Event Calendar

Friday, September 27, 2019

Fri, Sep 27, 2019

Climate strike 2019: your mother needs help

Amherst College Climate Strike

In the face of the climate crisis, we refuse to do nothing. Instead, strike on September 27 with other students, educators, and workers from around the world on a Global Day of Action. Starting at 10 a.m. on the First-Year Quad, we’ll hold teach-ins to educate ourselves and peers about what we can do about climate change, the injustice inherent in climate change, and how we got into this crisis. At 12:30 p.m., we’ll rally on the quad in solidarity with other alarmed people around the world, taking control of the narrative around climate change. Representative Mindy Domb will speak, followed by students sharing their personal experiences with the climate crisis.
Join us in this global movement. Don’t go to your classes. Don’t go to work. Don’t teach, and cancel your classes. In other words, do nothing that you would ordinarily do. If we continue to go about our lives like nothing is wrong, nothing will ever change.

Not of Glass, But of Paper: When Texts Become Lenses (And Why This Matters)

"Not of Glass, But of Paper: When Texts Become Lenses (And Why This Matters)" presented by Sanam Nader-Esfahani.

The Faculty Colloquium Series for 2019-20 presents a lecture titled "Not of Glass, But of Paper: When Texts Become Lenses (And Why This Matters)" presented by Sanam Nader-Esfahani, assistant professor of French.
https://www.amherst.edu/mm/33214

The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries mark a pivotal moment in the history of visual theories and technologies. From enhancements in the understanding and craftsmanship of lenses to new conclusions about the location and form of the image inside the eye, from progress in ophthalmology to telescopic discoveries, these developments raised questions about the nature of vision, exposed the vulnerability and limitations of “the most noble sense”, and created a rivalry between the natural organ of sight and the artificial instrument.

This talk analyzes works from the French and Italian traditions in the early modern period in light of the conversations that animated their contemporary scientific debates. Why might an author privilege the lens as a means of representation, be it through an explicit use of the metaphor or more implicitly in the text’s formal components? What does it mean for a text to behave as a lens, and what are the implications of its lenticular nature for the dynamic between vision, knowledge and power?

Faculty Colloquium events are sponsored by a group of faculty colleagues who meet informally with the purpose of supporting and promoting the College’s commitment to faculty research. Colleagues interested in joining this endeavor are welcome and should contact us by email: adsarat@amherst.edu . Faculty, staff, and members of the administration are cordially invited to attend these presentations.

Photo of the outside of Valentine Dining Hall

Chinese Language Table

If you are interested in having more opportunities to speak Chinese, then join us twice a week for lunch! The Chinese Language Table is open to students, faculty and staff who would like to have conversations in Chinese. All levels are welcome.

Plastic food display at a Japanese restaurant

Japanese Language Table

If you are interested in having more opportunities to speak Japanese, join us on Fridays for lunch! The Japanese language table meets once a week with Doshisha University student Tomajin Morikawa ’21. The Japanese Language Table is open to students, faculty and staff who would like to have conversations in Japanese. All are welcome to attend, and you can come and go as it fits your schedule. We hope to see you there!

Wellness Fair

7th Annual Wellness Fair

Drop by the Wellness Fair to participate in fun wellness activities, enjoy yummy snacks, and get to know Amherst’s mental health and wellness resources and student groups. Get a free chair massage, play with baby animals, pick up free giveaways and more! Rain date is October 4. This event is part of Mental Health Awareness Week and is sponsored by numerous campus partners and supported by the Community Mental Health Fund.

Knitting at Noon poster

Knitting at Noon

Are you a knitter who has longed to knit with others? Have you always wanted to be a knitter, but are
intimidated by all of the paraphernalia, complicated stitches and impossible-to-understand instructions?
All students, staff and faculty are welcome.
Please bring a brown bag lunch or grab-and-go lunch.

Women of Color Luncheon in the WGC

Join us for a discussion around holding intersectional identities as women of color. Food will be served. This is a space that centers around self-identifying women of color.
For accessibility and accommodations, contact WGC@amherst.edu.

Dr. Jacob Olshansky

Chemistry Seminar with Professor Jacob Olshansky

His seminar is titled “Photogenerated Spin Qubits in DNA.”

ACPD S'mores making

S’mores with First-Year Students

All first-year students come and make s’mores with ACPD. Ask questions and learn what we are all about!

Bienvenue à la boulangerie

8:00 pm King Hall, French House Common Room

Come join us in French House to speak French and enjoy crêpes and pastries. We look forward to meeting you!

Ongoing Events

Mammoths in (Library) Space Tour

Learning to navigate Frost Library can set you up to take on all your academic missions this year. Get on the right track: take the self-directed Mammoths in (Library) Space Tour! To begin the tour, go to the welcome station across from Frost’s circulation desk. Complete the tour and get a gift card to Frost Café plus a chance to win our grand prize!

Untitled, ripped and damaged black-and-white photo from the series "Love Notes," showing shrubbery in a field by the side of a road, under a cloudy sky

“Do Things to Images”: An Exhibition by Odette England

Do Things to Images presents for the first time a selection of photographs from 2014 to 2019 by the artist Odette England. It includes images from her newest series Love Notes.

England’s parents’ former dairy farm, and the archive of snapshots her family made there, serve as raw material for England’s practice. Many of her photographs are unique pieces. By mixing preciousness with low-fi, unrepeatable processes, England highlights the infidelity of memory.

This exhibition includes prints from negatives that England buried and then dug up, and hand-torn paper prints. It features pages ripped from family photo albums, and vintage snapshots that have been hole-punched, among other works. Her need to cut, crop, sand, fold and otherwise manipulate photographs is in contrast to the French meaning of her name, Odette, “Lover of Home.”

Join Odette England for a lecture and the opening of her exhibition on Thursday, Sept. 19, at 4:30 p.m. in Pruyne Lecture Hall, 115 Fayerweather.