tendencies, I offer a reading of new materialist theory with an eye toward how it may be specifically applied to electronic and digital musicians. New materialism projects a monistic perception of the world, in which the differentiation between humans, non-humans and objects is called into question. Applied to technological audio devices, porous boundaries allow a vision of audio technology that is inclusive of all the bodies with which it has come in contact, and urges a limited sense of anthropomorphic identification with its users. This sense of interaction is extended into the realm of audio feedback, in which all audio processors, regardless of their intended functionality, contribute to a common sonic end. Seen in this way, sound technology that was once subject to the whims of constant development, becomes imbued with a personal sense of vitality, making it more difficult to be perceived as a disposable and obsolete."

Joe Cantrell is an artist specializing in sound art, installations, compositions and performances inspired by the implications of technological objects and practices. His work examines the incessant acceleration of technological production, its ownership and the waste it produces. Joe holds a B.F.A. in music technology from CalArts, an M.F.A. in digital arts and new media from UC Santa Cruz, and a Ph.D. in music at UC San Diego. His work has been honored with grants from the Creative Capital Foundation, New Music USA and the Qualcomm Institute Initiative for Digital Exploration of Arts and Sciences, among others.

HLW Poster, image description: sepia photo of two people looking at each other, background in different blues, with text in yellow, blues and red orange.

HLW: Tell em how you survived

An open space for expression, articulation, resistance and gathering that centers healing, affirmation, resilience, and magnificence of/found in our complicated interwoven selves, this space aims to center all folks who hold marginalized identities. All forms of performance/art/expression welcomed.

Sign-up ahead of time is strongly encouraged. To do so, please contact Jxhn T. Martin, at jsmartin@amherst.edu with a brief description or draft of what you intend to perform or submit by the end of the day on Thursday, February 21. If you have any questions or concerns, please reach out.

Camille Brown performance

Five College Dance: "SPRING"

Five College Dance, in collaboration with the Amherst College Department of Theater and Dance, presents SPRING, an evening of dance featuring contributions from faculty, guest artists and dancers across all five campuses, including Camille A. Brown’s New Second Line, Five College Dance’s 2018-19 guest artist repertory project, made possible with a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. This dance is a celebration of the spirit and culture of the people of New Orleans.

The concert also features Picture This, a new work by critically acclaimed choreographer David Dorfman. Picture This is a kinetic, visual, musical and textual homage to the next generation of dance citizens-- a brief look at what makes these fine performers both joyous and angry in regard to love and politics.

Dances by Danté Brown (visiting assistant professor, Amherst College), Lailye Weidman (visiting assistant professor, Hampshire College) and Barbie Diewald (visiting artist, Mount Holyoke College), as well as a lobby installation by Rodger Blum (professor, Smith College), complete the program.

Tickets are free, but reservations are recommended: (413) 542-2277 or fcddance.reservations@gmail.com

Event poster showing the face of Nicole Mitchell

M@A Parallels Series Presents Nicole Mitchell: “Mandorla Awakening II”

With her Black Earth Ensemble, Mitchell uses science fiction to address the question: “What would a world look like that is truly egalitarian, with advanced technology that is in tune with nature?”

Tickets are required and are available at amherst.universitytickets.com or the Concert Office at (413) 542-2195.

Single ticket prices:
General Public: $18
Senior Citizens (65+) and Amherst College Employees: $12
Students, with valid ID: $10
AC student rush one hour before each concert: FREE

Recorded in May 2015 at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, Mandorla features Mitchell's Black Earth Ensemble with new collaborators Tatsu Aoki (bass, shamisen, taiko) and Kojiro Umezaki (shakuhachi). Also in the mix is Chicago artist, scholar and poet Avery R. Young, who brings the composers’ lyrics to life with visceral humanity; and longtime collaborators Tomeka Reid (cello, banjo), Alex Wing (electric guitar, out, theremin), Mazz Swift (violin) and Jovia Armstrong (percussion).

Mandorla Awakening II explores what Mitchell describes as a “collision of duality,” urban vs. country, hegemonic vs. vulnerable, acoustic vs. electric, with the dialogue of contrasting musical languages: Japanese, African-American gospel, R&B, jazz. The work chronicles the journey of a couple as they find themselves navigating between two civilizations: the World Union, a crumbling society rampant with disease and inequality, and Mandorla, a utopia where spirituality, technology and nature coexist harmoniously. Mandorla Awakening was included among the top 10 jazz albums for 2017 by The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, NPR and Wire (UK).

Nicole M. Mitchell is an award-winning creative flutist, composer, bandleader and educator. She is perhaps best known for her work as a flutist, having developed a unique improvisational language and having repeatedly been named “Top Flutist of the Year” by DownBeat magazine's critics poll and the Jazz Journalists Association (2010–17). Mitchell initially emerged from Chicago’s innovative music scene in the late ’90s, and her music celebrates contemporary African-American culture.

“One of the most exciting jazz soloists and composers in the world” –Peter Margasak, Chicago Reader

Tickets Required

Ongoing Events

Studio Art Faculty Exhibition

until Mar 1 Fayerweather Hall, 105 - Eli Marsh Gallery

Gallery hours are 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. on Mondays through Fridays, and noon - 4 p.m. on Sundays. Closed Saturdays. This exhibition will close at noon on Friday, March 1.