Navigation

Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
 
 
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Type of Event

Event Calendar

Monday, March 25, 2019

Mon, Mar 25, 2019

Shakespeare

Folger Fellows Presentations

Faculty and staff are invited to join us in the CHI Think Tank to learn about the fascinating research our talented Folger Undergraduate Fellows did at the Folger Shakespeare Library in D.C. last January! Light snacks and refreshments will be available.

Headshot of Susan Bush

Biology Monday Seminar: "Stress! Plants Have It Too"

Susan Bush, Ph.D. and assistant professor in biology at Trinity College, will present "Stress! Plants Have It Too." This talk will assess aluminum tolerance in plants: learning how tomatoes tolerate stressful soil.

The Bush lab studies the way in which plants respond to environmental stresses. Stresses like drought, heat or toxic minerals like aluminum in the soil can make it difficult for a plant to grow, and-- unlike animals --a plant must survive and reproduce in the same location it was originally planted. Crop plants, like tomatoes, have been domesticated to carry genes that are important for farming and high yield, but the plants may not carry the gene variants that can help them survive under environmental stresses. Wild South American relatives of the tomato and colorful heirloom varieties of domesticated tomatoes harbor naturally occurring genetic diversity, which can make them more tolerant of stressful conditions.

In the Bush lab, we study the physiology, or the growth traits, of plants under normal conditions compared to their growth in the presence of the toxic element aluminum. We also examine how differences in plant physiology are underlain by genetic variation. Students can examine growth of tomato plants and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the effect of stress hormones and the degree to which aluminum stress impacts different plants. We also study the genes involved in aluminum tolerance, using mutants and different species or varieties of tomato.

"Constructions of Europe/Europeans"

4:00 pm Fayerweather Hall, Pruyne Lecture Hall (Room 115)

This panel discussion on "The Future of European Studies" will reflect on what it means to study Europe in the era of the refugee crisis, climate change and Brexit. Panelists include three top scholars: Holly Case of Brown University, Denise McCoskey of Miami University and Katharina Piechocki of Harvard University. The panel discussion will be moderated by Christopher van den Berg of Amherst College.

Black-and-white image of two women on a staircase with a translucent curtain hanging over part of it. Across the top of the image are the words "The fabric is not torn" in pink.

"'Strange Radio' as Method" with Dr. Karen Werner

4:30 pm - 6:30 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

Strange Radio explores the transmission of Holocaust postmemory in Vienna through a series of radio fragments made from field recordings, narration, archival material and divination. "Strange Radio as Method" proposes an approach to art and research based on autoethnography, radiophonics, and the politics of knowledge plus an aspiration to transform.

Karen Werner, Ph.D., is a radio artist and sociologist based in Western Massachusetts. Recently, she has been an artist-in-residence in Finland at the Saari Residence-Kone Foundation and in Vienna, Austria, at the MuseumsQuartier/Tonspur and studio das weisse haus. Werner is a 2017-2018 Fellow of the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture and received a Tending Space Fellowship from the Hemera Foundation from 2014 to 2016 for artists with a Buddhist practice. In 2016, Werner’s radio documentary Laws of Lost and Found Objects won the Grand Prix Marulic. Her writings about radio, autoethnography and the performativity of language have been published in a range of academic journals. She teaches in the B.F.A. in Socially Engaged Art Program at Goddard College in Vermont.

All are welcomed. Reception to follow.