Event Calendar

Wed, Dec 11, 2019

Black-and-white photograph of Emily Dickinson

CHI Salon: Emily Dickinson's Birthday Party

We are celebrating Emily Dickinson's 189th birthday! Please join us for poetry readings, period music, tapas, wine and birthday cake! Childcare is available.

Thu, Jan 30, 2020

Cover of Anne Fausto-Sterling's book "Sex/Gender: Biology in a Social World"

Anne Fausto-Sterling Public Lecture

4:30 pm - 6:00 pm Science Center, Lipton Lecture Hall -- E110

Dr. Anne Fausto-Sterling is the Nancy Duke Lewis Professor Emerita of Biology and Gender Studies in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and Biochemistry at Brown University, and founder and former director of the Science & Technology Studies Program at Brown University. The author of three books that are referenced widely in feminist and scientific inquiry and over 60 scholarly articles, she is also a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and has received grants and fellowships in both the sciences and the humanities.

Fri, Feb 14, 2020

Hyper Education: When Good Grades, Good Schools and Good Behavior are Not Enough

"Hyper Education: When Good Grades, Good Schools and Good Behavior are Not Enough" presented by Pawan Dhingra.

The Faculty Colloquium Series for 2019-20 presents a lecture titled "Hyper Education: When Good Grades, Good Schools, and Good Behavior are Not Enough" presented by Pawan Dhingra, professor of American studies.

https://www.amherst.edu/mm/33214

"A recent truth in middle-class parenting is the over-scheduling of young children in extracurricular activities. Hyper-education refers to a growing trend of young children already performing well in school and yet participating in privatized, extracurricular education. After-school math learning centers and academic competitions (e.g. spelling bees) are two main types. This trend is normally associated with Asian Americans (e.g. “Tiger moms”) but is growing among whites as well. Based on ethnographic research on Asian Americans and others, I explain the motivations of this seemingly foreign practice and demonstrate that it is in line with contemporary education reforms, and as such should be expected to grow. The rise of hyper education has implications for educational inequality."

Faculty Colloquium events are sponsored by a group of faculty colleagues who meet informally with the purpose of supporting and promoting the College’s commitment to faculty research. Colleagues interested in joining this endeavor are welcome and should contact us by email: adsarat@amherst.edu . Faculty, staff, and members of the administration are cordially invited to attend these presentations.

Tue, Feb 18, 2020

JUSTICE.  Picture of hand grasping microphone.

JUSTICE! Amherst College’s Speaking Competition

JUSTICE! Amherst College’s Speaking Competition 2020.
Students compete with 5 - 7 minute speeches using this year’s theme: Justice.
Winners receive cash prizes and recognition in the college award ceremonies.

Fri, Feb 28, 2020

Parker String Quartet

M@A Masterclass: Parker Quartet Feb. 28

Please join us for a public masterclass as M@A Chamber artists, the Parker Quartet, work with students on their craft.

Fri, Mar 27, 2020

How Markets Made Gun Rights: Self-Defense, Property, and Firearms in the Nineteenth Century U.S.

"How Markets Made Gun Rights: Self-Defense, Property, and Firearms in the Nineteenth Century U.S." presented by Jonathan Obert

The Faculty Colloquium Series for 2019-20 presents a lecture titled "How Markets Made Gun Rights: Self-Defense, Property, and Firearms in the Nineteenth Century U.S." presented by Jonathan Obert, Assistant Professor of Political Science.
https://www.amherst.edu/mm/33214

"Scholarship on the origins of gun rights typically focuses on the Second Amendment, and the varied ways in which it has been interpreted by judges and the mass public. This project instead outlines a new approach to thinking about gun rights by focusing on the ways in which gun-makers articulated a vision of guns as meta-property - legally protected material objects used to protect property rights. Using a novel dataset of gun-making firms active in the U.S. from 1820 through the end of the century, as well as a content analysis of early American firearms advertisements, I trace the pre-history of gun rights discourse in the U.S. The symbolic construction of guns as commodities capable of protecting and providing in the late nineteenth century created the conceptual groundwork for their conversion into a rights discourse in the twentieth. Therefore, not only does "rights talk" concerning firearm ownership antedate much of the constitutional jurisprudence on the question, such talk was directly tied to the need for gun-makers to cultivate a domestic market for guns in highly competitive and uncertain economic conditions. "

Faculty Colloquium events are sponsored by a group of faculty colleagues who meet informally with the purpose of supporting and promoting the College’s commitment to faculty research. Colleagues interested in joining this endeavor are welcome and should contact us by email: adsarat@amherst.edu . Faculty, staff, and members of the administration are cordially invited to attend these presentations.