Event Calendar

Monday, February 15, 2021

Mon, Feb 15, 2021

Movement and Mindfulness Morning Workshops with Molly Kitchen

The OHR Learning & Development Team invites you to kick-start your day with invigorating, accessible movement as well as a few minutes of grounding meditation with Molly Kitchen. These workshops will set you up for a calm, focused day and provide you with practical mindfulness tools you can use and reuse any time. Schedule these breaks as a fun way to start your week, as well as to learn tips for keeping that energy alive each day.

Workday Open Lab/AskIT

Workday Open Labs are still happening! Join a session if you have a question about Workday. View the training website (login required) for the full schedule and Zoom info.

Workday Open Lab/AskIT

Workday Open Labs are still happening! Join a session if you have a question about Workday. View the training website (login required) for the full schedule and Zoom info.

Student Hiring in Workday

Sessions are designed for supervisors and will review the process for creating a student job requisition and hiring a student employee.

Headshot of Osama Ahmed

Biology Monday Seminar: Walking and Singing: The Neurobiology of Multitasking in Drosophila"

4:00 pm Virtual

Osama Ahmed, Ph.D., Presidential Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, will speak on "Walking and Singing: The Neurobiology of Multitasking in Drosophila."

Locomotion, such as walking or flying, is vitally important for the survival and fitness of practically all animals, and regularly occurs in tandem with other motor actions. Human locomotion, for example, may occur concurrently with talking, and similarly, Drosophila flies can walk and produce complex acoustic signals called “courtship songs.” While many components of the neural circuits that control either walking or singing have been identified, the neural substrates that couple these behaviors during multitasking are entirely unknown. Here, I show how Drosophila courtship behavior can be leveraged as a neuroethological model for studying multitasking. During courtship, male flies must attend to and keep up with their potential mates, all the while producing the right songs at the right times by correctly vibrating their wings. My results show that fly chase-and-stop courtship sequences exhibit hallmarks of multitasking: male flies either walk, or sing, or perform both behaviors simultaneously. Through optogenetic activation of locomotor neurons in freely courting male flies and new machine-learning methods for automated behavioral analysis, I reveal performance differences in how flies walk or sing (single-tasking) compared to when they walk and sing (multitasking). These results demonstrate that the fly courtship model is an advantageous and promising framework for characterizing and testing the neurogenetic control of multitasking. These experiments provide a strong foundation and entry point for probing circuit mechanisms that underlie multitasking via brain-wide neural recordings in behaving animals. Identifying these mechanisms will inform our understanding of how neural pathways interact to control, or limit, behavioral simultaneity.

Persons from the college community that wish to attend should please register by sending an email request to the Biology ADC, Karen Racz, who will provide the Zoom link to the event.