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Type of Event

Event Calendar

Today - Wed, Feb 19, 2020

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance for a weekly, informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon - 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Event poster with white text on a purple background, with a hexagonal RLadies logo

RLadies Amherst: A Conversation with Professors Brittney Bailey and Katharine Correia

Learn how two Amherst College statistics professors got to where they are now in their careers in data science. Everyone is welcome! RLadies hopes to encourage, inspire and support women in the R community.

This event is co-sponsored by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Refreshments will be served.

Wondering about how masculinity manifests itself at social events on campus? Join the Peer Advocates for a candid conversation on what masculinity looks like at Amherst parties!

Unpacking Masculinity 2.0: Mixers Edition

Join the Peer Advocates for Sexual Respect for a group discussion on masculinity and parties on campus! This event is a follow-up to our panel on masculinity last semester.

Students Only

Tomorrow - Thu, Feb 20, 2020

Rhonda Cobham-Sander sitting at desk with open book

Reflections on Teaching with Rhonda Cobham-Sander

4:30 pm Frost Library, CHI Think Tank

Rhonda Cobham-Sander, the Emily C. Jordan Folger Professor of Black Studies and English, will reflect with us about her teaching now and how her teaching has evolved throughout her career at Amherst College.

RSVP through the Center for Teaching and Learning website.

Law’s Infamy: Ashker v. Brown and the Failures of Solitary Confinement Reform

Keramet Reiter, Associate Professor of Criminology, Law & Society in the School of Social Ecology at the University of California, Irvine, will present a paper entitled “Law’s Infamy: Ashker v. Brown and the Failures of Solitary Confinement Reform.” This is the fifth presentation in a series of seminars that will take place this year on the theme “Law’s Infamy.”
Keramet Reiter studies prisons, prisoners’ rights, and the impact of prison and punishment policy on individuals, communities, and legal systems.

"The Court System of Japan"

"After giving an overview of the Japanese court system, I would like to talk about the mediation system, which has been evaluated as characteristic in the Japanese court system. Of course, there is a mediation system in the United States, but mediation in Japan is performed in a court building and involves nonlegal professionals as mediators, which is completely different from mediation in the United States. I would like to think about how disputes are resolved in Japanese court through this characteristic system and what kind of image the Japanese have of the court."

—Yukihiro Okada, Professor of Law at Doshisha University

Presented by the Doshisha University and Amherst College Faculty Exchange Program

Please note that this lecture will be in Japanese.

Event flyer featuring handwritten mathematical notes and illustrations of butterflies

Math Colloquium: Amanda Folsom, “Symmetry, Almost”

Some definitions of the word symmetry include “correct or pleasing proportion of the parts of a thing,” “balanced proportions” and “the property of remaining invariant under certain changes, as of orientation in space.” One might think of snowflakes, butterflies and our own faces as naturally symmetric objects—or at least close to it. Mathematically, one can also conjure up many symmetric objects: even and odd functions, fractals, certain matrices and modular forms, a type of symmetric complex function. All of these things exhibit a kind of beauty in their symmetries, so would they lose some of their innate beauty if their symmetries were altered? Alternatively, could some measure of beauty be gained with slight symmetric imperfections? We will explore these questions, guided by the topic of modular forms and their variants. What can be gained by perturbing modular symmetries in particular? We will discuss this theme from past to present: the origins of these questions have their roots in the first half of the 20th century, dating back to Ramanujan and Gauss, while some fascinating and surprising answers come from just the last 15 years.

Film & Media Studies Open House

Are you interested in exploring film and media but don’t know where to begin? Our Film & Media Studies open house is just the place! We have an array of opportunities for students here at Amherst College, so cozy up in the McCaffrey Room lounge and join us for pizza and cookies to learn more! All students and majors are welcome.

Financial Aid and Taxes Q&A

Tax Filing and Financial Aid Re-Application Party

It's the time we've all been waiting for! That's right, it's tax and financial aid re-application season. If you didn't know, everyone on financial aid has to re-apply every year and everyone who receives financial aid for housing and food has to file taxes. Don't fret, Amherst QuestBridge Low Income Community will help you as well as answer all your burning questions about financial aid and taxes. You've got to do it anyway, why not do it around friends and snacks??

Overland Summer Trip Leader Opportunities Info Session

Love the outdoors? Seeking an exciting summer opportunity? For more than 30 years, Overland (http://overlandsummers.com) has offered introductory biking, hiking, language, writing, service and field studies programs domestically and abroad for students in grades 4-12.
51 itineraries, 17 countries, 4 continents...that’s a lot of adventure. Far more than simply a summer experience, Overland aims to provide a life experience with value and resonance that extends beyond the boundaries of a single summer. Trip leaders seek to inspire each student group to see how beautiful, exciting and full of promise the world is.
Overland aims to a build supportive and wholesome team of leaders. Far more than simply counselors or guides, Overland’s leaders act as terrific role models for each group’s young student participants.
Join Overland representatives at this info session to learn more about 2020 opportunities and how to successfully apply for them.

Cover of Sarah Knott's book "Mother Is a Verb," with an illustration of a woman with her body underwater and her face and hand sticking out above the surface

"Feminist Theory? Queer Studies? Memoir? How to Write the History of Pregnancy and Birth in Changing Times"

Sarah Knott is a writer, feminist and professor of history. She is the author, most recently, of Mother Is a Verb: An Unconventional History, which The New York Times described as “a joy to read.” She is currently an associate professor of history at Indiana University and a research fellow of the Kinsey Institute.

Sponsored by the Department of History, the Lamont Lecture Fund, and the Eastman Lecture Fund

Introduction to the Finance Industry Workshop Series (9 Weeks)

What is the Introduction to Finance Industry Workshop Series?
This is a 9-week program open to first-year students and sophomores interested in learning more about the finance industry and exploring potential careers in finance. The workshop series is led by Stephanie Hockman, Director of the Business and Finance Program through the Loeb Center. The series is designed to help students understand the finance industry and its components, distinguish the nuances of career opportunities, and understand the lingo used in the finance industry. Some workshops will include alumni who will provide their practical insights, experience and understanding to the discussion.
What topics are discussed in the workshop series?
The 9-week course will include topics such as:
1. Overview of the Finance Industry
2. Investment Banking, Part 1 – Corporate Investment Bankers
3. Investment Banking, Part 2 – Global Markets (e.g. Sales & Trading, Research, and Investor Services)
4. Investment Banking, Part 3 - CIB Operations & Supporting functions
5. Investment Management & Asset Management
6. Industry Trends & Alternative Investments: Fintech, Hedge Funds, Insurance, & Real Estate
7. Private Equity
8. Private Wealth Management/Asset Management
9. Review of the industry and next steps to preparing for finance industry interviews
How do I register for the Introduction to Finance Workshop Series?
The weekly, one-hour workshops will be held every Thursday from 8pm – 9pm beginning February 6, 2020, through April 9, 2020 (excluding spring break - March 19). YOU MUST COMMIT TO ATTENDING ALL 9 WEEKS.
Space is limited and advance sign up is required. If you are interested in learning more about the finance industry and willing to attend all 9 sessions, please register on Handshake for the first session (Feb. 6) That enrolls you for the entire series.
All questions may be directed to Stephanie Hockman (shockman@amherst.edu).

Students Only
Registration Required

Fri, Feb 21, 2020

Internship Application Drop-In Clinic

Come to the Loeb Center and work on your internship applications! Show us your cover letters in progress, get feedback and advice, or just come for some dedicated time and space to make progress. There are also two other drop-in clinics on February 7 and February 21. Hosted by the Charles Hamilton Houston Internship Program.

Internship Application Drop-In Clinic

Come to the Loeb Center and work on your internship applications! Show us your cover letters in progress, get feedback and advice, or just come for some dedicated time and space to make progress. There are also two other drop-in clinics on February 14 and March 13. Hosted by the Charles Hamilton Houston Internship Program.

Headshot of Sherrie Tucker

"Improvising Across Abilities: Pauline Oliveros and the Adaptive-Use Musical Instrument": A Talk by Professor Sherrie Tucker (University of Kansas)

The music department presents a special talk by jazz historian and professor of American studies Sherrie Tucker. All are invited.

Professor Tucker’s talk focuses on the work of composer, musician and humanitarian Pauline Oliveros (1932-2016), who is renowned for her innovations in composition, sound technology, research, philosophy and practices of listening, as well as feminist and environmental humanitarian projects. Less known is her work on all-ability improvisation through the Adaptive-Use Musical Instrument (AUMI), a free download/app that transforms any laptop, desktop, iPad or iPhone into a musical instrument that uses motion tracking to adapt to every body. Oliveros considered the AUMI a continuation of, not a departure from, her life’s work, listing it as her major research project with her department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in her final years. From 2007 until her passing, she spoke of the AUMI as interconnected with her other projects and collaborations intended to expand our abilities to listen, and thus to expand consciousness—such as the Sonic Meditations, Expanded Instrument System and Deep Listening® practice. 

In this lecture/demonstration, jazz studies scholar Sherrie Tucker shares what she has learned as a member of the ongoing collaborative AUMI Research Project, including how it challenged her exclusive relationship with jazz as an object of study, and pivoted her jazz studies questions and methods toward explorations of inclusive mixed-ability listening, sounding and sociality. Participants are invited to bring laptops, iPads or iPhones (sorry, Android users), if they wish. Those who want to try the AUMI in advance may download it free of charge at http://aumiapp.com/download.php.

Sherrie Tucker (professor, American studies, University of Kansas) is the author of Dance Floor Democracy: The Social Geography of Memory at the Hollywood Canteen (Duke, 2014) and Swing Shift: “All-Girl” Bands of the 1940s (Duke, 2000) and co-editor, with Nichole T. Rustin, of Big Ears:  Listening for Gender in Jazz Studies (Duke, 2008). She is a member of the AUMI Editorial Collective, whose collaborative volume, Improvising Across Abilities: Pauline Oliveros and the Adaptive Use Musical Instrument (AUMI) is currently under review at University of Michigan Press. She is a member of two major collaborative research initiatives: the International Institute of Critical Improvisation Studies and Improvisation, Community and Social Practice (for which she served as facilitator for the Improvisation, Gender and the Body research area), both funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. She is a founding member of the Melba Liston Research Collective, a member of the AUMI (Adaptive Use Musical Instrument) Project and founding member of AUMI-KU InterArts, one of six member institutions of the AUMI Research Consortium. She was the Louis Armstrong Visiting Professor at the Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University in 2004-2005, where she was a member of the Columbia Jazz Study Group. With Randal M. Jelks, she co-edits the journal American Studies. She serves with Deborah Wong and Jeremy Wallach as series editors for the Music/Culture Series at Wesleyan University Press. She is the proud holder of a Deep Listening® Ear-tificate.

For more information, contact Professor Jason Robinson (jrobinson@amherst.edu).

Mon, Feb 24, 2020

Kiessling_headshot

Biology Monday Seminar

4:00 pm Science Center, Kirkpatrick Lecture Hall A011

Laura L. Kiessling, Ph.D., Novartis Professor of Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will give a talk titled “Carbohydrates at the Host–Microbe Interface.”
Our health depends on maintaining a functional microbiome and avoiding the propagation of pathogenic microbes. Our group seeks to understand the mechanisms of microbial control by focusing on a prominent feature of the cell’s exterior—the carbohydrate coat. From humans to fungi to bacteria, all cells on Earth possess a carbohydrate coat. A critical role of this coat is to serve as an identification card. Our group has been examining the role of carbohydrate-binding proteins, lectins, in influencing our microbiota and in immune defense. This seminar will focus on understanding the basis of carbohydrate-protein interactions and how they are used to control microbes. We envision that our findings can lead to alternative means to combat pathogens, methods for rapid approaches to ID microbiota, and the development of new strategies to regulate microbiome composition to promote human health.

Alumni-in-Residence

Alumni-in-Residence: Strategic Networking - Powerful Tactics to Gain the Most from Connections

5:00 pm - 6:30 pm Science Center, Lipton Lecture Hall E110

One of the most valuable skills you can have is being able to network strategically and effectively. Kim Karetsky ’99 will be at Amherst College as part of the Loeb Center’s Alumni in Residence Program. As an expert in leadership and learning, she will be hosting an interactive workshop on strategic networking and providing tactics and tips on how YOU can gain the most from your connections with alumni and others. Kim is the founder and CEO of KHK Leadership and Learning, a consulting business which designs and implements customized professional development and leadership services to organizations and individuals. After spending 15 years at Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan in leadership and professional development roles, Kim created KHK and is dedicated to helping her clients build skills in leadership. She is also dedicated to helping Amherst College students become the leaders of tomorrow. Through this workshop, she will help YOU develop skills and tactics on how to effectively connect with alumni and others and how to develop long-term, mutually beneficial relationships with others that can impact your professional (and personal) lives.

Tue, Feb 25, 2020

Alumni-in-Residence

Alumni-in-Residence: Lessons Learned About Starting a Business, Breakfast with Kim Karetsky ’99

Interested in starting a business one day or the lessons an entrepreneur learns when starting a new venture? Then have breakfast with Kim Karetsky ’99 as part of the Loeb Center’s Alumni in Residence Program. Kim Karetsky ’99 is the Founder and CEO of KHK Leadership and Learning, a consulting business which designs and implements customized professional development and leadership services to organizations and individuals. Before becoming a founder-owner, Kim spent 15 years honing her skills and abilities in leadership and professional development at Goldman, Sachs & Co and J.P. Morgan Chase. She took her knowledge and experience to create a company that is now transforming businesses and their people into leaders. This breakfast is a great opportunity for all students to learn what it takes to start a company and how women entrepreneurs succeed.

Statistics Colloquium: “Are We Not Doing Phrasing Anymore?":  Mining Narrative Texts for Meaning - John Laudun, Tues. Feb. 25, 4:30 p.m., SMUD 206

Statistics Colloquium: “Are We Not Doing Phrasing Anymore?”: Mining Narrative Texts for Meaning with John Laudun

The rise of algorithmic analysis has been met by a rise in the interest in storytelling, suggesting that we are most human in the stories we tell, and that the stories we tell cannot be readily rendered into numbers. And so data scientists and digital humanities scholars have turned their attention to narrative forms in hopes of at least sketching out a computational model of narrative which might reveal how narratives work at least as texts if not also as vehicles for the delivery of meaning. Much of this work has, however, focused on texts like novels, skipping over the kinds of texts that most of us
produce each and every day both online and off. This presentation surveys recent work in corpus
stylistics, digital humanities, and information and data sciences and then sketches out what might be a way to discern the shape of small stories. Examples are drawn from local legends about treasure, the clown legend cascade of 2016, and select literary works, among other things.
Dr. John Laudun, Professor of English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, is “fascinated by how humans create their world with relatively simple resources.” His current work in culture analytics has brought collaborations with physicists and other scientists seeking to understand how texts can be modeled computationally in order to better describe their functions and features.

Wed, Feb 26, 2020

Wall Street Journal Wednesdays

Please join Stephanie Hockman, Loeb Center program director for careers in business and finance for a weekly, informal discussion on any of your favorite Wall Street Journal articles. This informal lunch group will meet every Wednesday from noon - 1 p.m. in Terrace Room B on the lower level of Valentine Hall. Grab some lunch and join the discussion!

Schwarzman Scholars Info Session

This fully-funded program bridges the academic and professional worlds with a focus on leadership and China’s role in the world. Schwarzman Scholars earn a master’s degree in global affairs at Tsinghua University in Beijing, take Mandarin, are matched with senior mentors in their field, and complete internships. Learn more from Schwarzman rep Elysia Pan and Office of Fellowships staff. Register here: https://schwarzmantsinghua.radiusbycampusmgmt.com/ssc/eform/KBaB02Bkk03m....
Questions? Contact Christine Overstreet via email: coverstreet@amherst.edu.

Registration Required

Thu, Feb 27, 2020

Introduction to the Finance Industry Workshop Series (9 Weeks)

What is the Introduction to Finance Industry Workshop Series?
This is a 9-week program open to first-year students and sophomores interested in learning more about the finance industry and exploring potential careers in finance. The workshop series is led by Stephanie Hockman, Director of the Business and Finance Program through the Loeb Center. The series is designed to help students understand the finance industry and its components, distinguish the nuances of career opportunities, and understand the lingo used in the finance industry. Some workshops will include alumni who will provide their practical insights, experience and understanding to the discussion.
What topics are discussed in the workshop series?
The 9-week course will include topics such as:
1. Overview of the Finance Industry
2. Investment Banking, Part 1 – Corporate Investment Bankers
3. Investment Banking, Part 2 – Global Markets (e.g. Sales & Trading, Research, and Investor Services)
4. Investment Banking, Part 3 - CIB Operations & Supporting functions
5. Investment Management & Asset Management
6. Industry Trends & Alternative Investments: Fintech, Hedge Funds, Insurance, & Real Estate
7. Private Equity
8. Private Wealth Management/Asset Management
9. Review of the industry and next steps to preparing for finance industry interviews
How do I register for the Introduction to Finance Workshop Series?
The weekly, one-hour workshops will be held every Thursday from 8pm – 9pm beginning February 6, 2020, through April 9, 2020 (excluding spring break - March 19). YOU MUST COMMIT TO ATTENDING ALL 9 WEEKS.
Space is limited and advance sign up is required. If you are interested in learning more about the finance industry and willing to attend all 9 sessions, please register on Handshake for the first session (Feb. 6) That enrolls you for the entire series.
All questions may be directed to Stephanie Hockman (shockman@amherst.edu).

Students Only
Registration Required

Fri, Feb 28, 2020

Polyhedra

Playing with Polytopes

Join Amherst student Andrew Tawfeek '21 as he demonstrates the simple mathematical beauty of polytopes. Join the fun and build a 3-D polygon to display in the Science Center! This is an event open to everyone: first-years, faculty, staff, art majors, STEM-minded...all are welcome!

Parker String Quartet

M@A Masterclass: Parker Quartet Feb. 28

Please join us for a public masterclass as M@A Chamber artists, the Parker Quartet, work with students on their craft.

Crafting a Career in Food Writing

The foodie media universe offers storytellers with a passion for the culinary the opportunity to share in and define new culinary traditions. Explore the possibilities for your own work—across print, digital, and television—with this behind the scenes look at Crafting a Career in Food Writing. This in-depth discussion will feature three distinguished Amherst community members who will share the details of their trajectories into careers as food writer, cookbook authors, recipe developers and personal chefs.
They are:
Lizzy Briskin ’15 is a personal chef, cooking instructor, food writer and recipe developer specializing in healthy, vegetable-forward food.
Dana Cowin P ’22, best known for her two decades as the Editor-in-Chief of Food & Wine, is a tastemaker, talent scout, consultant, author, lecturer and radio show host.
Ted Lee ’93 is co-founder of The Lee Bros. Boiled Peanuts Catalogue, an award winning cookbook author, and host/executive producer of Southern Uncovered with The Lee Bros. on Ovation.