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Type of Event

Event Calendar

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Tue, Mar 3, 2020

Daniella Bardalez Gagliuffi, American Museum of Natural History: “Identifying Observational Signatures of Brown Dwarf and Giant Planet Formation”

Brown dwarfs are the critical link between the products of stellar and planetary formation pathways; hence, their population properties and compositions can inform on the likelihood of either formation history. In particular, multiplicity is a direct outcome of formation, yet it is challenging to measure it in a consistent way, since each binary detection technique is sensitive to a different range of separations and mass ratios.

In this talk, I will present results from a volume-limited spectroscopic sample, including a new binary fraction straddling the hydrogen-burning minimum mass, which separates stars from brown dwarfs. I will discuss future directions for a comprehensive characterization of both the statistical distributions of the population of multiple systems and the fundamental properties of their individual components as a function of age. These are crucial steps to identify spectroscopic signatures of formation.

Event poster featuring a blue outline of Latin America on a red, orange and yellow background, as well as a small photo of Chambers-Ju

“Mobilizing Teachers: The Political Strategies of Mass Member Organizations in Latin America”

Christopher Chambers-Ju ’04, visiting assistant professor at the College of the Holy Cross, will give a talk titled “Mobilizing Teachers: The Political Strategies of Mass Member Organizations in Latin America.”

Chambers-Ju received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2017. His research examines the politics of education through a focus on teachers’ unions. Studying the cases of Argentina, Colombia and Mexico, he examines why some teachers take to the streets while others form an organized voting bloc, with distinct relationships to political parties. By focusing on teachers, he seeks to shed light on broader dynamics of education policy-making and political change in contemporary Latin America.

This event is free and open to the public and is sponsored by the Department of Political Science at Amherst College with funding from the Lurcy Endowment and the Lamont Funds.