CHI Salon: "Digital and Open-Access Publishing of Native and Indigenous Knowledge"

October 20, 2021 - 4:30 pm to 5:30 pm (already occurred)
via Zoom
  • Registration Required
Headshots of authors Jane Anderson, Margaret Bruchac, Morgan Tunzelmann and Lisa Brooks

This CHI Salon kicks off Open Access Week 2021 (Oct. 25-31) with a conversation centering Indigenous scholarship and digital publication. Professor Lisa Brooks (Amherst College, American studies) will moderate a conversation with Jane Anderson (NYU), Margaret Bruchac (University of Pennsylvania) and Morgan Tunzelmann (RavenSpace, University of British Columbia Press) exploring initiatives that support the circulation of traditional knowledge practices and cultural heritage in sensitive and innovative ways. A Q&A with the audience will follow.

Jane Anderson is associate professor of anthropology and museum studies and a Global Fellow in the Engelberg Center for Innovation Law and Policy in the Law School at New York University; she also holds a Ph.D. in law from the Law School at the University of New South Wales. Her work is focused on the philosophical and practical problems for intellectual property law and the protection of Indigenous/traditional knowledge resources and cultural heritage in support of Indigenous knowledge and data sovereignty. She is co-founder, with Kim Christen, of Local Context, an initiative to support Native, First Nations, Aboriginal, Métis, Inuit and Indigenous communities in the management of intellectual property and cultural heritage specifically within the digital environment.

Margaret Bruchac is associate professor of anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, associate faculty in the Penn Cultural Heritage Center, coordinator of the Native American & Indigenous Studies Initiative, and a consulting scholar, American Section, for the Penn Museum. She is the author of Savage Kin: Indigenous Informants and American Anthropologists (University of Arizona Press, 2018) as well as project director of “On the Wampum Trail,” a restorative research and digital project on historical wampum beads, strings, belts and collars in Northeastern museums.

Morgan Tunzelmann is the market and business development manager for RavenSpace, a platform and model of publishing founded by UBC Press that embraces collaboration, respects Indigenous protocols, and uses digital tools in imaginative ways to make knowledge accessible and shareable across communities and generations.

Lisa Brooks is the Henry S. Poler '59 Presidential Teaching Professor of English and American Studies at Amherst College. She is the author of The Common Pot: The Recovery of Native Space in the Northeast (University of Minnesota Press, 2008) and Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip’s War (Yale UP, 2018), winner of the Bancroft Prize for American History and Diplomacy. With Amherst College students and other scholars, Brooks created an interactive website to accompany the book, featuring maps that decolonize the space of the colonial northeast, rare 17th-century documents, and digital storytelling designed to open paths of inquiry.

Additional Info

Registration Form

Contact Info

Darryl Harper
(413) 542-5316
image of e-mail address@amherst.edu