Event Calendar

Thursday, March 28, 2019

Thu, Mar 28, 2019

ProjectConnect lunch

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm Valentine Dining Hall, Front Room Community Table

ProjectConnect is a peer-led initiative to help build social connection and community on campus. Drop by the weekly ProjectConnect lunch Thursdays from 1-2 p.m. at the Val community table in the front room to meet the peer facilitators and learn more about it, or to get to know students who've been through the program.

Five College Faculty Seminar in Digital Humanities: Dr. Amanda Henrichs on "Computational Approaches to Shakespeare's Sonnets"

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Frost Library, Periodical Reading Room

The Five College Faculty Seminar in Digital Humanities and the Amherst College Library welcome Amanda Henrichs for a talk called "Computational Approaches to Shakespeare's Sonnets."

Amanda Henrichs is a postdoctoral fellow in English (next year, visiting assistant professor of English) at Amherst College.

This talk brings together Shakespeare's sonnets and topic modeling (a popular digital humanities process) in order to propose that word clouds are poems. As an author steeped in the humanist educational system of late sixteenth-century England, Shakespeare relies on the forms of his poetry to perform communicative functions; and in fact, early modern conceptions of shaped language help us understand word clouds. What unites humanist poems and digital humanities word clouds is an abiding concern with form, and particularly form as endowed with social meaning. Taken together, theories of early modern poetic form and modern digital humanities topic modeling practices emphasize that digital humanities products are not transparent keys to the text: they are generative, and are best when read like poems, a shaped remediation of language.

Huxley/Evie office hours

Canine Office Hours with Huxley or Evie

Drop by Frost Library for some canine affection and advice from Huxley or Evie. Every Thursday from 4:30-5:30p.m. beside Frost Cafe, or in front of the library when the weather permits.

headshot of Michael Warner

"Fake Publics" with Michael Warner

In this talk, Michael Warner will take a long view of media infrastructures as grounds from which to project publics, to ask what might have changed as well as what features of the public sphere might simply be newly exposed.

The current political crisis in the United States revolves around a media crisis: Twitter rivals official communiqués, bots plant invented news stories on social media to swing elections, television networks brand themselves with rival versions of the truth and reporters who document lies are accused of peddling “fake news.” It has become clear in retrospect that the comparatively stable public sphere of the twentieth century rested on the gatekeeping function of major newspapers and television news, a function they no longer play. Their model of broadcast-plus-feedback has come to seem archaic. Social media, especially Facebook, have introduced new structuring principles in public discourse, having to do with their own architecture and profit model. The media infrastructure by which publics come into existence has fractured. In other respects, though, the combat of representation has been a condition of the public sphere from its emergence in the early eighteenth century, the very notion of the public has always been an imaginary and publics have always been more plural than anyone wanted to admit.

Michael Warner is Seymour H. Knox Professor of English at Yale University. He received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins and taught at Northwestern and Rutgers before going to Yale, where he served as chair of the department of English. His books include Publics and Counterpublics (2002), The Trouble with Normal (1999) and The Letters of the Republic: Publication and the Public Sphere in Eighteenth-Century America (1990). With Craig Calhoun and Jonathan VanAntwerpen, he has edited Varieties of Secularism in a Secular Age (2010). He is also the editor of The Portable Walt Whitman (2003), American Sermons (1999), The English Literatures of America (with Myra Jehlen) and Fear of a Queer Planet: Queer Politics and Social Theory (1993).

Reception to follow. Childcare will be provided.

Image: Barbara Hepworth, Project for Wood and Strings, Trezion II, 1959. Oil, gesso, pencil on board. 14 7⁄8 × 21 1⁄8 inches. Mead Art Museum, Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts; Gift of Richard S. Zeisler (Class of 1937). © Bowness.

Dimensionism: Opening Keynote and Reception

Join us for a keynote talk with American Art Curator Vanja Malloy as she explains her pioneering research on Dimensionism, an art movement during the early twentieth century in which American and European artists responded in their work to the air of excitement from the scientific discoveries happening around them. After the talk, come experience this first-of-its-kind exhibition, Dimensionism: Modern Art in the Age of Einstein at the opening reception. This program is offered with support from the Arts at Amherst Initiative.

Free and open to all!

Keynote will begin at 5 p.m. in Stirn Auditorium, with reception to follow at the Mead.

Nina Emery - Thursday, March 28, 2019

First Lecture in the Forry and Micken Lecture Series on "Philosophy of Time"

Nina Emery from Mount Holyoke College will present the first lecture in the 2018-2019 Forry and Micken Lecture Series on "Philosophy of Time." The title of her lecture is "What Was and What Could Be: What Makes Time Different from Modality." All lectures are free and open to the public. For further information, please contact the Philosophy Department at (413) 542-5805.

Japanese Language Table

The Japanese Language Program hosts a Japanese language table twice a week with Doshisha University student Hikari Yoshida ‘19. All are welcome to attend, and you can come and go as it fits your schedule. We hope to see you there!

Mocktails and Machimos

Join the QRC, La Causa and Professor Sony Coranez Bolton for a conversation on toxic masculinity in the LatinX community. Food from La Veracruzana will be served along with mocktail mojitos.

Students Only
Rabbi Saul Berman

Protest, Prison, and Purim: A Rabbi Remembers 1965 in Selma Alabama

Rabbi Saul Berman, a leading Orthodox thinker and teacher, was part of a group of clergy who responded to a plea from Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for clergy to participate in voter registration campaigns and demonstrations in Selma Alabama in March 1965. Arrested twice, he will share his motivation for that participation, his experiences while incarcerated with other activists, and the March from Selma to Montgomery.

Rabbi Berman will be introduced by Norm Jones, PhD, Amherst's chief diversity and inclusion officer.

Rabbi Saul Berman was ordained at Yeshiva University, from which he also received his B.A. and his M.H.L. He completed a J.D. in law at New York University and an M.A. in Political Science at the University of California at Berkeley. Rabbi Berman has served in pulpits in Berkeley CA, Brookline MA, and Manhattan and run Edah, an organization invigorating Modern Orthodox thought and religious life. Currently, Rabbi Berman is Professor of Jewish Studies at Stern College and the Rotter Fellow in Talmudic Law at Columbia University Law School. Rabbi Berman is a contributor to the Encyclopedia Judaica and is the author of numerous articles published in journals such as Tradition, Judaism, Journal of Jewish Studies, and Dinei Yisrael. His book entitled “Boundaries of Loyalty: Testimony Against Fellow Jews in Non-Jewish Courts” was published in 2016 by Cambridge University Press.

Cantor Fitzgerald Networking and Information Session

Cantor Fitzgerald is a leading global financial services firm serving clients from over 30 offices around the world. Founded in 1945 as a securities brokerage and investment bank, the firm pioneered computer-based bond trading, built one of the broadest distribution networks in the industry, and became the market’s premier dealer of government securities.

Today, Cantor Fitzgerald is known for its strength across a diverse array of businesses, including equity and fixed income capital markets, investment banking, commercial real estate finance and services, prime brokerage, asset management and wealth management, and e-commerce and online ventures. In all its businesses, the firm is an acknowledged leader in developing advanced technologies to expand market access and help clients achieve their most important financial and strategic objectives. This commitment to client-centered innovation has led to enduring relationships with many of the world’s most demanding institutional investors and corporations.

Attend this information session to learn more about Cantor Fitzgerald’s company culture and its open internship and full-time opportunities. Food will be served!

Jazz at Schwemms

Jazz @ Schwemms

The third of three Thursday evening performances in the popular Jazz@Schwemm's series continues with the group “WW Project” featuring Joe LaCreta, David Picchi, Bob Weiner and Bruce Diehl. This event is free and open to the public.

Jazz@Schwemm's featuring the WW Project

The Spring edition of Jazz@Schwemm's concludes on Thursday, March 28 at 9 p.m. Help us welcome the the WW Project (featuring Bob Weiner, Joe LaCreta, David Picchi and Bruce Diehl) and two student groups: Impressions and Blue Trade. The pro groups start at 9 p.m. followed by student groups at 10 p.m. Thanks to Jazz@Amherst, the Office of Student Activities, and Schwemm's.

Ongoing Events

 Betsey Garand  Continuum VI    2018 monotype, cognate, pochôir on Rives BFK 27 1/4"  x  22 1/8"; fluorescence microscope photograph mounted on aluminum    12" x 12"  (4000 x magnification)

Between the Imagined and Seen: The Hand Pulled Prints of Betsey Garand and Microscope Images of Caroline Goutte

until Aug 30 Frost Library, Mezzanine Gallery (2nd Floor)

Visit the Mezzanine Gallery in Frost Library to view "Between the Imagined and Seen: The Hand Pulled Prints of Betsey Garand and Microscope Images of Caroline Goutte," on exhibit from March 4 - August 30. This exhibition is sponsored by the Arts at Amherst Initiative

Opening reception will be held on Tuesday, March 19 from 4:30 – 6 p.m in the Center for Humanistic Inquiry (Frost Library, 2nd Floor).

Professor Caroline Goutte is Chair of the Biology Department and a member of the Program in Biochemistry and Biophysics at Amherst College. Betsey Garand is Senior Resident Artist in the Department of Art and the History of Art at Amherst College.

A Pressing Conference

Against Doom - an exhibition by artist-in-residence Macon Reed

until Apr 5 Fayerweather Hall, 105 - Eli Marsh Gallery

Gallery hours are 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. on Mondays through Fridays, and from noon - 4 p.m. on Sundays. Closed Saturdays. This exhibition will close at noon on Friday, April 5.

Birth Doula Workshop

This semester, a birth doula workshop will be happening on campus. The course will be four full days long on March 23 and 24, and April 6 and 7. This opportunity will be open to Amherst College community members, as well as people from the local community. The workshop will be hosted by Michelle L'Esperance, a trained doula.

Registration Required

Bodies Week

Join the Student Health Educators for two weeks of events that focus on exploring your relationship with your body and celebrating what it does for you. See a full list of events on our Facebook!

Four books lay open on top of each other with blue, red, green and yellow hard covers.

Extended Study Hours

Join us in the Women's and Gender Center for our weekly study hours! Study in community with snacks and accountability partners to get your semester off to a great start!