Event Calendar

Monday, February 25, 2019

Mon, Feb 25, 2019

Arabic Language Table Second-Year Mondays

This Arabic language table is a weekly conversation group for second-year Arabic students. We meet every Monday in the upstairs seating section of the Valentine Dining Hall, and anyone who can communicate in Arabic at the second-year level is welcome to attend.

German Table

German Table

Enjoy informal conversations with students who have studied in Germany, the German faculty members, the German language assistants and other native speakers.

Chinese Language Table

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Small Conference Room, 1st Floor

Bring your lunch from Val and practice your Chinese. The Chinese language table will meet this semester every Monday, Tuesday and Friday from noon - 1 p.m.

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Common Table: A Weekly Lunch Conversation with Religious and Spiritual Life

Does everything happen for a reason? Where does morality factor into career choice? And more simply, how are you doing anyway? All are welcome to this casual, drop-in time to share lunch and conversation on a topic of spirituality, belief or values as we explore together what it’s like to be a person in the world. Hosted by Religious and Spiritual Life staff and a rotation of student, faculty and staff guests. Please reach out if you'd like to co-host a conversation!

Bard In Berlin

Bard in Berlin - Info Table

Meet Bard representative Hannah Barrett and find out about our study abroad options at Bard College Berlin. True to the principles of liberal arts education, Bard College Berlin offers interdisciplinary programs in the humanities and social sciences. Study in the core program and the student’s chosen field of specialization is supplemented by a wide variety of elective courses in fields such as theater, film, philosophy, and studio arts, and by many forms of engagement with the city of Berlin, including museum visits, special courses and internships.

Students Only
Bard In Berlin- Info Table Poster

Bard in Berlin - Info Table

Stop by the info table to meet Bard representative Hannah Barrett. True to the principles of liberal arts education, Bard College Berlin offers interdisciplinary programs in the humanities and social sciences, with a strong focus on individual growth and the development of essential skills in writing and thinking. 

Students Only

Zotero Workshop

Want to make your research process more organized and efficient? Attend a one-hour tutorial to get started with Zotero! Zotero [zoh-TAIR-oh] is a free application that helps you collect, manage, and cite your sources. It's available in all computer labs on campus and you can download it on your personal computer for free. If you're interested but can't make it to the workshop, click on the more information link below to see the full workshop schedule or to make an individual appointment.

Kamilah Ali wearing a white lab coat and smiling

Biology Monday Seminar: “The Forgotten One: ApoD, Lipoprotein Oxidation and Atherosclerosis”

Kamilah Ali, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Basic Science
Course Director, Pharmacology
Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine

Title: “The Forgotten One: ApoD, Lipoprotein Oxidation and Atherosclerosis”
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. The pathogenesis of CAD is complex and is due to the development of plaque, the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages, in blood vessels that can cause thrombosis, leading to a heart attack or stroke. Some of the key players or steps in accumulation of cholesterol are the levels of plasma lipoproteins, oxidative capacity of LDL-cholesterol, and the inflammatory state of macrophages. Apolipoproteins (apos) are major determinants in regulating human plasma lipoprotein levels, thus affecting plaque formation (atherogenesis) in blood vessels. Our protein of interest, ApoD, is associated with plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and is ubiquitously expressed in tissues and present in cell types (endothelial cells (EC), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), macrophages) involved in plaque formation. However, we have a poor understanding of the role(s) and mechanism(s) of apoD in plaque development. We use in vivo animal models on a Western diet, lipid biochemistry and cell culture to address our hypothesis. Our preliminary data suggest that apoD is anti-atherogenic whose effects may be mediated by modulating LDL oxidation and/or downstream activation of macrophage- vascular smooth muscle cells signaling pathways.

Derron Wallace, wearing a suit and tie and smiling

Education Studies Initiative Speaker Series Presents Derron Wallace: “Safe Routes to School? Black Caribbean Youth Negotiating Police Surveillance in London and New York City”

This talk examines how Black Caribbean youth perceive and experience the state-endorsed "Stop and Search" program in London and then-ongoing "Stop and Frisk" practices in New York City while on route to and from public schools between 2007 and 2014. Despite a growing body of scholarship on the relationship between policing and schooling in the U.S. and U.K., comparative research on how school students experience stop-and-frisk/search practices remains sparse. Drawing on the BlackCrit tradition of Critical Race Theory and in-depth interviews with 60 Black Caribbean secondary school students, this article explores how adolescents experience adultlike policing to and from schools. The findings indicate that participants develop a strained sense of belonging in British and American societies due to a security paradox—a policing formula that promises safety for all in principle, but does so at the expense of some Black youth in practice. Participants learned that, irrespective of ethnicity, Black youth are regularly rendered suspicious subjects worthy of scrutiny, even during the school commute. This paper concludes with recommendations that can assist in improving students’ safety while en route to and from school.

Derron Wallace is an assistant professor of education and sociology at Brandeis University, with joint affiliations in African and Afro-American studies and social justice and social policy. He is a sociologist of race, ethnicity and education who specializes in cross-national studies of inequalities and identities in urban schools and neighborhoods, focusing specifically on the experiences of young people of African descent. His work has appeared in journals such as Sociology: The Journal of the British Sociological Association, The British Journal of Sociology of Education and Harvard Educational Review. His research has been supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Gates Cambridge Trust, the Marion & Jasper Whiting Foundation and the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research. Prior to joining the Brandeis faculty, he served as a professional community organizer in London, working on youth safety, living wages, fair housing and immigrant rights campaigns.

Peer Advocate's 2nd Annual Community Promise Tabling

The Peer Advocate for Sexual Respect will be tabling this week to gather community responses to the prompt "Why and how we support survivors". These responses will be organized into a community poem that will be read by community members on March 20 at 7 p.m. in the Powerhouse. Stop by to give your response, sign up to be a reader, take some resources, or just say hello!

Spring 2019 Writing Center Workshops: Writing, Reading, Public Speaking, and Time Management

The Savvy Reader: Managing an Unmanageable Reading Load

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm Frost Library, 211 (CHI Seminar Room)

The reading load for many classes can sometimes seem overwhelming and unmanageable. This workshop will help you take control of your reading and stay on top of it, rather than drowning in it or avoiding it altogether. In addition to being introduced to approaches to managing large reading loads and long texts, you will have the opportunity to practice strategies for reading more effectively and, when necessary, more efficiently. Led by Kristen Brookes, Senior Writing Associate.

Students Only
Registration Required

Ongoing Events

Studio Art Faculty Exhibition

until Mar 1 Fayerweather Hall, 105 - Eli Marsh Gallery

Gallery hours are 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. on Mondays through Fridays, and noon - 4 p.m. on Sundays. Closed Saturdays. This exhibition will close at noon on Friday, March 1.

Black Art at Amherst Matters

Black Art Matters Festival

Join the MRC and the Mead as we conclude Black History Month with the Black Art Matters Festival, a visual art exhibition and performance showcase highlighting the work and artistic talent of Black student artists across the Five Colleges. Sunday February 24 at the Mead. The exhibition opens at 7 p.m., with live performances starting at 8 p.m.