Event Calendar

June 2019

Mon, Jun 3, 2019

Thu, Jun 6, 2019

"The Writers' Retreat" comic illustration of imaginary writing place, by Grant Snider, by permission.

Write-On-Site (for Faculty & Staff)

9:00 am - 12:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

Faculty and Staff are invited to an informal, drop-in writing space. If writing with others inspires you to maintain a regular writing practice, please join us. Light refreshments will be available. Hosted by the Writing Center.

Employee Council June Coffee Hour

Please join us for Coffee Hour on Thursday, June 6, from 10-11 a.m. in the Science Center Café. Meet Employee Council representatives and other staff from around campus, talk about issues that matter to you, and enjoy a free coffee and muffin—it’s on us!

Reading

Amherst Arts Night Plus Open Mic

Join us during Amherst Arts Night Plus on June 6, 2019 for our monthly Open Mic. Poets, writers, and performers of any kind are welcome! Come early to view the pop-up, contemporary art exhibition in the Homestead by our featured artist, Kandy Vermeer Phillips. The open mic begins at 6:00 p.m. and will be followed by this month's featured reader. Those who would like to share their work should arrive between 5:00 and 6:00 p.m. to sign up.

This month's Featured Poet: Naila Moreira is most often inspired by the natural world. After earning her doctorate in geology at University of Michigan, she worked as a journalist, Seattle Aquarium docent, and environmental consultant. She now teaches at Smith College and has served as writer in residence at the Shoals Marine Laboratory in Maine and Forbes Library in Northampton, MA. Her poetry, fiction and nonfiction are published or forthcoming in Terrain.org, The Boston Globe, Doctor T.J. Eckleburg Review, Cape Rock, Connecticut River Review, Rosarium Press Trouble the Waters anthology, and other venues, and her second poetry chapbook, Water Street (Finishing Line Press, 2017) won the New England Poetry Club Jean Pedrick Chapbook Prize. She writes a monthly environment column for the Daily Hampshire Gazette.

This month's Featured Speaker: Join Master Gardener and garden historian Marta McDowell for an informal talk on Emily Dickinson’s wildflowers. Following the relationship between the pen and the trowel led MartaMcDowell to Emily Dickinson for Emily Dickinson’s Gardens (2005), which will be reprinted in full color by Timber Press in 2019. Marta also scripted the Emily Dickinson Museum’s landscape audio tour, and was an advisor for the New York Botanical Garden’s 2010 show, “Emily Dickinson’s Gardens: The Poetry of Flowers.” Her other works include The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder (2017), All the Presidents Gardens (2016) and Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life (2013).

This month’s Featured Artist: Kandy Vermeer Phillips’s “Poetry in Silver: The Language of Flowers in the Works of Emily Dickinson.” This ongoing series of silverpoint drawings compares specimens found in Dickinson’s herbarium to those housed in the U.S. National Herbarium. “Poetry in Silver” highlights several of these cherished woodland flowers that inspired Dickinson’s poetry along with her use of the popular Language of Flowers.

Fri, Jun 7, 2019

IGD Flyer

Intergroup Dialogue Conference

"Intergroup Dialogue: Pedagogy of Possibilities" is the theme for the 3rd Biennial Conference on Intergroup Dialogue. The conference is co-sponsored by UMass Amherst, as well as Amherst, Smith, Hampshire and Mount Holyoke Colleges. The mission of the 3rd Biennial Conference on Intergroup Dialogue (IGD) is to share knowledge, skills, stories and practices that illustrate how dialogue can be a catalyst for envisioning new possibilities for collaboration and solidarity across differences.

Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum, President Emerita, Spelman College, widely known for her expertise on race relations, will join us alongside other invited guest speakers.

Please register for the conference at tinyurl.com/IGDconference2019

Registration Required
garden

Garden Days at the Homestead

Celebrate the beauty of spring during Garden Days at the Emily Dickinson Museum!

As warmer temperatures arrive in Amherst, Emily’s garden begs to be tended. On June 7 and 8, join our 2018 Gardener-in-Residence Marta McDowell and a group of volunteers to aid in the cultivation and growth of the historic Dickinson family landscape. You do not need to be an expert gardener for this “all levels” program. Learn from volunteers who have tended the gardens in the past and become part of a new generation of caretakers for this precious piece of land.

From 9 a.m.-1 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. on Saturday, visitors to the Museum can tend the historic landscape, discuss nature poetry under the great white oak tree, learn about the ongoing archaeological work, and enjoy gatherings in the garden all weekend long. Those who wish to volunteer are asked to sign up in advance for either or both days by emailing EDMPrograms@EmilyDickinsonMuseum.org.

Registration Required

Tue, Jun 11, 2019

Summer Researcher Reception

Working on an academic project on campus this summer? Student researchers are invited to enjoy some refreshments, talk informally about your projects, and learn about available resources. Rain location: Frost Library Friendly Periodicals Reading Room

The watershed has the typical triangular shape, with the larger portion extending to the top of the Holyoke range and narrowing as it proceeds downhill to the reservoir.

Mapping Geographic Data with ArcGIS

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are a powerful tool to discover spatial relationships and illuminate your research with intuitive maps:

• Illustrate historic sites and extract features from old maps;
• Spatially correlate census, economic, and other data;
• Display geologic formations and delineate watersheds;
• Track human, animal, and plant populations; and
• Map locations from a GPS receiver.

You will learn about:

• Constructing and Sharing Maps (including with Google Earth);
• Mapping Named Data (including census data and street addresses);
• Mapping Coordinate Data (including using a GPS receiver);
• Mapping Image Data (including scanned maps and satellite data); and
• Extracting Map Features

This workshop is in four parts:

• Tuesdays, June 11,18, 25, and July 2

Snacks and drinks will be provided!

Please register in advance:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScijz6Qre8lrzSjOJrujtOXhGpKob9m...

Registration Required

Wed, Jun 12, 2019

Writing While Researching

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Frost Library, 211 (CHI Seminar Room)

Designed for students at the start of a large scholarly project, this workshop will introduce writing techniques for taking effective and versatile notes, processing what you learn as you read, and developing your own ideas in relation to the texts you’re reading. Bring a reading from your project, as we’ll practice the techniques together. Taught by Jessica Kem, director of the Writing Center.

Students Only
Registration Required

Manipulating Images with Adobe Photoshop

Adobe Photoshop is the industry-standard program for image creation and editing. Images created in Photoshop can be incorporated into other documents such as Word, InDesign, PowerPoint, and Web pages. Using Photoshop you can easily crop and merge photos (e.g., “Photoshop me in!”) and retouch them to create sharper, more vibrant, and blemish-free images. Students can use Photoshop on their own computers with an Adobe Creative Cloud license.

• Wednesday, June 12
• 6-8 p.m.

Snacks and drinks will be provided!

Please register in advance:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScijz6Qre8lrzSjOJrujtOXhGpKob9m...

Registration Required

Thu, Jun 13, 2019

"The Writers' Retreat" comic illustration of imaginary writing place, by Grant Snider, by permission.

Write-On-Site (for Faculty & Staff)

9:00 am - 12:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

Faculty and Staff are invited to an informal, drop-in writing space. If writing with others inspires you to maintain a regular writing practice, please join us. Light refreshments will be available. Hosted by the Writing Center.

Exploring Data with Excel

Excel is an essential tool for organizing and exploring data from all fields of research. Its flexible tabular format provides a convenient display of data, and it provides many functions for basic statistics, selection, summary, and plotting. In addition, if you understand Excel, you will also be familiar with Google Docs online spreadsheets. If you’ve been a casual user of Excel, there are many capabilities and tricks that you may not be aware of. Come and find out what you’ve been missing. Excel is part of Microsoft Office, which Amherst students, faculty, and staff can download for free.

• Thursday, June 13
• 6-8 p.m.

Snacks and drinks will be provided!

Please register in advance:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScijz6Qre8lrzSjOJrujtOXhGpKob9m...

Registration Required

Sat, Jun 15, 2019

Two people digging in the ground at the Archaeology Field School

Tour the Archaeology Field School

Our archaeology students have been hard at work at the Emily Dickinson Museum! Come tour their dig sites and see their discoveries firsthand on June 15 at 1 p.m. In past years, visitors have received a close-up look at remains of plants that once grew in the gardens, buried paths, water pipes, bed borders and other garden infrastructure that existed when Emily Dickinson was alive. This year, see the hard work of our Archaeology Field School students as they continue to delineate the archaeological footprint of the Dickinson home.

Image is of an ice cream cone with flowers and ice cream on stems coming out. Text reads " Enjoy seeing flowers at fall fest? Join Book and plow in planting flowers for our pick your own garden. Ice cream will be served!"

Flower Planting and Ice Cream

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Book and Plow Farm

Join Book and Plow Farm on Saturday 6/15 from 2-4pm to help us plant flowers for our pick-your-own flower garden! Ice cream will be served.

Mon, Jun 17, 2019

A stylized representation of two intertwined python snakes

Scientific Programming with Python

Python is a freely distributable high-level programming language that has become very popular for everything from scripting applications and web-page generation to solving scientific problems. It shares many basic characteristics with languages like Mathematica, Matlab, and Labview, and has an extensive set of numerical and scientific modules. In this class we will use Python to build instructions describing a scientific problem, and solve it using the college computing cluster.

This workshop is in four parts:

• Mondays, June 17, 24, and July 1, 8

Snacks and drinks will be provided!

Please register in advance:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScijz6Qre8lrzSjOJrujtOXhGpKob9m...

Registration Required

Tue, Jun 18, 2019

All-Staff Meeting

President Martin and members of the senior staff will share their reflections on the year, update you on college priorities and developments in staff life, and respond to your questions and comments.

The watershed has the typical triangular shape, with the larger portion extending to the top of the Holyoke range and narrowing as it proceeds downhill to the reservoir.

Mapping Geographic Data with ArcGIS

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are a powerful tool to discover spatial relationships and illuminate your research with intuitive maps:

• Illustrate historic sites and extract features from old maps;
• Spatially correlate census, economic, and other data;
• Display geologic formations and delineate watersheds;
• Track human, animal, and plant populations; and
• Map locations from a GPS receiver.

You will learn about:

• Constructing and Sharing Maps (including with Google Earth);
• Mapping Named Data (including census data and street addresses);
• Mapping Coordinate Data (including using a GPS receiver);
• Mapping Image Data (including scanned maps and satellite data); and
• Extracting Map Features

This workshop is in four parts:

• Tuesdays, June 11,18, 25, and July 2

Snacks and drinks will be provided!

Please register in advance:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScijz6Qre8lrzSjOJrujtOXhGpKob9m...

Registration Required

Wed, Jun 19, 2019

Summer Thesis Research Table

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Frost Library, Research Tables (1st floor)

The thesis research table is a regular meet-up for students who are starting work on a thesis (or other similar long-term research projects). Each week, we’ll start with reflective accountability check-ins and then focus our discussion on a particular aspect of the research and writing process. Drop in or attend regularly. We'll provide the donuts! Hosted by Frost Library and the Writing Center.

Students Only
A diamond shape with three-node network suggesting the merging and forking of a set of code.

Debugging and Version Control for Programming

Want your computer code to be perfect? Start by realizing that you will make mistakes when writing it! In this class you’ll learn how to discover and fix your errors. We will cover basic principles of debugging applicable to any programming language, though examples will use the Python language and its standard debugger pdb. Sometimes you’ll also want to try out new ideas without ruining the code that’s already working. We will therefore learn the basics of using the Git version control system, which makes it easy to fall back to an earlier version of your code if necessary. Git is also an important tool for collaborating with others, so that you can safely experiment with fixing errors in their code and taking it in new directions.

Snacks and drinks will be provided!

Please register in advance:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScijz6Qre8lrzSjOJrujtOXhGpKob9m...

Registration Required

Thu, Jun 20, 2019

"The Writers' Retreat" comic illustration of imaginary writing place, by Grant Snider, by permission.

Write-On-Site (for Faculty & Staff)

9:00 am - 12:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

Faculty and Staff are invited to an informal, drop-in writing space. If writing with others inspires you to maintain a regular writing practice, please join us. Light refreshments will be available. Hosted by the Writing Center.

Fri, Jun 21, 2019

ninja typing on a computer

Productive Habits for Big Writing Projects

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Frost Library, 211 (CHI Seminar Room)

If you are getting started on a long-term writing project such as an honors thesis, you may have good intentions about setting deadlines and staying motivated, but you may also recognize that you've never done this before. Learn practices that will help you start and complete a project you can be proud of while minimizing agony and despair. This workshop will introduce you to strategies for establishing good habits early, for breaking a large project into smaller chunks, and for addressing procrastination and writer’s block. Please bring your calendar.

Students Only
Registration Required
Portrait photo of Emily Dickinson

Unveiling of Emily Dickinson Paintings in Johnson Chapel

Come see two new paintings being added to Johnson Chapel’s portrait gallery. Pendant portraits of Emily Dickinson by Bob Sweeney, the William R. Mead Professor of Art, will be dedicated on Friday, June 21, at 1:30 p.m. in Johnson Chapel, followed by a reception featuring desserts based on Emily Dickinson's recipes. All are welcome.

ninja sitting at a laptop

Productive Habits for Big Writing Projects

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm Frost Library, 211 (CHI Seminar Room)

If you are getting started on a long-term writing project such as an honors thesis, you may have good intentions about setting deadlines and staying motivated, but you may also recognize that you've never done this before. Learn practices that will help you start and complete a project you can be proud of while minimizing agony and despair. This workshop will introduce you to strategies for establishing good habits early, for breaking a large project into smaller chunks, and for addressing procrastination and writer’s block. Participants should bring their calendars. Led by Jessica Kem, director of the Writing Center.

Students Only
Registration Required

Emily Dickinson Museum Conservatory Art Installation Opening

Join us at The Emily Dickinson Museum to celebrate the opening of our inaugural Conservatory Art Installation! On June 21, from 6:30 to 8:00PM, Tereza Swanda will transform the Conservatory with her exhibition of stained and painted glass. A graduate of the Vermont College of Fine Arts and the Massachusetts College of Art and an Instructor of Art at Dean College, Swanda will transform the Conservatory alongside glass artist Ingrid Pichler and musician Fletcher Boote with their exhibit “In formation.”

Taking the Emily Dickinson poem “Nature is what we see” as the starting point, the installation will include stained and painted paper hung from the windows in the Conservatory to mimic the colors of a sunset. Providing each visitor with a sense of what Dickinson saw from her conservatory windows, the medium will also make malleable the experience of the artwork, changing with the time of the day and the amount of light present. In addition to this visual component, the landscape will be translated into sound by Boote that wordlessly references Emily Dickinson’s poetry.

Mon, Jun 24, 2019

A stylized representation of two intertwined python snakes

Scientific Programming with Python

Python is a freely distributable high-level programming language that has become very popular for everything from scripting applications and web-page generation to solving scientific problems. It shares many basic characteristics with languages like Mathematica, Matlab, and Labview, and has an extensive set of numerical and scientific modules. In this class we will use Python to build instructions describing a scientific problem, and solve it using the college computing cluster.

This workshop is in four parts:

• Mondays, June 17, 24, and July 1, 8

Snacks and drinks will be provided!

Please register in advance:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScijz6Qre8lrzSjOJrujtOXhGpKob9m...

Registration Required
RAD Self Defense

RAD Self Defense classes

R.A.D. (Rape Aggression Defense) course is a comprehensive self defense program for folks who self-identify as trans or cis women and/or nonbinary. It begins with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance while progressing to the basics of hands-on defense training. The R.A.D. system is dedicated to teaching defensive concepts and techniques against various types of assault by utilizing easy, effective and proven self-defense tactics.

Please email RAD@amherst.edu to sign-up and bring a friend!

Tue, Jun 25, 2019

Farewell Reception for Bulaong Ramiz-Hall, MRC director!!

Please join us in celebrating Bulaong and wishing her the best of luck in her new position on Tuesday, June 25 at 3:30pm in the MRC. Refreshments will be served.

Bulaong has accepted a new position as Director of the Emily Taylor Center for Women and Gender Equity at the University of Kansas. Bulaong will be the first woman of color to oversee the Center and no doubt, bring her brilliance, expertise, and love for cultivating community and joy to her new workplace as she has done here. During her three years at Amherst, Bulaong has transformed the Multicultural Resource Center. She has created and cultivated with her students and specialists, a space of support, growth, community, education, joy, and resilience for students of color and all members of the College. Her legacy will be long lasting and she will certainly be missed.

We look forward to celebrating her time at the College and wishing her best of luck in her next adventure! We hope you will join us!!!

The watershed has the typical triangular shape, with the larger portion extending to the top of the Holyoke range and narrowing as it proceeds downhill to the reservoir.

Mapping Geographic Data with ArcGIS

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are a powerful tool to discover spatial relationships and illuminate your research with intuitive maps:

• Illustrate historic sites and extract features from old maps;
• Spatially correlate census, economic, and other data;
• Display geologic formations and delineate watersheds;
• Track human, animal, and plant populations; and
• Map locations from a GPS receiver.

You will learn about:

• Constructing and Sharing Maps (including with Google Earth);
• Mapping Named Data (including census data and street addresses);
• Mapping Coordinate Data (including using a GPS receiver);
• Mapping Image Data (including scanned maps and satellite data); and
• Extracting Map Features

This workshop is in four parts:

• Tuesdays, June 11,18, 25, and July 2

Snacks and drinks will be provided!

Please register in advance:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScijz6Qre8lrzSjOJrujtOXhGpKob9m...

Registration Required

Wed, Jun 26, 2019

Summer Thesis Research Table

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Frost Library, Research Tables (1st floor)

The thesis research table is a regular meet-up for students who are starting work on a thesis (or other similar long-term research projects). Each week, we’ll start with reflective accountability check-ins and then focus our discussion on a particular aspect of the research and writing process. Drop in or attend regularly. We'll provide the donuts! Hosted by Frost Library and the Writing Center.

Students Only

Thu, Jun 27, 2019

"The Writers' Retreat" comic illustration of imaginary writing place, by Grant Snider, by permission.

Write-On-Site (for Faculty & Staff)

9:00 am - 12:00 pm Frost Library, Center for Humanistic Inquiry

Faculty and Staff are invited to an informal, drop-in writing space. If writing with others inspires you to maintain a regular writing practice, please join us. Light refreshments will be available. Hosted by the Writing Center.

Ongoing Events

 A print depicting a 4,000x magnification of a microscope photograph

"Between the Imagined and Seen: The Hand-Pulled Prints of Betsey Garand and Microscope Images of Caroline Goutte"

until Aug 30 Frost Library, Mezzanine Gallery (2nd Floor)

Visit the Mezzanine Gallery in Frost Library to view Between the Imagined and Seen: The Hand-Pulled Prints of Betsey Garand and Microscope Images of Caroline Goutte, on exhibit from March 4 to Aug. 30. This exhibition is sponsored by the Arts at Amherst Initiative

Professor Caroline Goutte is chair of the Department of Biology and a member of the Program in Biochemistry and Biophysics at Amherst College. Betsey Garand is senior resident artist in the Department of Art and the History of Art at Amherst College.